Average US price of gas up 10 cents a gallon to $2.45

first_imgCAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) — The average U.S. price of regular-grade gasoline jumped 10 cents a gallon over the past two weeks to $2.45. Industry analyst Trilby Lundberg of the Lundberg Survey said Sunday that a rise in crude oil prices since November is behind the increase. The price at the pump is 15 cents less than it was a year ago. The highest average price in the nation is $3.46 a gallon in the San Francisco Bay Area. The lowest average is $2.07 in Houston. The average price of diesel went up 5 cents over the same period to $2.70.last_img

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EXPLAINER: How Taiwan figures in US-China ties under Biden

first_imgTAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — It didn’t take long for relations with China to become an issue for new U.S. President Joe Biden. A show of force by the Chinese air force off Taiwan last weekend prompted a U.S. response, even as Biden and his administration focus on pressing domestic issues in what is still their first week in office. The U.S. State Department issued a statement urging China “to cease its military, diplomatic, and economic pressure against Taiwan” after a dozen Chinese warplanes entered the self-governing island’s air defense identification zone on Saturday. China then sent 16 more planes on Sunday. The Taiwan issue will likely remain a source of friction in U.S.-China relations.last_img

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Trial over moderate Serb leader’s killing opens in Kosovo

first_imgPRISTINA, Kosovo (AP) — Six Serbs accused of involvement in the murder of a Kosovo Serb political party leader have pleaded not guilty at the start of a much-anticipated trial in a Kosovo court. Oliver Ivanovic, once a hardline nationalist who turned a moderate politician, was gunned down in front of his party office in the Serb-controlled northern part of Mitrovica on January 16, 2018. The killing increased tensions between Kosovo and Serbia. Kosovo declared independence from Serbia in 2008 but Serbia does not recognize its former province’s statehood.last_img

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AP analysis: Federal executions likely a COVID superspreader

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — The executions at the end of Donald Trump’s presidency, completed in short windows over a few weeks, likely acted as a superspreader event. That’s according to records reviewed by The Associated Press. It was something health experts had warned could happen when the Justice Department insisted on resuming executions during a pandemic. By the end of 2020, 70% of death row inmates were sick with COVID-19. Guards were ill. Traveling prisons staff on the execution team had the virus. So did media witnesses, who may have unknowingly infected others when they returned home because they were never told about the spreading cases.last_img

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