Covid-19 may limit Saudi Arabia tourism expansion | News

first_imgGlobalData forecasts that Saudi Arabia’s international arrivals will reach 21 million by 2024. Ben Cordwell, tourism analyst at GlobalData explains that does not mean that Saudi Arabia cannot become a dominant force in the Middle East destination market.“The Red Sea Project is looking to establish Saudi Arabia as a luxury tourist destination which could attract many of the tourists that travel to Dubai each year, particularly high-spending travellers from the UK and China. – Advertisement – OlderMSC Magnifica suspends sailings until late December “Meanwhile, the capital city of Riyadh has the potential to establish itself as a premium luxury destination to rival Dubai.”Religious attractions and celebrations is already the main source of tourism in the country with millions of international visitors arriving to take part in the Hajj and Umrah. A more accessible Saudi Arabia could attract a greater number of Muslim visitors to these events each year.Cordwell continued: “Saudi Arabia is also home to historical sites dating back thousands of years, and so the country could become a hub for cultural tourism to the Middle East thereby diversifying the type of tourist that the country attracts.”Sports tourism is another area that Saudi Arabia is investing heavily in, recently hosting Anthony Joshua’s world title fight against Andy Ruiz. Hosting major sporting events provides Saudi Arabia with a major opportunity to market itself as a prime tourist destination.Cordwell concluded: “Saudi Arabia offers much that can attract a high number of international visitors each year. “The country has a number of initiatives in place to help achieve its ambitious tourist targets to 2030, but it remains to be seen how much of a limiting factor Covid-19 has on international arrivals over the coming years.”Image: KAEC NewerChile leads winners at 2020 Latin America World Travel Awards Saudi Arabia can become a regional tourism powerhouse, according to new analysis of the region. However, the country is unlikely to reach its optimistic annual visitor goals as the Covid-19 pandemic hits global travel. – Advertisement – The Middle Eastern destination is seeking to welcome 100 million guests annually by 2030, Fahd Hamidaddin, chief executive of the Saudi Tourism Authority, recently stating the country remained on track. However, this would mean a near six-fold increase in tourist arrivals over the next 11 years, from the 17 million visitors the country welcomed in 2019, argues GlobalData, a data and analytics company.An increase on this scale now appears overly ambitious, with the massive impact that the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic has had on global travel and tourism. – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Known for baseball prominence, Titans looking to make mark in basketball tournament

first_imgView Gallery (2 Photos)OMAHA, Neb. ? Folks around here know all about Cal State Fullerton ? at least when it comes to the College World Series.The Titans? baseball team has made 15 trips to Omaha and won four national championships, the most recent one in 2004.Basketball?Well, it?s been a while since the Titans have played hoops on a big stage. Fullerton is in the NCAA tournament for the first time since reaching the final eight in 1978, its only previous appearance.Given the track record of CSF?s baseball brethren, there?s no place Titans guard Frank Robinson would rather be than Omaha.?It?s a sign of good luck,? he said. ?They come here and win a lot. If we can pull out a couple wins, it will show that we own Omaha.?Big words for a team that comes into the Midwest Regional as a No. 14 seed. The Titans (24-8) open Thursday against Big Ten regular-season and tournament champion Wisconsin (29-4).Asked what they know about Fullerton, the basketball team, Wisconsin center Brian Butch hemmed and hawed a bit. Then Butch went to the baseball card.?That?s about where we heard of them, from the baseball team,? he said, smiling. ?Our coaches were able to get a great scouting report together for us, and I think their basketball team is really good, too, this year.?If the Titans are looking for some karma, maybe they can get it from their bus driver. Mike Williams has been the Fullerton baseball team?s driver the past four times the Titans have reached the CWS. When he heard the basketball Titans were coming to town, he requested to drive them.Associate athletic director Mel Franks said it was suggested that Williams take the team on a ride to Rosenblatt Stadium, a couple miles south of the Qwest Center and site of so much Titan baseball glory. The schedule wouldn?t allow it.But senior forward Scott Cutley said he knows the baseball players are with the basketball team in spirit. Longtime baseball coach George Horton, who left for Oregon after last season, sent his congratulations this week. And the baseball players have been big supporters all year.?The baseball team has been great for our school,? Cutley said. ?They?ve come down here almost every year and done well, so they?re a great inspiration for us.?It will take more than inspiration to beat the Badgers, who are making their 10th straight appearance in the tournament. Only seven other programs have that distinction.Fullerton is prolific offensively, setting school records for scoring (82.6 ppg) and 3-pointers (278). Josh Akognon is averaging 19.9 points, Robinson 16.0 and Cutley 14.8.But those numbers have been rolled up mostly against Big West competition, or worse. Against the Badgers, points are always hard-earned. Wisconsin leads the nation in scoring defense, at 53.8 points a game, and the deliberate Badgers have given up 60 points only seven times this season.They?ve also won 23 of 25 games, with those two losses coming against Purdue.Then there?s Wisconsin?s size advantage. The tallest player in Fullerton?s rotation is 6-foot-6 ? a fact that did not go unnoticed as coach Bob Burton watched the Badgers head to practice Thursday.?I think my guys are in the locker room hiding now,? Burton said. ?If I can get them out tomorrow night, maybe we can show up and play.?Wisconsin has disappointed in the tournament since reaching a regional final in 2005. The Badgers lost by 19 points to Arizona in the first round in 2006, and last year as a No. 2 seed they were upset by UNLV in the second round.?We hope to do better than we did last year,? Butch said. ?We have a great balanced team here. That?s the nice thing about this team. It?s been there all year. Different people have stepped up in big games and helped us win. The way we?ve been playing recently, we feel we can make a pretty good run.?The winner of this game plays either Southern California or Kansas State on Saturday.To make it to Saturday or beyond, Burton said, is almost too much to imagine for the Titans.An upset or two this weekend surely would make the basketball Titans as popular around campus as the school?s proud baseball program.?If we can get a couple of wins,? Burton said, ?I?ll probably be in Mozambique on a beach and won?t even make it to the next round.?last_img read more

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Syracuse falls to No. 14 Buffalo, 71-59, in historic loss

first_img Comments Oshae Brissett stood at the free-throw line with Syracuse trailing by seven in the final three minutes. His first attempt rimmed out, but he had another chance. The second followed. No good.Brissett jumped up high and let out a scream. He knew the game was slipping away. Buffalo pushed tempo after corralling the miss, and CJ Massinburg nailed a 3 from the wing to extend Buffalo’s lead to double digits.It was the dagger in a game Syracuse (7-4) desperately needed to win. But the Bulls, which had struggled with shooting all game, caught fire, and SU missed all its free throws in the final 4:11. It was a perfect recipe for the Orange to choke late in back-to-back games, this time losing against the No. 14 Bulls (11-0), 71-59, on Tuesday night inside the Carrier Dome. For the first time since 1975, Syracuse lost back-to-back nonconference games.“We’re still quite a ways away,” SU head coach Jim Boeheim said. “… We’ve got to get better.”The Orange never trailed in the first half. An 11-2 run helped push Syracuse’s lead to nine early. Tyus Battle slammed one home from the right wing to cap off the run. A Buffalo turnover the following possession led to Frank Howard throwing his hands up, while the Carrier Dome crowd rose to their feet.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFor the first time all season, Howard looked like the dominant floor general people expected. A lower leg injury had set the senior back. He missed both of Syracuse’s games at Madison Square Garden — both losses.When he returned, he was far from 100 percent. Boeheim said Howard’s shot was being held back because of the nagging injury a few weeks ago. On Tuesday, Howard hit his groove, leading the team with 10 first-half points and knocking down a pair of 3s.It was a glimpse of Syracuse’s potential. The offense was finally free-flowing, making 57.1 percent of its shots. Brissett made all four of his attempts. On the other end, the defense stopped a veteran-savvy Buffalo team that averaged 11.4 turnovers per game. By half, the Bulls had coughed up the ball nine times.Entering the break, the Orange led the No. 14 team in the country by four. It wasn’t the 10 points Syracuse held over Old Dominion on Saturday, but it was an attainable win, a much-needed one to bolster SU’s NCAA Tournament resume early in the season.And for the first 10 minutes of the second half, SU was en route. Buffalo didn’t let up, however, remaining in striking distance the entire 30 minutes SU led, in large part to its second-chance opportunities. Buffalo finished with 18 offensive rebounds and 12 second-chance points to SU’s 10 and five, respectively.The Bulls waited for the Orange attack to go cold. And when it eventually did, Buffalo pounced.“About the 30-minute mark,” Boeheim said, “We had four or five opportunities going to the basket, and we just didn’t convert any of them.”Then, with 9:30 remaining, Jeremy Harris nailed a 3 from the top of the key to give UB its first lead all game. The game which Syracuse had controlled for nearly 75 percent of the time, began slipping away.There was nothing Syracuse could do to answer. Brissett and Howard tried attacking the rim. Elijah Hughes only made two of his seven 3-point attempts in the second half. The offense regressed back to its normal, struggling self.“Standing. Not being engaged on defense. Not rebounding,” Howard said of the second-half struggles. “… We just got to do better.”There were chances for the Orange to strike back. Marek Dolezaj missed the front end of his 1-and-1 with SU down two. Buffalo responded with a 3. An offensive rebound resulted in second-chance points for Massinburg to extend the Bulls lead to seven.Boeheim called a timeout, trying whatever he could to lift Syracuse out of its second-straight collapse inside the Carrier Dome. He couldn’t. Brissett drew a foul but missed both free throws. The Bulls drove down the court and Massinburg, who finished the game with 25 points, nailed a 3 to extend the lead to double digits.Howard compared the loss to “big brother playing you outside,” saying that Syracuse got “bullied.”Before the season started, Syracuse entered with high expectations. It was the No. 16 team in the country with all five starters returning, fresh off an NCAA Tournament run that ended in the Sweet 16. The glaring weaknesses were thrown aside. No one considered the 14 losses or that the offense shot 31.8 percent from 3. Still, it wasn’t expected for Syracuse to enter the last two nonconference games with three losses, let alone four.Tuesday night offered a chance to prove its early season doubters wrong. That the Orange could string together two good halves and beat a top-15 opponent. But the Orange fell apart once again.“It’s all mental,” Brissett said. “Everyone’s out of it right now.” Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on December 18, 2018 at 10:22 pm Contact Charlie: csdistur@syr.edu | @charliedisturcolast_img read more

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