Improvements Coming to the Artesian Well

first_imgImprovements About to BeginOver the coming months, the City of Olympia will be making improvements to the Downtown Artesian Well. A rendering of these improvements is shown at right.Highlights include:Surface improvementsSolar lightingA community message boardA raised area to fill bottlesFirst Phase Starts August 27 and 28City of Olympia crews will begin construction of a new drain at the well on August 27 and 28, 2011 from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.The new drain will improve water discharge. Crews will also construct a temporary filling station for well users during the construction. Rich Hoey, Interim Public Works Director, says that the goal is to keep water accessible during construction.  However, there may be times when this is not possible, plan ahead and fill extra bottles.Future ImprovementsLate September/early October:Concrete workNew signage and community information boardMid-October/early NovemberSolar lights and flower polesBrick work and remaining surface improvementsSpring 2012A public art project provided by a grant from the Downtown Parking and Business Improvement Area (PBIA).What to Expect – Impacts:Fencing is for Everyone’s Safety: During times of active construction, the work site and equipment will be fenced, including around the well. Access Impacts: There may be times when access to the well is not possible. Please plan ahead.What You Can do to HelpPlan ahead – fill extra bottles.Keep area clear of debris.Stay out of fenced area.Check the City’s website for updates.For More InformationFor more information about this project, contact Danelle MacEwen, Engineering Technician II, at 360.753.8211 or email dmacewen@ci.olympia.wa.usVisit our website for construction updates. ####olympiawa.gov/artesianwell Facebook0Tweet0Pin0Date: August 25, 2011Released by: Danelle MacEwen, Engineering Technician II360.753.8211dmacewen@ci.olympia.wa.uslast_img read more

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Lacey Offers Scholarships to Local Businesses to Attend Training Program

first_imgFacebook72Tweet0Pin0Submitted by City of LaceyThe City of Lacey has scholarships available for business located in Lacey, or its urban growth area, to attend the “Build Your Market” training program, offered by the Thurston Economic Development Council Center for Business and Innovation. The program is part of the ScaleUp training series and begins April 11 at the South Puget Sound Community College Lacey Campus.Training attendees will learn how to:Identify and explore growth opportunitiesDevelop a competitive advantage.Define a marketing strategy.Choose the most effective marketing tactics for their business, and more.To get more information and apply, visit ScaleUpThurston.org or contact George E. Smith, Economic Development Coordinator, City of Lacey, at GSmith@ci.lacey.wa.us or (360) 412-3199.last_img read more

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Thrills – and Chills – at Monmouth Park

first_imgOCEANPORT – Appren­tice jockey Jonathan Zayas captured his first career win by taking Monmouth Park’s fourth race on Saturday, Aug. 24, atop Saint Goldie Locs.“It’s thrilling,” said Zayas following his first winner’s circle photo. “My father was a jockey and I’ve been around this my whole life.”In keeping with racetrack tradition, apprentice jockey Jonathan Zayas gets doused with water after winning his first race.While up on the early pace, Saint Goldie Locs and Zayas asserted their authority, turning for home and opening up to a convincing 5 ¾-length victory, going six furlongs in 1:12 flat. They returned $15.40 in the field of seven fillies.A 20-year-old native of Puerto Rico, Zayas moved to New Jersey when he was 8 years old.  He is a graduate of Monmouth Regional High School in Tinton Falls.Saint Goldie Locs, trained by Juan Serey, was Zayas’s third career mount. Hall of Fame jockey Jorge Velasquez is Zayas’s agent.last_img read more

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Dispute Over Mad Hatter Loses an Objector

first_imgBy John BurtonSEA BRIGHT – There is one less objector, and a continuing number of supporters, as the borough Planning Board continues to hear the application this week for the re-envisioned Mad Hatter restaurant.As the board continued to address the plans to rebuild the popular Sandy-damaged spot, located at 10 East Ocean Ave., the lawyer representing one of the project opponents withdrew the objections.Jeffrey Gale, a Hazlet attorney representing the owner of a now-vacant neighboring property, told the board and crowded audience that his client was satisfied with changes to the plan that address the concerns.Gale’s comments were met with a round of applause by the supporters of the project, causing the attorney to quip he’s been waiting months to hear that applause.Later, Gale said the issue was the concern over the noise that would emanate from the popular shore spot. But given the testimony of a sound expert for the bar at the hearing held earlier this month and the planned changes, “My client is satisfied and ready to let the board do as it may,” the attorney said.Gale represents JMN Holdings, Inc., the owner of record of the neighboring property that formerly had a lumber business before being damaged by Super Storm Sandy in October 2012.Kevin Asadi, the lawyer representing the Mad Hatter’s owners, told the board that the plans changed to include modifying the stereo sound system and installing an 8-foot-high wall, made of half-inch glass, around the second floor rear outdoor deck.Courtney Davis, a borough resident who has attended hearings to support the project, was happy with this development. “Hopefully, they’ll come to their senses,” she said of the other objectors.Davis has been giving out T-shirts reading #MADPRIDE and a number of audience members wore them. “We decided we wanted a visual support and show the Kellys we’re behind them,” Davis said, referring to the bar’s owners.Despite this development, Red Bank attorney Ron Gasiorowski, representing a neighboring homeowner, gave no quarter. Gasiorowski cross-examined professional planner Keenan Hughes, representing the bar. Hughes said the use is permitted and desirable for a downtown commercial zone and would encourage visits to the area and insisted the site isn’t a “nightclub” under state land use definition; it is primarily a restaurant and bar, but will have live and recorded music, Hughes said.Gasiorowski is representing Jennifer Walsh, who lives in the vicinity of this Ocean Avenue location, and has been arguing that the project is too substantial for the property and would be disruptive for the quality of life for area residents.The board will again hear this application on May 19, when Gasiorowski is expected to continue to present professional testimony of a noise expert.Kelly Management Group, LLC, headed up by Scott Kelly, is seeking board approval to construct a three-story, elevated structure, which would have seven parking spaces under it. The three stories would consist of the ground floor with restaurant seating and a retail kiosk for selling T-shirts and sweatshirts and takeout food; the two upper levels would have bars and outside decks. The site would have live entertainment during the busier evenings and a sound system playing recorded music the rest of the time. Kelly said his planned operating hours would be between 11 a.m. and 2 a.m., seven days a week.Supporters say this project would help in Sea Bright’s ongoing redevelopment after Sandy’s devastation to the community. Opponents say the owners are seeking to overdevelop the site which would overtax area parking and be noisy.last_img read more

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Backyard Chicken Coops Debated in Oceanport

first_imgBy Jenna O’DonnellOCEANPORT – A measure to allow residents to keep backyard chickens has some in the borough crying “fowl” ahead of a council meeting to decide on the matter next month.Though Oceanport’s code does not presently allow for backyard chickens, support has grown from some in the community who believe that rule should be changed.An ordinance amendment originally debated last year was introduced by a narrow margin in a split council vote during a March 16 meeting. That measure modifies an existing ordinance to allow residents to have as many as six hens, depending on lot size. Residents would also have to take a class in keeping chickens before picking up an annual $10 permit.Advocates argue that chickens are charming pets that can help residents be more environmentally conscious, but opponents worry that chicken coops on small lots will create friction between neighbors.“People are passionate about it,” said Councilman Joe Irace. “In all the years I’ve been on this council, this is the most I’ve heard from people on any issue.”Irace was one of three Oceanport council members who voted against introducing the amendment, concerned that allowing chickens on small lots could cause potential problems between neighbors and raise enforcement issues for their small town.Those reservations are shared by Mayor John “Jay” Coffey, who cast a tiebreaker vote in March to bring the chicken issue before the council for a full public discussion during the April 20 council meeting.“I just want to have, once and for all, a full blown public discussion,” Coffey said. “This sounds great in theory, but I think this is something we don’t need from a headache standpoint.”Part of the opposition to chickens stems from neighbors who have lived next to coops already in town and complained about noise and odor.But supporters, including Councilwoman Ellynn Kahle, hope the ordinance amendment, by establishing rules and limitations for keeping chickens, will do more to prevent problems from arising than simply continuing to ban them. A chicken advisory board is one aspect of the amended ordinance that Kahle hopes will help smooth things over for residents concerned about chicken-related issues.“With the chicken ordinance there is going to be an advisory board there to help them,” Kahle said.The proposed rules for chicken-keeping go further than any that govern cats and dogs in town to ensure that neighbors are considerate, Kahle notes.Residents in favor of the amendment are counting on more than just fresh eggs. Shannon Scheffling, a resident who started the Oceanport Backyard Chicken Supporters Facebook Group, did chicken research as a student at Rutgers University. Even after they stop laying eggs, Scheffling says chickens provide chemical-free fertilizer for gardeners, are great for composting, and provide backyard pest control.“Chickens eat grubs, ticks, fleas, termites and even mosquitos,” she said. “If it’s a bug you don’t want in your yard, chickens will eat it.”Several area towns including Middletown, Red Bank, Fair Haven and Tinton Falls currently allow chickens on residential properties. Advocates like Gwenne Baile of Haddon Township help to create pilot programs in hopes of clearing up some misconceptions about backyard chickens, like noise and odor issues, which she says aren’t a problem so long as coops are cleaned and cared for properly.“I truly believe that anyone who is opposed to this is not educated on what it means to have backyard chickens,” Baile said. “This is no more agriculture than you having a few vegetables growing in your backyard. They are pampered pets and they’re the only pet that can give you breakfast. But that’s not the only thing they can do.”Residents are invited to share their views during a public discussion prior to the council’s vote at the April 20 borough council meeting.“There’s going to be a discussion about it which I think is good,” Kahle said. “I just really hope that people haven’t already made up their minds.”last_img read more

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Very Special Oyster Recovered From Navesink Riverbed

first_imgSmall Discovery Could Mean Progress for Future Reef |By Jay Cook |RED BANK – Eastern oysters in the Navesink River have been elusive to environmentalists since disease wiped out the reefs in the mid-1990s.But a recent small discovery may give those advocates reason to cheer.The encounter came on March 31, just a few hours after the sun rose on a Sunday morning. Bill Carton and a crew of fellow members from the Monmouth Boat Club, a private boating club in Red Bank along the Navesink River, were conducting quadrennial inspections of their mooring lines in the river. When Carton’s own mushroom anchor came up, it was carrying a familiar 4-inch-long inhabitant – one of those rare eastern oysters.So what exactly does this mean?It has the potential for big things, said American Littoral Society executive director Tim Dillingham, who spearheaded an effort last summer to investigate any signs of natural oysters in the river.“This is not a quixotic adventure. We’re not tilting at windmills here,” an excited Dillingham said this week. “We know this is a great sign that we can do this.”American Littoral Society launched Operation Oyster in June 2017 as a program to find if, and where, there are signs of the eastern oyster in the Navesink River. Oysters have the helpful ability to filter up to 50 gallons of water daily. Re-establishing oyster reefs would be a natural way to clean the Navesink River, which has suffered from poor water quality in recent years from fecal contamination and fertilizer runoff.The environmental group hung hundreds of oyster shell bags from dozens of private docks along the river as they studied to find any indication of oyster “spat” or larvae. Their research ultimately yielded no results after the summer-long initiative concluded in September, but state officials say this discovery will help the local groups going forward.“This is a bit of good news after what I’m sure was a disappointing summer for them,” said Bruce Friedman, director of the Division of Water Monitoring and Standards, an arm of the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). “We’re excited that the Littoral Society is excited and also that they’re seeing something like oyster growth. That is a good sign.”It’s been difficult for environmentalists to pinpoint any hotspot for oyster growth. But Carton, a Monmouth Boat Club member of two decades, and the DEP both say they’ve seen and quantified historical evidence.Between the Molly Pitcher Inn and Marine Park, Carton said clam beds have historically been found in an area 1,500 feet by 1,500 feet underwater. If clams can thrive there, so can oysters, he believes.“There’s a huge clam bed right there in the Navesink River,” Carton said this week. “You can go down there at low tide and pull up huge ones.”Friedman also said shellfish resource stock assessments from the state show there have been “small historic oyster reefs in the upper portion of the Navesink River that we have identified and quantified since the 1980s.”While this recent find is generating excitement, it’s not the first time Monmouth Boat Club staff has found live oysters. In the fall of 2016, Carton and a crew came across a similar situation with an oyster on a mushroom anchor. The only difference, though, was then they only reported it after throwing it back into the river. This time they passed the oyster over to the DEP for analysis.At the Operation Oyster launch last summer, American Littoral Society’s assistant director Pim Van Hemmen said the 2016 Monmouth Boat Club discovery provided enough evidence to launch their program.he 4-inch-long Eastern Oyster recovered by Bill Carton was eventually delivered to the Dept. of Environmental Protection for additional testing.Dillingham said American Littoral Society has been planning to try new methods for Operation Oyster heading into this upcoming season and this newest oyster find only helps their cause. The group will first have the shell bags sit in oyster spat tanks, so the larvae can attach, before rehanging them from the docks. Any oyster growth will be monitored until the shellfish reach a state-mandated 2-inch size limit and must be removed from the water.The ultimate goal of bringing back oyster reefs still stands at the top of Dillingham’s wish list. Other environmental groups like NY/NJ Baykeeper, based in Keyport, have had recent success with building and sustaining man-made oyster reefs along Naval Weapons Station Earle’s 2.9-mile long pier in Leonardo.If American Littoral Society can prove oysters can live in the Navesink, then they’ll gladly go to the DEP with all the evidence it needs to bring reefs in.“We’re going to be looking for the sweet spot where the oysters can grow, provide the benefit to the ecology of the river, do their filtering job and not be in anybody’s way,” said Dillingham.While they’ve been missing for the last two decades, natural oyster reefs were once an integral piece of the Navesink River’s watershed. Up until the mid-20th century, eastern oysters were harvested from the river and sent to some of the more lavish restaurants in New York City.The real end goal, Monmouth Boat Club’s Carton said, is to return the Navesink River to a healthy body of water. He believes that’s the most important issue.“I’m very happy to be part of it and that we’re trying to clean the river,” said Carton. “That’s why I’m a sailor and not a motorboater.”This article was first published in the April 12-19, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Rebels double Leafs, exhibition home-and-home resumes in Nelson Thursday

first_imgLeaf coach Frank Maida will make a few changes to the lineup as the rookie skipper looks to finalize the roster for the upcoming season.The Leafs open the KIJHL season Friday, Sept. 16 against the same Rebels in Castlegar. Puck drops at 7:30 p.mNelson’s home opener goes Saturday, Sept. 17 at the NDCC Arena against the Rebels. sports@thenelsondaily.com The Castlegar Rebels continued its success over the Nelson Leafs, albeit in the exhibition season, doubling the Green and White 6-3 Wednesday in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action at the Complex in the Sunflower City.The game was the first of the two-game, home-and-home preseason series between the two West Kootenay rivals.The back end of the series goes Thursday in the Heritage City at the NDCC Arena.Game time is 7 p.m.last_img read more

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Early season showdown goes Tuesday between Beaver Valley and Nelson

first_imgIt’s only October, but we have a good old fashion showdown in the Murdoch Division of the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League.Division-leading Nelson Leafs play host to second-place Beaver Valley Nitehawks in the first meeting of the season between the two West Kootenay combatants Tuesday at the NDCC Arena.“It’s exciting the guys are starting to believe, but this will be a good test for us,” said Leaf coach Frank Maida.Both teams enter the contest on a roll to start the KIJHL season.Nelson has won five consecutive games after losing two of its first three — the second setback coming in overtime to Kelowna.In the Beaver Valley, the Hawks, under the guidance of seasoned KIJHL veteran coach Terry Jones, have lost just once in six games and sit only three points behind the Leafs in Murdoch Division standings.“Beaver Valley is a strong, disciplined coached team,” said Maida of the upcoming clash.“Terry (Jones) has been around the league a long time and it looks like he has his team playing very well.”Snipers Ryan Edwards and Chris Derochie along with 16-year-old rookie Craig Martin lead Beaver Valley in scoring.All three players have more points this season than the top scorer on the Leafs, Matti Jmaeff.Last season Beaver Valley dominated the Leafs, winning the season series.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Nelson triathlete Denise Uhrynuk makes a strong showing at World Triathlon Championships

first_imgDenise Uhrynuk of Nelson braved chilly temperatures to finish 14th in her age group for Team Canada at the recent World Triathlon Championships in Edmonton.”It was my second time competing at the Worlds,” said Uhrynuk, who competed at the Auckland event in 2012.”It is a week long event with parade, banquets, multiple events for age groups ages 16 to 80-plus and the grand finale for the elite athletes.”Uhrynuk, who qualified for Team Canada last year at Nationals in Toronto, competed in the sprint triathlon — 750 meter swim, 20 kilometer bike and five kilometer run — and finished 14th out of 60 competitors in the 45-49 age category. “I found the swim tough  — got behind and blocked by slower swimmers,” said Uhrynuk, who finished with the fourth fastest run in her age group.”I didn’t find my rhythm till half way through the swim. Cycling is my weakest event so I pushed hard.”Uhrynuk said there were gusty cross winds made the bike a bit tricky but was able to take advantage of the flat, kilometer run.”Because of the windy bike, I really had not much left in me for the run but pushed past many runners to move myself up to 14th and clocked one of my fastest run time,” she said.The winner of Uhrynuk’s age group won the silver medal in triathlon in the Sydney Olympics (2000).The Worlds attracted close to 4000 athletes from over 40 countries.last_img read more

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Calling all Women Soccer players to Vernon 55-plus Seniors Games

first_imgEach team must register a minimum of nine players to a maximum of 12.Complete rules are available at BC Games website — or zone coordinator John Legg @ johnrlegg@gmail.com.“This is the inaugural year for Women’s Soccer and we need at least four teams to make it a viable event,” the presser said.The games are expected more than 3,500 athletes, supporters and officials to the Central Okanagan.The games will have 27 events including archery, badminton, bocce, bridge, carpet bowling, cribbage, cycling, darts, dragon boat racing, equestrian, five pin bowling, floor curling, golf, horseshoes, ice curling, ice hockey, lawn bowling, mountain bike racing, pickleball, slo-pitch, soccer, squash, swimming, table tennis, tennis, track and field and whist.The Vernon 55-plus Senior Games are September 12-16. BC Seniors organizers are adding another event to the popular 55-plus Games with the introduction of Women’s 7-A-Side Soccer beginning this year in Vernon.So all those 55-plus female players, dig out the cleats and start training.“If you’re still an active soccer player, or used to play and can dig out some cleats, come join us for some friendly competition and lots of fun and camaraderie,” said the media press release.There are seven on the field at one time, one player who is a goalkeeper.Games are two 30 minute halves with unlimited substitutions.last_img read more

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