McGinley not swayed by Clarke rift

first_img And w hen Tom Watson was named US captain in December 2012, Clarke suggested 2010 captain Colin Montgomerie should also be considered as “whoever it is standing on that stage opposite Tom Watson needs a huge presence”. With the public backing of players such as Rory McIlroy, Luke Donald and Ian Poulter, McGinley subsequently won the day but admitted recently that his conversations with Clarke were now “short and sweet” and amounted to little more than passing pleasantries. However, the 47-year-old vowed to be professional when the new selection process gets under way. Since 1999, the captain was selected by the European Tour’s 15-strong tournament committee, but changes announced in August last year mean the responsibility now falls to the previous three captains (McGinley, Jose Maria Olazabal and Montgomerie), the Tour’s chief executive and a tournament committee representative. Asked by Press Association Sport if his relationship with Clarke would be a problem, McGinley said: “Abs olutely no problem whatsoever. I’m going to be very professional in my input. “I’m going to get opinions from a lot of players and a lot of people before I put my opinion forward as to what it will be. Just like I was very much pushed over the line by the players, I want to get the opinion of the players. “I think we’re very fortunate in Europe, a little bit like the Liverpool soccer team and the boot room, I think a lot of us have benefited hugely from being vice-captains. Darren has been a vice-captain along with many other guys. We will see where that all evolves and I’ll make a professional decision based on the views of people that I respect.” As to whether he would be a vice-captain under Clarke, McGinley added: “I don’t think I’d be vice-captain to anybody going forward to be honest. I’m very happy to help in an unofficial capacity but I don’t think I have the personality to go back in as vice-captain. Press Association Paul McGinley insists his strained relationship with Darren Clarke will not influence his opinion on who should be Europe’s next Ryder Cup captain. Clarke is odds-on favourite to lead the side at Hazeltine in 2016, when Europe will be looking to claim their fourth straight victory and ninth in the last 11 contests. The former Open champion sent McGinley a letter in 2011 offering his support for the latter’s bid to become captain in 2014, but later changed his mind and also put himself forward for the role. “I would like to be able to support the new captain in whatever direction he went, and if I had a belief about a different area, I’m afraid there would be a conflict.” That means McGinley’s Ryder Cup career is officially over, a career which has seen three wins as a player (2002, 2004 and 2006), two as a vice-captain (2010 and 2012) and one as captain. “That’s six I have been involved in and six wins,” he said. “L ike a heavyweight fighter, I will retire undefeated.” Undefeated but perhaps not uninvolved, McGinley raising the possibility of using his expertise in the same way he got former Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson to speak to the team on Tuesday. “I would certainly like to play a role, if required, a little bit like Alex Ferguson did this week for me,” he added. “I bounced ideas off him. He didn’t preach to me. He didn’t tell me what to do, but what he did was he solidified my ideas and he gave me confidence that, yeah, my hunches were right. “I certainly won’t be pushing myself forward (but) whoever the next captain may be, if he has any questions, I’ll help in any single way I can.” McGinley admitted his one regret at Gleneagles was not having enough time to coach Ian Poulter in the role of senior player for his partnership with Stephen Gallacher, the untried duo losing 5&4 on the opening morning. But he praised Poulter for accepting his somewhat limited role during the week, the top European points scorer in each of the previous three contests playing just twice before the singles. “I had to make some tough calls, really tough calls,” added McGinley, who said his decision not to pick Luke Donald as a wild card was still eating away at him; Donald sending McGinley a long text of congratulations on Sunday evening. “All along I had thought that Ian Poulter was going to play in the second afternoon, and he thought he was going to play, and at the 11th hour I decided on Martin Kaymer instead and to break up that dynamic of Poulter and (Justin) Rose which has been so successful. That was a big call. “But the way Ian accepted that decision, I mean, he came out to me on the golf course in the afternoon and he was consoling me. That means more to me than the Ian Poulter banging on his heart and what he did in Medinah.” last_img read more

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Mark Cuban believes the NBA could return in May

first_imgIt has been almost a month without the NBA, and it is still not known when the season will return.Dallas Mavericks owner, Mark Cuban, said he believes the 2019-2020 NBA season could be back by May! “Hopefully by the middle of May, we’re starting to get back to normal and the NBA is playing games,” Cuban said, via WFAA’s Mike Leslie. “Maybe not with fans, but we’re playing it because sports plays such an important role. You know, people want something to cheer for, people want something to rally around, people want something to be excited about. “… I mean you know no one has perfect information right now, and so all decisions are tough. But, you know, if I had to guess based off the people I’ve talked to at the CDC and other places — I would say that the over-under would be June 1, and I’m taking the under.”Cuban says once scientist find a way to for the population to cope with the coronavirus, the league will “have a path out” of its hiatus.last_img read more

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Steelers rookie RB Samuels morphs from project to starter

first_imgPittsburgh Steelers running back Jaylen Samuels (38) is tackled by New England Patriots free safety Devin McCourty (32) during the first half of an NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Don Wright)PITTSBURGH (AP) — Jaylen Samuels spent the months leading up to the 2018 NFL draft answering one question over and over again.“People were like, ‘What position (are you) going to play?‘” the Pittsburgh Steelers rookie said. “And I just kept saying ‘I’m going to play running back.’”Not everyone believed him. The NFL included.The NFL was so skeptical of the former North Carolina State star’s potential out of the backfield he was told shortly before the scouting combine that he wouldn’t be working out with the running backs but the tight ends. Samuels shrugged his shoulders, figuring it was better to be at the combine — even if it wasn’t your preferred position — than stuck at home watching it on TV.Fast forward 10 months. They don’t ask Samuels where he fits anymore. Not after the 22-year-old lit up the New England Patriots for 142 yards rushing and 172 total yards in a victory over the New England Patriots last Sunday.Samuels carried the ball 19 times — more than he can remember at any level of football — and caught a pair of passes, including a leaping 20-yard, fourth-quarter grab that helped the Steelers run some clock before adding a late field goal that pushed the margin to seven points.There were the usual aches and pains on Monday, but nothing out of the ordinary after the heavy workload. Good thing, because Samuels figures to be just as busy when the Steelers (8-5-1) travel to New Orleans to face the NFC South champion Saints (12-2) on Sunday.Newly minted Pro Bowler James Conner is still dealing with a sprained left ankle that’s forced him to miss the past two weeks, meaning Pittsburgh’s running game will be in the hands of a fifth-round pick who has quickly morphed from project to capable starter.Samuels earned a spot out of training camp thanks to the way he embraced special teams and had found a small niche as a receiving threat — he’s N.C. State’s career leader in receptions (202), just ahead of former NFL wide receivers Jerricho Cotchery and Torry Holt — before Conner went down in the fourth quarter against the Los Angeles Chargers. Samuels came in and caught a 10-yard touchdown pass on the next play.His first NFL start didn’t go quite as planned. He managed just 28 yards on 11 carries in a stunning loss to the Oakland Raiders. The problem wasn’t so much Oakland’s defense or the iffy turf so much as Samuels’ own jitters.“I felt like I wasn’t being patient enough, just being in a rush, hurry up and get to the hole and try to get there,” Samuels said. ”(Against the Patriots) I could definitely feel it all sorting out. The holes are just opening. I just felt smoother and it felt like it was more my game.”A game that not every college coach that recruited Samuels out of high school understood. UNC brought the Charlotte native in for a camp and had him practice with the linebackers.“I was like, ‘What am I doing? Why am I going backward’” Samuels said. “I need to be going forward with the ball.”N.C. State assistant coach Eddie Faulkner saw the potential and during the recruiting process pointed out all the varied ways the Wolfpack could use him. Samuels spent four record-breaking years doing a little bit of everything.Running back. Fullback. H-back. Tight end. Slot receiver. His polished route running was immediately apparent to Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger when Pittsburgh used its second pick of the fifth round on Samuels.“He has really good hands, soft hands you can really throw it all over the place and he can make plays,” Roethlisberger said.“I think he showed that this week that we can put him out there and we can do some things with him and hopefully we are just scratching the surface.”While Steelers coach Mike Tomlin jokingly replied “who said I had confidence?” when asked what gave him faith Samuels could produce, he’s not particularly surprised by what he saw against the Patriots. The shakiness in Oakland was understandable. The bounce back versus New England was promising.“There are oftentimes when you walk into stadiums, particularly as a young guy, it is a first time for a lot of things,” Tomlin said. “And I am sure as he continues to step into stadiums with a significant role for us he’ll check some boxes and do some things he hasn’t done before, but that’s just a very natural thing in terms of a young player.”One who no longer has to deal with questions about where he fits.NOTES: Conner and LB Bud Dupree (knee) did not practice Wednesday. … S Terrell Edmunds (concussion) was limited. … DE Cam Heyward (knee) was a full participant. … Roethlisberger and C Maurkice Pouncey were given the day off.___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFLlast_img read more

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Early season showdown goes Tuesday between Beaver Valley and Nelson

first_imgIt’s only October, but we have a good old fashion showdown in the Murdoch Division of the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League.Division-leading Nelson Leafs play host to second-place Beaver Valley Nitehawks in the first meeting of the season between the two West Kootenay combatants Tuesday at the NDCC Arena.“It’s exciting the guys are starting to believe, but this will be a good test for us,” said Leaf coach Frank Maida.Both teams enter the contest on a roll to start the KIJHL season.Nelson has won five consecutive games after losing two of its first three — the second setback coming in overtime to Kelowna.In the Beaver Valley, the Hawks, under the guidance of seasoned KIJHL veteran coach Terry Jones, have lost just once in six games and sit only three points behind the Leafs in Murdoch Division standings.“Beaver Valley is a strong, disciplined coached team,” said Maida of the upcoming clash.“Terry (Jones) has been around the league a long time and it looks like he has his team playing very well.”Snipers Ryan Edwards and Chris Derochie along with 16-year-old rookie Craig Martin lead Beaver Valley in scoring.All three players have more points this season than the top scorer on the Leafs, Matti Jmaeff.Last season Beaver Valley dominated the Leafs, winning the season series.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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