7 Ways to Make This Year the Year of the Donor

first_imgThe good news is that giving continues to grow. The bad news is that donor retention rates aren’t what they should be. Think about the donors who came into your organization’s ecosystem during the past year. Will they give again?You can improve the odds of keeping more of your supporters by declaring this year the Year of the Donor. What this looks like for your organization may be different than for your nonprofit peers, but here are a few basics to get you started:1. Have a solid plan.The biggest way to ensure your donors remain your top priority is to create a well-organized plan for cultivating your organization’s supporters throughout the year.To do: Create a comprehensive donor stewardship plan that complements your overall marketing strategy and retention goals. Your plan should include a timeline, messaging guidelines, and who will be responsible for each component of your donor outreach. For more planning tips, take a look at Network for Good’s donor stewardship checklist.2. Send an amazing thank you.Of course you’re thanking all your donors. Right? (Right?) But are you making it an amazing experience of effusive gratitude? Is your thank you so awesome that donors will tell their friends all about it? Even tell strangers? If not, there’s always room for improvement. Your goal: Express to impress!To do: Take the time to write a series of really great donor thank you letters. Make them personal, memorable, and full of gratitude. Your thank you letters should reinforce the projected impact of a donor’s gift and open the door for an ongoing relationship. If possible, hire a professional copywriter to polish your thank yous.3. Keep the conversation going.Your thank you note is really just the start of a new conversation with your donor. Keep this conversation flowing by updating your supporters on your work and how their gift has helped make it possible. Update supporters on what’s new in your community, your work, and how they can continue to be involved. As you build on this communication, you’ll have earned the opportunity to invite them to give again.To do: Create an editorial calendar to plan your outreach and news you’d like to share. Use your email marketing tools to segment your lists so you can separate donors from those who’ve yet to give. Communicate to these two groups differently when sending updates to tailor your message to reflect donors’ special status.4. Clearly articulate your impact.One of the main reasons donors don’t go on to give a second gift is because they’re not sure how their money was used to create real impact. It’s your job to make sure supporters know exactly how their gift is being used and how it makes a difference. Get in the habit of making this a part of everything you do—from fundraising appeals to your monthly newsletter.To do: Illustrate a donation’s impact through photos, testimonials, and quantifiable results that are easy for donors to understand. Incorporate these elements in every piece of donor communication you send. Build a collection of stories that are organized by program or locality so you can easily match these with the profiles of your donors.5. Invite donors for their feedback.More and more donors don’t want to just give and run—they want to be an active part of your cause. Because they’ve been moved enough to donate, they can offer valuable insight on what went into their decision and how you can continue to reach them and others in their network.To do: Regularly invite your donors to provide you with feedback. Add this to your donor thank you phone script and conduct periodic donor surveys to collect their input on everything from your newsletter content to how you contact them. Making them feel more invested in your work will bring donors even closer to your organization.6. Regularly test and improve.It takes a lot of work to acquire new donors, so it’s crucial that you do everything you can to keep the ones you’ve got. One way to do this is to find and fix any leaks in your process. Once you’ve fixed the obvious problems, optimize your donor retention strategy by testing new messages and acknowledgement techniques.To do: Track and measure every interaction with your donors. If you don’t have Google Analytics on your nonprofit website or donation form, that’s one place to start. Identify where donors may be falling off by looking at your website bounce rate, form abandonment, and email unsubscribes. Use A/B testing to see which calls to action and content types work best for your audience.7. Create feel-good moments.Everyone gives for different reasons, but we all want to feel good about our charitable gifts. To keep this positive vibe flowing, it’s important to create moments of connection and with your donors. Ronald McDonald House Charities does just that with this simple thank you video that puts the donor at the center of the experience and in the embrace of those who feel the impact of their donations every day:To do: Commit to making your ongoing donor outreach unique and personal. Get creative with photos, video, and perks for your donors to help your cause stay top of mind. Recruit volunteers and beneficiaries to help keep your communications authentic and original. (Want more ideas on using images to stand out? Read these 10 ways nonprofits can use visuals.)How will you make this year the Year of the Donor? I’d love to hear your plans, and I know your donors can’t wait to see what happens next.last_img read more

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Goodbye Spreadsheets: A Donor Management Software Success Story

first_imgFounded in 2005, Ovarian Cancer Connection (OCC) is no stranger to fundraising success during its 11-year history. In fact, this Ohio-based nonprofit has raised $36,000 just for their program that provides financial assistance to women undergoing treatment for ovarian cancer.This fundraising success, however, came with its own challenges. Without the right tools in place, the OCC’s system for tracking donors and donations ended up being a lot of manual work.Gini Steinke, OCC’s founder and executive director, knew that there was a better way to track OCC’s donor data. Gini decided getting a new database, known as donor management software or a donor management system (DMS), would help the OCC get all their donor data in one location. After exploring different options, OCC migrated their donor data from spreadsheets into Network for Good’s donor management system.Gini recently shared how she manages OCC’s donor information and fundraising now that they have a system better equipped to get the job done.Tracking Individual FundraisingLike many small nonprofits, the OCC raises most of their funds through individual gifts. These donations either come in through events or donations from individuals who have a personal connection with organization. Currently, the OCC has more than 3,000 donors in their database.Before Network for Good’s DMS, the OCC’s donor database was a detailed spreadsheet with tabs representing each year’s gifts. Although it’s not ideal, this system for tracking gifts is pretty standard among many nonprofits. Network for Good’s donor management system brings it all together. The primary problem with this practice is that a spreadsheet isn’t ideal for accessing donor information. If Gini was looking for a specific donor, she’d have to search through multiple tabs to find the donor’s complete giving history over the course of his or her relationship with the organization. According to Gini, transitioning to a system built to manage donor information has made this process much easier:“We did track donations through spreadsheets, but I’d have to go through all the tabs to find a donation. But now, Network for Good’s donor management system brings it all together.“Transforming Online Giving Gini estimates that she saves about 2 hours of work a day by using Network for Good’s donor management software. The Ovarian Cancer Connection has an incredible mission and is fortunate to have a savvy executive director like Gini who has created fundraising strategies that work. Gini estimates that she saves about 2 hours of work a day by using Network for Good’s donor management software. And during events season, she estimates she’ll save 3 hours of manual work every day.Now that they have the tools to help save time, keep donor records organized, and raise more money, the Ovarian Cancer Connection can focus what matters most: their mission.Are you ready to make the switch from spreadsheets to a donor management system that will save you time and help you streamline your fundraising processes? Schedule a demo and see Network for Good’s donor management software for yourself! Our easy-to-use system that’s helping organizations like Ovarian Cancer Connection save time everyday can help your organization too. Schedule a demo today!center_img I went into the donor management system and the online donation was right there. Everything was already entered. It was like a miracle! It was wonderful! Before using Network for Good’s online donation page and donor management software, OCC was collecting online gifts through PayPal, which made tracking a very cumbersome process:“Donations would come in through PayPal. We’d get an email notification and transfer the money to our bank. Then, I’d input the donation in QuickBooks and enter it into a spreadsheet. It was time consuming to make sure everything was recorded accurately.” Now, online donations are automatically added to OCC’s DMS. Using Network for Good’s donation page and donor management system together means there’s no manual lift required:“I went into the donor management system and the online donation was right there. Everything was already entered. It was like a miracle! It was wonderful!”Gini is especially excited to use the donor management system and donation pages during the organization’s big events.“This is going to be great when it comes time for our major events! More and more people are getting comfortable with online giving. This is great because it makes it easier for [donors] and it saves us money.”Managing Offline GiftsDonor management software isn’t just for tracking online donors, it can track offline gifts too. If Gini gets a check handed to her at an event, she can easily log the donation in the DMS and track specifics like the gift’s designation or if the gift is made in someone’s honor or memory.  Notes on why the donor gave can be attached to a donation too.Making Segmentation EasierSmart fundraisers like Gini use segmentation to send more relevant (and more effective) messages to different groups of supporters.And, because of the nature of their work, they need to be especially diligent with keeping track of those supporters who are survivors of ovarian cancer.Using the group feature in Network for Good’s donor management system allows the OCC to track survivors easily. When Gini is inviting survivors to a luncheon, she can seamlessly send the email through the system by simply selecting the group labeled “Survivors.” There’s no need to sort through a list, run a filter again, or import/export a spreadsheet.Ovarian Cancer Connection’s executive director saves 2-3 hours of work a day after switching from Excel to Network for Good’s donor management software.Keeping Track of Donor NotesGini truly understands that fundraising is about relationships, not transactions. For this reason, Gini needs to keep notes on every donor she speaks with. But with thousands of donors, details about important donor conversations can’t be kept organized with post-it notes or in someone’s memory. This is why Network for Good’s donor management system’s notes feature is so important to the OCC and Gini in particular:“In the donor management software, I can pull up the [donor’s] records and see my notes so the next time I talk to them, I can ask them ‘how was your son’s move?’ Otherwise, it would be in a paper file. But now, everything is right there in the donor record.”Reporting Success to the Board Network for Good’s donor management system offers built-in dashboards that are easy to understand and can help people like Gini explain the organization’s financials to those who aren’t digging into the numbers on a regular basis:“At board meetings, I plan to give a snapshot of our fundraising efforts so far. The dashboard clearly explains to everyone, especially to those without a finance background, the most important information:  average donation and giving to date. I think our Board will be surprised with what our average donation really is!”Saving Time by Getting Out of Spreadsheetslast_img read more

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PMNCH Launches New Resources on National Progress and Global Commitments to MDG Maternal and Child Health Targets

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 22, 2013February 2, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As world leaders gather at the UN General Assembly to review progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and considers the framework that will follow the 2015 MDG deadline, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) has released its annual review of commitments to the Global Strategy on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. This year’s edition of the report focuses on assessing whether and how the 213 partners that committed to the Global Strategy have followed up on their pledges. As PMNCH Executive Director Carole Presern wrote in the Huffington Post introducing the report, “The report shows that more organizations, governments and the private sector are making commitments to improve women’s and children’s health every year, and that those commitments are being followed up with real action.”Along with the review, PMNCH has also produced “Success Factors,” a series of 10 national case studies that present critical lessons learned for global efforts to advance maternal, newborn and child health. The case studies focus on a diverse group of countries that have achieved substantial progress in recent years, and highlight both common themes and country-specific examples of how effective approaches have been implemented to achieve dramatic effects on maternal and child health.From PMNCH:Success Factor Country Summaries highlight lessons learned from 10 countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Laos PDR, Nepal, Peru, Rwanda and Vietnam) that are well on the path to achieving the MDG targets for maternal and child health.These summaries present different types of policies and programmes that countries use in key areas known to influence the health of women and children.The lessons learned from the analysis of these 10 countries illustrate: The summaries are drawn from evidence collected as part of “Accelerating Progress for Women’s and Children’s Health,” an ongoing, multi-partner effort to answer the question “What can we learn about making progress on women’s and children’s health?” based on  large-scale vidence from 136 low- and middle-income countries over the past 50 years.Share this:center_img Political commitment overcomes challengesEvidence guides policy and investmentSustainable development accelerates progressStrong partnerships achieve goalslast_img read more

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New Research: Examining Maternal Health in the Context of Women’s Health Throughout the Lifespan

first_imgPosted on October 16, 2013February 2, 2017By: Kate Mitchell, Manager of the MHTF Knowledge Management System, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Each year, the Maternal Health Task Force and PLOS Medicine work together to organize an open access collection of research and commentary on maternal health. The two organizations team up to identify a specific and critical theme that merits further exploration within the broader context of maternal health. The Year 2 Collection, titled ‘Maternal Health is Women’s Health‘, launched in November and focuses on establishing a stronger understanding of how the health of women and girls before pregnancy influences maternal health—and also considers the impact of maternal health on women’s health more broadly even beyond the reproductive years. Today, the MHTF and PLOS Medicine are delighted to announce the addition of 12  articles to the Year 2 collection. The articles include research on the effect of prophylactic oxytocin for postpartum hemorrhage delivered by peripheral health workers in Ghana, a commentary that calls for the prioritization of cervical cancer in the post-2015 era, as well as an article that explores the impact of maternal deaths on living children in Tanzania, and much more. Our colleagues at PLOS Medicine shared a blog post on their blog, Speaking of Medicine, about the additions to the collection. In this excerpt, they describe in more detail the theme for the Year 2 collection:This theme was created to highlight the need to consider maternal health in the context of a women’s health throughout her lifespan. While pregnancy is limited to women of reproductive age, maternal health is influenced by the health of women and girls before pregnancy. The effects of key health issues such as the impact of poor nutrition, poverty, lack of available quality healthcare and low socioeconomic status can occur during childhood, adolescence, throughout the pregnancy and beyond. These issues can heavily influence a woman’s maternal health, heightening the risk of complications in pregnancy, such as obstructed labour in adolescent girls or increasing the likelihood of HIV infections due to a woman’s physical susceptibility and her relative disempowerment.Read the post on Speaking of Medicine.The following new articles from PLOS Medicine and PLOS ONE have been added to the MHTF-PLOS collection on maternal health:Preconception Care in Low and Middle Income Countries:  new opportunities and a new metric by Joel G. Ray and colleagues.Reproductive and maternal health in the post-2015 era: cervical cancer must be a priority by Ruby Singhrao and colleaguesEffect on postpartum hemorrhage of prophylactic oxytocin by peripheral health personnel in Ghana: a community-based, cluster-randomized trial by Cynthia K. Stanton and colleaguesSetting Research Priorities for Preconception Care in Low-and Middle-income Countries: Aiming to Reduce Maternal and Child Mortality and Morbidity by Sohni Dean and colleaguesFactors Affecting the Delivery, Access, and Use of Interventions to Prevent Malaria in Pregnancy in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis by Jenny Hill and colleaguesHIV and the Risk of Direct Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis by Clara Calvert and Carine RonsmansAntenatal depression in Sri Lanka and the factor structure of the Sinhalese version of Edinburgh Post Partum Depression Scale among pregnant women by Suneth Buddhika Agampodi and Thilini Chanchala AgampodiComorbidities and Lack of Blood Transfusion May Negatively Affect Maternal Outcomes of Women with Obstetric Hemorrhage Treated with NASG by Alison El Ayadi and colleaguesCosts of Inaction on Maternal Mortality: Qualitative Evidence of the Impacts of Maternal Deaths on Living Children in Tanzania by Alicia Ely Yamin and colleaguesAcute Maternal Infection and Risk of Pre-eclampsia: a Population-Based Case-Control Study by Caroline Minassian and colleaguesRepresentation of women and pregnant women in HIV research: a systematic review by Daniel Westreich and colleaguesAttitudes Toward Family Planning Among HIV-Positive Pregnant Women Enrolled in a Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission Study in Kisumu, Kenya by Shirley Lee Lecher and colleaguesCommunity Health Workers and Health Care Delivery: Evaluation of a Women’s Reproductive Health Care Project in a Developing Country by Abdul Wajid and colleaguesAnalysis of the Maternal and Child Health Care Status in Suizhou City, Hubei Province, China, from 2005 to 2011 by Hui-Ping Zhang and colleaguesWhen Women Deliver with No One Present in Nigeria: Who, What, Where and So What? by Bolaji M. Fapohunda and Nosakhare G. OrobatonTo learn more about the MHTF-PLOS Collection on Maternal Health, contact Kate Mitchell.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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The Global Stage Needs a Global Audience

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 23, 2014November 7, 2016By: Lennie Kamwendo, White Ribbon Alliance Global Board MemberClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, what does the future hold for international maternal mortality targets? The MHTF is pleased to be hosting a blog series on post-2015 maternal mortality goal setting. Over the next several weeks, we will be featuring responses and reactions to proposed targets from around the world. Please share your thoughts with us!The importance of the global attention that maternal health was given when world leaders recognised that MDG5 was (and still is) the most offtrack goal of all is evident. The $70bn pledged since 2010 to ‘The Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health’ is pivotal in the history of maternal, newborn and child health, and pledges which may not have been made without the broad MDG target and tracking of progress. We, as advocates for maternal and newborn health welcomed this fantastic news – finally women’s childbirth rights were being prioritised – but we know the real work comes when pushing for these promises to be delivered.Indeed, a main challenge that civil society faces when pushing for such promises to be delivered is just how much any of these commitments are discussed in our parliaments and our media. Targets are useful, and absolute targets relative to the reality in the country are even more useful. As we move towards the deadline of the MDGs, we have lessons to learn from blanket targets being set in the international arena with little regard for whether they are attainable in the country. When targets are obviously not going to be achieved it can be demoralizing, even when progress is being made. Perhaps this is a contributory reason as to why accountability is so low on the commitments our governments make on the international stage. The targets are unattainable as are the promises made on how to achieve them, creating a cyclical process of underachievement.The general consensus in Malawi is that our politicians, for the most part, are not even aware of the promises made on their behalf. Our President has been a champion for maternal health and has made impressive commitments to Malawi’s women and children, ensuring free care, strengthening of human resources for health and attaining the WHO standard for emergency obstetric care. Yet there are no numerical targets attached to these commitments, no clear plan as to how they will be achieved and weak accountability at the national level on commitments made. As a Global Board member of The White Ribbon Alliance, I am consistently hearing the same story from our members in many other countries where maternal deaths are high. Perhaps 2014 will see a tangible balance between targeted creation of demand for skilled care for childbearing women and the supply of all the necessary aspects of maternity care. We need the full package from adequate, well qualified and competent human resource to an enabling environment for the provision of quality care.Targets are important. Commitments are encouraging. But we need the international community to invest in building civil society’s capacity to call their leaders and governments to account on making these promises a reality. Now is the time to build on the targets already set and drive home that unmet promises are not acceptable. We know change can happen when civil society pushes for accountability. The global stage needs a global audience.Share this:last_img read more

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Building Community Capacity for Maternal Health Promotion: An Important Complement to Investments in Health Systems Strengthening

first_imgPosted on October 23, 2014November 2, 2016By: Ellen Brazier, Senior Technical Advisor for Community Engagement, EngenderHealth; Moustapha Diallo, Country Director, EngenderHealth GuineaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)EngenderHealth’s Fistula Care Plus project recently published the results of two studies in Guinea, one examining factors associated with institutional delivery and another investigating the effect of an intervention to build the capacity of community-level volunteers to promote maternal health care-seeking.Community empowerment and participation has long been recognized as a fundamental component of good health programming and as a critical strategy for improving access to and use of health services. However, as Susan B. Rifkin notes in a 2014 review of the literature, evidence directly linking community participation to improved health outcomes remains weak.For maternal health, the evidence gap is particularly acute. A 2014 World Health Organization (WHO) report reviewed a community mobilization approach that involves training and supporting women’s groups to carry out an ongoing process of problem exploration, priority-setting and action planning. The report concluded that, while such participatory approaches appeared to have a strong effect on neonatal mortality, there was no evidence of effects on maternal mortality or on other critical maternal health indicators, such as institutional delivery, delivery with a skilled attendant, or receiving the recommended number of antenatal care visits.While important questions remain about what types of interventions are effective in improving maternal health, our recent research in Guinea found that women’s use of maternal health services was associated with the existence of strong support systems for maternal health within communities. Our study focused on villages where community volunteers had been trained to raise awareness about obstetric risks, including fistula, to monitor pregnancies, and to promote women’s routine use of maternal heath services. We assessed the extent to which community members were aware of and relied on community-level cadres as a main source of maternal health information and advice.We also found that women living in communities with a high score on our community capacity index were much more likely to use maternal health services than those living in communities with weak support systems. In fact, women living in villages with a high score on our community capacity index were more than twice as likely to attend at least four antenatal care visits during their pregnancies, to deliver in a health facility, and to seek care for perceived obstetric complications.Building the capacity of community cadres and volunteers to promote maternal heath and monitor maternal health care-seeking is challenging, and it does not occur overnight. However, our findings suggest that such capacity-building investments are worth it since community-level cadres can be important catalysts for changes in maternal health care-seeking when they have the training, support, and recongiztion they need to serve as a resource in their communities. Such investments are an important complement to ongoing efforts to improve the availability, accessibility, and quality of the continuum of maternal health services.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Five Ways an Innovative Program Increased Facility Birth in Nigeria

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 13, 2015October 28, 2016By: Nnenna Ihebuzor, Director of Primary Health Care Systems Development; Seye Abimbola, Research Fellow; Ugo Okoli, Program Director of SURE-P Maternal and Child Health Programme, Nigeria’s National Primary Health Care Development AgencyClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our Translating Research into Practice Series, which features guest posts from authors of the MHTF-PLoS open-access collections describing the impact of their research since publication.The Midwives Service Scheme (MSS) was set up as a game changer to reduce maternal and child mortality so Nigeria could achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) on maternal and child health (MCH). Established by the national government in 2009 to improve the availability of skilled birth attendants in rural communities, the program engages newly graduated, unemployed and retired midwives to work temporarily in rural areas. Four midwives are posted for one year to selected primary health care (PHC) facilities to provide the human resources for health necessary to achieve the MDGs in their states and local government areas.1. Scale upSince the publication of our PLoS Medicine paper, the MSS has subsequently been scaled up from 625 PHC facilities to an additional 375 facilities, providing 1,000 facilities across Nigeria with an additional 4,000 midwives and 1,000 community health extension workers.2. Antenatal care, facility delivery, and family planning increase, maternal and neonatal mortality decreaseThe MSS continues to contribute to improved health outcomes in the rural communities where antenatal care visits and facility delivery have increased by more than 100%, family planning uptake by more than 200% and maternal and neonatal mortality have decreased by 19% and 5%, respectively, since the 2009 baseline. In 2012, inspired by the success of the MSS, the national government created an MCH component of the Subsidy Reinvestment and Empowerment Programme (SURE-P), which provides an additional 1,000 PHC facilities and strategies to mitigate some challenges encountered in implementing the MSS. Since its commencement, routine monitoring data show a 50% reduction in maternal mortality, 48% increase in antenatal visits, 61% increase in skilled birth attendance and 59% increase in first time acceptors of contraceptives in SURE-P MCH facilities compared to the baseline data.3. Policy Change for Family PlanningThe experience of implementing the MSS has helped reveal to the national government the existing realities of PHC in Nigeria. This has contributed to influencing a change in national policy to now allow community health extension workers, who form the bulk of the PHC workforce in Northern Nigeria, to provide contraceptive injectables to women.4. Conditional Cash Transfers Increase Facility DeliverySince antenatal care uptake far outpaces facility deliveries within the MSS, SURE-P MCH includes a conditional cash transfer component that is currently being piloted in 18 of Nigeria’s 36 states. Pregnant women receiving the cash transfer are required to attend four antenatal care visits, deliver in a facility and attend postnatal visits. In return, they are given N5,000 (US$32), pro-rated based on the number of conditions they meet. Preliminary results show a 27% increase in facility delivery with this incentive.5. Improved community engagement and human resources investmentFurther, the MSS has renewed attention to community engagement in PHC by reactivating community health committees, which have been successful in ensuring community ownership and support for health workers. To support these committees in generating demand for MCH services, SURE P MCH introduced a cadre of 6,000 lay community-based health workers nationwide. Selected by the committees, they help pregnant women, mothers and their children use PHC facilities along the continuum of care.Despite these improvements, the high health worker attrition within the MSS continues. This is worse in northern Nigeria, where in some states only one third of deployed midwives stay. SURE-P MCH is trying to address the challenges responsible for attrition: challenging living and working conditions, irregular payment of salary and deployment far from home, since the majority of the midwives are from southern Nigeria.The way forwardAlthough we’ve seen great success from the MSS, SURE-P MCH and the MSS together support only 10% of PHC facilities in Nigeria. While they significantly improve health outcomes where they are implemented, nothing short of active support for PHC by states and local governments will make a major dent on national MCH indices to affect progress towards the MDGs. Translating MSS into significant improvements in national MCH indices requires innovative ways of getting sub-national governments to support PHC. One such way is contained in the 2014 National Health Bill, which was signed into law by President Goodluck Jonathan on December 9th, 2014. The bill guarantees that 1% of national revenue will go to PHC, but sub-national governments have to match federal allocation as a condition for accessing support for PHC. Hopefully this new law will help us to turn the page on PHC governance in Nigeria.Share this:last_img read more

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10 Things to Do for Your Final Year-End Push

first_imgHeads up, fundraisers. It’s crunch time!Are you ready to win the race to year-end? You can’t ignore the data—10 percent of all online giving happens December 29-31. Do you really want to miss out on those donations because you didn’t do one final year-end campaign push? Here are ten simple things you can do right now to ensure a successful year-end.Make it easy for donors to find you and donate.Post a vibrant year-end donation banner on your website’s homepage that links directly to your online donation page. Go the extra mile and make sure your nonprofit’s information is up-to-date on Charity Navigator and GuideStar, too.Write a stellar, story-driven appeal.An effective appeal is equal parts emotion and urgency. You want to pull people into your message with a compelling story, and then push them to act with a specific, clear, and urgent call to action. Not sure what to write? Check out our chapter, “Write a Story-Driven Appeal,” in our recent eGuide, Last-Minute Tips for Year-End Success.Send an email every day, December 29-31.Last call for giving! This one’s crucial—and we know it scares you. You worry you’ll annoy your donors with too many requests. Guess what…YOU WON’T! Your supporters want to hear from you. That’s exactly why they signed up for your emails. You can always segment out donors who have already given to your year-end campaign. But, if you don’t ask them to support you, there are plenty of other nonprofits who will.Share your donation page on social media—every day.You have plenty to post about. Share photos and memories of the work your donors have helped you accomplish this past year. Build excitement around what you’re looking forward to in the year to come. Give donors the inside scoop on how their gift helps.Make sure your online donation process is easy.Be sure the donation button is easy to find on your website and in all your email blasts, so donors can simply click and give without wasting time hunting for your donation page. Minimize the steps your donors must go through to donate. Don’t lose them because your process takes too long!Make sure your year-end efforts are donor-centric.Make the donor the superhero of your nonprofit’s success instead of talking about the greatness of your organization. Remember, your donors make your work possible. They’re your stakeholders. Show them how their donations will be used and be transparent about your programs, spending, and impact.Have a clear call to action in every message you send.Know your audience and craft a call to action that will motivate them. Tie it into your appeal’s overall story. Focus your appeal on the community you serve and individual stories, rather than statistics. This will resonate at the emotional level.Set SMART goals.It’s essential to have a clear and measurable result in mind. Decide how you will define success, so you can report on it at the end of your campaign. Make sure your goals are SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound). Set your goals by answering four simple questions:What am I trying to accomplish?Who am I trying to reach?What do I want them to do?What is the best way to reach my audience?Say thank you.Send a thank you message as soon as you can—and make sure it does just that: says thanks. Your sincere note of gratitude (that doesn’t include donation history or another appeal) will be remembered next year!Track results.Tracking results isn’t just for internal reporting. Let your supporters know about the progress of your campaign, how close you are to your goal, and how much their support matters.This final week is crucial. It’s the last lap in the race. Use these tips to boost your year-end fundraising campaign with one final appeal that inspires donors to give. Download our Last-Minute Year-End Fundraising Appeal template to write your best email blasts of the year. There’s no time to waste!last_img read more

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Women in Philanthropy Profile: Kim O’Brien

first_imgKim O’Brien, Executive Director of Network for Good customer, Nonprofit Leadership Initiative, works with nonprofit leaders in the Fox Valley area of Wisconsin to provide opportunities ​for leadership development and learning to ​better achieve their missions. Like most executive directors, O’Brien has 100 balls in the air on any given day, meeting with new executive directors and board members about the tools and resources NPLI provides.Building Stronger Nonprofits“I do a lot of connecting the dots. My work is about connecting nonprofit leaders to the resources in the community that can help them with whatever they’re working on at the time.”What does the NPLI do?We provide different programs for the nonprofits in our community, including Leadership Forums, a Leadership Institute, Board Effectiveness, and a quarterly Join a Board event.The centerpiece of our programs is our Leadership Institute, a year-long series of seminars equivalent to a master’s degree in nonprofit management. Each cohort consists of 14 people—a combination of executive directors and senior leaders such as development directors or program managers—who spend a full year together learning nonprofit leadership best practices. We start with a DiSC assessment to determine their individual leadership style. Throughout the year, an expert in the field is hired for each session, ranging from the role of nonprofit boards to finance to human resources and much more. The Institute creates a tight cohort among the 14 participants. When they leave the program, they have someone to call and talk to about similar programs or issues. There’s a lot of sharing in the class.In addition to the Institute, our Leadership Forums offer executives and board members expert training on everything from aligning human resources with their mission to leadership skills to board roles and responsibilities. Our Board Effectiveness program consists of small, facilitated group discussions with board chairs and vice chairs about their role and responsibilities—what a board is supposed to look like, self-assessments, hands on training, etc. Finally, our Join a Board program brings the whole community together on a quarterly basis to learn about what it means to be on a nonprofit board or committee. Our corporate partners—large companies in the area—send their employees to us to learn about board service. Employees who are engaged in the community, stay in the community. Plus, board or committee service helps grow their leadership skills by helping expand critical thinking and communications skills and improving the ability to work collaboratively and within a team. It benefits everyone.All of our trainings route leaders back to our Nonprofit Next platform. This is an information rich website offering tools, tips, templates, and local resources in one location. Nonprofit Next is hosted by the New Hampshire Center for Nonprofits and available to the nonprofits in our service area.For each program, our goal is to provide nonprofit leaders and board members a place to be in a room together, face to face, to build trust and relationships. They share their best practices and successes so other leaders can learn from them. It’s inspiring. Even though they’re competing for donor dollars, they’re sharing with each other quite a bit and building a trusting, collaborative relationship. Nothing builds up a community better than when the nonprofits take hold of this collaborative mindframe.How did the NPLI start?This work all came out of a group of funders in our local community who approached the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region to profess, “We are tired of funding failing nonprofits. What can you do to help?” United Way, the Community Foundation, Thrivent, and Community First Credit Union put together some money in the beginning to start us off. And now we’re coming up on three years in June. We’re an integral part of the community, helping to build stronger nonprofits and stronger leaders. Most of our nonprofits staff under 10 employees and they don’t put dollars aside for leadership or technology, so this helps them think a little differently about how they approach running their business.How long have you been with the organization?My background is in HR. I started in 2015 on a three-month part-time project, and a year later I was still a part-time employee. I wrote a job description in that first year for an executive director position. At the time I wasn’t interested in the job, but when they finally posted it I thought, “I have to apply for this. I really love this work.” And I got the job!What attracts you to nonprofit work?My mother started the Meals on Wheels program in my hometown and pulled us all in as kids to help. She instilled in me a belief in helping the community by helping the people who live and work in your neighborhood.  And according to my mother, everyone lives in our neighborhood. I volunteered for a nonprofit in college and then my first job was with a nonprofit, and it stuck. I’ve always worked for a nonprofit and can’t imagine myself in any other setting.The people I work with in the nonprofit community are highly passionate. Every day, we help our community by helping these leaders who are improving everyone around us and building a stronger community for all. I cannot advocate for them enough. The nonprofit leaders that I work with drive my own passion for this work.What advice do you have for other nonprofit leaders or aspiring leaders?It takes a village to make this work. I get to be collaborative and have conversations and bring the work of these nonprofits forward in a lot of different ways. I never turn down a coffee or a lunch request because you never know where it’s going to lead. In this industry, you need to stay open to collaboration in whatever form you can find it. The Fox Valley is a special place as it allows for the collaborative work we do as a community every day. That way we all succeed in the long run. Thus, my advice to nonprofit leaders is, “Everyone leads, so build strong relationships around you with everyone and anyone you can.”Women in Philanthropy is an ongoing blog series in celebration of Women’s History Month, featuring some of the incredible women Network for Good has the pleasure to work with. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

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Save the Children Publishes 16th State of the World’s Mothers Report

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 6, 2015December 3, 2015Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Yesterday, Save the Children released the State of the World’s Mothers 2015 report, which focuses on the disadvantages of being poor in an urban setting.This report presents the latest and most extensive analysis to date of health disparities between rich and poor in cities. It finds that in most developing countries, the poorest urban children are at least twice as likely to die as the richest urban children. In some countries, they are 3 to 5 – or even more – times as likely to die.Read the full report here >>Share this:last_img read more

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Cabinet to Receive Proposed Amendments to Laws on Parish Council Operations

first_img Enactment of the Local Government Financing and Financial Management, and Local Government Unified Services and Employment Acts, are also being put forward. Cabinet is expected to receive a draft of proposed amendments to legislation governing parish council operations from Local Government and Community Development Minister, Hon. Noel Arscott, shortly.The Minister, who made the disclosure at a Social Development Commission (SDC) community conference in Mandeville, Manchester, on October 2, said development of the “long awaited” proposed strategic laws for reformed local governance process has been completed.He informed that the reform process being pursued entails proposed amalgamation of the Kingston and St. Andrew, Parish Council, and Municipalities Acts into one legislation – the Local Governance Act.Enactment of the Local Government Financing and Financial Management, and Local Government Unified Services and Employment Acts, are also being put forward.These, the Minister explained, are intended to equip the local authorities with greater autonomy and responsibility to administer their affairs. They are also intended to formalize the involvement of organizations, such as parish and community development committees in the local governance process.Mr. Arscott advised that “consensus” has been reached among all stakeholders with whom the Ministry had consultations, consequent on a review of aspects of the provisions.These, he informed, include: introducing shared services, such as accounting and engineering, “because there is a realization that the capacity for certain technical services does not reside in each (or some) parish council(s).”The Minister explained that once Cabinet approves the submission, drafting instructions will be issued to the Chief Parliamentary Counsel to initiate the enactment process, subject to parliamentary deliberations.While noting that successive administrations have been “working assiduously” on local government reform for upwards of two decades, Mr. Arscott pointed out that it is a “very complex” process relating to all 14 parish councils, and involving “hundreds of laws, dating way back.”Mr. Arscott said in pursuing the local government reform process, the Government, through the Ministry, has been in discussion with South Africa’s Ministry of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs on the matter.Part of this process entailed a visit that country by him earlier this year for discussions with Minister Lechesa Tsenoli, who in turn came to Jamaica last month.“We are trying to partner with them (South Africa), because they are already advanced in terms of their local government reform (process). So, we are now sharing information and looking at best practices, so (that) we can learn from them,” the Minister said.Mr. Arscott said he hopes to have the proposals tabled in Parliament within a few weeks, once they are approved by Cabinet and passed on to the Chief Parliamentary Counsel.The meeting,  held under the theme: ‘The Governance Framework: The Pathway to Local Economic Development’, is the first of 12 community development committee conferences slated to be staged by the Social Development Commission (SDC), between October and November.The conferences are being held to heighten participants’ knowledge of the importance of local governance and its processes; and the link between governance and economic development, among other matters. The National Association of Parish Development Committees (NAPDEC) and National Integrity Action (NIA) have partnered with the SDC to stage the conferences.A major outcome is increased public advocacy for timely passage of the revised local governance legislation through a petition which will be circulated islandwide to facilitate Community Development Committee (CDC) executives signing the document. This is currently being done in Manchester.The petition will be presented to Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller, after all stakeholders have signed it. Story Highlights Development of the “long awaited” proposed strategic laws for reformed local governance process has been completed. The Kingston and St. Andrew, Parish Council, and Municipalities Acts are to be joined into one legislation – the Local Governance Act.last_img read more

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Charity Supporter Wendi Russo Competes For Ms America

first_imgWendi Russo from Eden Prairie, Minnesota (Ms. Minnesota State America 2013), will compete for the title of Ms. America on June 23, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Hilton Orange County/Costa Mesa Resort Hotel in Costa Mesa, California.The competition is scored on interview, evening gown, fitness wear and an on-stage question. The Ms. America Pageant will award over $40,000 in gift and prizes at this year’s national finals to the winner.As Ms. Minnesota State America, Wendi’s mission during her reign is to help “Create a Better Life for Children” by recruiting mentors for the hundreds of children in Minnesota still waiting for a for Big Brother or Sister through the Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) of Twin Cities and recruit more volunteers to become Wish Granters and volunteers with Make-a-Wish Foundation. Wendi has been a mentor with BBBS, Kinship of Greater Minneapolis and ACES (Athletes Committed to Educating Students) for 13 years and is a Wish Granter with the Minnesota Chapter of Make-A-Wish Foundation, which supports the wishes of children with life-threatening illnesses.Wendi is a National Television host with Shop NBC Channel, a Home Shopping Network seen in 72 Million homes based out of Eden Prairie, MN and a professional Media and on-camera coach. She is sponsored by Studio Elan Hair in Edina, MN, Isomers Laboratories found on Shop NBC, Fernando Wong at WB Boutique in Florida, Youngquest Fitness in Eden Prairie and Georges Gabrielle Couture in Utah.To read an interview with Wendi about her charity work, click here.For ticket information or to become a contestant in the 2014 Ms. America Pageant, please contact: MsAmericaPageant@aol.com or log onto www.MsAmericaPageant.com.Copyright ©2013Look to the Starslast_img read more

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The Latest Macron takes part in wreathlaying in Germany

first_imgFRANKFURT — The Latest on the French president’s visit to Germany (all times local):1 p.m.French President Emmanuel Macron has taken part in a wreath-laying ceremony at Germany’s memorial to the victims of war and dictatorship.Macron stood with folded hands and bowed head alongside German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Frank-Walter Steinmeier at the Neue Wache memorial in Berlin as part of a national day of remembrance.Macron is visiting as both he and Merkel are lagging in the polls and need some mutual reinforcement and support.Merkel has backed Macron’s proposal for a European army someday, saying it would show the world that there will never again be war between European nations. The two are meeting before a December summit intended to decide limited reforms of the shared euro currency to make it more resistant to financial and economic crises.___8:40 a.m.French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, both limping in the polls, are looking for common approaches to Donald Trump and fixing the flaws in the euro currency.Macron speaks in the German parliament in Berlin on Sunday on an annual day of remembrance for victims of war and dictatorship, a week after the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, and then consults with Merkel on European and international issues.Merkel last week echoed Macron’s call for a European army, a long-term prospect that drew tweeted criticism of Macron from Trump. Merkel said a European force would save money and agreed with Macron that Europe must be able to defend itself on its own. The two also face a December summit on limited reforms to the euro currency.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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The Latest Prosecutors to hold Ghosn for as long as needed

first_imgTOKYO — The Latest on the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance and former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn, who has been arrested on suspicion of financial irregularities (all times local):7:45 p.m.Japanese prosecutors say they will detain former Nissan Motor chairman Carlos Ghosn for as long as needed to finish their investigation into suspicions of financial irregularities.Shin Kukimoto, deputy chief prosecutor for the Tokyo District Public Prosecutors’ Office told reporters Thursday the authorities have no intention of releasing Ghosn because of international attention or concern about his case.Ghosn and another Nissan executive, Greg Kelly, were arrested on Nov. 19. They are being held at a detention centre in Tokyo. Kukimoto refused to confirm reports that both men have denied the allegations against them.Last week, prosecutors got approval to hold Ghosn without formally charging him until Friday, as is standard in Japanese investigations. The prosecutors can detain suspects for up to 20 days per charge, gaining time with more charges.___6:30 p.m.Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi, the world’s bestselling auto group last year, has reaffirmed its commitment to its alliance.The group issued a statement Thursday saying the member companies had individually and collectively “emphatically reiterated their strong commitment” to their partnership.The announcement follows the arrest on Nov. 19 of Nissan’s former chairman, Carlos Ghosn, for alleged financial irregularities. Japanese automakers Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motor Corp. have since dismissed Ghosn as their chairman. Renault SA of France has named an interim chairman but kept him on while seeking more information about his case.Ghosn’s troubles raised speculation about troubles within the alliance, which says it sold more than 10.6 million vehicles in nearly 200 countries in 2017.Prosecutors have not yet formally charged Ghosn, who is being held in Tokyo.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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‘Was not prepared to watch 12 Years a Slave for first time’

first_imgLos Angeles: Actor Chiwetel Ejiofor says he was “not prepared” to watch for the first time 12 Years a Slave, film which marked a turning point in his career. The biographical drama, directed by Steve McQueen, featured Ejiofor as Solomon Northup, a New York State-born free African-American man who was kidnapped in Washington by two conmen in 1841 and sold into slavery. He was put to work on plantations in the state of Louisiana for 12 years before being released. Also Read – Hilarie Burton, Jeffery Dean Morgan tie the knotDuring his appearance on PeopleTV’s ‘Couch Surfing’, the 41-year-old actor, who is making his directorial debut with Netflix’s ‘The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind’, said he knew that the film will be “a strong piece of work”. “I was just not prepared the first time that I watched the film, even knowing it so intimately,” he said. “It took me a little while, even in a practical sense, of coming out of that experience, of being able to turn up at dinner parties and not just be talking about man’s inhumanity to man. It took me a little while to re-enter society,” he added. At the 86th Academy Awards, 12 Years a Slave bagged three Oscars.last_img read more

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BEL gets 1st Green Channel Status certificate

first_imgBANGALORE: Navratna Defence PSU Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) has received the first Green Channel Status certificate from Directorate General Quality Assurance (DGQA) for supply of Spares for a particular Radar being manufactured by Military Radar Strategic Business Unit (SBU) of BEL’s Bangalore Complex. The certificate was issued by Chairman of the Green Channel Committee, Brig Vikram Ahooja, ADGQA (R&S), and was received by Ravi B S, General Manager of Military Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalRadar SBU. It is noteworthy that this is the first certificate issued to any organisation in India after the Green Channel Policy was formulated during March 2017. The Ministry of Defence had promulgated the Green Channel Policy for promoting ease of doing business as part of its ‘Make in India’ initiatives. A mechanism was set up to award Green Channel Status to firms with pre-defined financial and quality credentials for broad categories of items having continuous requirement in the Defence Forces. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostResponsibility of inspection of goods is given to the firms, after their credentials are verified by the Green Channel Committee (GCC), comprising of various stakeholders from DGQA and the procurement ecosystem. Green Channel Status is the authority given by the Purchaser to the Manufacturer to formally certify its products or stores on behalf of the purchaser or any other authority designated by him, after having verified the Firm’s infrastructure, quality policies and practices to produce and supply goods of specified quality. The Purchaser’s confidence in the Firm’s Quality Assurance is the central tenet in awarding of Green Channel Status.last_img read more

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Novoneel’s ‘Cheaters’ to be web series

first_imgA thrilling story from ‘Cheaters’ – a 2018 anthology of nine short stories on modern-day infidelity – authored by Novoneel Chakraborty, will soon be adapted into a web series, publishers of the book said recently. Chakraborty has signed the rights for the story ‘The Vacation’, which is about a person’s clash of loyalty and morals on social media, the publisher said in statement. Known for his romantic thrillers, the Mumbai-based author’s short stories on human relationships discuss a different shade of infidelity in today’s times. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainSaying that he is thrilled to be seeing “some exciting on-screen storytelling”, Chakraborty thanked the director, Srikanth Velagaleti, for his directorial vision. Velagaleti, who wrote the 2011 film Utt Pataang, himself finds the tales intimately relatable with today’s audience who “binge-watch web content”. The publisher said that books transitioning into films or web series is a seamless move, with the potential to engage with a larger audience, and added that Chakraborty’s stories are dark and edgy with a twist at the end. Before writing this crime, thriller and mystery novel, the author wrote and developed TV shows such as ‘Savdhaan India’ and ‘Yeh Hai Aashiqui’.last_img read more

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The Week In College Football Conferences Are Weird So Our Predictions Are

Temple<1<1<1181 CHANCE A TEAM WILL … Oklahoma173831887 Florida State<11<1282 Houston22<1227 Alabama43612125>99 Northwestern<1<1<112<1 Notre Dame303123874 Mississippi<1——21<1 Conferences are weird. And not just because some of their names don’t make any sense. (The Big Ten has 14 members?! The Big 12 has 10?!) Although most college football conferences hold championship games, others are prohibited from holding them (and get screwed because of it). They feature rapacious money grubbing and encourage teams to destroy rivalry games. No wonder independent Notre Dame disdains conference membership altogether.More importantly, for our selfish interests, conferences cloud interpretations of FiveThirtyEight’s playoff predictions — which you can find here. The weird structures and dynamics of conferences sow lots of confusion. Since we launched our College Football Playoff model last week, we’ve received lots of reader questions, and many of them boil down to one of two “conference conundrums.” Elsewhere on FiveThirtyEight, Nate Silver has explained some tweaks to our model that should make the numbers more sensible. But in case you’re still scratching your head, let’s run through the two big reasons conferences can befuddle:1. The Two-Team Conundrum: How can [Ohio State/Alabama/LSU/TCU] have higher odds of making the playoff than winning its conference?Because some conferences have enough good teams that they could send two squads into the playoff. Alternatively, other considerations in the selection process might outweigh a good team’s loss in a conference championship.For example: Our model gives No. 21All the rankings I’m using in this article are the committee’s. Alabama a 43 percent chance of being selected into the playoff but a 35 percent chance of winning the SEC. In a simulation that my colleague Jay Boice ran, a two-loss Alabama team that doesn’t get to play in the SEC championship game still makes the playoff 25.3 percent of the time (probably alongside a one-loss SEC champion). Similarly, No. 3 Ohio State has a 56 percent chance of making the postseason but a 44 percent chance of winning the Big Ten. If both Ohio State and Iowa remain undefeated heading into the Big Ten championship, there’s a good chance that both will make it in, regardless of the outcome.Other cases are more complicated. What if an undefeated Ohio State team fell to a one-loss Iowa team in the Big Ten championship?2Iowa can afford to take a loss, maybe even two, since the Hawkeyes are a game ahead of Wisconsin and also have the tiebreaker over the Badgers. It’s feasible to imagine almost any outcome in that case: The committee could go with Iowa, Ohio State, both teams or neither team.In the conference previews below, I explain more about how those scenarios might play out. But know that there isn’t necessarily a one-to-one correspondence between conference championships and slots in the playoff; things could get messy. It’s the job of the model to sort all of that out — though, admittedly, we don’t know much (or anything, really) about how the committee weights conference championships, as it didn’t have to deal with any upsets in those title games during its inaugural season last year.2. The Division Conundrum: For two teams in the same conference, how can one team have a better chance of winning the conference but another team a better shot at making the playoff?We received lots of these questions, and the culprit is arbitrary conference divisions. Take Florida and Alabama, for example. The SEC has two divisions: East and West. The Gators have a 38 percent chance of winning the SEC, according to our model. That’s higher than Alabama’s odds! But Florida is given only a 17 percent chance of making the playoff, to the Tide’s 43 percent. That’s because the Gators play in (and have clinched) the SEC East, and ’Bama faces a tougher task in the other division, the SEC West (where LSU, Ole Miss and Mississippi State play). Florida, which has one loss, has an 80 percent chance of making the playoff if it wins out. But if Florida takes a second loss (say, at South Carolina on Saturday) but still wins the SEC championship, it might not. (That’s a nightmare scenario for the SEC, in which it might be denied representation in the playoff entirely.)What-ifs of the weekOur College Football Playoff predictions have been updated with the rankings released Tuesday night, and we project Clemson, Ohio State and Alabama to make it, in agreement with the committee’s latest rankings. But we expect Baylor to have a better path than Notre Dame and to be the fourth team included.But that’s what’s current. We’re already thinking about what’s next. Take a look at our “what-if table” below, which shows how our projected playoff odds would likely change if a team wins or loses its upcoming game. Also included is how likely we think it is that a team will win all its remaining games, and its chance to make the playoff if that happens. TCU1011<12149 Oregon<1<1<181 Michigan79<11742 SCHOOLMAKE PLAYOFFMAKE PLAYOFF GIVEN WEEK 11 WINMAKE PLAYOFF GIVEN WEEK 11 LOSSWIN OUTMAKE PLAYOFF GIVEN WINNING OUT Utah111711473 Iowa222551396 Navy<1<1<1112 Stanford2834101996 Florida172331880 USC12<1314 Memphis<1<1<1121 Mississippi St.36<11125 Michigan St.101111087 Clemson67%70%37%49%>99% Baylor3145111699 Oklahoma St.232671698 Wisconsin<1——50<1 Ohio State56623227>99 UCLA33<1645 LSU1216<12155 North Carolina46<1946 Let’s use Iowa as our guinea pig. We currently give the Hawkeyes a 22 percent chance of making the playoff. But if they beat Minnesota on Saturday, those odds tick up to 25 percent; if they lose, they shrink to 5 percent. Although the rest of the Hawkeyes’ regular-season schedule isn’t that challenging, if they win out, they’ll face a tough matchup in the Big Ten title game. We give them a 13 percent chance to run the table. But if they do, they’re almost certainly in the playoff (96 percent).What to watch for this weekBig 12Game of the week: Baylor vs. OklahomaCollege football statheads: This is your game! While Oklahoma is No. 12 and Baylor is No. 6 according to the latest committee rankings, they are the No.1 and No. 2 squads according to ESPN’s Football Power Index (FPI), a computer-generated measure of team strength. Oklahoma is the best team in the country according to FPI, despite losing to lowly Texas. Baylor, on the other hand, is unsurprisingly high-rated by FPI because of its high-powered offense, which easily leads the nation at 57 points per game. Despite being No. 2 in FPI, the Bears are a 58 percent favorite to beat the Sooners because the game is at home in Waco, Texas. The game has big implications: If Oklahoma wins, its odds of making the playoff will rise to 38 percent from 17 percent; if Baylor does, the Bears will rocket from 31 percent to 45 percent likely to make the playoff.ACCGame of the week: Clemson vs. SyracuseThe ACC story hasn’t changed: Undefeated No. 1 Clemson is in the playoff if they win out, but it looks bleak for all other ACC teams (and for Clemson, should they lose). After last week’s victory over Florida State — in what was likely their last truly tough game — Clemson saw its playoff odds rise to the highest of any team (67 percent). But should the Tigers stumble, the ACC’s hopes fall off a cliff. Although one-loss North Carolina has almost wrapped up the ACC Coastal division, and has a 30 percent chance of winning the conference, its chance of making the playoff is a measly 4 percent — but if UNC wins out (and beats Clemson in the ACC title game), its chances rise to nearly 50/50.Big TenGame of the week: Ohio State vs. IllinoisEven if the Buckeyes stumble, they won’t necessarily be out. Their odds are strongly affected by the conference conundrums I outlined earlier. A one-loss Ohio State team might not even get to play for the Big Ten title. This is why the undefeated Buckeyes have a 56 percent chance of making the playoff despite only a 44 percent chance of winning the Big Ten. A one-loss reigning national champion excluded for its conference championship game may still rate highly according to the committee.SECGame of the week: Alabama vs. Mississippi StateAlabama crushed my beloved LSU Tigers, ending their hopes for an undefeated season. And, as a result, the Tide are now the No. 2 team in the latest College Football Rankings. ’Bama is not totally out should they lose again — either to Mississippi State on Saturday, or in the Iron Bowl against Auburn. In that scenario, a one-loss SEC champion could get into the playoff alongside the Tide, or the Tide could win the conference with two losses and still get in. But it’s not likely: In Jay Boice’s simulations, a two-loss Alabama team excluded from the SEC title game would be expected to make the playoff 25.3 percent of the time, and a two-loss Alabama that wins the championship game would make the playoff 34.3 percent of the time.Pac-12Game of the week: Stanford vs. OregonOne-loss Stanford is the best Pac-12 bet to make the playoff, at 28 percent. The Cardinal are almost a sure thing if they win out (96 percent likely, according to the what-if table). But the threat to Stanford is that they’re the odd man out in a scenario with a one-loss SEC champion, an undefeated Clemson and an undefeated Big Ten or Big 12 champion.Beyond The Power FiveGame of the week: Memphis vs. HoustonNotre Dame is looking good. On the heels of LSU’s loss to Alabama, the Irish have moved up to the No. 4 spot in the committee’s playoff rankings. But our model gives Baylor an ever-so-slight advantage over Notre Dame to make the playoff (31 percent vs. 30 percent).But the real game to watch is Memphis vs. Houston. With Memphis’s crushing loss to Navy last week, its dream to be the mid-major that crashes the playoff party has ended. Houston, however, is still undefeated, and the two squads meet in the premier conference game of the season among non-Power Fives. To have any shot at the playoff, Houston will have to win out. But even if they do, their odds of making it are only 7 percent, by our estimation. So the Cougars need to keep praying for carnage among the elites.CORRECTION (Nov. 11, 4:40 p.m.): An earlier version of the table in this article listed incorrect numbers for Wisconsin’s and Mississippi’s chances of winning out. Those odds are 50 percent and 21 percent, respectively. The table has been updated. read more

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Baseball Full circle for Nanci Coolen on Ohio State Senior Day

Bo Coolen (center) walks with his mom Nanci (right), sister Demi (left) and father (back) to be honored before the start of Ohio State’s game against Purdue on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Nanci brought lei for all the moms of graduating seniors, all the players, coaches and coaches’ wives. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Editor-in-ChiefThere seemed to be only one way to truly send out the seniors on Ohio State’s baseball team.Give everyone a lei.At least, that’s what Nanci Coolen thought. The mother of senior first baseman Bo Coolen thought the best way to honor her son would be to bring some of his home state culture up to him. She said lei are given out for everything just like “giving a birthday card for a birthday gift” for everything from weddings, retirements, birthdays or graduations.She had to order them all only a couple days in advance because as real lei, made from purple orchid, they would wilt after too long.So she bought 30 lei and had them all shipped to Columbus. A lei for each player, mother, coach and coach’s wife. It wasn’t enough just to have one for the players and coaches. After all, it wasn’t just Senior Day for Ohio State. It was Mother’s Day.“Oh it’s perfect,” Demi Coolen, Nanci’s daughter said. “Two birds, one stone, our whole family gets to be together and celebrate both of their days.”Ohio State made sure to celebrate both days in style, sending Bo and his family out happy with a dominant 16-6 win against Purdue to give the Buckeyes the series victory and clinch a spot in the Big Ten tournament.It’s a particularly special day for the whole family. Nanci, a P.E. and health teacher at Punahou School, has been in Columbus since March — she’s lived in a pair of AirBnBs during her three-month stay — finishing up work on a sabbatical while Bo plays for Ohio State. Bob, her husband, has been back in Honolulu, Hawaii, coaching the Hawaii softball team and Demi has been working as an engineer for Boeing.It’s the first time the whole family has been together since Christmas.“It’s just great because we don’t always get to be together,” Nanci said. “But for that to happen on Mother’s Day in Columbus, to culminate, the whole thing is amazing. And then we’re actually going after the game to Eddie George’s [Grille] because that’s where they took him on his recruiting trips, so full circle and we haven’t been yet.”Nanci Coolen and her daughter Demi cheer on Nanci’s son, senior first baseman Bo Coolen, as he bats during the third inning of Ohio State’s game against Purdue on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Editor-in-Chief——“Let’s get a hit here, Bo-Bo!” Nanci screams from her picnic table down the third base-line as her son steps into the batter’s box in the third inning of Sunday’s game, her last chance to watch her son play at Bill Davis Stadium.This isn’t something unusual for Bo, a role player with a .209 batting average in 29 games, and he said he’s gotten used to it. In fact, he welcomes it. She was only able to attend two of his games during his first year at Ohio State in 2017 after he transferred from Cypress College. He said after a year watching the other players greet their mothers down the sideline after the games ended, it was a comforting feeling to have her there because “I got to go hug someone.”She did not always welcome him with hugs though. Other times, he was met with critiques. After starting Wednesday against Campbell, Coolen came away hitless with an 0-for-3 night. As he was leaving with senior designated hitter and fellow Cypress College transfer Noah McGowan, Bo said his mother had some things to say. She questioned why he took so many pitches during his at-bats.“Mom, it was a good pitch, I don’t know what you want me to do,” Bo recalled saying. “Well, I want you swinging at everything whether it’s a strike or not,” she responded. Since then, Bo said he has taken a much more aggressive approach to the plate.Senior first baseman Bo Coolen takes a swing at a pitch during the third inning of Ohio State’s game against Purdue on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Editor-in-ChiefAs a coach’s wife and former softball player, Nanci is no stranger to providing this type of feedback. Bob said she is often hanging around the Hawaii softball team, not just providing them with someone to talk with for life advice, but someone to talk with about the game. Bob said she has helped inspire in his players a mental toughness that he often has trouble relaying.“She becomes not a mother-figure, but a real figure for the young ladies that I have that they can talk to her and she’s so chipper and cheery and positive and it just was tough not having her around for my whole season,” Bob said. “She was there in Vegas when we played and we did well, we ended up going 5-2 and then after that it went all downhill.”——Moving to Columbus from Hawaii in March, Nanci had a bit of an adjustment period.March in Hawaii is warm weather. Surely, Columbus couldn’t be too much worse, right?So Nanci came without any big jackets, assuming that whatever cold she might be initially greeted with would change before too long.It did not. Bo had warned her. “Mom, the heavier the better,” he remembered telling her. Without any winter clothing, Nanci was forced to borrow some of Bo’s until eventually she went with him to buy  “some puffy coats” and “some real winter boots,” Bo said.But the one thing Nanci enjoyed about the weather that she hadn’t seen much in Hawaii was a real change of season. The transition from the winter to the spring was fun to watch, she said.“I saw the leaves come up and the green and all of that,” Nanci said. “It’s just been fabulous.”Still, Nanci has tried to go out and enjoy all the city has to offer. And that “big-city element” was one of the biggest reasons Bo wanted to come to Ohio State. She said he never wanted to go to a small school. He wanted to go to a big school that had a football team and where he could really enjoy the college experience.He didn’t get that in his first year at Pepperdine, so his mom advised him to go to junior college and try for a bigger school. That sophomore year when he was being recruited by other schools, Bo received offers from plenty of smaller schools. She said he continued to put off his decision until eventually Ohio State sent an offer his way.She remembers him saying that it was his “perfect dream school.”But for the family, it meant Bo would be much farther away from home. This was sort of the expectation, Nanci said. Most kids from Hawaii leave for the mainland at some point. She had already gone through it once with Demi leaving for the University of Southern California and Bo had already spent two years on the mainland.This would be the furthest from home he had been, however. Bo said it’s a three-stop process to get to Columbus from Hawaii: fly six hours to California, another three to Chicago or Texas and then a couple more hours to Columbus. In total, Nanci said it’s about $1,000 to fly one person to and from Hawaii. One time, Nanci tried to shorten the number of stops Bo had to make on his return trip home. She had him go from Columbus to Newark, New Jersey, and then straight to Honolulu. That flight from Newark was 12 1/2 hours.“Don’t ever do that again,” Bo told his mom.——-When Senior Day finally arrived, Bo had started to catch on about his mother’s planned surprise. He had seen the package arrive earlier and remarked on its odd shape, at the time, not 100 percent sure what exactly it held. On Sunday morning, he finally saw what the mysterious package held in store: those colorful circles to celebrate his final home game at Ohio State.Nanci Coolen, senior Bo Coolen’s mother, watches her son play at first base during Ohio State’s game against Purdue on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Editor-in-Chief“As soon as I saw her holding all of them, I was like, ‘Wow’ because it felt like senior day back in Hawaii with all the leis,” Bo said.The ceremony itself was surreal, Nanci said. She had been to so many for the Hawaii softball players, so she knew what it would be like. But she couldn’t believe the one for her son had finally arrived . She couldn’t believe her son, whom she would make wear a helmet even during tee-ball, was preparing to graduate from college.Two years ago, Bo went to Eddie George’s Grille for dinner with the Ohio State coaching staff while head coach Greg Beals recruited him to transfer from junior college. He committed on the spot.Now, after Bo finished Senior Day with the win, the family will again head out to that same restaurant to celebrate Mother’s Day. Just like that day, he plans to order a buffalo chicken sandwich. He will recommend his mom do the same. It will all come full circle for Nanci. read more

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Bale admitted that he will probably leave to play regularly

first_imgGareth Bale managed to score two goals in yesterday’s final game but he claimed that it might have been his last game for Real Madrid as he needs to play every week.The Wales international was injured for the part of this season but even after that, he struggled to get enough game time and he admitted that it has been frustrating for him not to be in the starting eleven.The former Tottenham player spoke about his future as he said, according to Gianluca Di Marzio:divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“I’ve been disappointed about the exclusion in the first moment because I was playing well at that time. I deserved to be an important player, I’m a player and I know football is about the team so I got at my teammates’ disposal. I need to play every week and that didn’t happen.”“I’ve had an injury at the beginning of the season but I’m fine now. I need to talk with my agent to decide what to do about my future. Today’s finale is a dream come true. If I can’t play every week at Real, I’ll find somewhere else to do so. I now have a lot of time to think about my future and I’ll do so.”last_img read more

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