Voices of frustration

first_imgIn some instances the details are so graphic, her editor chooses not to publish them.For years, investigative journalist Fatima Tlisova has documented the torture of prisoners and the corruption of government officials in Russia’s Northern Caucuses. And for years, Russian officials, and the mainstream media, have largely ignored her stories.But the work is vital and needs to reach a wider audience, said Tlisova during a discussion at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society. The July 11 talk explored the challenges of reporting international stories to U.S. and global audiences.Because many members of the Russian media are also corrupt or controlled by the government, the real stories are never told, Tlisova said. “That is why attention from the Western audience is needed,” she said, so that the world knows what is happening.She recalled reporting on a corrupt Chechnyan official who, though he earned a mere $5,000 salary, had a fleet of exotic sports cars and lived in a mansion. She showed the audience a Web video shot by citizens who snapped pictures of the home and the vehicles using their mobile phones.“The media doesn’t give you the real picture,” she said. “You have to listen to the local people.”But a commitment to reporting the truth can come with a high price, as is the case with Nigerian Dele Olojede.A joint winner of a Pulitzer Prize in 2005 for his work reporting on the aftermath of the Rwandan Genocide, Olojede began his career in Lagos, Nigeria. He later worked for Newsday in the United States, eventually becoming the paper’s foreign editor.One day Olojede said he “looked up on the wall and saw that the clock was winding down.” So he returned to Nigeria, where he created NEXT, NextOnSunday, and 234NEXT.com, news outlets that he calls “an honest space” for credible news.But today his business is on the brink of collapse after advertisers and shareholders balked at his practices of exposing widespread government corruption. Despite his efforts, the public continues to elect the same corrupt officials, said Olojede, and the mainstream media ignores the story. His options, he said, are to find another type of business model, or “just say the hell with it, we have already made our statement.”He challenged the audience with “a very important question.”“What if you provide the information, what if you take the risk, what if you did all the reporting, what if you are broken in the process? … What if we did all this and armed the public with the information that they need to enable them to make rational decisions as citizens, and they don’t?”The event was a tribute to Persephone Miel, a onetime Berkman Fellow who died last year. Miel was a longtime employee of Internews Network, a media development organization that supports independent media around the world.She devoted much of her life to figuring out how to help make international stories more accessible to American and global audiences.One of the best ways to honor Miel’s memory is to seek out and engage with stories that are largely ignored by the mainstream media, said Ivan Sigal, executive director of Global Voices, a nonprofit media initiative.In places like Afghanistan and Pakistan, “tremendously dangerous places to work,” where U.S. reporters focus on drone strikes and terrorism, local journalists are also risking their lives to report on those and other important stories with a different point of view, he said.Today Dele Olojede’s business is on the brink of collapse after advertisers and shareholders balked at his practices of exposing widespread government corruption.“The potential for us to listen to and read and hear stories that are coming from Pakistanis that are not about primarily the framework that the American media places on those stories or those kinds of narrow channels … is a tremendous one, and I urge you all to take the time to engage those different stories.”Jon Sawyer, founding director of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, briefly discussed the Persephone Miel Fellowship. Before she died, Miel expressed her wish to be remembered by a fellowship that would help journalists outside the United States report on their home countries and bring their stories to a wide international audience. The fellowship, overseen by the Pulitzer Center in partnership with Internews, recently announced its first fellows.“Persephone was so involved in so many things,” said her husband, Tony Rudie, who spoke briefly at the event. “We miss her in so many different ways.”last_img read more

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Students travel to Super Bowl

first_imgThe sports world’s eyes will turn to Indianapolis this Sunday for the Super Bowl XLVI, which will feature a rematch between prominent East Coast teams the New England Patriots and the New York Giants. Several students plan to make the short trip to Indianapolis and participate in Super Bowl festivities before the game begins Sunday evening. Freshman Kayla Polcari said she and her sister, senior Annie Polcari, decided to spend the weekend in Indianapolis after they received tickets to the Super Bowl as a surprise gift. “The best dad in the world surprised me with them,” she said. Seniors Christina Carson and Michael Oliver said they are also driving to Indianapolis with a group of friends to experience the events in Super Bowl Village, though they do not have tickets to the game. “We’re going downtown for the concerts in Super Bowl village, like Darius Rucker, LMFAO and O.A.R., and they’re all free,” Carson said. The concerts begin Thursday evening and continue through Sunday. Carson and Oliver said they expect Saturday night’s CMT Crossroads Pepsi Super Bowl Fan Jam concert to be the highlight of their weekend. “We also somehow won tickets to the Crossroads concert at the Pepsi Coliseum with Steven Tyler and Carrie Underwood, so I’m really excited for that,” Oliver said. Though they plan to visit Super Bowl village, Carson and Oliver said they will come back to South Bend in time to watch the game with other students. Oliver, a Patriots fan, will be set against students like Polcari who will cheer for the Giants. “I’m so excited for the Giants win,” she said. Freshman Rachel Miceli, of Queens, New York, said her decision to cheer for the Giants was painful since her true loyalties lie with the New York Jets during the regular season. “I usually hate the Giants, but not as much as I hate the Patriots,” Miceli said. “I guess it comes down to the Giants being a New York team, so I’m supporting them.”last_img read more

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Ways to save money on mortgage closing costs

first_imgAnother good reason to buy a home now – in addition to the relatively low interest rate environment – is that mortgage closing costs have declined 7% over the past year and now average $1,847 on a $200,000 loan, according to Bankrate.com.“The reason is there [are] caps in place on a lot of things now,” said Mike Brennan, founder of MJB Mortgage Services in Bohemia, New York, referring to a 3% cap on bank origination fees. “Plus it’s a competitive environment.”A decrease in mortgage volume over the last couple of years could have prompted lenders to become more competitive, according to Crissinda Ponder, mortgage analyst at Bankrate.com.“The most important thing to do is shop around,” Ponder said.Mortgage costs typically include taxes, title insurance, property insurance and the origination fee, which is what a lender charges for processing the loan. The origination fee typically includes the bank’s application fee, a processing fee and underwriting fees, according to Brennan. continue reading » 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Five percent of Indonesia’s COVID-19 cases are children: Ministry

first_imgThe ministry was therefore devising a protocol for implementing the so-called new normal at schools to prevent the further spread of the coronavirus among children, Ciput said.Read also: 22-month old baby in N. Sulawesi may be Indonesia’s youngest COVID-19 related deathAs of Thursday afternoon, Indonesia has recorded 24,538 COVID-19 cases nationwide, 1,496 of which have turned fatal. Based on the ministry’s statement, that would mean roughly 1,200 children are infected with SARS-CoV-2 in the country.The Indonesian Pediatricians Association (IDAI) previously revealed that at least 584 children in Indonesia had tested positive for COVID-19, 14 of whom had died of the disease.Meanwhile, up to 3,324 children have been classified under the PDP status, which refers to people with COVID-19 symptoms who have not been confirmed as having the illness. As many as 129 of them have died.”We retrieved the data on May 18,” IDAI chairman Aman Bhakti Pulungan told kompas.com last week.Topics : According to the Women’s Empowerment and Child Protection Ministry, around 5 percent of all people found to be COVID-19-positive in Indonesia are children below 17 years of age.”Normally, children’s immunity is lower than that of adults,” said the ministry’s deputy assistant for child protection in emergency situations and pornography, Ciput Eka Purwianti, on Thursday.According to the ministry’s preliminary analysis, many children are infected with the virus due to the lack of a clean and healthy lifestyle, indicators of which include frequently washing hands with clean water and soap, eating fruits and vegetables in sufficient amounts and doing physical activities on a daily basis.last_img read more

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