Covid-19 may limit Saudi Arabia tourism expansion | News

first_imgGlobalData forecasts that Saudi Arabia’s international arrivals will reach 21 million by 2024. Ben Cordwell, tourism analyst at GlobalData explains that does not mean that Saudi Arabia cannot become a dominant force in the Middle East destination market.“The Red Sea Project is looking to establish Saudi Arabia as a luxury tourist destination which could attract many of the tourists that travel to Dubai each year, particularly high-spending travellers from the UK and China. – Advertisement – OlderMSC Magnifica suspends sailings until late December “Meanwhile, the capital city of Riyadh has the potential to establish itself as a premium luxury destination to rival Dubai.”Religious attractions and celebrations is already the main source of tourism in the country with millions of international visitors arriving to take part in the Hajj and Umrah. A more accessible Saudi Arabia could attract a greater number of Muslim visitors to these events each year.Cordwell continued: “Saudi Arabia is also home to historical sites dating back thousands of years, and so the country could become a hub for cultural tourism to the Middle East thereby diversifying the type of tourist that the country attracts.”Sports tourism is another area that Saudi Arabia is investing heavily in, recently hosting Anthony Joshua’s world title fight against Andy Ruiz. Hosting major sporting events provides Saudi Arabia with a major opportunity to market itself as a prime tourist destination.Cordwell concluded: “Saudi Arabia offers much that can attract a high number of international visitors each year. “The country has a number of initiatives in place to help achieve its ambitious tourist targets to 2030, but it remains to be seen how much of a limiting factor Covid-19 has on international arrivals over the coming years.”Image: KAEC NewerChile leads winners at 2020 Latin America World Travel Awards Saudi Arabia can become a regional tourism powerhouse, according to new analysis of the region. However, the country is unlikely to reach its optimistic annual visitor goals as the Covid-19 pandemic hits global travel. – Advertisement – The Middle Eastern destination is seeking to welcome 100 million guests annually by 2030, Fahd Hamidaddin, chief executive of the Saudi Tourism Authority, recently stating the country remained on track. However, this would mean a near six-fold increase in tourist arrivals over the next 11 years, from the 17 million visitors the country welcomed in 2019, argues GlobalData, a data and analytics company.An increase on this scale now appears overly ambitious, with the massive impact that the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic has had on global travel and tourism. – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Senderos quits football at 34

first_imgRelatedPosts Joe Aribo vows to bounce back from injury Laudrup: Aribo needs back ups at Rangers Joe Aribo scoops Young Player, Goal of the season awards Former Rangers defender Philippe Senderos has announced his retirement at 34. The centre-back, who endured a miserable one-year spell in Scotland, thanked the Ibrox club in a message to the 10 sides he represented during his career. Signed by Mark Warburton in August 2016 after a trial spell, the Swiss was sent-off on his debut in a 5-1 defeat to Celtic. He made only four appearances for the club before being released in May 2017. Senderos played his last game for Swiss second-tier side Chiasso on Sunday, a 3-3 draw against FC Aarau. The defender, who shot to prominence at Arsenal, issued a heartfelt Twitter post on Monday to confirm he was stepping away from the game. He wrote: “This past weekend, I played my last game as a professional footballer. “As a kid, I used to dream wildly about getting the opportunity to play for and against the best and as I close this chapter of my career and life, I couldn’t be more thankful for the blessings and opportunities I’ve had had over the years. “To @servettefootballclub for giving my education and start – to @arsenal, @acmilan, @everton, @fulhamfc, @valenciacf, @avfcofficial, @gc_zuerich_offiziell, @rangersfc, @houstondynamo and @fcchiasso_officialpage for believing me – and to the @nationalteams_sfvasf and the people of Switzerland for letting me lead and represent my country. “To my friends and amazing family – THANK YOU a million times over. “I look forward to the next chapter. Phillipe.”Tags: Mark WarburtonPhilippe SenderosRangersScotlandlast_img read more

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Screen & Roll: How entertainment gives and takes from sports culture

first_imgWhat do a journalism major with a sports media minor and a cinema and media studies major have in common? Enough to argue about.Think of this as an introduction, the only edition of this column in an explanatory format. Every edition after this will read as a running dialogue between the two of us about a number of subjects under the umbrella topic of sports entertainment, including narrative films, television shows and documentaries.We felt that a written conversation was the best way to display our thoughts in the most engaging manner. Sports and movies are particularly ripe topics for fun and informative arguments among friends, and we want this to read almost exactly that way.The cyclical nature of sports culture is inextricably linked to entertainment. From beach volleyball Olympian Kerri Walsh Jennings drawing inspiration from soccer star Mia Hamm’s prominence after mainly watching male athletes on the screen, to researchers studying the effects of watching televised sports on physical activity, the connection is stronger than ever.There’s even more ways to investigate their mutual influence (if you’re willing to separate sports as its own entity from entertainment), whether it be Jim Brown and Gina Carano turning in the pads and gloves for the silver screen, Jay-Z selling his portion of the Brooklyn Nets to lead Roc Nation Sports as an agent or the Golden State Warriors becoming the “centerpiece” of a larger sports and entertainment conglomerate.It brings us here — a place that hasn’t quite been tapped as much as it can be — as our tenuous connection to sports currently relies on a cable TV, a WiFi connection and professional sports organizations throwing their players to the coronavirus wolves. Mediums such as movies, television and more are some of the ways that have brought us closer to the sports and athletes we love, and we want to discuss why they are so good at imparting those experiences.There needs to be an honest examination of how the entertainment side of sports culture exploits the same athletes that bring us to the TV or theater.We’ve seen athletes recounting the mental health suffering that goes ignored once they are past their “prime.” We saw it when the NFL Draft relayed with sickening tediousness the trials and tribulations athletes faced to even get a spot on the map. All of this highlights structural inequities of race, class, gender, sexual orientation and disability that often are swept under the rug unless it has a quantifiable entertainment “value” to it.A key motivation for us writing this column is the fact that sport is a fantastic source of original stories, and so it makes sense that it would translate to entertainment mediums. There’s inherent drama that comes with games and seasons where the outcome is unknown, which is the entire basis of movies and television (as long as no one spoils them for you). We track the streaks and runs of games and seasons for the same reason we follow “Game of Thrones” to the bitter, bitter end: We want to find out what happens, who wins and who loses.That leads us to the first — though not necessarily most important — purpose we want this column to fill: It will be a space for us to explore how the storytelling structures of movies, TV and documentaries apply to sports.Sometimes the sports side of the story is too good to stray away from (as was the case in “Miracle”). Sometimes sports are used as a way to ground the story and provide an intriguing subplot (like in “Uncut Gems”). And sometimes sport is lazily thrown in a way that spits on the entire industry (clearly, “Duff” didn’t have anyone on staff who had seen a snap of football in their life and could keep Robbie Amell’s travesty of a throwing motion from seeing the light of day).We will also examine how documentaries go about telling the stories of things that really happened. For example, we can reflect on a long overdue portrait of the “Women of Troy” and their influence that will last generations. Or, after we watch “The Last Dance,” do we really want to accept that Michael Jordan could be a total jerk, or do we want to keep the image of our idols alive and well?Second, we’d like the column to serve as a forum for us to discuss and appreciate how sports entertainment adds to sports culture. A lot of the stories we discuss will be fictional, but they still teach viewers a lot about sports’ core values and place in society. “Rocky,” “The League” and “The Fab Five” center on the important roles of competitiveness, social life and capitalism in sports, respectively, and those are just a few examples of the lessons we can learn from these mediums.Lastly, since we are both sports and entertainment nerds, this will be a place for us to geek out on some of our favorite viewing experiences. So expect to see “White Men Can’t Jump” brought up at least once. Maybe we’ll mention the ESPN 30 for 30 “Trojan War” segment, too.Aidan Berg and Lauren Mattice are seniors writing about sports culture and entertainment. They are also the deputy outreach director and digital managing editor of the Daily Trojan, respectively. Their column, “Screen & Roll,” runs every other Monday.last_img read more

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