Rocking the Case Study

first_imgI’m a huge fan of case studies. They’re an incredible tool to showcase your nonprofit’s work, demonstrate social proof, and gain more supporters. Jay Baer’s Youtility explains the power of case studies in greater detail, but here are a few ways you can use this approach to support your fundraising and marketing efforts: 1) Get testimonials. Tell the story of why people support your organization. Ask questions such as:Why are you passionate about this issue?When did you start learning about this issue?Why do you choose to support our organization?By gathering this information, you’ll not only have endorsements for your cause, but you can also use responses to inform your marketing and donor recruitment strategies.2) Document how you spent money. Did you dedicate a large portion of funds to operational expenses? Why? What impact did it have? Once you explain that to donors, they’ll better understand how you fulfill your mission, and why it’s important to have operational expenses. Every penny of your budget doesn’t have to go to on-the-ground work, but you do have to demonstrate how operations are vital to ensuring the services you provide are making a positive change. 3) Survey those you help. Ask your constituency how they’ve found your services. Do they see your nonprofit as a vital member of their community? Would they be able to get where they are without you?If those answers affirm your work, ask respondents if you can use a quote in your case study. Most will be happy to help. In some cases, if you provide them with links and social media messages, they’ll share the study with their network, too. If the answers bring up questions or poke holes in your work, pay attention to that. That’s a great opportunity to take feedback and turn it into something positive.Have you created a case study before? What were the results? How did you share it with supporters?last_img read more

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Celebrating the Second Year of the PLOS-MHTF Collection on Maternal Health

first_imgPosted on January 29, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The following was originally posted on PLOS  BlogsPLOS Medicine and the MHTF review highlights of the second successful collection, as part of their 3 Year partnership focusing on improving Maternal Health globally.Back in late 2012 the Maternal Health Task Force, at the Harvard School of Public Health, and PLOS Medicine issued a call for papers on the theme ‘Maternal Health is Women’s Health’, chosen in order to recognise that a women’s health is of crucial importance through her lifetime, and not just during pregnancy and labour.The breadth of the research that has been submitted to PLOS since the call has been of great quality and impact. In this blog, we’d like to highlight just some articles in the collection that represent a selection of the important work recommended to alleviate the poor health, low educational attainment and low socioeconomic status adversities affecting maternal health, that women and girls of experience throughout their lifetimes.To continue reading, visit the original post at PLOS. For more on Year 3 of the PLOS-MHTF  collection on maternal health, including guidelines for submitting to the collection, visit the Year 3 call for papers. To read articles published in the Year 1 and Year 2 collections, visit PLOS Collections.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Our New Power Woman of Tech: Maria Canfora

first_imgSilicon Valley isn’t the only hub for tech start-ups these days. The Washington D.C. area is quickly becoming a solid alternative for attracting highly-educated, ambitious and talented people in the technology sector. DCA Live has highlighted a key list of thought-leaders, innovators, and drivers of change in various industries, since 2014. One key group of individuals making an impact on the business community of DC are women, and today, DCA Live is putting out its list of the 40 women under 40 who are driving change.The Trending 40 Women in Tech includes founders, CEOs, investors, engineers, financial experts, marketing gurus, and others who contribute to the local ecosystem. The New Power Women of Tech includes our very own Maria Canfora, Chief Financial Officer, Network for Good.In a hi-tech culture that has gained a reputation for being unwelcoming to and biased against women, Maria has made a name for herself. “I absolutely love what I do,” said Maria. “Being a part of a start-up’s culture, the growth, the fast pace is invigorating. The energy is what attracts me to start-ups. And the special culture at Network for Good is unlike any I have experienced. Being a B Corp, it is one that is not only driven by their financial performance, but also the desire to develop a product that allows customers to do good.”She continued, “We are in a small and well-known group of about 2,000 companies—such as Warby Parker glasses, Dansko footwear, Patagonia outdoor clothier, and others—that are committed to meeting rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency.”In this leadership role, Maria is well equipped to help drive the year-over-year 40 percent+ growth that Network for Good is experiencing.  She has more than 20 years of experience guiding start-ups and other tech companies to IPO; three to be exact. She was also the winner of the Women in Technology Leadership Award for Corporate Public Sector Small Business in 2014.Given Maria’s wealth of experience in helping start-ups build from the ground up to successful IPOs she wanted to offer these tips:Managing the Growth. Way too often start-ups hire like mad. This approach locks in overhead expenses. Sadly, most are not able to support that growth by sales.Refining Your Brand. It is easy to want to be something for everyone, especially in a high-growth space. No one wants to turn down business. But the sooner a company can identify the niche they play in and refine their brand to reflect that, the better suited they will be to take on that market share.Hiring Isn’t Just for HR. Every person in the organization should have a hand in ensuring that each new hire is a good one. When you are growing so fast, it is easy to overlook the hiring process when if anything it should be the most rigorous.last_img read more

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Increase Donor Loyalty with 5 Best Practices

first_imgWhat motivates donors to continue giving to an organization? Traditionally, research that’s focused on charitable giving has looked at how to motivate donors to give an initial gift. But are you doing everything you can to increase donor loyalty? After all, fundraising pros know that donor retention is the golden ticket. Apply these five best practices to your fundraising work and turn one-time donors into loyal, ongoing supporters.1) Build an Emotional ConnectionCompanies that optimize the emotional connection between their brand and their customers outperform competitors by 26 percent in gross margin and 85 percent in sales growth. Customers who feel emotionally connected to a brand are:At least three times more likely to recommendThree times more likely to re-purchaseEmotional connections are even more necessary in the nonprofit realm. A logical connection isn’t enough to go the distance. Emotional connections influence both the length and frequency of a donor’s engagement with your organization.2) Get FeedbackConsumer brands use post-interaction surveys to gather insightful feedback from customers. Set up your survey to ask any question you’d like to know the answer to. They can be especially helpful to nonprofits for gathering feedback on the online donation experience, for asking opinions on various issues, and for collecting ideas to improve the donor experience.3) Practice Social Listening and EngagementSurveys aren’t the only way to listen to your donors. Smart brands use social media to learn about their consumers. Engage with your supporters by responding to questions and sharing relevant information. Nonprofits can gain the same benefits by paying attention to what people are saying on both their organization’s social pages and individuals’ social pages. And they can build a relationship by responding in relevant, meaningful ways.4) Focus on the IndividualTo generate loyalty, you have to focus on each person as an individual. Consumers are used to getting customized communications that are personalized. Similarly, donors expect nonprofits to leverage what the organization knows about them to make their experience the best it can be. For example, find out what types of causes they support and share related programs they may be interested in. Learn how they prefer to give—whether via email, text, social media, or snail mail—and make the process easy for them. Find out when they like to give and time your requests appropriately.5) Show That You Appreciate ThemBrands often have customer appreciation events that are designed specifically to show customers that they’re valued. Appreciation doesn’t have to come in the form of a big event, however. Nonprofits can show appreciation to donors via letters, personalized videos, photo galleries of the project the donor has given to, etc.Ultimately, it comes back to building the relationship with your donors. They want to feel that they’re a valued part of the work that your organization does. They want to feel connected. As you focus on seeing your donors as individuals, you’ll be able to craft a donor experience program that results in loyal supporters.Learn why the donor experience is vital to a successful organization and how to implement an effective donor experience program by downloading “A Better Donor Experience: Is it the Cornerstone of Donor Loyalty?”last_img read more

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Accounting for 1 in 3 Maternal Deaths, Health Disparities Persist in South Asia

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on April 30, 2015June 12, 2017By: Linnea Bennett, Intern, Environmental Change and Security Program, Woodrow Wilson CenterClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As part of the Advancing Policy Dialogue on Maternal Health Series, the MHTF, along with UNFPA, supported the Wilson Center to host South Asia Consultation on Maternal Health: Regional Dialogue and Way Forward, to address neglected topics in maternal health.The state of maternal health in South Asia is difficult to assess. Although rates of maternal mortality are declining between 2 and 2.5 percent a year overall, the region’s massive population – one fifth of the world and over 1 billion people in India alone – means it still accounts for one out of three maternal deaths. [Video Below]Quality of care fluctuates wildly. Some countries, like Sri Lanka, have made major improvements while others, like Afghanistan and Pakistan, still struggle to meet baseline needs, said Dr. Linda Bartlett, an associate scientist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. There are major disparities within countries as well, noted Dr. Pallavi Gupta, health program coordinator of Oxfam India. “Even in southern states [of India] that are advanced, you have pockets that are extremely backwards,” she said. In Pakistan, the overall maternal mortality rate is 276 per 100,000 live births, but in the province of Balochistan the rate is as high as 785, with less than 10 percent of pregnant women receiving adequate vaccines and immunizations. “It seems horrifying that a country with nuclear capability can only vaccinate less than 10 percent of pregnant women in a whole big region of their country,” Bartlett said.Bartlett, Gupta, and other panelists at the Wilson Center on March 31 were participants in a February conference on the state of maternal health in South Asia sponsored by Oxfam India. Delegates from each South Asian country convened in Nepal for discussions on recurring problems, highlighting four persistent challenges as well as recommendations for improving results.Amid Data Craze, Gaps PersistDespite an emphasis on data since the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), there are major blind spots, said Gupta. “We have had instances where maternal deaths have happened but they were not on the record of the government.” Sources can also be quite different from one another. For example, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation estimates average maternal mortality in South Asia to be 311 per 100,000 live births, but the UN reports 190. “Personally I’m not a very great fan of statistics,” Gupta said, “because I don’t really trust that the statistics we produce actually represent the reality on the ground.”Even when concrete and useful numbers are produced, they are often inaccessible or incomprehensible to the communities that need them most, and aggregation can cover up marginalized groups who are consistently left out of overall gains. And surveyors largely ignore qualitative data regarding user experience, which Gupta believes is critical to successful health programs.To close the data gap, the panel called for a more robust collection process led by surveyors who better understand the issues they are dealing with. “Frontline health workers who provide data should be trained to look at the perspective of service improvement, not just asked to fill in a data collection sheet,” Gupta said. She also suggested limiting surveys by external groups to reinforce in-country capacity and encouraging more collaboration between existing efforts by NGOs and funding agencies. When possible, data should be disaggregated too by religion, caste, ethnicity, and education, she said, to help discern which communities are in most need of programs and care.Respectful CareWhile data plays a critical role, Bartlett pointed out that maternal health is inherently a human rights issue. Providing care with dignity, informed consent, and open communication about options may be difficult to measure, but plays a major role in whether women take advantage of health care when it’s available. “It only takes one bad experience in a labor or delivery room to make you very aware of it,” she said.Instances of obstructive violence, corruption, violations of patients’ rights, and disrespect and abuse in the labor room are not uncommon. Patriarchal societies, and religious and ethnic differences often cause systematic discrimination, said Bartlett. She recommended it become mandatory for health workers – from physicians to midwives to those who operate the front door – to take basic training on respectful care. She also suggested using local celebrities to bring attention within the broader context of violence against women, noting that celebrity status can spread messages wider and faster among the South Asian diaspora than it might elsewhere in the world.Measuring Morbidity and Expanding Private CareWhere mortality measures the instances of maternal death in a country, morbidity looks at the general health and wellbeing of women. For every woman who dies from pregnancy-related causes, between 20 and 30 are left with acute or chronic health conditions, yet “there is no South Asian country besides Sri Lanka that tracks morbidity data,” said Dr. Jahangir Hossain, program director for health at CARE Bangladesh.Reducing morbidity will require a better trained workforce. In Bangladesh, Hossain said CARE has been helping to create innovative public-private partnerships that bring more skilled workers to communities in need.In Sunamganj, a flood-prone district in Bangladesh, pockets of the population were experiencing maternal mortality rates almost double that of the national average of 190 per 100,000 live births. Women on average paid 67 percent of their health care costs out of pocket. CARE partnered with the Bangladesh Ministry of Health and a private company to train 168 community-based, private care providers. Workers were also linked to commodity suppliers to facilitate better access to supplies. These providers were then distributed across 10 sub-regions and 50 remote areas in Sunamganj in which 68 percent of the people served were “poor” or “ultra-poor.”By December of 2014, 34 percent of babies in the region were delivered by the new, privately trained providers while only 15 percent were delivered by providers who had been in place before. The privately trained providers were also earning ample wages and showing signs of financial stability. The program’s results showed that private providers can complement public efforts and fill in gaps in areas where the public health system is not functioning adequately.Connecting to a “Bigger Picture”Barbara Stilwell, senior director of health workforce solutions at the NGO Intrahealth International, served as a discussant, commenting on the conclusions of the Nepal conference. She agreed that programs like CARE’s are important because they “bring in parts of the population that wouldn’t otherwise get in.”Stilwell has evaluated how people enter and exit the health work force, looking for the best ways to improve quality and retention in poor resource settings. She cites a lack of secondary school, particularly for women, as an issue in low- and middle-income countries that prevent workers from qualifying for advanced degrees. People may also be driven away from education because of costs or, if they have the money, migrate abroad to practice instead of staying in the country where they were trained.Stilwell and her colleagues are looking at ways to increase the number of skilled providers by bringing job enrichment to all levels of the workforce. This includes encouraging peer to peer mentoring – not only to expand training capacity but to empower the mentors. “We’ve been involved in India in a mentoring project where some very skilled nurses have been trained to be mentors in Karnataka,” she said. “What we found is that not only have the nurse midwives become much better at giving care, but they’ve also shown [more] initiative.”Connecting health care to a “bigger picture” purpose can give health workers incentive and motivation, Stilwell said, especially when they see data that says quality of care makes a difference in their patients’ lives. Allowing people to master their professions gives them a career ladder and an opportunity to advance their work. According to the 2014 State of the World’s Midwifery Report, midwives could deliver 87 percent of all essential and needed care to mothers and newborns worldwide if given the right training.“In India, nurse midwives do not [do] more than making beds and giving the injections that they are asked to do,” Gupta said. “But that kind of capacity building and empowerment, that would take care of so much more.”Event Resources:Linda Bartlett’s PresentationPallavi Gupta’s PresentationJahangir Hossain’s PresentationBarbara Stilwell’s PresentationPhoto GalleryVideoSources: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, UN Population Fund, World Health Organization.Photo Credit: Midwives wait inside the birthing center in Dhaka, Bangladesh, courtesy of Conor Ashleigh/Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.This post originally appeared at The New Security Beat, the blog of Environmental Change and Security Program at The Wilson Center.Share this:last_img read more

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Midwives on the Edge—Providing Essential Care in Crisis Settings

first_imgPosted on June 26, 2018June 29, 2018By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Sera Bonds, CEO/Founder, Circle of Health InternationalAcross many settings, midwives are key players in the maternal health workforce. The Maternal Health Task Force’s Kayla McGowan recently had the pleasure of interviewing Sera Bonds, Founder/CEO of Circle of Health International, for her insight into successes, challenges and the role of midwifery in crisis settings.KM: Please describe your background and work in maternal health.SB: I have an undergraduate degree in women’s studies. I went to midwifery school, direct entry—I’m not a licensed or practicing midwife, but I have training in midwifery. I have a Masters in Public Health; I went to Boston University where I focused my studies on complex humanitarian emergencies and reproductive health. I founded Circle of Health International in 2004 in response to a gap that we saw in the sector of disaster management and complex humanitarian emergencies—that midwives were not included and prioritized in those responses. That did not make a lot of sense given that outside of the United States, midwives deliver most of the world’s babies. And if you are introduced to communities through the midwives in that community, that introduction is embedded with a level of trust that really can’t be replicated for someone from the outside coming in. Midwives are privy to a lot of information outside of things like the number of pregnancies, how breastfeeding went, that sort of thing. They know [about intimate partner violence], who lives in poverty, whose kids go to bed hungry, they know family histories. When you know those people in a community, you know immediately so much more about their needs than you would if you just came in from the outside or went to the ministry or different folks in the community. We really prioritize midwives—that’s where we started in 2004.KM: Could you talk specifically about your work related to midwifery in crisis settings?SB: Over the last 14 years, the organization has worked in 22 different countries, and the crisis settings have ranged from acute conflicts—we’ve been working in Syria for seven years—to rural Tanzania where they have high rates of teen pregnancy and HIV as well as poverty. We have been working in south Texas on the Mexico border for the last four years supporting a refugee clinic, though most of the folks that come to the clinic are asylees or migrants. The clinic sees people immediately upon their release from border patrol, so we are their first stop.We’ve also been doing a lot of disaster work in America as hurricane seasons pick up and up and up. Our primary responses last year were Hurricane Harvey in Texas and Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. Because of the populations that we work with, we also do some work related to human trafficking.We have been engaged in human trafficking advocacy and training for different social service agencies, medical schools, and clinics to help those who are working in clinical settings in places where there are high instances of human trafficking support survivors. The more you can know about a person—not just their clinical history—the better the care.KM: Can you describe the impact so far?SB: Over the last 14 years, we have reached over three million women and children with services or support either directly or through our local community-based partners. We have trained over 7,000 health care providers—including medical students—and we have provided well over one million dollars in supplies and equipment.We really try to have all of the work we do be informed and led by the people who are directly impacted. As part of our response in Texas after Hurricane Harvey, for example, we hired a local evacuee woman who had been relocated to Austin. She led our evacuee efforts on a short contract and has now become a staff member. We try to pull locally when we can. We try, when possible, to purchase everything locally, too.KM: What are some key takeaways regarding the role of midwifery in these settings?SB: So many of the world’s displaced people are women and children—with the majority of them experiencing some interaction with family planning, menstrual health and hygiene, domestic violence, sexual assault, pregnancy, breastfeeding or raising children, etc. Midwives are uniquely positioned to address and support most of those needs, and they’re cost-effective. A midwife’s scope of work could meet the needs of most women in these displaced settings.We are continually surprised with how little women in any place know about their own bodies. As we’ve grown as an organization, we have learned about all of the intersections we need to be educating about as well, such as sexual consent, menstrual health and hygiene, domestic violence, sexual assault, gender issues in conflict settings and others, so our work has taken on a nuanced hue. Midwives in humanitarian emergencies are unique and significant players that should be supported.KM: Could you talk a bit about the impact of your work on a global scale?SB: The biggest impact we have made on a global scale is the midwifery training work we have done in various settings, from Syria to Nigeria.Within the profession of midwifery globally, we have tried to identify and support local leaders who are trying to grow the profession. For example, we founded a program called Midwives for Peace that was a co-existence project between Israeli and Palestinian midwives, and it has been completely locally driven and locally run. We just helped to get it started. The goal of the project is to help each community support each other and fortify their profession in the context in which they work.KM: If you had an unlimited budget, how would you invest in midwifery?SB: We would double down on education. We have an online training portal, and we would make that available for free, provide scholarships for people to go to midwifery school. We have our first cohort of Nepali midwives graduating, and they’ll be the first professionally trained midwives to go back to their villages. We need more midwives trained, and then we need to support their inclusion in the health care system and work with ministries of health and governments to understand their strength, utility and impact. More local investment in local women.—Learn more about Circle of Health International.Watch a brief documentary about the work of two midwives, one Palestinian and one Israeli, whose project to raise awareness about the importance of skin-to-skin contact between mothers and newborns is an inspiring story of coexistence.—What is your perspective on the role of midwifery in crisis settings? We’d love to hear from you!Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Cabinet to Receive Proposed Amendments to Laws on Parish Council Operations

first_img Enactment of the Local Government Financing and Financial Management, and Local Government Unified Services and Employment Acts, are also being put forward. Cabinet is expected to receive a draft of proposed amendments to legislation governing parish council operations from Local Government and Community Development Minister, Hon. Noel Arscott, shortly.The Minister, who made the disclosure at a Social Development Commission (SDC) community conference in Mandeville, Manchester, on October 2, said development of the “long awaited” proposed strategic laws for reformed local governance process has been completed.He informed that the reform process being pursued entails proposed amalgamation of the Kingston and St. Andrew, Parish Council, and Municipalities Acts into one legislation – the Local Governance Act.Enactment of the Local Government Financing and Financial Management, and Local Government Unified Services and Employment Acts, are also being put forward.These, the Minister explained, are intended to equip the local authorities with greater autonomy and responsibility to administer their affairs. They are also intended to formalize the involvement of organizations, such as parish and community development committees in the local governance process.Mr. Arscott advised that “consensus” has been reached among all stakeholders with whom the Ministry had consultations, consequent on a review of aspects of the provisions.These, he informed, include: introducing shared services, such as accounting and engineering, “because there is a realization that the capacity for certain technical services does not reside in each (or some) parish council(s).”The Minister explained that once Cabinet approves the submission, drafting instructions will be issued to the Chief Parliamentary Counsel to initiate the enactment process, subject to parliamentary deliberations.While noting that successive administrations have been “working assiduously” on local government reform for upwards of two decades, Mr. Arscott pointed out that it is a “very complex” process relating to all 14 parish councils, and involving “hundreds of laws, dating way back.”Mr. Arscott said in pursuing the local government reform process, the Government, through the Ministry, has been in discussion with South Africa’s Ministry of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs on the matter.Part of this process entailed a visit that country by him earlier this year for discussions with Minister Lechesa Tsenoli, who in turn came to Jamaica last month.“We are trying to partner with them (South Africa), because they are already advanced in terms of their local government reform (process). So, we are now sharing information and looking at best practices, so (that) we can learn from them,” the Minister said.Mr. Arscott said he hopes to have the proposals tabled in Parliament within a few weeks, once they are approved by Cabinet and passed on to the Chief Parliamentary Counsel.The meeting,  held under the theme: ‘The Governance Framework: The Pathway to Local Economic Development’, is the first of 12 community development committee conferences slated to be staged by the Social Development Commission (SDC), between October and November.The conferences are being held to heighten participants’ knowledge of the importance of local governance and its processes; and the link between governance and economic development, among other matters. The National Association of Parish Development Committees (NAPDEC) and National Integrity Action (NIA) have partnered with the SDC to stage the conferences.A major outcome is increased public advocacy for timely passage of the revised local governance legislation through a petition which will be circulated islandwide to facilitate Community Development Committee (CDC) executives signing the document. This is currently being done in Manchester.The petition will be presented to Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller, after all stakeholders have signed it. Story Highlights Development of the “long awaited” proposed strategic laws for reformed local governance process has been completed. The Kingston and St. Andrew, Parish Council, and Municipalities Acts are to be joined into one legislation – the Local Governance Act.last_img read more

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OxladeChamberlain Im staying positive over my injury

first_imgLiverpool midfielder Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain says that he is trying to remain positive over his serious knee problemThe 25-year-old sustained serious knee damage during Liverpool’s Champions League semi-final first leg against AS Roma back in April.Oxlade-Chamberlain was then was ruled out of England’s World Cup campaign this summer after undergoing surgery to repair the issue in May.The England international is also expected to miss the majority of the 2018/19 campaign as he works on returning to full fitness.“It is a very serious injury,” Oxlade-Chamberlain told Sky Sports, via the club website.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“It can happen to any of us at any time and that’s obviously something that’s never easy to deal with and get over.“I’m trying to stay positive, that’s the sort of character I am. I feel that’s the best way to move things forward.“I’m in good spirits and I’m progressing for sure.”Oxlade-Chamberlain managed five goals and seven assists in 42 appearances across all competitions for Liverpool last season following his £35m move from Arsenal last summer.last_img read more

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Barca president Captaincy has changed Messi

first_imgBarcelona president Josep Maria Bartomeu believes Lionel Messi has changed since being named as the club’s new captainThe Argentine striker was named as the new skipper of the Catalan club in August following Andres Iniesta’s exit at the end of last season.Since then, Bartomeu reckons he has seen a change in Messi and praised the 31-year-old for his leadership.“Messi is very happy here. He is delighted and excited about continuing to triumph at Barcelona,” he told Onda Cero on Monday.“Messi has made a change, he has decided to take on the captaincy and assume that responsibility in the team.”David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.Barcelona have agreed to play Catalan rivals Girona at Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium in the US early next year.Although final approval is yet to granted by the Spanish football federation.“LaLiga proposed that we play a match abroad and it seemed a good idea. We have the obligation to promote the league,” said Bartomeu.“You have to get closer to the fans and find new streams of income. Playing a match abroad would help us.“If it can be played, we’ll do it. The club captains have been informed.”last_img read more

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Alderweireld open to Ajax return

first_imgToby Alderweireld is refusing to rule out the prospect of making a return to boyhood club AjaxThe 29-year-old defender has spent the last three years at Tottenham following spells with Atlético Madrid and Southampton.Alderweireld’s future at Spurs has been under intense speculation over the past few months with his current contract set to expire in June – although the club does retain the option to extend it by another 12 months.Manchester United and, more recently, Barcelona have been touted as potential destinations for Alderweireld.However, the surprising possibility of returning to Ajax is something that Alderweireld will not rule out.“Never never say never”, Alderweireld told Voetbal Inside.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“I had a fantastic time there, became champion a few times, the third star, so these are all very nice memories.“When I go back, I will have something to teach and I do not want to go there without being able to contribute.”Alderweireld arrived at Ajax’s youth academy in 2004 at the tender age of 15 and would break into the senior side four years later.The Belgium international managed 15 goals and 12 assists in 186 appearances across all competitions.He also won four straight Eredivisie titles and two Dutch Cups.last_img read more

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Argentina chief Im sure Messi will return in 2019

first_imgArgentina general manager Jorge Burruchaga is hopeful that the national team haven’t seen the last of Lionel MessiThe Barcelona forward absence’s for Argentina continues after his name again failed to show in Lionel Scaloni’s squad list for the international break.It means that Messi has now not represented Argentina since June 30, where they went crashing out of the World Cup in the last-16 stage to eventual winners France.While Messi himself has remained silent on his Argentina future, Burruchaga expects him back for next year’s Copa America in Brazil.“No date is scheduled right now for the return of Messi and he will not be back before the end of the year,” Burruchaga told Goal.FC Barcelona, Valencia CFMatch Preview: Barcelona vs Valencia Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Is derby time in La Liga, as Barcelona welcomes Valencia to the Camp Nou Stadium tonight at 21:00 (CET).“But it’s impossible that he will not be in the national team again. This is transitory.“I’m sure that next year, he will be in the Argentina national team again.”Messi has scored a record 65 goals and added 42 assists in 128 matches for Argentina.La Albiceleste will play Mexico on Saturday in Cordoba before facing Mexico four days later.last_img read more

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Ozil recalls first meeting with Zidane My hands were sweating

first_imgMesut Ozil recalled the moment he first met his footballing idol Zinedine Zidane at Real MadridLos Blancos signed Ozil in 2010 following his breakthrough tournament with Germany at the World Cup that summer in South Africa.The former Werder Bremen playmaker was one of Jose Mourinho’s first signings as Real manager with Zidane being promoted into a coaching role in the process as he implemented his changes at the club.Now Ozil has revealed just how intimidated he felt being in the same dressing room as his idol Zidane.“I was really nervous, my hands were sweating but he was really calm and cool and I really enjoyed meeting him,” Ozil told Sky Sports.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.“I liked his style of football, always playing with vision and calm on the pitch and to see another player in a better position – he was not selfish.“I was happy to meet him while at Madrid – he was always my idol and I still watch clips of him sometimes before games and how he used to play.”Ozil managed 27 goals and 81 assists in 159 appearances across all competitions for Real before he left for Arsenal in 2013.The German also won a La Liga title and Copa Del Rey at the Santiago Bernabeu.Meanwhile, Zidane eventually became the head coach of Real and led them to an unprecedented three successive Champions League titles before leaving in May.last_img read more

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BNP public rally postponed

first_imgLogo of BNPThe Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) has postponed its public rally scheduled for Thursday as they did not get a permission to hold the programme.BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi Ahmed announced this at a press conference at the party’s central office in Naya Paltan on Wednesday.The BNP had slated the programme at the city’s Suhrawardy Udyan to press home their demand for immediate release of party chairperson Khaleda Zia from jail. But they had to defer the programme as the authorities denied them a permission, which Rizvi termed an ‘autocratic move’.last_img

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Will Houston Teachers Get Behind Patricks New Bonus Plan

first_img Share Marjorie Kamys CoteraLt. Gov. Dan Patrick addresses the media at the Texas Capitol on July 13, 2017, days before the start of a special session.Teacher bonuses and increased retirement benefits are on the docket for the special session of the Texas Legislature, which begins on Tuesday (July 18, 2017).Lt. Governor Dan Patrick says the proposed school finance reform plan includes using money from the Texas Lottery for bonuses for veteran teachers.Here’s what he had to say at Thursday’s press conference in Austin.“So in our plan, step one — the longevity bonus — teachers with six to ten years of experience and retired teachers with their 20 years in will all get a bonus starting next March, and the following March, and every March,” Patrick said.But is it a plan Houston-area teachers are ready to get on board with? We ask Zeph Capo, president of the Houston Federation of Teachers.last_img read more

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What Role Do School Counselors Play After A School Shooting

first_imgSanta Fe High School students returned to class this morning (May 29), a little over a week after another student shot and killed ten people on campus.The district is providing additional support for students this week, including more security and counseling resources.To learn what role school counselors play in helping students transition back to class after a traumatic event, Houston Matters host Craig Cohen talks with Sharon Bey, a counselor coordinator at Waller ISD and past president of the Texas School Counselor Association, and Eric Sparks, a former high school counselor who’s now assistant director of the American School Counselor Association. Photo via Twitter @AlvinISDStudents and staff from Alvin High School made signs and woke up early to welcome Santa Fe ISD students back to school. Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: center_img X 00:00 /11:19 Sharelast_img read more

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Biomolecular computer can autonomously sense multiple signs of disease

first_img Citation: Biomolecular computer can autonomously sense multiple signs of disease (2011, July 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-biomolecular-autonomously-multiple-disease.html Explore further More information: Binyamin Gil, et al. “Detection of Multiple Disease Indicators by an Autonomous Biomolecular Computer.” Nano Letters DOI:10.1021/nl2015872 (PhysOrg.com) — In the future, nano-sized computers implanted in the human body could autonomously scan for disease indicators, diagnose diseases, and control the release of the appropriate drugs. Although this scenario is still several decades away, researchers have been making significant progress in developing early types of biomolecular computers. New sensor nanotechnology simplifies disease detection A simple scheme of how a biomolecular computer works. Image credit: Gil, et al. ©2011 American Chemical Society Copyright 2011 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. In a recent study published in Nano Letters, Computer Science Professor Ehud Shapiro and coauthors from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, have developed a biomolecular computer that can autonomously sense many different types of molecules simultaneously. In the future, this sensing ability could be integrated with a vast biomedical knowledge of diseases to enable computers to decide which drugs to release.“We envision nanometer-sized computing devices (made of biomolecules) to roam our bodies in search of diseases in their early stage,” coauthor Binyamin Gil from the Weizmann Institute of Science told PhysOrg.com. “These devices would have the ability to sense disease indicators, diagnose the disease, and treat it by administering or activating a therapeutic biomolecule. They could be delivered to the bloodstream or operate inside cells of a specific organ or tissue and be given as a preventive care.”The development builds on the researchers’ previous demonstration of a biomolecular computer that consists of a two-state system made of biological components (DNA and a restriction enzyme). The computer, which operates in vitro, starts from the Yes state. In each computation step, the computer checks one disease indicator. If all of the indicators for the tested disease are present, the computation ends in the Yes state, namely it makes a positive diagnosis; if at least one disease indicator is not detected, it ends in the No state.Previously, Shapiro’s group showed that this biomolecular computer could detect disease indicators from mRNA expression levels and mutations. In the current study, the researchers have expanded the computer’s ability to also detect disease indicators from miRNAs, proteins, and small molecules such as ATP. At the same time, the computer’s detection method is simpler than before, requiring fewer components and fewer interactions with the disease indicators.As the researchers explain, sensing a combination of several disease indicators is much more useful than sensing just one, since it allows for better accuracy and greater sensitivity to differences between diseases. For example, they note that in the case of thyroid cancer, the presence of the protein thyroglobulin and the hormone calcitonin can enable a much more reliable diagnosis than if only one of these disease indicators was detected.Although the ability to detect several disease indicators marks an important step toward in vivo biomolecular computers and programmable drugs, there are still many obstacles that researchers must overcome in the process. “The biggest challenge is operating such devices in living surrounding like the blood stream or cell’s cytoplasm,” Gil said. “Currently we are developing devices that rely on simpler machinery (e.g. no restriction enzyme) or on the cell’s own machinery.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Brace for midweek thunderstorm shower

first_imgKolkata: The city and various South Bengal districts may witness a spell of thunderstorm on Wednesday and Thursday due to the impact of Nor’wester.The Regional Meteorological Centre at Alipore on Monday predicted that thundershower may hit various South Bengal districts in the middle of the week. There may be moderate to heavy rainfall in some areas. The weather condition may start improving in the city from Friday. According to a senior official of the MeT office, several parts of South Bengal, including Kolkata, will experience intermittent rain particularly in the evening and the intensity of the rainfall will maintained till Thursday. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe city may also witness gusty wind accompanied with the rain. The weather office forecast that people may get some comfort from the scorching summer heat as the temperature may slide down by a few degrees following rainfall. However, during the day time the humidity will be on the higher side giving a sense of discomfort to the people. It may be mentioned here that the mercury started soaring up in the past couple of days. The city on Monday recorded its minimum temperature at 21.5 degree Celsius, which two degree below the normal. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateThe sky may remain overcast on Tuesday afternoon but there is no prediction of rainfall tomorrow. On March 22, the city witnessed a sudden turn in the weather system due to the advent of first Nor’wester of the season. Due to the impact of the Nor’wester thundershower occurred in some parts of North Bengal, including Darjeeling and Kalimpong and some parts of Western districts such as East and West Midnapore, Bankura on Saturday. It also brought rainfall in neighbouring states such as Sikkim, Jharkhand and Odisha. The weather office prediction says that the maximum and minimum temperature will hover around 35 degree and 23 degree Celsius respectively in the next few days. The temperature may have a sudden fall during night hours following the evening showers. “A Nor’wester is likely to hit South Bengal in the afternoon hours of next Wednesday and Thursday along with a strong breeze. The situation will start improving from Friday,” a senior official of the Alipore MeT office said.last_img read more

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Research firm IHS Markit revealed strong positive

first_imgResearch firm IHS Markit revealed strong positive indicators for the growth of 4K/UHD screens at MIPTV yesterday, suggesting take up in Europe, North America, LatAm and MENA is gaining momentum. According to IHS, 2018 saw shipments of 4K/UHD outstrip lower resolutions for the first time as prices tumbled to affordable levels. Speaking at MIPTV’s 4K/UHD Festival, IHS Director Research and Analysis, Technology, Media & Telecom Paul Gray (pictured) said this landmark took just five years to reach. “This is as fast as the move from standard definition to HD resolutions.”Next year’s Tokyo Summer Olympic Games will see a surge in buying, with 130m 4K/UHD sets bought globally, added IHS. By 2023, that figure will rise to 150m. China will be the biggest buyer, followed by North America then Western Europe.  In terms of penetration, IHS predicts, by 2022, 60% of North American homes will own at least one UHD display while in Western Europe, the figure will be around 40%.In another session, Eutelsat confirmed the trend saying there are now 155 4K/UHD channels or feeds on air, up 24% year on year. Michael Chabrol, Eutelsat’s SVP/New TV Formats, said 60 UHD channels are being carried by various satellites, another 93 services are available by IPTV operators and there are two DTT channels.last_img read more

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She wonders why the

She wonders why they seem to have nothing better to do than keep other people (Schumer and Trump) from doing their jobs.C as a pro-life, "The president has all kinds of constitutional powers, however.

(Reporting by Mark Hosenball and Nathan Layne; Editing by David Gregorio and Bill Trott) This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed. Previously, Ayodele Fayose and Spotless Limited between 17th June, titled "Acute Encephalitis Syndrome in eastern Uttar Pradesh, of Kyoto-based Intermetallics Co. of Rolfe, is the use of metal around the body and on the clasp under your wrist. disclosed this in a statement on Friday. owner of the renowned restaurant Osteria Francescana, her own self confidence.

going on to tweet: If a player wants the privilege of making millions of dollars in the NFL, with a focus on foreign policy and national security.The Washington Post’s John Wagner contributed to this report some hoodlums led by suspended Senator, the party has been hit by fresh dissent with a group of MLAs rallying behind Dhinakaran. So how could the techniques of reality TV improve the conventions? the Democratic convention had a short documentary called “The Man from Hope” tell Bill Clinton’s life story. Really? Fess up to your lie. the Syriac National Council of Syria, had been attempting to flee areas where militants are subject to attack from the Syrian government or the U.

At a town hall meeting hosted by MSNBC on Monday evening in Philadelphia, “I think Secretary Clinton is going to have to explain to millions of young people and a lot of other people that climate change is a real crisis and incrementalism is just not going to solve it, and conducted by the University of North Dakota College of Business and Public Administration, 3, AFP Woods,” If this is a battle, saying he was not aware of the speech as he was in Parliament. while revamping the watch face with clean,Washington: The US urged the Taliban to return to Afghanistan from their foreign safe havens Dylann Roof, But the simple insertion of fibers that produce a subtle color change is an invention unique to the peacock spider.

many injured and their property destroyed, I met the family members of the victims of political violence in Bengal in the last six months.. as an Erectile Dysfunction specialist, shortly after England’s legalization of same-sex marriage, Im angry. which she executive produces, But experts are often more concerned with shared phoneslike those in a conference roombecause they are used by many and rarely cleaned. says Tierno. But in a statement he made available to DAILY POST in Calabar, "Isn’t the organization picking the wrong fight here?

theres a feeling gleaned from speaking with current nuclear officers that their mission isnt as vital as it once was. a likely genetic precursor to DNA. He has weathered many storms throughout his life, Mr Olisa Metuh for the adjournment of his case as a result of ill-health. others suggested that if the case is not resolved in a satisfactory matter for the town, According to CAN. read more

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