Cajon takes control of SAL

first_imgSAN BERNARDINO – Cajon grabbed control of the San Andreas League volleyball title on Tuesday with a convincing 25-19, 25-22, 25-17 win over Pacific in a match held at the Cowboy gym. Cajon (5-0, SAL, 7-1 overall) was led by the strength of junior Tiffany Owens’ match-high 18 kills, most coming off precise sets from Angela Ho, who recorded 33 assists. Cajon set the tone early. A kill from Laura Briones, four from Owens, and a service ace from Brittany Kanady helped propel the Cowgirls to a 13-6 lead in Game 1. Still trailing 24-14 in Game 1, Pacific (4-1 SAL, 10-3 overall) closed to 24-19 on two kills from Tompara Youpele and two service aces from Kimberly Payne. But Owens ended the Pirate rally with a powerful game-point kill. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “Today, our offense was stronger, and we had some stronger servers,” Cajon coach Paula Bougie-Thomas said. “We had a lot more kills, and our hitting was on. We just are more experienced.” Pacific made a run in Game 2 after five consecutive points made it 22-22, but a kill from Owens and two from Briones ended the game. Pacific also stayed in Game 3 until the combo of Owens and Ho helped Cajon to a 7-0 run, good for a 25-17 match win. “We were a little slow and timid, and they had the better passing game today,” Pacific coach John Arient said. “They never took control. They just won on our errors.” Arient was quick to note the play of Cajon setter Ho, who kept her team composed during every Pirate rally. “I love number 3 (Ho). She can do anything. She found and picked our weaknesses apart,” Arient said. “Of course, I’m looking for Tiffany every time, but I try to mix it up to give every one an opportunity,” Ho said. “I envision myself seeing a kill every play.” center_img Youpele led Pacific with 16 kills and Kryssy Tuitele had 18 assists. Sophomore teammate Sebastiana Lopez earned eight digs. Cajon’s Marissa Anderson had seven kills and three aces. Ho chipped in with four of Cajon’s eight aces. `’We now have the advantage in league. They are at home against us next time, and they will fight for it. Pacific won’t lay down,” said Bougie-Thomas, who’s team was league co-champion with Pacific last year. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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Anglican church launches campaign against abuse

first_img“Faith gives South Africa a foundation to build a violence-free country,” says South Africa’s Anglican archbishop, Thabo Makgoba.(Image: Anglican Church of Southern Africa)Veena O’Sullivan of global Christian relief and development agency Tearfund says faith-based organisations have an obligation to work to end sexual violence against women and children.(Image: Sulaiman Philip)MEDIA CONTACT• Veena O’Sullivan Team LeaderTearfund+27 31 266 8469Sulaiman PhilipThe rape and murder of cousins Yonelisa (2) and Zandile (3) Mali in the poor settlement of Diepsloot north of Johannesburg in October enflamed the crime-ridden community, and led to violent reprisals. The community burnt the suspects’ homes to the ground.Every day, South Africans face reports of dreadful violence against women and children: the rape of a 90-year-old grandmother, or of a three-week-old child. Each new horror rouses people’s anger. But, until now, that anger has had no outlet. The rape and murder of the Mali toddlers was just one of 64 000 reported cases of sexual violence that take place in South Africa in a single year. It’s a shockingly high number. And according to to Breaking The Silence, a report released by global Christian relief and development agency Tearfund, those reported cases make up a mere 5% of all sexual assaults committed in a year.Tearfund’s report spurred the agency to set up We Will Speak Out, with the support of Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, the Anglican archbishop of Cape Town. Launched at St Albans the Martyr Church in Pretoria on Monday 25 November, the intention of the campaign is to help combat sexual violence through the more active involvement of the church.Some 35-million South Africans identify themselves as Christian, out of a population of 51-million. Christian South Africans, Makgoba said, have a history of fighting injustice. Desmond Tutu, South Africa’s only archbishop emeritus, won the Nobel Peace Prize for his campaign to end apartheid using economic sanctions.“We have done mighty things before, and we can do it again,” Makgoba said. “Together, we can draw a line and move forward towards a different future.”Veena O’Sullivan, Tearfund team leader, said the involvement of the worldwide Anglican Communion would help stop the stigma against rape survivors, and break the silence that allows sexual violence to continue. “We needed a champion, a strong voice that will be heard and listened to,” she said. “Reverend Makgoba is that man who can bring together leaders of all religions.”Multi-denominationalFor now, the campaign involves only the Christian community. But Tearfund hopes that within a year all faiths will be join it. The NGO’s research found that survivors believed it was time people of faith proved themselves. A common assertion among survivors interviewed for the study was the belief that the church was far too concerned with theology and did not see tackling sexual violence as part of its biblical mandate.Tearfund’s research involved interviews with survivors of sexual assault, many of whom were clear in their feeling that the church had failed them as women and then again as victims. Researchers in Bredasdorp, where teenager Anene Booysen was brutally raped and murdered, found a negative perception regarding the role of the church when it came to victims of sexual assault.“The church is the anchor of the community but they run from victims. They sweep it under the rug. Or they stigmatise victims, isolating them,” an anonymous survivor told the researchers.O’Sullivan has worked with survivors in Democratic Republic of Congo, where rape is used as a weapon of war, but is shocked by the cyclical nature of sexual violence in South Africa. “The culture of rape is so cyclical in this country. We found families where the grandmother and mother had been raped; now the child as well.”Sexual violence has become normalised in some communities, the report suggests, and O’Sullivan argues that there is a real danger that these perceptions will become ingrained and intractable. “There is a culture of silence that comes from that; an acceptance that it is inevitable. That is what we must bring an end to.”Four-point planWith this as a guiding principle, Tearfund and the Anglican Church formulated a four-point plan that forms the basis of We Will Speak Out:● Faith communities will speak out and act: despite the negative perception that some survivors have of the church, they still feel that religious communities are a refuge. The church has a unique role to offer lifelong support to survivors. A church in Bredasdorp is showing the way by setting up a neighbourhood watch scheme. It spreads safety messages and offers counselling and home visits to survivors.● Churches will become safe spaces for survivors: beyond praying for an end to sexual violence and offering a safe space for healing, congregations are encouraged to become non-judgemental sanctuaries for survivors. Male church leaders need to highlight and spread the message that women in their congregation share the same rights as men and that the blame for sexual violence cannot be laid at the door of the victim.● Survivors’ movement will influence policy and practice: the church’s response to the epidemic of sexual violence will be shaped by survivors. The church has undertaken to work with the authorities to understand the procedures involved in reporting rape and to offer assistance to any victim who asks for it.● Men will be involved in preventing sexual violence: the faith community has access to a pool of dedicated volunteers who can mentor men and boys about their role in relationships and society. They are often also the only source of positive role models in a community and these should be tapped to spread the message that sexual violence must end.O’Sullivan admits that the findings did not come as a surprise, but she says that it is a reflection of the inherent good of South Africans that they are embracing a programme hoping to make a change. “South Africa is an amazing country but on the ground there is so much pain and suffering. Communities are willing to join hands, to collaborate. There is hope.”last_img read more

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Salman and Katrina still remain the best of pals

first_imgKatrina-Salman’s split story might have done the rounds but the two still remain good friends.This is why Katrina was spotted visiting Sallu to wish him for his birthday, two days in advance. This year, Salman celebrated his birthday in Dubai with family members.Kat took out time from her shooting schedule to wish ex-beau before he went for the trip.Though the rumour of their split is rife, the two have maintained a cordial relationship.Kat and Sallu shared several jokes when Kat appeared on Bigg Boss to promote her film Tees Maar Khan. Kat was sporting enough to smile while Salman joked about Ranbir Kapoor on the show.Katrina and Ranbir are said to be a promising Bollywood pair. But now we hear that Katrina has distanced herself from Ranbir.After Power did not take off, director Rajkumar Santoshi thought of approaching his hit romantic comedy, Ajab Prem Ki Ghazab Kahani, pair. He approached the stars of the film with a script to make a sequel, calling it Ajab Haseena Ghajab Deewana . But Kat cited dates issues and turned down the offer.The million dollar question now is whether Kat refused Santoshi’s film because of Ranbir’s closeness with hottie Nargis on Rockstar’s sets or the old flame between her and Sallu has been rekindled.last_img read more

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GAME DEVELOPMENT POSITION IN NT

first_imgGAME DEVELOPMENT OFFICERTouch Football Australia is recruiting a Game Development Officer for the Northern Territory.  The successful applicant will deliver a range of development programs and services to affiliated Touch Football Associations. Remuneration will be in the range of $30 – $45K plus superannuation.Applications addressing selection criteria must be sent via email to nttouch@octa4.net.au or  mailed to P.O. Box 42193, CASUARINA, NT  0811 by no later than Thursday 13 April 2006.For more information phone 08 89816963 bhTo view the Game Development position description, please click here: GAME DEVELOPMENT NT- POSITION DESCRIPTIONlast_img

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Social Media Content Is Sitting Right in Front of You

first_imgContent for your social media channels is sitting right in front of you. Really! Your website, donor appeals, and newsletters are just waiting to be translated into a Facebook post, tweet, or YouTube video. Repurposing content can take some time, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll start thinking of ideas to feed your social channels in your sleep. To help get your creative juices flowing, here are some quick tips and content ideas for Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram: Try experimenting with videos and picture slideshows. Quick tips: Do share candid images. Don’t share stock photos. Ideas for posts: Quick tips: Don’t be afraid to retweet. Share content that is relevant to your audience. Repurpose a success story from an appeal letter. Do some research on hashtags. Does your issue area or local community have a hashtag? Post images of your team prepping for an event. Ideas for posts: Twitter Quick tips: Invite people to join your email list. Think visual. Studies show that posts with images perform much better than posts without. Post a photo from an past year’s event for #tbt (Throwback Thursday). Which posts have done well in the past? Try to repeat what works well but with a fresh twist. Facebook Share opinion pieces from your staff or experts from your issue area. Even more than on Twitter, hashtags can help you connect with new audiences. Share stats from your annual report. Instagram Don’t be afraid to be fun. Organizations are made up of people, and your Facebook fans know that. Step outside the box every once in a while and let your personality shine. Create an image of your mission statement. (We like Canva for projects like this.) Share a photo of your volunteers in action. Post pics of the thank you notes your organization sends (or receives). Live tweet an event, rally, or staff luncheon. Share a glimpse into the day-to-day life of staff, clients, and volunteers. Remind everyone what a $25 donation will accomplish. Ideas for posts: Follow back. You can’t have a conversation if you aren’t following your followers. Get more ideas (101, in fact!) for social media posts by downloading 101 Social Media Posts and watching our archived webinar The Art of Social Media, with social media expert and author Guy Kawasaki. And if you aren’t following us on our favorite social channels, what are you waiting for? TwitterFacebookInstagramlast_img read more

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#GivingTuesday Success with a Staff of One: Q&A with CASS

first_imgWhat surprised you the most about #GivingTuesday? Because I experience and witness street harassment in Washington, DC, I can see the immediate importance of CASS’ mission. CASS mobilizes the community, through online and offline activism, to end public sexual harassment and assault in the DC metropolitan area. The campaign caught my eye and I was inspired to donate to it on #GivingTuesday. After I became a donor, I was delighted to receive some of the best post-donation communication ever! CASS has become one of my favorite nonprofit customers that we serve in DC. Thank you, Zosia, for sharing these details with us! If you want to put on a great #GivingTuesday campaign in 2015, we can help. Sign up to get Network for Good’s #GivingTuesday resources sent directly to your inbox. ZS: We started reaching out to donors four weeks in advance with soft touches via email. A week or two before, we gave all of them a call and asked folks to pledge. During the campaign, we reached out via email and social media. Afterward, everyone who donated received a special thank you email and a handwritten card. Zosia Sztykowski: We set a very ambitious goal for our end-of year-campaign—triple what we had done in the previous year—and based on our experience, we knew we’d have to get a strong start on #GivingTuesday for that to work. #GivingTuesday and New Year’s Eve are always the best giving days for us. Last year, Network for Good customer Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS) had a great #GivingTuesday campaign and won our prize for Best Social Campaign. The organization raised more than $17,000, came in fourth on our leaderboard for number of donors, and exceeded its original goal by 43%. ZS: We’re planning to reach out to more big donors way in advance to build a lot of momentum for #GivingTuesday. ZS: Yup, just one—me! Needless to say, I had some pretty serious tunnel vision going in late November/early December. But our volunteers are one of our strongest assets. They get the word out and solicit people in their networks. Every time we run a campaign like this, we don’t just reach multiples of our dollar goal, we also multiply the length our donor list, and I think this is directly attributable to our grassroots strategy. If a volunteer team is well organized and engaged—trained, prepared with all the materials they need, and knowledgeable about the organization and its fiscal needs—then they will follow through. Better yet, they’ll make it fun. It’s really about starting a conversation with volunteers that continues throughout the process. Because CASS had such great success on #GivingTuesday 2014, I wanted to do a Q&A with Zosia Sztykowski, the nonprofit’s executive director, to find out how they put together an amazing campaign with just one paid staff member.center_img How did you plan and set goals? ZS: Plan, plan, plan. Read about others’ successful strategies. Get your emails and your social media materials ready well in advance. Know that you’ll need all hands on deck on #GivingTuesday. Have a schedule—but be prepared to throw it out the window if you come up with a better idea at the last minute. How did you manage it all with very few paid staff members? CASS only has one paid staff member, right? And how did you make sure volunteers followed through with their commitments to help make it great? What is the number one piece of advice you would give to nonprofits doing #GivingTuesday for the first time? What will you differently this year? ZS: It’s amazing how generous everyone is even when every other organization is asking for donations at the same time. There’s something very touching about that. It really is a day about giving in the broad sense of the word. In 2014, we managed to quadruple what we raised in 2013 on #GivingTuesday because of this generosity. How did you reach out to donors before, during, and after?last_img read more

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Understanding the Flow of Reproductive Health Knowledge in Ethiopia

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 1, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)K4Health recently published a needs assessment and network mapping of family planning and reproductive health information in Ethiopia. The overall goal of the assessment was to gain a better understanding of the accessibility and flow of information relating to family planning and reproductive health among key actors in Ethiopia.In Ethiopia, K4Health sought to explore the current family planning/reproductive health (FP/RH) knowledge management system; examine information flows and barriers at different levels of the health system; and identify areas to strengthen health information sharing and use. Using a novel, participatory approach (Net-Map) yielded a highly visual presentation of the data that identifies key FP/RH actors in Ethiopia, explores the nature of relationships among the actors, and examines the level of influence of the different actors with regard to reproductive health information exchange. Using the Net-Map approach, the researchers were able to identify bottle necks to information flow and opportunities to improve that flow across health system levels in Ethiopia.This body of research aimed to determine how to better meet health care professionals’ dynamic information needs so that they can provide better health care to the populations they serve. In Ethiopia, reproductive health indicators can be improved through better health information exchange. This report provides important recommendations that can help get the right information delivered to health care professionals when they need it and can help enhance the quality of health care programs countrywide.Read the full assessment here.Share this:last_img read more

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Rethinking Family Planning in China

first_imgPosted on July 6, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Family planning laws in China, particularly the one child policy, are being challenged by high profile scholars and other individuals this week. The Wall Street Journal‘s China Realtime Report explains the issue and why we are seeing increased activism surrounding family planning in China:A group of 15 prominent Chinese scholars issued a open letter [in Chinese] on Thursday calling for a rethink of country’s family-planning laws, arguing that the law in its present form is incompatible with China’s increasing respect for human rights and need for sustainable economic development.It was the second open call for reform of the one-child policy this week, and comes less than a month after the shocking story of a seven-months pregnant woman forced undergo an abortion ignited a firestorm of anger online.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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World Health Assembly Convenes With Focus on Post-2015 Global Development Agenda

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 20, 2013March 8, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The 66th World Health Assembly convened today, May 20 with addresses and discussions focused on the post-2015 global development agenda. The Assembly runs through May 28, and will feature numerous discussions and consideration of resolutions on issues that are critical to advancing maternal health.The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) has prepared an overview of side events on reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health. Among the highlights is “Securing the future: Saving the lives of women and children,” which will focus on success stories, as well as key challenges for the United Nations Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health and Every Woman Every Child movement. It will provide an opportunity for discussion of a proposed resolution on the ‘Implementation of the recommendations of the Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children.’ Other key events include a session on promoting accountability for maternal and child health, which will provide health ministers an opportunity to share perspectives on progress and challenges for MDGs 4 and 5, and to reflect on the “unfinished business” that will require attention past the 2015 MDG deadline; and a session on the importance of human resources for health.For more on the proceedings of the World Health Assembly, including the provisional agenda and highlights of each day’s proceedings, visit the World Health Organization media center. Share this:last_img read more

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Preconception Planning, Counseling and Care (PCC) is Important for All Couples, Including Those Affected by HIV

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 21, 2013March 6, 2017By: Dr. Jean Anderson, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Jhpiego; Kelly Curran, Jhpiego, MCHIP; Laura Fitzgerald, Jhpiego, MCHIPClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Decisions about whether a woman and her partner want to have children, how many they might want to have, and when they might want to have them, are not always clear-cut or predictable. Reproductive goals are often linked to a multitude of complicated and deeply personal hopes and beliefs. For this reason, healthcare providers have a responsibility to value clients as individuals with unique sets of life circumstances and priorities. All women, and all couples, deserve to access the information they need to make safe and informed choices…regardless of geography, regardless of socio-economic status, regardless of age, regardless of marital status, and regardless of the result of an HIV test.Safe family planning (FP) as well as preconception planning, counseling, and care (PCC) are important in the continuum of care for all couples, including those affected by HIV. These critical services:Prevent unintended pregnancy;Promote appropriate birth spacing;Optimize maternal health before pregnancy and maternal and fetal health during pregnancy;Prevent maternal to child transmission of HIV; andReduce the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected partner.A considerable unmet need for FP exists for women living with HIV.  In sub-Saharan Africa, for example, between 66 and 92 percent of HIV positive women do not want more children, but only 20 to 43 percent of women use contraception (Sarnquist et al. Curr HIV Res 2013;11:160). Irrespective of this need and of the safety of most FP methods for women living with HIV, some providers limit options for these women. Research demonstrates that providers are especially hesitant to recommend long acting reversible contraception or emergency contraception in the setting of HIV.Similarly, some providers do not feel comfortable when these women and their partners want to conceive.  Too many HIV positive women are told that intended pregnancies are irresponsible. All people have the right to respectful, quality care; not only do HIV positive women share similar feelings about motherhood as other women, but in the era of antiretroviral therapy, many also experience improvements in fertility.This is not to suggest that women living with HIV are without particular healthcare needs.  For instance, women who live with HIV may be more likely to experience violence within their intimate relationships.  They are also particularly vulnerable to co-infections with tuberculosis or malaria and to suffer from anemia.  Further, many of these women – up to 50 percent in a country like Kenya – are in serodiscordant relationships, and transmission to a partner is a concern. Appropriate PCC for couples allows for optimal prevention of transmission to HIV negative partners, as well as vertical transmission to children.PCC also offers an excellent opportunity to promote healthy behaviors.  PCC presents an opportunity to counsel couples about risk mitigation, FP, healthy eating habits, psychosocial and mental health issues, and long term care plans, as well as to address care and treatment of HIV and related issues.  Additionally, through PCC, underlying medical conditions – such as tuberculosis, other opportunistic infections, or other chronic conditions such as hypertension or diabetes – can be identified and treated, optimizing maternal health and pregnancy outcomes.Recent years have witnessed great strides in HIV prevention, care, and treatment.  People living with HIV enjoy longer and healthier lives. As a public health community, there is a pressing need to look beyond a narrow biomedical treatment lens, and to acknowledge clients’ fundamental life goals. Do couples want to postpone pregnancy to attain other educational, professional, or relational goals?  Do they want to conceive now, a year from now, five years from now, or not at all?  It is time to better understand how to integrate FP and PCC services into HIV care, and to look closely at their effectiveness in achieving better outcomes for women and their families.This post is part of a blog series on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS. To view the entire series, click here.For additional information about maternal health, HIV, and AIDS, visit our topic page. Share this:last_img read more

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