4 Actions You Can Take to Grow and Sustain Your Email List

first_imgWhether you’re starting from scratch or have been building your email list for years, you know it’s important to actively promote your email list and encourage your existing contacts to engage with your organization.After all, a dedicated email list can have serious payoffs for your nonprofit — including everything from better event attendance to increased web traffic and larger donations at your next fundraiser.The key to successful email list is to see your contacts as people. Grow your list — one name at a time— and once they’ve subscribed provide them with a quality experience, just as you would in-person.Here are 4 tips for growing and sustaining your email list:1. Choose a reliable email providerThe first step of building a loyal email list is making sure you have a safe place to store your contacts’ information and an easy way to send them mailings.If you’re just getting started, take a look at what other organizations are using, and think about what kind of tools and features will be important for your organization. Will you need access to reports to see how your emails are performing? What about support to help with any technical questions you have?You may also want to think about what solutions work with products you are already using. Constant Contact easily integrates with Network for Good so that you can launch campaigns, organize contacts, and manage your campaigns from a central location.2. Make sign-up simpleMost people aren’t going to seek out your mailing list on their own; it’s up to you to encourage them to sign up and make it easy for them to do so.Here’s a great example of a website sign-up form from Canadian nonprofit, The Local Good. Not only do they make sign-up super simple, they also provide a useful description of what their newsletter will include and how often they send.Subscribers will be more likely to sign up if they know what to expect from you.There are also handy tools you can use so that subscribers can sign up on social media or even through a mobile device.3. Deliver a personal experienceBuilding a list is half the challenge, sustaining that relationship is just as important. To build long-lasting relationships with your subscribers, you’re going to have to think beyond your organization and think about how you can deliver a great experience for your contacts.Start by answering a few questions like:Who are your contacts?What are they interested in?How often do they want to hear from you?The more information you can collect and store about your contacts the better. For example, if you collect email addresses at an event, make note of that so you can reach out to them with a targeted follow-up soon after.The timing of your emails is important — you want to make a good first impression on new contacts so that they read your future messages. You can also use this information to reach out to them if you are holding a similar event in the future.4. Don’t send carelesslyThis includes sending with a set schedule and goal in mind, but also checking back in to see how each mailing performed, and making changes when necessary. Using email reports, you have access to important information like open and click-through rates, which will show you what messages are attracting interest and getting your readers to interact with your content.You don’t want your email marketing strategy to become static. Spend some time thinking about little tweaks you can try. What happens to your open rate if you ask a question in your subject line? Does your click-through rate increase if you link to a YouTube video?Seeing what works best for your audience will ensure you are getting the return on investment you’re looking for from email marketing. Taking a few extra minutes to try something new could mean reengaging contacts that have fallen out of touch.last_img read more

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How to Avoid Predatory Journals: A Five Point Plan

first_imgPosted on January 28, 2015May 9, 2017By: Jocalyn Clark, Executive Editor, Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition at icddr,bClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Increasingly, I’m asked to advise and assist with the problem of predatory journals. While it’s probably only an annoying nuisance to many in the developed world, the increasing number of spam emails inviting articles and conference participation is beginning to feel like a potentially serious problem for developing world scientists and institutions. This demands action, as Richard Smith and I argue in a recent editorial in The BMJ.That’s because these countries’ relative lack of development also extends, unsurprisingly, to scholarly publishing. Whereas in rich country institutions we would have training, supervision, and support that generate a level of literacy to discern predatory versus legitimate journals, this is often missing or nascent in developing country institutions. As a recent paper shows, the majority of authors in predatory journals are inexperienced and based in developing countries.Predatory journals (a term first coined by librarian Jeffrey Beall) are fake or scam journals that send phishing emails offering “open access” publication in exchange for payment, without providing robust editorial or publishing services. They have been discredited by the scientific community, and because they are not indexed in standard databases any research published in them is effectively lost. Their motive is financial gain, and their modus operandi is a corruption of the business model of legitimate open access publishing.Many organisations and universities around the world are facing this problem, but it appears predatory publishers may be particularly targeting institutions in the global south.I’m struck by how many more spam emails from predatory publishers I get to my Bangladesh institutional email than I do to my Canadian academic account. In a recent seven day trial, I received 14 predatory journal spam emails to my icddr,b account and six to my University of Toronto account; a colleague at Harvard in the same period got just two.This can’t be explained by inadequate junk mail filters, as the system we use at my organisation in Bangladesh is an industry standard.I recommend a five point plan for researchers to avoid predatory journals, which involves “doing your homework” to check the credibility of a journal or publisher, and always being sceptical of unknown journals. To distinguish legitimate from predatory journals, here are some useful sources of information—none of which are adequate on their own:Is the journal or publisher listed in Beall’s List? If so, it should be avoided, as this “blacklist” is regularly updated and specifies criteria for identifying predatory journals and publishers.If claiming to be an open access journal, is the journal in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)? This is a sort of “whitelist,” and journals here must meet specific criteria.Is the publisher a member of recognised professional organisations that commit to best practices in publishing, such as the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE); the International Association of Scientific, Technical, & Medical Publishers (STM); or the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)?Is the journal indexed? Do not accept the journal’s claims about being indexed. Instead verify these claims by searching for the journal in databases such as PubMedCentral (free) or the Web of Science (requiring subscription).Is the journal transparent and following best practices when it comes to editorial and peer review processes, governance, and ownership? Are there contact details for the journal and its staff (email, postal address, working telephone number)? Reputable journals have a named editor and editorial board comprised of recognised experts. Are the costs associated with publishing clear? Credible journals do not ask for a submission fee. Many bona fide open access journals require a publication charge, but this is levied after acceptance and through a process separate from the editorial process.To help with “doing your homework” authors can consult new guidance from COPE, which—along with the DOAJ, OASPA, and the World Association of Medical Editors—has set out principles of transparency and best practice that set apart legitimate journals and publishers from “non-legitimate” ones.These sources of information can help any researcher struggling to avoid predatory journals, but should supplement rather than supplant extensive discussions among co-authors about the right and reputable target journals for their papers.In addition, those of us who collaborate with and advocate health research from developing countries should lend our support to colleagues, especially junior colleagues, to spread publication literacy and to fight against the predatory journals.This post originally appeared on BMJ Blogs.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Tax Reform and Charitable Giving for Nonprofits

first_img“In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” Ben Franklin’s wit aside, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) will impact every individual and organization. The issue we hear about the most from our customers is how the increase in the standard deduction amount will effect giving. If the standard deduction is more beneficial than itemizing and donors find they can’t write off their donation anymore, will they still give as much? The truth is, only time will tell. But recent history gives us hope.Americans Reach New High in GivingAccording to Giving USA’s annual report on philanthropy, American individuals, estates, foundations and corporations contributed an estimated $390.05 billion to U.S. charities in 2016, surpassing 2015 and 2014, when charitable donations hit a record high. Americans continually prove that they want to make a difference and are dedicated to contributing to the causes that matter to them.TCJA’s Impact on GivingThe key changes under the TCJA include:Increase in the standard deduction to $12,000 for individuals and $24,000 for joint filers.Elimination of personal exemptions.Limitation on State and Local Taxes (SALT) of $10,000 (inclusive of income and property taxes).Reduction in the corporate income tax rate.Reduction of five of the seven tax brackets (marginal rates).At Network for Good, we specialize in fundraising best practices, not tax policy. So the best piece of advice we can offer you about how the TCJA will affect your nonprofit is to talk to your accountant and make a plan that includes donor engagement. But to help us break down the TCJA changes, we reached out to Network for Good Fundraising Coach and Founder of Fundraising Strategies, John Gilchrist, FAHP, CFRE, who joined us for a recent webinar “3 Ways the New Tax Reform Act Impacts the Nonprofit Community.” You can also read some of John’s insights on these changes and their effect on nonprofits in our other blog post here.Keep Calm and Carry OnChange can be scary, but the worst thing you can do is overreact. The key factors that drive giving still exist. Professors Sara Konrath and Femida Handy, experts in giving-related topics in psychology and economics, respectively, conducted a study on why people give to charity. Through their findings, they developed a ‘motives to donate’ scale, highlighting five key factors for why people give to nonprofits: altruism, trust, social, egoism, and taxes.As you can see, altruism is the number one reason—far surpassing taxes—which supports our belief at Network for Good that the desire to help others is stronger than any personal tax benefits.Take ActionAt the heart of every nonprofit is the desire to change the status quo. You don’t throw up your hands and capitulate. You roll up your sleeves and make things happen. Even tax laws can’t break that spirit. Giving habits may change as a result of the TCJA, but Americans have proven over and over again that we are a philanthropic society. Even at the height of the Recession, charitable giving in the U.S. exceeded $300 billion.The changes put into effect by the TCJA offer nonprofits an opportunity to lean in and revisit the conversation with donors about how you’re improving the community you serve. The fact that they may not receive a tax break makes their gift that much more significant and shows their commitment to the work you do. Now is the time to talk to your donors about how their gift directly affects the change they want to see in their community. Find additional inspiration for donor engagement in our “10-Point Checklist to Make the New Tax Laws Work for Your Nonprofit.”We know that altruism is the driving factor for why people donate. The generosity of your donors is what makes your work possible. Let them know how much you appreciate them and you’ll all share in the success of your organization. Use Network for Good’s donor management system and our personal coaches to analyze your data in order to put your organization’s energy and funds where it will do the most good. Continue to cultivate the loyalty of your donors that give small gifts; the donors that may not be affected by itemized taxes. Look at their giving history. How long have they been with you? Perhaps now is the time to ask them to expand their giving? If you depend on midlevel donors, allocate resources for marketing and outreach to them in order to engage a broad spectrum of donors. In conversations with your major donors, discuss with them the importance of their gifts and remind them, throughout the year, of the impact they have.Interested in hearing more about how the new tax laws will impact nonprofits? Register today for our upcoming webinar “Tax Reform – Impacts on Nonprofits and Giving.”last_img read more

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10 Things to Do for Your Final Year-End Push

first_imgHeads up, fundraisers. It’s crunch time!Are you ready to win the race to year-end? You can’t ignore the data—10 percent of all online giving happens December 29-31. Do you really want to miss out on those donations because you didn’t do one final year-end campaign push? Here are ten simple things you can do right now to ensure a successful year-end.Make it easy for donors to find you and donate.Post a vibrant year-end donation banner on your website’s homepage that links directly to your online donation page. Go the extra mile and make sure your nonprofit’s information is up-to-date on Charity Navigator and GuideStar, too.Write a stellar, story-driven appeal.An effective appeal is equal parts emotion and urgency. You want to pull people into your message with a compelling story, and then push them to act with a specific, clear, and urgent call to action. Not sure what to write? Check out our chapter, “Write a Story-Driven Appeal,” in our recent eGuide, Last-Minute Tips for Year-End Success.Send an email every day, December 29-31.Last call for giving! This one’s crucial—and we know it scares you. You worry you’ll annoy your donors with too many requests. Guess what…YOU WON’T! Your supporters want to hear from you. That’s exactly why they signed up for your emails. You can always segment out donors who have already given to your year-end campaign. But, if you don’t ask them to support you, there are plenty of other nonprofits who will.Share your donation page on social media—every day.You have plenty to post about. Share photos and memories of the work your donors have helped you accomplish this past year. Build excitement around what you’re looking forward to in the year to come. Give donors the inside scoop on how their gift helps.Make sure your online donation process is easy.Be sure the donation button is easy to find on your website and in all your email blasts, so donors can simply click and give without wasting time hunting for your donation page. Minimize the steps your donors must go through to donate. Don’t lose them because your process takes too long!Make sure your year-end efforts are donor-centric.Make the donor the superhero of your nonprofit’s success instead of talking about the greatness of your organization. Remember, your donors make your work possible. They’re your stakeholders. Show them how their donations will be used and be transparent about your programs, spending, and impact.Have a clear call to action in every message you send.Know your audience and craft a call to action that will motivate them. Tie it into your appeal’s overall story. Focus your appeal on the community you serve and individual stories, rather than statistics. This will resonate at the emotional level.Set SMART goals.It’s essential to have a clear and measurable result in mind. Decide how you will define success, so you can report on it at the end of your campaign. Make sure your goals are SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound). Set your goals by answering four simple questions:What am I trying to accomplish?Who am I trying to reach?What do I want them to do?What is the best way to reach my audience?Say thank you.Send a thank you message as soon as you can—and make sure it does just that: says thanks. Your sincere note of gratitude (that doesn’t include donation history or another appeal) will be remembered next year!Track results.Tracking results isn’t just for internal reporting. Let your supporters know about the progress of your campaign, how close you are to your goal, and how much their support matters.This final week is crucial. It’s the last lap in the race. Use these tips to boost your year-end fundraising campaign with one final appeal that inspires donors to give. Download our Last-Minute Year-End Fundraising Appeal template to write your best email blasts of the year. There’s no time to waste!last_img read more

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Women in Philanthropy Profile: Janet Cobb

first_imgA native of California, Janet Cobb currently serves as one of Network for Good’s Personal Fundraising Coaches. She has lived and worked in Oregon, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, before finally calling Chicago home. Cobb has thoroughly enjoyed her professional experiences in the culinary arts, in the high school classroom, and in fundraising and development; not to mention the gift of being a wife and a mother to three children who have become phenomenal young adults.Coaching NonprofitsWhat’s involved with your coaching process?In my role, I work with small nonprofits across the country to help them strategize around their fundraising efforts, particularly through the effective use of online fundraising, donor management, and communication tools. Together, we coordinate an integrated communication and fundraising plan that is data-driven and right-sized to fit each individual organization’s capacity to implement. I offer strategic and practical advice along with encouraging and supportive accountability.How long have you been a fundraising consultant?I’ve engaged in various aspects of fundraising throughout my career in the nonprofit arena and transitioned into coaching and consulting in 2013.How did you get started in nonprofit work?I’ve been a “do-gooder” my entire life and have worked within the nonprofit industry—in programming, administration, and fundraising—in some capacity my entire career. Working primarily in smaller nonprofits and schools, the program staff was often responsible for fundraising efforts. I remember in the 1980’s, conducting a ‘monthly giving’ program via snail mail when our donors mailed in $1 bills each month, sorting bulk mailings by zip code on tables in the retreat house dining hall, and sponging stamps long before self-stick existed. In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, I was heavily involved with strategic planning and grant-writing focused on transforming outdated classrooms and libraries into 21st century learning environments. By 2004, I moved more directly into fundraising and development work. Since then, I’ve been responsible for donor communications, database management, special events, major gifts, strategic planning, and capital campaigns—sometimes all at once.What keeps you in the nonprofit sector?I believe in the power of empowering others. The nonprofit sector declares that “we” are all in this together instead of “every ‘man’ for himself.” I believe in the interdependence of the community that fosters the independence of individuals within that community.What do you enjoy most about coaching fundraisers?Through coaching, I get to work with so many fabulous nonprofits that do great work in their own corner of the universe—doing good to make the world a better place. Fundraising is about engaging in conversation with others who care about what you care about, so that the donor has the opportunity to make an impact in a way that is meaningful to them. I enjoy sharing the skills I’ve acquired with others to make a positive impact.What’s your proudest accomplishment with the organization?My proudest accomplishment as a coach is that I’ve been able to support the fundraising efforts of more than 150 small and early-stage nonprofits who have a passion for their mission but can benefit from encouraging and supportive accountability around fundraising. I get to help bring their vision to reality!Women in Philanthropy is an ongoing blog series in celebration of Women’s History Month, featuring some of the incredible women Network for Good has the pleasure to work with.Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

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Uganda Policy Makes Protecting Pregnant Mothers From Malaria a National Priority

first_imgPosted on April 23, 2015June 12, 2017By: Allen Namagembe, Research Coordinator, PATH Uganda OfficeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we gear up to celebrate World Malaria Day this Saturday, April 25th, we’ll be featuring posts that highlight work currently happening to protect women and their babies from malaria in pregnancy.Rachel Jocb, 28, who is pregnant with her second child, attends an antenatal clinic at the Kuje Primary Health Care Center. Photo: Evelyn Hockstein/PATHFor any expecting mother there are many things to worry about – from ensuring her growing baby’s health to making preparations to welcome him or her into the world. Imagine if one of those concerns was malaria. For the 1.6 million Ugandan women who live in areas where malaria is endemic, contracting malaria while pregnant is a dangerous reality.Malaria in pregnancy, or MiP, significantly increases the risk of serious health issues for both mother and baby, including maternal anemia, miscarriage, stillbirth, prematurity and low birth weight. Since 2001, the government of Uganda has been making strides to include malaria prevention for pregnant women in their health policies. In fact, they integrated a MiP policy into national malaria guidelines in 2011. However, the policies were loosely coordinated, not fully implemented and did not reflect the World Health Organization’s (WHO) 2014 revised recommendations for preventing MiP with a package of key supplies and interventions.One of the WHO-recommended supplies is a simple, cost-effective antimalarial drug called sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine that is used for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy, or IPTp-SP. In Uganda—even though 90 percent of pregnant women receive antenatal care—40 percent of those women do not receive this preventive treatment at the recommended level. WHO’s new guidelines increased the recommended preventive drug’s dosage for pregnant women from three doses to seven, creating an even wider gap in protection for expecting Ugandan mothers.A group of advocates, led by PATH and including WHO, Jhpiego, CHAI, and the President’s Malaria Initiative, knew that if Uganda’s MiP policy could be better coordinated and updated to align with global standards, it could help reduce malaria rates among pregnant women.The advocates sought to achieve these system improvements in three stages:Research and map MiP policies and responsibilities across government programs and departments to identify policy obstacles or gaps and identify key decision-makers and influencersForm an Action Group to develop a shared vision for MiP prevention across multiple governmental departments and define roles for MiP work within the Ministry of HealthConvene the government’s existing Maternal and Child Cluster working group to draft an addendum that would align Uganda’s policies across government ministries and update the recommended IPTp-SP dosage to match global recommendationsThe result of this advocacy work was a health triumph. The Ugandan government adopted this important addendum as national policy early this year. The advocates played a critical role by speeding up an otherwise lengthy process through active coordination and compiling and sharing evidence to convince policymakers that an innovative preventive treatment would improve health outcomes.The policy adoption makes MiP prevention a national priority and will ultimately help remove the burden of malaria among expecting mothers in Uganda.No woman should have to worry about malaria during pregnancy. Thanks to the Ugandan government, strong advocates and a simple drug with a complex name, Uganda is now on track to making that vision a reality.Learn more about PATH’s MiP advocacy efforts in Uganda here. For information about PATH’s advocacy capacity support, please visit sites.path.org/advocacyimpact.This post is part of the blog series “Increasing access to maternal and reproductive health supplies: Leveraging lessons learned in preventing maternal mortality,” hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition/Maternal Health Supplies Caucus, Family Care International and the USAID-Accelovate program at Jhpiego which discusses the importance and methods of reaching women with lifesaving reproductive and maternal health supplies in the context of the proposed new global target of fewer than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 births by 2030. To contribute a post, contact Katie Millar.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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New Drug Shows Promise in Preventing One of the Most Common Causes of Maternal Death

first_imgPosted on July 12, 2018July 27, 2018By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)A large randomized trial conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) has found that heat-stable carbetocin is as safe and effective as oxytocin in preventing postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)—excessive bleeding after childbirth and one of the leading causes of global maternal deaths. This is a critical finding given that oxytocin, the current standard therapy for preventing PPH, requires storage and transport conditions that are often not accessible in low-resource settings. The new formula of carbetocin used in the study does not require refrigeration and lasts for at least three years when stored at higher, more humid temperatures.Researchers randomized nearly 30,000 women from 23 sites in Argentina, Egypt, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand, Uganda and the United Kingdom to receive a muscular injection of either heat-stable carbetocin or oxytocin immediately after vaginal delivery. They then measured the proportion of women with blood loss of at least 500 milliliters or the use of additional uterotonic agents as well as the proportion of women with blood loss of at least 1000 milliliters at one hour and up to two hours after birth for women who continued to bleed after one hour. Results indicated no significant differences in blood loss among women who had received the heat-stable carbetocin compared to those who had received oxytocin.The researchers noted that since both oxytocin and carbetocin were maintained in low temperatures needed to ensure oxytocin’s efficacy, the results may underestimate the benefits of heat-stable carbetocin in real-life settings where higher temperatures may compromise the quality of oxytocin.According to leaders at WHO:“This is a truly encouraging new development that can revolutionize our ability to keep mothers and babies alive.”—Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO“The development of a drug to prevent postpartum haemorrhage that continues to remain effective in hot and humid conditions is very good news for the millions of women who give birth in parts of the world without access to reliable refrigeration.”—Dr. Metin Gülmezoglu, from the Department of Reproductive Health and Research at WHONext stepsThese findings represent a critical development in preventing the most common direct cause of maternal death around the world, with next steps including regulatory review and approval by countries. WHO’s Guideline Development Group will be considering whether to include heat-stable carbetocin as a recommended drug for PPH prevention.—Read the full news release from WHO>> Access the full study>>Read more about preventing postpartum hemorrhage>>What else is needed to ensure that no woman dies from postpartum hemorrhage, a preventable cause of maternal death? We’d love to hear from you!Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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August 30 2006 Welcome to the August 27 2006

first_imgAugust 30, 2006 Welcome to the August 27. 2006 seminar-week and workshop participants: back row from left: Nick and Neil Holloway [seminar week], Gabriele Falconi, Peter Ingraham, Mario Nuzzolese and Zeev Shilor [seminar week]. front row from left: Brendan Maloney, Callie Russell, Laszlo Kerekes, Tucker Zenski, Michal Shilor [seminar week], Annie Suzanne Murray-Bissonn and Austin Vanaria [seminar week], [Photo & text: sa]last_img

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Facebook to overhaul ad targeting to prevent discrimination

first_imgGalen Sherwin, senior staff attorney at the ACLU and the group’s lead attorney on its suit, praised the settlement as “sweeping” and said she expects it to have ripple effects through the tech industry.Facebook agreed to let the groups test its ad systems to ensure they don’t enable discrimination. The company also agreed to meet with the groups every six months for the next three years, and is building a tool to let anyone search housing-related ads in the U.S. targeted to different areas across the country. In this May 18, 2012, file photo a television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook has settled five lawsuits alleging that its advertising systems could be used to enable discrimination in housing, credit and employment ads, checking off one problem from its list of many. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File) Discrimination hasn’t been Facebook’s only problem with ad targeting. It’s taken fire for allowing advertisers to target groups of people identified as “Jew-haters” and Nazi sympathizers. It’s also still dealing with fallout from the 2016 election, when, among other things, Facebook allowed fake Russian accounts to buy ads targeting U.S. users to stir up political divisions.One of the complaints said that Facebook violated the Fair Housing Act because its targeting systems allow advertisers to exclude certain audiences, such as families with young children or disabled people, from seeing housing ads. Others alleged job discrimination, with ads being shown to men but not women in traditionally male-dominated fields, or only to younger users.As part of the changes, advertisers who want to run housing, employment or credit ads will no longer be allowed to target people by age, gender or zip code. Facebook will also limit the targeting categories available for such ads. For example, such advertisers wouldn’t be able to exclude groups such as “soccer moms” or people who joined a group on black hair care.Endlessly customizable ad targeting is Facebook’s bread and butter. The ads users see can be tailored down to the most granular details—not just where people live and what websites they visited recently, but whether they’ve gotten engaged in the past six months or share characteristics with people who have recently bought a BMW, even if they have never expressed interest in doing so themselves. It’s how they company made $56 billion in revenue last year.Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, would not say whether the changes will hurt the company’s advertising revenue. The most important thing, she said, was to protect Facebook’s users from discrimination.”Today’s changes mark an important step in our broader effort to prevent discrimination and promote fairness and inclusion on Facebook,” she said in a blog post Tuesday . “But our work is far from over.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. US regulators target Facebook on discriminatory housing ads Facebook will overhaul its ad-targeting systems to prevent discrimination in housing , credit and employment ads as part of a legal settlement. For the social network, that’s one major legal problem down, several to go, including government investigations in the U.S. and Europe over its data and privacy practices.The changes to Facebook’s advertising methods —which generate most of the company’s enormous profits—are unprecedented. The social network says it will no longer allow housing, employment or credit ads that target people by age, gender or zip code. Facebook will also limit other targeting options so these ads don’t exclude people on the basis of race, ethnicity and other legally protected categories in the U.S., including national origin and sexual orientation.The social media company is also paying about $5 million to cover plaintiffs’ legal fees and other costs.Facebook and the plaintiffs—a group including the American Civil Liberties Union, the National Fair Housing Alliance and others —called the settlement “historic.” It took 18 months to hammer out. The company still faces an administrative complaint filed by U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in August over the housing ads issue.What’s not yet clear is how well the safeguards will work. Facebook has been working to address a slew of social consequences related to its platform, with varying degrees of success. Last week, it scrambled to remove graphic video filmed by a gunman in the New Zealand mosque shootings, but the footage remained available for hours on its site and elsewhere on social media.Earlier in March, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced a new “privacy-focused vision” for the company to focus on messaging instead of more public sharing—but he stayed mum on overhauling Facebook’s privacy practices in its core business. Explore further In this April 10, 2018, file photo Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg adjusts his tie as he arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. Earlier this month Zuckerberg announced a new “privacy-focused vision” for the company to focus on messaging instead of more public sharing, but he stayed mum on overhauling Facebook’s privacy practices in its core business. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File) Citation: Facebook to overhaul ad targeting to prevent discrimination (2019, March 19) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-facebook-ad-targeting-discrimination.htmllast_img read more

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Deliveroo on trial in Madrid over workers status

first_imgEmployee or contractor? Food delivery pladforms such as Deliveroo are under pressure over the status of their riders Brought by Spain’s social security system, which is claiming 1.2 million euros ($1.3 million) in unpaid contributions, the case is one of several being fought by Deliveroo and other gig economy groups like Uber in various countries over whether drivers should be classified as employees.Online food platforms have bloomed worldwide, allowing people to order from local restaurants via mobile phones, with dishes delivered to their homes or offices shortly afterwards, often by young bicycle couriers.The trial is expected to end later on Friday, a Madrid court spokesman told AFP, but a verdict is likely to take much longer.The case originated from a health and safety report ruling that Madrid’s more than 500 Deliveroo riders “were false self-employed contractors, which means they are employees,” said Esther Costa, the lawyer of seven couriers in this case.Self-employed contractors have to pay their own social contributions to the health and pensions systems.Employees, meanwhile, have such contributions transferred directly by their employer, which pays a portion of them.A similar trial took place in February in Valencia concerning the eastern city’s 200 drivers. But a verdict has not yet been reached.Two other similar trials will take place this year in Barcelona and the northeastern city of Zaragoza.There have been previous court rulings in Spain over the status of couriers working for Deliveroo or Glovo, another food delivery platform, but these had always been brought by the drivers themselves.The Madrid case, as well as that of Valencia and the others, “will directly affect the model of labour relations imposed by sharing economy platforms as a whole,” said legal firm Colectivo Ronda to which Costa belongs.But in a statement, Deliveroo said it “collaborates with self-employed riders… They can choose when and where they work, and for how long.””Those who campaign to get rid of flexibility don’t represent the opinion of a majority of riders,” it added.The company asked for “a legal reform allowing companies to offer self-employed drivers more security without endangering flexibility.” Explore further © 2019 AFP Citation: Deliveroo on trial in Madrid over workers’ status (2019, May 31) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-deliveroo-trial-madrid-workers-status.htmlcenter_img Online food delivery group Deliveroo went on trial in Madrid on Friday, accused of wrongly hiring more than 500 of its riders as self-employed contractors instead of regular workers, which costs less for the firm. UK union loses challenge to Deliveroo over drivers’ status This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Apples Indiamade topend iPhones to hit stores next month source

first_img Related News Apple’s devices are coveted by millions of Indians, but its premium pricing has limited its market share to a meagre 1% to the gain of rivals such as China’s OnePlus.Reuters had previously reported that the local unit of Hon Hai Precision Industry Co, widely known as Foxconn, would this year begin assembling iPhone X family devices in India’s southern Tamil Nadu state.Cupertino, California-headquartered Apple also assembles the lower-cost SE, 6S and 7 models in India through Wistron Corp’s local unit in the tech hub of Bengaluru.”Local production will give Apple the leeway to play with the margins of their distributors and indirectly price their phones lower,” said Rushabh Doshi, a research director at tech consultancy Canalys.Trade warPrime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has tried to position South Asia’s third-biggest economy as a hub for smartphone manufacturing, wooing global players with access to a market with over a billion wireless connections and cheap labour.That push has met with some success as global smartphone giants including Samsung and China’s Oppo have expanded rapidly in India, and contract manufacturers like Foxconn have ramped up domestic operations.Beyond fulfilling local demand, companies such as Apple could also use India as an export hub to soften the impact of a bruising trade war between the United States and China, according to technology analysts.Apple cut its fiscal first quarter sales forecast, blaming slowing iPhone sales in China where uncertainty around US-China trade relations has hurt the economy.Some of the Wistron assembled iPhone 6s and 7 are being exported from India to markets in Europe, Neil Shah of Hong-King based tech researcher Counterpoint said.Wistron’s India head declined to comment. – Reuters {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Tech News 15 Apr 2019 Foxconn is poised to begin mass production of iPhones in India Corporate News 15 Apr 2019 Foxconn poised to begin mass production of iPhones in India Related News Beyond fulfilling local demand, companies such as Apple could also use India as an export hub to soften the impact of a bruising trade war between the United States and China, according to technology analysts. — Reuters Tech News 10 Jul 2019 Apple starts China app development programme in services business push MUMBAI: Apple Inc’s top-end iPhones, assembled in India by Foxconn’s local unit, are likely to hit Indian stores next month, a source said, potentially helping the tech giant drop prices in the world’s second-biggest smartphone market.Some approvals are pending, but the India-made iPhone XR and XS devices are expected to hit the market by August, the source said, asking not to be named as the matter is not public.Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Foxconn said it does not comment on customers or their products.Expanding local assembly will help Apple save on high taxes levied on the import of fully-built devices, as well as meet local sourcing norms for opening its own retail stores in India.last_img read more

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