Salman and Katrina still remain the best of pals

first_imgKatrina-Salman’s split story might have done the rounds but the two still remain good friends.This is why Katrina was spotted visiting Sallu to wish him for his birthday, two days in advance. This year, Salman celebrated his birthday in Dubai with family members.Kat took out time from her shooting schedule to wish ex-beau before he went for the trip.Though the rumour of their split is rife, the two have maintained a cordial relationship.Kat and Sallu shared several jokes when Kat appeared on Bigg Boss to promote her film Tees Maar Khan. Kat was sporting enough to smile while Salman joked about Ranbir Kapoor on the show.Katrina and Ranbir are said to be a promising Bollywood pair. But now we hear that Katrina has distanced herself from Ranbir.After Power did not take off, director Rajkumar Santoshi thought of approaching his hit romantic comedy, Ajab Prem Ki Ghazab Kahani, pair. He approached the stars of the film with a script to make a sequel, calling it Ajab Haseena Ghajab Deewana . But Kat cited dates issues and turned down the offer.The million dollar question now is whether Kat refused Santoshi’s film because of Ranbir’s closeness with hottie Nargis on Rockstar’s sets or the old flame between her and Sallu has been rekindled.last_img read more

Read More

How to Add Email Lists in Facebook for Page Promotion

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Dec 3, 2010 1:30:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Facebook Reach If your business is using Facebook as a part of its inbound marketing strategy, then it is likely that a goal of your marketing team is to expand your reach by attracting more people to like your Facebook page . For a long time marketers have faced a challenge in inviting new users through Facebook. While they have been encouraging people to visit their Facebook Fan Pages , it hasn’t been easy to do the reverse–get email addresses into Facebook and send invitations through Facebook’s messaging system.This process has now changed. This week, Facebook has enabled business page administrators to import email addresses into Facebook to invite people to like their page. Check out the rest of this post for a walkthrough of these process! Step 1: Go to your Facebook Business Page and click “Edit Page” Step 2: Click on “Marketing” and then select “Tell your Fans.” Step 3: Upload your email list and invite fans.Have you used this feature to tell more people about your Facebook page? Topics:last_img read more

Read More

6 Compelling Social Media Stats Marketers Should Know [Data]

first_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Social Media Analytics Originally published Sep 14, 2011 5:30:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 This week, the media research firm Nielsen released its Q3 report on the state of social media. Unsurprisingly, social network usage is up, and the findings showed that nearly 80% of US internet users spend time on blogs and sites like Facebook and Twitter.Here were 6 of the most interesting facts from the report and what each means for marketers as they look ahead to Q4.1. 37% of consumers access their social media networks through their phone. (Tweet This Stat!)As a marketer, this means that any landing pages, blog posts, or ebooks you link to on Facebook or Twitter accounts should be optimized for mobile devices. It could mean the difference between a new lead and a lost opportunity.2. During May 2011, over 31 million people in the U.S. watched video content on social networks and blogs.(Tweet This Stat!)Providing a rich media experience for your company can increase engagement on your website. Video content is a great way to bolster your inbound marketing efforts.3. Tumblr nearly tripled its unique US audience over the last year.(Tweet This Stat!)As a marketer, it’s important to keep your eyes open to new online tools and forms of media and determine if you can use them to deliver your message. In May alone, Tumblr generated over 21,000 messages and links a day to the site. The amount of traffic you could leverage from a new medium like Tumblr should never be overlooked.4. 56% of mobile users most value the GPS capabilities of their smartphone.(Tweet This Stat!)In today’s world, geo-marketing is a powerful opportunity that both small and medium-sized businesses can leverage. Leveraging location-based applications and social media platforms can be a great way to engage with and capture a mobile audience of prospects.5. 53% of active social networkers follow a brand.(Tweet This Stat!)As a marketer, it’s important to engage with your users in social media, and make sure you’re providing them with valuable content. These active social networkers don’t just follow brands. According to the report, they’re also 60% more likely to write reviews about brands’ products or services as well.6. In May, internet users spent more time on Facebook than Yahoo, Google, AOL, and MSN combined.(Tweet This Stat!)With 53.5 billion minutes spent on Facebook, the site continues to prove the value of being “Liked.” While Google and other search engine rankings are extremely crucial for a company to get found, Facebook and other social media sites are also as important for companies to engage with their customers as well as prospects who can potentially be converted into sales.have you come across any other interesting facts from the report you think marketers should be aware of? Let us know!last_img read more

Read More

A Look Back at 20+ Years of Website Design

first_img Website Design Examples Web design has come a long way since 1991 when the first ever website was published.Exclusively text-based, this first website marked the beginning of what would become a digital revolution. And while recollections of “under construction” GIFs and blinding background colors make me thankful for just how far web design has come, there are some historical web design choices that actually demand a nod of respect.Want to see what an old website looked like at any period since its launch? Enter a company domain name you want to see old versions of into the Wayback Machine. Then, select a date to see a cached image of an old web page from that time period.I took notes on my favorites, below. Here’s a fascinating look at old websites over the last 20 years, and how web design has evolved (for better and for worse).Early 1990s: AntiquityPrior to the late 90s, there was no such thing as “high-speed” when it came to internet connections. It was dial-up modems, or it was nothing. Therefore, websites from this period needed to be built for less-than-stellar connection speeds. They were largely comprised of text, and what we now take for granted as “design layout” did not exist.While later versions of HTML allowed for more complex design capabilities, they were still extremely basic, consisting mainly of tags for headers, paragraphs, and links. Visual considerations such as typography, imagery, and navigation were still things of the not-too distant future.21st Century Takeaways:While the function of these early sites was purely informational, there are some design elements from these days of antiquity that still apply today. These old web pages were very lightweight, optimized for that slow internet connection we all remember. These design considerations took user experience into account — something websites today don’t always remember, even with our faster connection speeds.Yes, today’s internet can handle media-rich websites … but it still has some limits. Large media files and heavy graphic design can contribute to high bounce rates when load speeds aren’t as fast as we expect. Keep your user in mind when considering complicated design, and remember to K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple, Stupid).Mid-1990s: The Middle AgesThe middle ages of web design were plagued by on-site page builders and spacer GIFs (better than an actual plague though, right?). By the mid-90s, web design had evolved both in terms of structure and appearance. Designers began to use table-based layouts to organize their content, allowing for greater flexibility and creativity. Sites were still quite text heavy, but this text could now be divided into columns, rows, and other navigational elements.Graphical design elements also quickly grew in popularity. Page hit counters, animated text, and dancing GIFs are just a few of the graphical elements that mark this period in web design.21st Century Takeaways:Today, there are plenty of reasons why table-based design is not the best choice for your website — the extensive markup, slow page-load times, and visual inconsistency are just a few of the pitfalls of this method. Regardless, this development was an important one in the evolution of web design. It was the beginning of a concerted move toward page structure. Different elements could now be positioned in different sections of a web page, so designers had to consider the best way to present their information to the user.Today, page structure remains important and becomes critical when thinking about such design elements as navigation, content, calls-to-action, and trust signals. The positioning of these elements will determine how a user experiences and interacts with your site. While these considerations might not have been at the forefront during the middle ages of web design, they are certainly important today.(P.S. If you want to learn more about usability, one of our partners, Callia Media, has an excellent ebook on the subject; specifically, how to align it with inbound marketing.)Late 1990s: The RenaissanceRenaissance. Rebirth. Web design has had its fair share of reimaginings, but one of the first occurred with the introduction of Flash. Developed in 1996, but made popular a couple of years later, Flash opened up a world of design possibilities that weren’t possible with basic HTML. It was the marriage of virtual graphics and interaction.While many of the same design elements of the previous period were still present, these were enhanced (and I use the term loosely) with new features such as color-changing navigations, tiled background images, neon colors, 3D buttons, and the ever-popular splash pages. It marked the beginning of visitor-focused design. Structure and navigation became important considerations and design began to zero in on appearance and usability.21st Century Takeaways:Seeing as Flash has been deemed one of the biggest SEO sins of all time, we’ll take this era as an example of what not to do. While the increased use of multimedia content was intended to attract more visitors, it likely had the opposite effect. Some of the biggest misuses of Flash today come from incorrect scripting. Making this mistake across an entire site is extremely detrimental to SEO, so you might be better off just avoiding it. If you still feel compelled to utilize Flash, however, do so correctly. Even better, opt for alternative applications such as JavaScript or HTML5 to get similar effects.Y2K: The EnlightenmentThe early 2000s brought with it an increase of support for CSS, which allowed for the separation of content and design. This gave greater creative freedom to both web designers and content developers — content could now be developed exclusively from design, and vice versa. This made websites easier to maintain (less code and complexity), more flexible (div tags are independent of one another), and quicker to load.Better understandings of color also saw the increase of whitespace and the decrease of garish colors, like neons. Links began to be attached to icons rather than just text, resolution and pixilation became more important concerns, and considerations over the placement of content also grew. Overall, it was a period when usability started to become more important than other design elements.21st Century Takeaways:People typically scan websites, looking only for the information they need — so any site that makes this job easier as a user gets a giant check-mark. A savvy web designer is aware of the fact that most users don’t read everything on a website, and understand how readers take in information.Therefore, intuitively placed information, visually accentuated links, and a straightforward navigation are just a few best practices today’s websites should adhere to. Always design with usability in mind!Mid-2000s: The Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution of web design begins with the birth of Web 2.0; it’s at this time things really begin to move toward the modern web. The growth of multimedia applications, the implementation of interactive content, and the rise of the social web are a few definitive features of this period.Moreover, these features largely dictated the way web design was … well, done. Aesthetic changes included better color distribution, increased use of icons, and greater attention to typography.More importantly, design became about content and, apart from that pesky Flash, content became about SEO. With the user now firmly at the center of design, selling products (at least explicitly) became the secondary function of websites.21st Century Takeaways:As mentioned above, the evolution of Web 2.0 saw the growth of SEO as a consideration. While these techniques have obviously been adapted over the years, thinking about your website in terms of SEO is still central to people’s minds today.SEO demands content, and content largely became the focus of web design during this era. Keyword optimization, inbound and outbound linking, authoring, tagging, and syndication technology such as RSS became natural design elements. While link spamming and keyword jamming soon exploited these techniques, these black hat methods are no longer effective and (I hope) have largely fizzled out.Web Design TodayToday, over two decades after the publication of the first website, web design has firmly established itself as an irreplaceable component of every good marketing strategy.In terms of modern aesthetics, we have seen the proliferation of minimalism, flat graphics (so long, 3D buttons!), blended typography, and large background images. In addition, UX has taken center stage, giving way to such design features as infinite scrolling and single-page design.The explosion of the mobile web has been another important consideration for site development. This recent digital revolution has given way to the popularization of responsive design and has called for a re-evaluation of the way websites are structured. This is one area of web design that still has a ways to go in its development, and I look forward to seeing how it evolves over the coming years.Regardless, there is one factor that has informed every single one of these developments — content. Every design element here has been adapted in such a way to bring the most relevant content to the user in the most efficient and effective way. Notions of accessibility, adaptability, and usability truly define this era of web design.Looking at how web design has progressed thus far, it’s exciting to think about where it will be in the next 20 years.Myia Kelly is a marketing assistant at Powered by Search, a Toronto SEO and inbound marketing agency. She specializes in content and social media marketing. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Jul 10, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated March 02 2018 Topics:last_img read more

Read More

Meet Objective-Based Ad Buys: Facebook’s New Consultative Ad Dashboard

first_imgPage Post Engagement Originally published Oct 8, 2013 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 App Engagement Event Responses Website Conversions App Installs Facebook Advertising Then, based on your objective, Facebook makes recommendations on which types of ads you should create to meet that objective. Facebook gives an example of a Page post link ad that could be recommended to drive clicks to your website, for instance.After you select your objective and ads you want to run, Facebook’s Ads Manager will display the chosen objective, the number of times it was met, and the cost per stated objective. Basically, Facebook’s new tool turns it into a consultative resource for marketers so you can optimize and assess your ads’ business impact from the get-go. Pretty sweet, huh?According to Facebook, this update should be live, but at the time of publishing, we haven’t seen this roll out to our accounts. So keep checking back to see if you have the new layout soon.Why Marketers Should CareCool! So now Facebook is helping you set up goals and track your success — this seems like a no-brainer news story. This means all of us marketers can sit back and let the social network drive our ad campaigns … right? Wrong. While this new feature is exciting and helpful, we can’t take our hands off the wheel just yet. Be careful not to extrapolate the advertising data to the rest of your marketing activities. For example, if you are using multiple data sources, you might find that Facebook’s Ads Manager metrics show that links drive clicks while your Facebook Page organic posts’ links don’t. So be sure that you’re supplementing the objective-based ad data with other information to get a robust picture of your marketing’s success. Besides that one caveat, this update seems like a very helpful feature that will help Facebook Advertisers create ads the inbound way — something that we can’t help but celebrate. What do you think of this update? How would you use this new feature in your marketing? Leave your ideas in the comments below!center_img Topics: When I created my first Facebook ad ever, I had no clue what I was doing. I picked target demos at random (The more people who see my ad, the better!) and barely considered the difference between CPM and CPC. All I knew was that my boss asked me to make a Facebook ad — now — and it was my duty to get it up as fast as possible. No goals, no objectives, no metrics even entered my thought process.And I know I’m not the only person who has been confused by Facebook advertising — heck, we’ve even written a whole ebook trying to quell some of that confusion. I’m not surprised that people are so concerned about getting their Facebook ads right — their budgets and jobs are on the line if those ads don’t drive positive business results. Luckily, now, it’s going to be a lot easier for the average marketer like myself to advertise on Facebook. Today, Facebook announced a brand new way for marketers to create and measure ads. Now, people can create and measure ads all based on one goal, which Facebook deems “objective-based ad buying and reporting.” I know that’s a lot of jargon in one sentence, so let me break down how the new tool works. Objective-Based Ad Buying: DecodedBasically, when you go to create a new ad, you’ll be asked about which objective you want to accomplish with your Facebook ads. You can choose among these: Page Likes In-store Offer claims Clicks to Website Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Read More

Help! Our VP of Sales Wants My Job

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Twitter Marketing Topics: If you had access to 373K new followers for a day, what would you say?That’s a question that HubSpot’s Phil Harrell, VP Corporate Division, is currently contemplating as he prepares to take on an entirely new role here: Social Media Manager.Yeah, you heard me right.On Monday, March 3rd, Phil Harrell will be taking over my job as Social Media Manager in addition to the job of HubSpot CMO, Mike Volpe. Why? He won it. During HubSpot’s 4th Annual Charity Auction, Phil purchased “@HubSpot for a day” and “CMO for a day” for a grand total of $875. This money went to Read to a Child, Phil’s charity of choice.In preparation for the big day, Phil and I sat down to go over the protocol for running HubSpot’s Twitter account. As it turns out, there’s a lot to think about (and a lot to be careful about) when you’re speaking in front of 373K people, on behalf of a company. Here’s some tangible advice I gave to Phil on ways he could be most successful:Have a Goal In Mind … And Stick to ItTo get an idea of Phil’s goals, I asked him why he chose to bid on @HubSpot for a day. He said:If you ask me, he’s already off to a great start simply because he has a clear goal in mind. This goal is not only helpful to him as the Corporate Divisions VP, but it’s also helpful to the company as a whole.Compile Great Content … And Schedule ItSince Phil’s ultimate goal is to build awareness around enterprise sales and marketing, I suggested he tap the resources he likes to read first. If he’s interested in the content, surely someone else at his level would be interested in that content, too.Next, since Phil actually paid good money to get access to HubSpot’s Twitter followers, I suggested that he promote himself in some way. Not tweet selfies and start bragging about how great he is, but I did advise that he share his knowledge with others. He’ll be doing this through his personal blog, SlideShare presentations, and general Q&A on HubSpot’s Twitter account.Finally, once Phil compiles all the content he wants to share, I told him to schedule it through HubSpot’s Social Inbox. This way Phil can participate in impromptu engagement during the day and worry less about the stuff that he can prep ahead of time. The @HubSpot account gets over 1,000 mentions per day, so he’ll need all hands on deck for interacting and responding.Add Value … And Align It With Your Buyer PersonasAs a Social Media Manager, one question I ask myself every day is: “Will this tweet/post add some kind of value to our audience’s life?”Value could mean many different things — including entertainment or education — and it’ll certainly change depending on your goals and buyer personas. But if the answer to this question is “yes,” then I proceed with scheduling the tweet or post. If the answer isn’t clear, I usually end up nixing it … because if I’m not clear about the value, our audience won’t be clear about it, either.Optimize Your Tweets … And Be Mindful of Your MessagingSince the average shelf life of a tweet is only 3 hours, I wanted Phil to be mindful of his messaging so he could get the biggest bang for his buck. I suggested he should optimize for clicks from the audience he’s trying to reach, which means he needs to think about writing his tweets differently than if he were optimizing for retweets.Something that works really well for HubSpot normally is asking a question, then following up with an action statement and a link. To use a very general example, a highly clickable tweet might say “Is your marketing stale? Read this ebook to find out: [link]” Nobody wants to think their marketing is going stale, so they’ll click the link just to make sure. ;-)Add Personality … But Not Too MuchOther messaging tips I gave Phil were related to tone. As a brand, it’s important to be professional, but it’s equally as important to have a touch of personality. The last thing someone wants is to talk to a wall that won’t talk back. People like talking to other people, so brands need to show that real human beings are there on the other end.Have a Sense of Humor … You Might Get Picked On ;-)Last year, our CEO and Co-founder, Brian Halligan, donated $600 to the Animal Rescue League of Boston to run HubSpot’s Twitter account. He was heckled by @DunkinDonuts and @BostonVC (in a loving kinda way) during his time running the account. I was proud to see that he stayed strong and came out of it with a smile on his face.The moral of the story here is that you never know who will mention you; you have to be prepared for absolutely anything. The happy, the sad, and the trolls. Just remember that on top of it all, you’re a human and it’s okay to act that way.I’m really excited to have some fresh new perspective on the HubSpot Twitter account, and I think Phil Harrell will be a great source of quality content for anyone who wants to come hang out with us on Twitter on Monday. Be sure to follow him at @HubSpot on Monday, March 3rd, so you can join in on the fun! Originally published Feb 28, 2014 3:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

Read More

5 Need-to-Measure Ecommerce Metrics to Scale Like the Big Box Retailers

first_img Originally published Apr 16, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Marketing Metrics The internet has an infinite amount of benefits, but one in particular that has wholly disrupted business operations. See, the world wide web allows for equal and fair access to websites, which means that startups and small businesses are essentially on an equal playing field with their big box competitors when it comes to ecommerce.This makes for a monumental advantage when it comes to smaller ecommerce shops. Through an easy checkout process, excellent customer service and a smooth delivery experience, startups and small businesses can oust competitors who have long been household names.This is exactly what Warby Parker did, ousting Luxottica, or what Rent the Runway did, ousting David’s Bridal, among others.Of course, as legacy brands become more and more educated to the power of ecommerce, their large budgets follow. And, more often than not, those budgets are going toward analytics platforms that help these brands optimize for repeat customers and quickly notify them to what is working on their sites and what is just sitting in inventory.In other words, legacy brands do have a leg up on smaller retailers when it comes to ecommerce and it’s in the amount of intelligence they are using to drive conversions and increase revenue.That said, data and analytics should be democratized throughout the ecommerce space, and no, Google Analytics isn’t enough. Your big box competitors aren’t simply monitoring new and repeat visitors, or from where their web traffic comes. No, they are using enhanced ecommerce analytics to push visitors down a purchase funnel from the moment they land on the site.Below, the top metrics these retailers are using and how you should be using them, too.Cost of Acquiring a Customer (CAC)Before customers can begin purchasing on your site, you need to get them there first. Big box brands have an advantage here in that they have marketplace name recognition. In other words, people will simply type their name into Google and land on their page.For smaller retailers, you’ll likely need to spend some cash to get your target customers to your site. The cost of acquiring a customer metrics, or CAC, reveals how much money you spend throughout the acquisition funnel, from creating an ebook or promoting a post on Facebook, to having a visitor come to your site because of the ebook or promotion, all the way through to their finding a product they like and finally checking out.The cost of customer acquisition is the amount of money you have to spend to get one customer. The lower the cost of acquisition, the better: i.e., you always want your cost of acquisition to go down. As a quick example, your CAC is $40 if you need to spend $200 to get five visitors to buy on your store.You may employ different techniques to bring in those visitors — SEO, paid ad campaigns, high-quality content, social media — but all of them cost you either in terms of money or time.There are a lot of factors that affect your cost of customer acquisition, but it is important to get an accurate number here. As a best practice, you should always try to find marketing outlets that lower your CAC valuation.Conversion RateOnce your store gets traffic, you need to see how many visitors are buying. Conversion rate reveals just that.Conversion rate is defined as the percentage of visitors who end up buying from your store. The higher the conversion rate, the better. When it comes to conversion rate, you always want it to be going up. As a quick example, your conversion rate is 2% if 2 out of 100 visitors buy from your store. According to this recent Marketing Land article, one way to improve conversion rate is to add video to a majority of your product pages; retailers adding video reported conversion rates close to 9%.There are hundreds of articles out there on how to improve conversion rates –– because it is just that important. There’s so much emphasis on conversion rate because it directly affects your business’s bottom line. Regardless of how much effort you spend on driving traffic to your store, if most visitors don’t end up buying, it’s all wasted. That said, it’s really important to make sure you know what your conversion rate is at all times and keep tabs on whether it’s improving and if you should stay the course or not.Shopping Cart AbandonmentWhen your conversion rate is low, you need to understand how many visitors had an inclination to buy. To do this, you’ll want to examine your store’s cart abandonment. This metric indicates the percentage of visitors who added products to their shopping cart but did not complete the checkout process. The lower your cart abandonment rate, the better. As a quick example, your shopping cart abandonment is 75% if 75 out of 100 visitors with a cart leave without buying.Cart abandonment is the closest you come to earning real customers before they leave your site. Adding to the cart typically indicates an intent to purchase. The fact that they leave without buying means you lost potential customers. It gets especially bad if you paid a lot of money to get these visitors to your store. Making sure your cart abandonment is low is key to improving your conversion rate.Average Order ValueYou should monitor how much money each order brings in to see how much revenue you can generate. That’s what AOV tells you.This is the average size of an order on your store. The higher the average order value, the better. For example, your AOV is $35 per order if you made $140 from 4 orders.By monitoring AOV, you can figure out how much revenue you can generate from your current traffic and conversion rate. Being able to predict revenue is a big deal for any business. If most of your orders are really small, that means you have to get a lot more people to buy in order to achieve your target. It’s important to have at least a few high value orders so that your overall average is on the higher side.ChurnIf your LTV is low, it could be that many of your customers buy once and never return. This is measured by what is referred to as “churn.”Churn is the percentage of your customers who do not come back to your site. The lower the churn, the better. For example, a churn rate of 80% means 80 out of 100 customers do not come back to buy from your store.As we have seen, to ensure a high profit, it’s important to influence your customers to keep coming back to purchase. That means you want your churn to be low so that once you acquire a customer, they continue to come back and purchase again and again. Lower churn means higher LTV and a healthier business overall.Once you start measuring your ecommerce store performance and using data to drive your business decisions and strategies, you’ll be well on the way to enterprise-level success! No big box retailer takes action without measuring the impact and neither should you. Monitor your metrics, pivot when and where necessary and make the most of your both your time and money in order to build a successful brand.last_img read more

Read More

How to Analyze Your Blog Posts: A Beginner’s Guide

first_img Topics: Originally published Apr 22, 2015 6:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 How do you decide which topics to write about on your blog to attract the most traffic and leads? What about which types of blog posts to write? How many to publish in a week? How to promote them?These are just some of the questions you might have when creating your blog strategy — and knowing a thing or two about your top performing blog posts will help you find the answers.If you know what made your best blog posts perform so well, you’ll be able to better prioritize certain topics or types of posts according to your content goals. You’ll also get smarter about your overall blog promotion strategy.Download Now: 6 Free Blog Post TemplatesHow do you know which blog posts are your best ones? To find this out, run a blog leads analysis and attribution report — click here to learn how. Make a list of your top 10 posts along with their traffic numbers and conversion rates.Now, ask yourself which scenario your top posts fit into overall: 1) low traffic but high conversion rate; 2) high traffic and high conversion rate; 3) high traffic but low conversion rate; or 4) low traffic and low conversion rate? In this post, I’ll dig into what each of these four different scenarios might mean and how you can turn that information into an actionable plan for the future.Scenario #1: Low Traffic & High Conversion RateIf you’re not getting a lot of traffic to your blog but your conversion rate is high, it’s a good indication that the traffic you’re getting is high quality. But in order to grow your blog, you’ll need to work on increasing traffic to your blog while still maintaining that high conversion rate.Here are ways you can increase your traffic:Make it easy for your readers to share your content. Include “Tweet this” links throughout your content that have pre-written tweets. “Click-to-Tweet” is a great tool to do that.)Email your blog content to your database. There may be people in there interested in your content but unaware that they can subscribe to your blog.Optimize your blog posts around keywords you want to rank for. You can learn how to do this here.Create content that answers questions you hear about on social media. Then, you can tweet it out to anyone who was discussing the question.Link to other blog posts you’ve written within your post. This’ll help keep readers on your blog longer, get traffic to some of your other posts, and benefit your overall SEO strategy. Look at a report that shows where your traffic is coming from. If you are getting some traffic from certain channels but not others, you’ll learn to focus more on the channels that are driving visits to your site. (Scroll to the bottom of this post to learn more about this.)Build relationships with other bloggers and influencers in your industry. They can help you reach more people in your industry by promoting your content.As you’re working to attract more traffic to your blog, keep a close watch on your conversion rate. Even though you want more traffic to your website, you don’t want the quality of the traffic to suffer and therefore lower your conversion rate. Scenario #2: High Traffic & High Conversion RateYou may take a look at your top 10 blog posts and see that not only do they have a high conversion rate, but they have high traffic, too. That’s great news! In this situation, the next question isn’t, “How can I increase my metrics?” Instead, it’s, “How can I maintain these high metrics?”Here are some ways to get you started:Note if there was a specific topic or topics that you blogged about in many of your top posts. If you see the topic appeared multiple times, write about that topic again from a different angle. (Here’s some help on turning one topic into many.)Note which type of post appeared most in your top ten. Were many of your top posts quick tips? Detailed analyses? Infographic or image-heavy posts? Videos? How-to posts? If you see a pattern, prioritize that format for future blog posts. Note the authors of your top posts. Was it someone on your team? On another team within your company? Certain guest bloggers? While these authors won’t be able to write all your future posts, it’s certainly a good thing to know so you can encourage and coach them to contribute more often, and allocate resources for great guest bloggers if applicable.Note how you promoted those top blog posts. Was it through social media, organic traffic, email marketing, or something else? Some of these channels may have done much better than others. Keep promoting your posts on the channels that did well, and consider scaling back on the channels that didn’t do as well. This will give you an opportunity to invest your resources in your top performing channels.Note where you placed calls-to-action on your top posts. Were there multiple opportunities to convert? You may have had a call-to-action at the end of your blog post as well as others sprinkled throughout your post. See how your different calls-to-action compared and see how you can replicate their success.Scenario #3: High Traffic & Low Conversion RateYou’re attracting a lot of people to your site, but they aren’t converting. That could mean a couple of things.First, that could mean that they aren’t qualified visitors. You may be writing interesting content that simply doesn’t relate to the interests of your target audience. If this is the case, you’ll want to take a hard look at whether your content strategy aligns with your target audience. How are you deciding which types of content to create? Is the content you’re creating relevant to your audience’s interests and needs?In another scenario, your content could be just fine — it’s just that your path to conversion isn’t clear. Your blog readers may be interested in hearing more from you and reading your stuff, but you aren’t giving them a compelling reason to convert. Or, they aren’t sure how to get more content that pertains to their interests.If this sounds like you, here are our suggestions:Take a look at where your calls-to-action are placed. Is it easy for your visitors to convert into a lead? Are there multiple opportunities for them to convert throughout the blog post? Be sure they’re visible and you’re making it as easy as possible to convert. The last thing you want to do is hide your CTAs where no one can see them.Is your primary CTA related to the blog post it’s been placed on? It can be confusing for website visitors to read a blog post on one topic and then click on a CTA that brings them to another topic. Keep the conversion path consistent from start to finish.Assess how compelling your offers are. Are they compelling enough to get someone to convert into a lead? If someone can get the same information on your website without filling out a form, they probably will. Make your website visitors curious enough that they would want to convert into a lead.If you aren’t getting qualified visitors to your site, though, then you have more work to do. After all, if you have 10,000 blog visitors but none of them are qualified, then your blog posts aren’t doing much to help bring in new customers.If this sounds like you, here are a few things to try:Take a hard look at whether your content strategy aligns with your target audience. How are you deciding what type of content to write? Is the content actually relevant to your audience?See what keywords you rank for. (Learn how here.) Are you ranking for the keywords that are the most important to your business? If not, work on optimizing your blog posts and creating new blog content around the keywords that your buyer persona searches for.Look at conversion rate by channel. Do certain channels have a higher conversion rate than others? In the example below, let’s say you’re analyzing how well your social media channels are doing. Even though Twitter has the most visits, it has the lowest visitor-to-contact conversion rate. While Twitter may be a good channel in theory, LinkedIn has the higher conversion rate in this case — so it’d make sense to consider whether or not your core audience is on LinkedIn rather than Twitter or Facebook. If so, you’ll want to invest more of your efforts in LinkedIn than the other social media channels. Marketing Analyticscenter_img (HubSpot customers: You can see all of your marketing channels’ individual performance in the Analytics tool.)Scenario #4: Low Traffic & Low Conversion RateIf you’re creating content but it isn’t driving a lot of traffic and has a low conversion rate, you need to change your approach. To start, let’s focus at the top of the funnel traffic you’re trying to generate to your blog.Why start with traffic? Because without traffic to your blog, no one will convert to the next stage in the funnel. Use some of the tips from Scenario #1 (low traffic & high conversion rate) to get more people on your website and reading your content.Once you’ve successfully increased your traffic, shift your focus to conversion rate. One of the most important things you can do is ensure you have a clear path to conversion. For example, let’s say you write a blog post about DIY design. Is there a clear CTA at the end of the blog post leading to a design-related offer? Having blog content that aligns with the content piece that your visitors convert on is essential. Use some of the tips from Scenario #3 (high traffic & low conversion rate) to create a clear path to conversion for your audience.What other insights have you learned from figuring out your top performing blog posts? Share with us in the comments. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Read More

How to Persuade People by Asking the Right Questions [Video]

first_img Topics: Originally published Jul 4, 2015 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack This post originally appeared on HubSpot’s Sales Blog. To read more content like this, subscribe to Sales.As marketers, it’s our job to be convincing … but that doesn’t mean it’s easy. In fact, persuading someone to complete a certain action requires a lot of careful consideration. Click here for our free guide to improving your presentation skills.For example, I’m willing to bet at least one person that’s reading this has a child with a messy room. How do you get a kid to clean their room?You beg and plead. You offer rewards. You threaten punishments. You create checklists. You offer to pitch in. You might even just forget the whole thing, and make peace with the disaster behind the door.But all of these approaches come from a single perspective — why it’s important to you that your child cleans her room. Wouldn’t it be more effective to help the child to realize the benefits of a clean room?In the following video, Daniel Pink uses this very example to set the record straight on persuasion.”We tend to think persuasion or motivation is something that one person does to another,” Pink says. “But what the social science clearly tells us it’s really something people do for themselves.”Watch the clip to discover the power of counterintuitive questions in persuasion (and finally get a no-fail room cleaning remedy).By the way — Daniel Pink is set to grace the stage of INBOUND 2015. To see him speak in person, register here.center_img Persuasion Daniel Pink: How to Persuade Others with the Right Questions from Big ThinkLiked this article? Click here to subscribe to Sales.last_img read more

Read More

The 7 Excel Tricks Every Office Worker Should Know [Infographic]

first_img12K+SaveWhat other Excel tricks do you find handy? Share with us in the comments. Originally published Sep 28, 2015 12:00:00 PM, updated December 10 2018 Topics: Excelcenter_img Computer technology moves fast — which is why it’s so hard to believe that a computer program that’s been around for 30 years is still one of the most popular programs in the world. And yet, I’m willing to bet every single one of you has had to use Microsoft Excel at some point in your life.Nowadays, most office workers are simply expected to know basic Excel functions — so much so that many recruiters suggest you shouldn’t even bother listing it on your resume. “I swap ‘Proficient in Word, Excel and PowerPoint’ for ‘Proficient in Breathing Oxygen,'” quipped the founder of Mergers & Inquisitions.Beyond creating basic charts and graphs, there are a few other Excel tricks that everyone working in an office should know. For instance, it’s really helpful to at least have a basic understanding of how to create pivot tables and VLOOKUPs. (Don’t worry — it’s easier than it sounds.)Download 9 Free Excel Templates for MarketersFrom charting to conditional formatting to pivot tables, check out the infographic below from Microsoft Training to learn the top seven most useful Excel tricks everyone working in an office environment should be familiar with. (And read this blog post to learn these tricks and others in more detail.)12K+Save Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Read More