COVID-19: Jakarta to impose progressive fines for not wearing masks in public

first_imgThe city’s Public Order Agency (Satpol PP) has been tasked to enforce the regulation, with possible assistance from the National Police and Indonesian Military (TNI).“Satpol PP personnel will record the names, addresses and identification numbers of violators in a database or information system,” the regulation states.Read also: Jokowi orders nationwide enforcement of COVID-19 protocols, sanctionsThe regulation was issued amid rising COVID-19 cases the capital. The national epicenter of the outbreak, Jakarta recorded 657 new cases on Friday, bringing the total to 32,267, according to the central government’s official tally.Despite the increase, many Jakartans are still ignoring health protocols. According to Satpol PP data, the city has collected Rp 1.7 billion in fines from 11,680 violators as of Thursday, based on a previous regulation that fines people Rp 250,000 for not wearing a face mask in public. More than 80,000 people have also been required to do community service as part of the penalty.“We hope that the fine can give a deterrent effect so Jakartans will follow the rules better,” Jakarta Satpol PP chief Arifin told kompas.com on Friday.Topics : The Jakarta administration will start enforcing progressive fines for residents who do not wear a face mask in public as the capital struggles to curb COVID-19 transmissions.The newly issued Gubernatorial Regulation No. 79/2020 states that violators will be fined Rp 250,000 (US$16.92) or required to participate in 60 minutes of community service.The fine will be increased to Rp 500,000 or 120 minutes of community service for those who are caught violating the regulation a second time. Third-time offenders will be required to pay a Rp 750,000 fine or 180 minutes of community service, while the fourth and subsequent violations will result in a Rp 1 million fine or 240 minutes of community service.last_img read more

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European parliamentarians decide on IORP Directive rapporteur

first_imgEuropean parliamentarians have named the MEPs to oversee negotiations for the passage of the IORP Directive, with a former Irish government minister to lead efforts.Despite the appointment of Brian Hayes, who joined the European Parliament following last May’s elections, there will be a strong Dutch presence among the rapporteurs and shadow rapporteurs.A former junior minister in the current Irish coalition government, Hayes spent three years in the Department of Finance. He will act as rapporteur for the Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee (ECON).As a Fine Gael MEP, he is a member of the European People’s Party (EPP) and was appointed to ECON after joining parliament in July. He is also vice-chair of the parliamentary delegation for relations with Iraq. His appointment comes after several months of uncertainty over the appointment of a rapporteur, who facilitates the passage of legislation and leads negotiations between Parliament, the Council of the EU and the European Commission.Several people with knowledge of the situation told IPE last year that the EPP was behind schedule in naming the rapporteur.Many were hopeful that German Christian Democrat MEP Thomas Mann, an ECON substitute member and former rapporteur for a report on demographic challenges, would be appointed.Jeroen Lenaers, a Dutch member of the Employment and Social Affairs Committee, has been named its rapporteur,The other main political factions have appointed rapporteurs to shadow Hayes, with a further three Dutch MEPs among them.Paul Tang, a member of the Dutch Labour Party, will represent the Socialists & Democrats (S&D), Bas Eickhout will represent the Green parliamentary faction. Eickhout was previously a member of ECON and was appointed as a substitute late last year.Sophie in ‘t Veld, the third Dutch MEP, will represent the interests of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats. She is also a former member of ECON and has acted as rapporteur and shadow rapporteur on a number of matters relating to civil liberties.The European Conservatives and Reformists Group will be represented by Ashley Fox, in his first term as a UK MEP and an ECON substitute, and Spanish MEP Teresa Rodríguez-Rubio will represent the European United Left.last_img read more

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Disaster medicine scientist may face death sentence in Iran

first_imgAhmadreza Djalali was arrested in April 2016 on still-unknown charges. Disaster medicine scientist may face death sentence in Iran Courtesy of VUB Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Colleagues are convinced of Djalali’s innocence. A petition set up by Hakan Altintas, a supporter in Turkey, asks the Iranian government to let Djalali come home; friends and colleagues are also raising awareness about his case on a Facebook page.”Ahmadreza is passionate about science,” says Ives Hubloue, the head of VUB’s Research Group on Emergency and Disaster Medicine. “He’s not interested in politics. We don’t believe he would do anything at all” to undermine the Iranian government.The petition says that Djalali, who has a wife and two children aged 14 and 5, has serious health issues after losing 18 kilograms during a hunger strike that he began on 26 December 2016.Djalali, 45, was arrested last April by the security forces of Iran’s Ministry of Information while en route from Tehran to the city of Karaj and was taken to Evin Prison in northwest Tehran, according to the petition. Worried that international publicity might make his situation worse, Djalali’s family initially told his colleagues that he was in a coma after a car accident, Hubloue says. VUB and CRIMEDIN didn’t learn that he had been imprisoned until October 2016, and even then, the family initially asked that his case not be publicized. Djalali studied medicine at the University of Tabriz in Iran and obtained a Ph.D. in disaster medicine, the study of health care management during large-scale emergencies, at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. He also earned a master’s degree from a program in disaster medicine jointly organized by CRIMEDIN and VUB. Now, he’s a professor in the same program and a scientist. His research focuses on how hospitals can best prepare for events with large numbers of casualties, including natural disasters and terrorist attacks, Hubloue says.Just what he has been accused of is unclear. “Ahmadreza has informed his family in Iran that he was forced to sign a confession, but the content is unknown,” says the petition. “His family has been informed that the investigation relates to an issue of ‘national security.’ They have no evidence against him, but they are continuing to keep him.”Hubloue says the charges are apparently related to Djalali’s international contacts. The joint masters program draws students and professors from countries around the world, he says, including the United States, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. “That could have something to do with it.” But any contacts with colleagues from countries that Iran might see as adversarial would have been solely about the science of saving lives, he says. “We don’t believe he did anything wrong,” Hubloue says. “Let him go. Let him do his work. We need him.”center_img *Correction, 7 February, 2:15 p.m.: This story previously said, based on information provided by the Free University of Brussels, that Djalali had been sentenced to death. On 7 February, we learned that information was erroneous. The story has been corrected accordingly.A researcher studying disaster medicine at two European institutes has been detained in Iran for 9 months, apparently for security-related offenses, and may face the death penalty. Iranian-born Ahmadreza Djalali, a scientist at the Research Center in Emergency and Disaster Medicine (CRIMEDIN) at the University of Eastern Piedmont in Novara, Italy, and the Free University of Brussels (VUB), was arrested in April 2016, and has spent much of the time since in solitary confinement and without access to a lawyer.According to Amnesty International, Djalali was taken before Branch 15 of the Revolutionary Court in Tehran on 31 January, without his lawyer present, and was told by the presiding judge that he was accused of “espionage” and could face the death penalty. 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