Syracuse scores 4 1st-period goals, cruises to 9-2 win over Indiana University of Pennsylvania

first_imgSyracuse scored less than a minute in, and it was only a precursor for what was to come.Freshman forward Ben King’s tally with 55 seconds gone was followed by three more in the first period and against inexperienced Indiana University of Pennsylvania goalie Austin Moody, SU jumped out to a four-goal advantage after 20 minutes.The Orange (13-7) started early and never looked back in a convincing 9-2 win over Indiana University of Pennsylvania (8-12) on Saturday at Tennity Ice Pavilion.“We wanted to score tonight and we scored,” SU head coach Nick Pierandri said. “We kept them off the board for the most part and limited their shots. I would say it was one of our better efforts of the year.”Moody was seeing time in only his third game of the season, which SU quickly took advantage of. The Orange scored three goals in the first 15 minutes, prompting IUP head coach Cody Krynock to replace him with regular starter Robbie Stock late in the first period.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe change in net did nothing to stop SU offensively, though.Seven different players recorded goals against IUP, but junior forward JR LaPointe was the difference-maker. The Orange’s leading scorer added four more to his season total and provided consistent pressure against a soft Crimson Hawk defense.“We went out there and took care of business,” LaPointe said. “Any success I had was a direct reflection of my teammates and I’m just glad we were able to string together a good group of goals today.”On the other end of the ice, SU continued their streak of defensive excellence, keeping its opponent under three goals for the fifth straight game.Senior goalie Austin Lefkowicz faced a minimal challenge from the Crimson Hawks, keeping them scoreless for much of the first two periods. Despite the large scoring gap between the two teams, Pierandri decided to keep his starter in to finish out the game.“The defense definitely helped me out,” Lefkowicz said. “When I’m in the game I feel like I can help the team win.”The Orange face IUP again on Sunday for its final game before winter break, and will look to continue its current five-game win streak.“I think we’ve got to come in and be physical and have the same kind of jump that we did today,” Pierandri said. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 6, 2014 at 6:09 pmlast_img read more

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NY Phil. concertmaster expects familiar faces at Thornton

first_imgWhen Glenn Dicterow, concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic, takes his place at the Thornton School of Music in 2014, his colleagues will not be strangers, but old friends.“I go back a long way historically with a lot of the faculty,” Dicterow said. “I’ve known [Midori Goto] since she was a little girl. I’ve known Ralph Kirschbaum since we were teenagers. I’ve known Alice Schoenfeld since I was a child because her sister Eleanor was one of my chamber coaches.”After a two-year search, USC announced Thursday that Dicterow would be the first person to hold the Robert Mann Endowed Chair in Violin and Chamber Music, honoring the founder and first violinist of the Juilliard String Quartet. The move back to Los Angeles will mark the end of what will be a 32-year tenure with the New York Philharmonic.Maestro · Glenn Dicterow, who will join the Thornton faculty in 2014, has taught at Julliard and the Manhattan School of Music. – Photo courtesy of Glenn Dicterow“I will have had almost 40 years of orchestral playing and I’m ready for the next part of my life,” he said. “When I step down from the [New York Philharmonic], I’m not going into any other orchestra.”Dicterow is no stranger to teaching, though. Despite a busy schedule of rehearsing and performing with the orchestra, he has regularly taught violin students at Juilliard and master classes at the Manhattan School of Music.“I just have to fit it in between rehearsals when I have time,” he said.Though the basics of his teaching will not change, he said he expects his students at USC to be different from his current students because Thornton, unlike Juilliard and MSM, is not a traditional conservatory.“The conservatories here are different in the way that they function because the academics are not stressed as much,” he said. “I think what Thornton is trying to do is to make more an intellectual product. They encourage study in history, in philosophy and I think that’s great.”What Dicterow will bring to students’ education is his expertise in performance, which began long before his time with the New York Philharmonic. He and his brother began playing violin when he was 8 years old. But his father, a violinist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, was not always supportive of his sons’ potential.“My father was actually not encouraging to us because, in those days, he realized how hard it was for a musician to make a living and he wanted something a little bit more secure,” Dicterow said. “I think because both my brother and I showed a pretty significant talent in that area, my mother encouraged us and practiced with us.”Dicterow made his orchestral debut as a soloist with the L.A. Philharmonic at 11 years old, playing Tchaikovsky’s “Violin Concerto in D Major.” He continued learning violin and sometimes attended master classes taught by famed violinist Jascha Heifetz at USC. He also continued performing and decided to attend Juilliard with several more years of solo performance experience in many major orchestras under his belt.“Performance is a part of what you teach and how you come across in front of an audience and how you play — it’s a package,” he said. “It’s interpreting the music and delivering the message that you teach and how you come across in front of an audience and how you play — it’s a package,” he said. “It’s interpreting the music and delivering the message that you want from within and really finding your own voice.”Dicterow’s career also includes time as both associate concertmaster and concertmaster of the L.A. Philharmonic, a guest soloist in many orchestras and international tours and several recordings for films including The Untouchables, Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast and Interview with the Vampire.He will spend the next two years balancing his time between the New York Philharmonic and teaching master classes at USC before returning to Los Angeles to begin teaching full-time in fall 2014.He will make the move with his wife, Karen Dreyfus, a violinist and teacher at MSM, Juilliard and Mannes College, who will also join the Thornton faculty in 2014.last_img read more

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Men’s basketball prepares for Arizona trip

first_imgThe 56-52 win against Utah showed that the Trojans can win low-scoring games thanks to their top-tier defense, which ranks third in the conference in blocked shots and top-five in points allowed per game, opposing rebounding totals and opposing field goal percentage. USC will need to continue to win gritty games to boost its resume for the Pac-12 and NCAA tournaments that are fast approaching. The Trojans are at their best when these two start to heat up. The duo combined for 29 points on 70.6% shooting from the field in a 20-point win at Oregon State a couple of weeks ago.  Although the Trojans have lost nine straight games in Tucson, the squad is 7-2 away from Galen Center this season and has seemed to be largely unaffected by hostile environments. “We feel very comfortable on the road,” head coach Andy Enfield said after practice Monday, per the Orange County Register. “It’s hard to explain. This team is different than some previous teams. But you can say that if you go into Arizona and you don’t play well, it’s going to be a long night.” For the offense to be at full strength, Okongwu needs to be involved early and often. As teams focus their defensive efforts on stopping him from getting the ball down low, ball movement and outside shooting will be pivotal. Led by elite freshmen such as guards Nico Mannion and Josh Green and forward Zeke Nnaji, the Wildcats play at a high pace, leading the Pac-12 in scoring and coming in at third in 3-point shooting. USC will need a big scoring night from senior guard Jonah Mathews and sophomore guard Elijah Weaver to match that production.  USC and Arizona will tip off Thursday at 6 p.m. at McKale Center. Freshman guard Ethan Anderson has continued to showcase his explosiveness through his acrobatic layups and dunks all season. (James Wolfe | Daily Trojan)center_img Freshman forward Onyeka Okongwu will be tested early and will try to stop Nnaji, who leads the Wildcats in scoring, rebounds, blocked shots and field goal percentage. The two have eerily similar stats, with both hovering at around 16.5 points per game on 61% shooting to go along with nine rebounds per game. Nnaji has a few inches on Okongwu, but the Trojan has proved his defensive prowess all season. Expect this matchup to be competitive and one that could heavily alter the course of the game. Coming off a tough home loss against No. 20 Colorado, the USC men’s basketball team, which has won 11 of its last 14, will look to rebound against No. 23 Arizona in Tucson Thursday. The Wildcats will challenge USC defensively after sweeping their two-game Washington road trip against Washington and Washington State. “We’re not going to be able to just get the ball to [Okongwu] in the post,” freshman guard Ethan Anderson said. “No team’s going to just sit there and let that happen. So we’re going to have to [make] five to six passes around, make somebody else attack and they’ll have to leave [Okongwu to defend] a layup and then get it to [Okongwu].” Sophomore guard Elijah Weaver has averaged 11.3 points per game in his last three Pac-12 contests. (James Wolfe | Daily Trojan) Crashing the boards hard will also be pivotal, as USC and Arizona rank first and second respectively in the Pac-12 in rebounds per game. Arizona struggled mightily with rebounding earlier in the season but has since turned it into a strength during conference play.  They also scored a combined 18 points on 30.4% shooting from the field in the 21-point loss to Colorado. If they can’t get going Thursday, keeping up with the Wildcats won’t be easy. last_img read more

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