Attendance at Valencia park drops

first_img“Now that they’re going to stay and they’re going to become more family-friendly, I think they can probably reverse that trend,” said Jack Kyser, chief economist with the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. The attendance estimates were compiled by Economics Research Associates and a group called TEA, based on information from operators, historical trends, the investment banking community and other sources. The report says Disneyland, which last year celebrated its 50th anniversary and opened an improved Pirates of the Caribbean ride, had 14.73 million visitors, an increase of 1.2 percent. Disney’s California Adventure, which opened Monsters Inc., had 5.95 million visitors, an increase of 2.1 percent, according to the report. Attendance stayed flat at Universal Studios Hollywood, with 4.7 million visitors, according to the report. Knott’s Berry Farm in Buena Park had 3.67million visitors, an increase of 2 percent, the report stated. Most Southern California theme parks saw an increase in attendance in 2006, but Magic Mountain in Valencia saw a 10percent dip, an industry report issued Thursday says. Six Flags California’s Magic Mountain had 2.55 million visitors, putting it 20th on the list of top North American parks, according to estimates published by InPark Magazine. Magic Mountain, which is owned by Six Flags Inc., declined to comment on the attendance estimates. But in December, Six Flags CEO Mark Shapiro said Magic Mountain attendance dropped during the second half of last year. Shapiro blamed the decline on customer uncertainty from the park being temporarily up for sale, an offer that has since been withdrawn. In Southern California’s competitive theme park industry, Knott’s gets customers from being so close to Disneyland, and Universal Studios benefits from being in tourist-heavy Los Angeles, analysts said. “The reality is, about every two years you have to have a major new attraction to call attention to yourself,” Kyser said. Magic Mountain, which opened the Tatsu roller coaster in May, draws plenty of Southern California residents, Kyser said. An annual pass at Magic Mountain is cheaper than passes offered at Disneyland, Knott’s or Universal Studios. “I think that one of the things that they have to their benefit are those Warner Brothers characters, the Bugs Bunny and Wiley Coyote and all those other characters,” said Martin Palicki, editor-in-chief of InPark Magazine. “I think those are incredibly valuable; they’re certainly more valuable than any brand that Universal has.” Attendance was up 1.5 percent at North America’s top 20 theme parks last year, with nearly 120million total visitors, according to the report. alex.dobuzinskis@dailynews.com (661) 257-5253160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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England Euro 2016 song: Four Lions

first_imgWith no official England song to accompany this summer’s Euro 2016 tournament, the stage is clear for other contenders to soundtrack the summer.Step forward the Four Lions.Shaun Ryder, Paul Oakenfold, Kermit and Goldie have joined forces to release ‘We Are England’, which kicks off with evocative 90’s rave keyboard stabs.The video features all four ‘Lions’ as well as Happy Mondays legend Bez and even a Scotsman, in the shape of Trainspotting author Irvine Welsh.Check it out, above.last_img

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Prep football playoff brackets unveiled

first_imgThe regular season is over, win-loss records have been reset and the successes and failures of the past 11 weeks mean little now as the North Coast Section football playoffs are set to begin this Friday. The California Interscholastic Federation unveiled its 2018 North Coast Section playoff brackets last Sunday and eight local teams made the cut, with a few squads receiving high praise from the selection committee.Division IIIEureka (10-0)It’s championship or bust for the Eureka Loggers. …last_img

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Fortune cookie

first_imgRishi Kapoor loves recalling how he felt like a prodigal son when he first visited the Johnnie Walker distillery in Scotland. The Scotch label, he remembers feeling at that time, owed his family at a least a square metre of land for the services it had rendered to it for three generations.The whisky-gargling generation of Bollywood heroes has made way for Bacardi-loving hunks. The three Khans of Mumbai’s dream factory – Aamir, Shah Rukh and Salman – are famous for their love for Bacardi and Coke, so is Sanjay Dutt, and fawning film journalists dine out on stories of how Salman and Sanjay just breeze through their parts even after a night dedicated to Cuba’s exiled rum.But if there’s a drink that’s synonymous with Hindi cinema, it’s VAT 69. Think of any villain of the yesteryear, from Ajit to Pran, and there’s bound to be the light green bottle of VAT 69 somewhere in the background of the frame.Maybe the satraps of Bollywood couldn’t bear to see their favourite Johnnie Walker Black being sullied by bad company.VAT 69′ s biggest Bollywood moment, however, was when a very drunk Shatrughan Sinha lipsynched Zindagi Imtihaan Leti Hai swigging from a bottle of VAT 69 in the Manmohan Desaiblockbuster Naseeb (1981).For reasons I haven’t been able to fathom, the whisky of the villains went out of favour in the retail market despite all the free publicity it got from Bollywood, but VAT 69 is being re-launched in a new bottle and will be available across the country for Rs 900 (its price point, clearly, makes it the poor cousin of the guy who keeps walking). VAT 69, incidentally, is owned by Diageo, whose topselling brand is Johnnie Walker.advertisementThe world of alcoholic beverages can be incestuous.Will Bollywood be drinking to its health? I doubt it. Bollywood’s new generation tends to swing between Bacardi and wine ( Winchester- educated Saif Ali Khan is said to be quite a wine connoisseur, for instance), but VAT 69′ s recurrence in popular culture doesn’t cease to surprise me.Sir Ernest Shackleton took a stock of VAT 69 with him on the 1914 Imperial Trans- Antarctic Expedition. Gregory Peck drank it in the 1949 World War II film, Twelve O’Clock High.It shows up frequently in James Hadley Chase novels, and in Fawlty Towers, and puts in a guest appearance in Raymond Chandler’s The Lady in the Lake . And in the film version of Graham Greene’s Our Man in Havana, starring Alec Guinness, one of vacuum cleaner salesman James Wormwold’s agents is found killed with a bottle of VAT 69 in his hand.Even the high priestess of feminist literature Simone de Beauvoir had a thing for VAT 69. A character in one of her lesser- known novels, She Came to Stay (1943), makes this statement that’s often quoted in cocktail parties: ” When I’m rich and run my own house, I’ll always keep a bottle of VAT 69 in my cupboard.” That’s a line Diageo can filch for its promos. California Burger doesn’t sound any goodCan you imagine a Superbowl final without hot dogs or a Kentucky Derby sans a Mint Julep, or an English Premier League match without the lager fumes blowing across the stadium?Every big-ticket sports event becomes synonymous with a kind of food (or drink), so what is the signature offering of the Commonwealth Games going to be? We now know all about the kitchens that have magically become operational in the Games Village but what about the appetites of spectators?With Fast Trax, a lesser-known fast food chain backed by the Rs 1,000-crore meat processing company, Hind Group, getting the contract at the last minute – as we have come to expect by now – for catering to spectators and the media during the Games, it looks like the event will be remembered for the California Burger.I’m not being hyper-nationalistic, but shouldn’t thick chicken burger with mint yogurt sauce-in place of the traditional mayonnaise- been named after hamaari Dilli? I would’ve loved to dig into a New Delhi Burger, or Shera Tikki Wrap. And I would have wolfed down a Purani Dilli take on the vada pao with aloo tikki and chhole.Such finer details must have escaped Fast Trax – after all, it has had to plan in record for over 16 lakh meals that it estimates it’ll serve across 97 outlets at all the 12 stadiums during the Games. It promises to flip a burger in three seconds. I’ll be around to see if Fast Trax delivers on its promise.A little bit of trivia: Siraj Qureshi, who heads the Hind Group, is also the chief of the Indo- Islamic Cultural Centre, which has a fine restaurant that you enter, literally, through a back gate for a meal you would normally get only at Jama Masjid.advertisementBurger for veg buffs If you’re vegetarian and are tired of having the McAloo Tikki Burger, which insults both the aloo tikki and the burger, I strongly recommend Choko-la’s Lentil Burger. The name, let me forewarn you, can be misleading, for the burger patty does not have any daal. Instead, it’s made with kidney beans (rajmah) that are spiked with crushed walnuts and masala. It tastes different and its crunchy exterior quilts a melt-in-the-mouth core that entices you with its simple charm. I only wish chefs across the industry get innovative and make life peppier for the vegetarians.last_img read more

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In a need of a good coach: Team India

first_imgWhatmoreViswanathHopefully when the Indians queue up at Heathrow immigration on their tour of England, they will know who their coach is. What we already know is that Indian cricket is adamantly refusing to move up the evolutionary ladder. Going by the noise, this could be 2000, the first time the,WhatmoreViswanathHopefully when the Indians queue up at Heathrow immigration on their tour of England, they will know who their coach is. What we already know is that Indian cricket is adamantly refusing to move up the evolutionary ladder. Going by the noise, this could be 2000, the first time the Indians hired a foreign coach. The conscientious objectors to the idea have remained the same, their arguments have remained the same, and their choice of alternative candidates does not feature any new names. At least none that have made public.Sri Lanka and Pakistan, with equally capricious Boards, now know how to hunt for coaches. They put out ads, invite candidates. India’s method involves big-name committees, shooting in the dark, Chinese whispers and conspiracy theories.While other countries pick coaches in a planned manner, the BCCI believes in shooting in the darkWhat do the Indians look for when picking a coach? Er, who cares because coaches, apparently, come in only two kinds: Indian and foreign. Other qualities like a track record, the ability to manage men, to work hard, to build trust, are, apparently, built into passports, rather than the men carrying them.Dav Whatmore, as is known, is the front-runner but could be part of a package deal which includes G.R. Viswanath as batting consultant. South African Graham Ford is a late entrant with backers in the team, but more names will be thrown into the meeting for dramatic effect.In 1990, former India batsman Nari Contractor went to England to find a coach for the Mumbai Cricket Association’s bowling scheme. When no one impressed him, he returned and was not satisfied until he ran into former England fast bowler Frank Tyson. Twenty-seven bowlers from that scheme played first-class cricket and one of them, Paras Mhambrey, is a coach himself today. That’s the effect the right man can have in a job.advertisementLike Mhambrey, there are other former players who have committed themselves to cricket coaching like students, rather than gurus. Robin Singh and Venkatesh Prasad are already with the team. It won’t be long before an Indian heads our support staff. But to push for an Indian for the sake of his Indianness is meaningless.This is no defence of or campaign for What more. But the Sri Lanka-born Australian must be wondering what is it about him that has so incensed two of our luminaries, Kapil Dev and Sunil Gavaskar. When asked about Whatmore taking the job he once did (without any great distinction) Kapil Dev responded, “Who is Whatmore? Why do we need to talk about Whatmore?” So often has Kapil paaji replied to questions by asking “Who is…?” in his fabricated earthiness, that he should consider patenting the response to prevent other rent-a-quote artists from making capital out of it.Sunil Gavaskar’s recent newspaper columns have contained a series of sniper attacks on Whatmore. May 23: “While it is no secret that (Habibul) Bashar is not the greatest tactical captain, what was the dressing room doing?” May 26: “Bangladesh’s limited success… is largely a matter of a good team playing them having a bad day… If eyes aren’t opened after this, then we are a myopic nation.” May 28: “What more does it take to prove that they have been plain lucky in their odd oneday wins and have made zilch progress in Test cricket? Nothing more, I guess.” You get the drift.For a columnist, all this is fair game but Gavaskar was also part of the panel to pick the new coach. Couldn’t a candidate believe Gavaskar has it in for him? Didn’t this strident public stance muddy the process? Besides, is any of it constructive? As India staggered into a new season, the search to find a perfect fit for their backroom turned into a battle of wills, a contest of non-issues and an exercise in self-aggrandisement.last_img read more

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Motorola P30 Play spotted on official website, may launch soon

first_imgAfter the iPhone X-like Motorola P30 and P30 Note were announced for China recently, we now have the Motorola P30 Play, which completes the trio. The phone was briefly listed on the official website before it was taken down. The P30 Play has been spotted on the company’s website previously as well, which led us to believe the phone would be announced soon. While the phone is still to be officially announced, the product page revealed pretty much everything we needed to know.The Motorola P30 Play is the cheapest in the P30 family. The phone will be powered by a Snapdragon 625 chipset with 4GB of RAM. It will sport a 5.88-inch HD+ (720×1520) display with a notch similar to the P30 and P30 Note. The device will be offered with 64GB of internal storage which should be expandable. There is no mention of any other variant on offer so this might be the only option.Play models in Motorola’s portfolio typically boast of large batteries for gaming enthusiasts, but the website mentions a 3,000mAh battery for the P30 Play, which is the same as the regular P30. In fact, the P30 Note houses a massive 5,000mAh battery, which is the one to choose for gaming and media needs. As for the cameras, the P30 Play will get a 13MP + 2MP setup on the back and an 8-megapixel camera on the front. The cameras will get some AI support as well like smart beauty, night scene and portrait mode, among others.advertisementThe P30 and P30 Note have been called out by people for being too similar to the iPhone X and the P30 Play seems to be no different. As per the marketing images, the phone has a shiny stainless steel-like frame and all-glass design, which looks especially like the iPhone X in white. The back panel shows a vertical dual camera setup and the Moto batwing logo which will house a fingerprint sensor. The device will ship with Android 8.0 Oreo with ZUI 4.0 on top in China.As for the pricing, the Motorola P30 Play will cost CNY 1,899 (approx Rs 20,000). As of now, there is no mention of when the Play model will be announced officially in China.last_img read more

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Free webinar: Turn first-time donors into repeat givers

first_imgHow many of your first-time donors go on to give again? What kind of impact would it have on your fundraising if you could retain more donors each year? We’ve asked two of the best fundraising experts to share their secrets. Join our free webinar on Tuesday, September 24 at 1pm EDT to learn from Jay Love and Tom Ahern as they show you how to create a communication plan that will help you retain more donors and raise more money. Register here.If you’d like to see more long-term benefits from your year-end fundraising and donor acquisition efforts, you do not want to miss this session.Turn First-Time Donors Into Repeat DonorsTuesday, September 24th 2013 1 pm EDTlast_img

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2014 Year-End Giving Results in Big Win Online for Nonprofits

first_imgWant more insight on how online giving is growing? Stay tuned! In February, we’ll release our Digital Giving Index, which will take a closer look at online giving trends. We’ll share where, how, and how much donors gave across our digital channels in 2014. How did your year-end fundraising campaigns perform? Chime in with your experiences in the comments and let us know what you plan to build on—or change—in 2015! It’s no secret that year-end giving is an important source of donation dollars for most nonprofits. Last year was no exception and we saw a lot of “generous procrastinators” giving big online in December 2014. When we looked at organizations who received donations on the Network for Good platform in both December 2013 and December 2014, we saw an 18% increase in total donation volume year over year. A few other important notes about year-end giving results:The total number of donations also grew year over year. In December 2014, 22% more donations were made to charities through Network for Good compared to December 2013.As expected, #GivingTuesday was a big driver of December donations on the Network for Good platform in 2014, with over $4.5M raised on December 2. This represented a 148% increase over total donation volume on #GivingTuesday 2013.December giving also accounted for 30% of all online donations made to nonprofits through Network for Good in 2014, with 10% of all annual giving happening on the last three days of the year. This stat has remained consistent for the last 5 years, underscoring the significance of year-end giving on overall fundraising results.The average gift size for the month of December also increased by 6.5% compared to 2013.last_img read more

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Rethinking Family Planning in China

first_imgPosted on July 6, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Family planning laws in China, particularly the one child policy, are being challenged by high profile scholars and other individuals this week. The Wall Street Journal‘s China Realtime Report explains the issue and why we are seeing increased activism surrounding family planning in China:A group of 15 prominent Chinese scholars issued a open letter [in Chinese] on Thursday calling for a rethink of country’s family-planning laws, arguing that the law in its present form is incompatible with China’s increasing respect for human rights and need for sustainable economic development.It was the second open call for reform of the one-child policy this week, and comes less than a month after the shocking story of a seven-months pregnant woman forced undergo an abortion ignited a firestorm of anger online.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Learning From Failures? Op-ed Calls for Better Use of Negative Findings

first_imgShare this: Posted on February 4, 2013March 21, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Last weekend, The New York Times featured an op-ed by journalist Sam Loewenberg on research published last summer in PLOS Medicine, “Community Mobilization in Mumbai Slums to Improve Perinatal Care and Outcomes: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.” For anyone interested in the challenges related to improving maternal health in cities, the PLOS article is a fascinating read and, in fact, it is part of the MHTF-PLOS collaboration on Maternal Health. Loewenberg highlights this article for a reason that comes up in many discussions of how to develop better maternal health interventions: the pressure to highlight only success, and, in particular, to downplay research findings that show interventions falling short of actually improving maternal and newborn health.As Loewenberg writes:                            The travails of the Newborn Health project aren’t unique. What is noteworthy is that when the project did not work as planned, the team reported it openly and in detail, providing potentially valuable information for other researchers.   It is a provocative point, and one that comes up often in our discussions of how to better address the biggest challenges for improving maternal health. In fact, it was a major topic at GMHC2013, as Lancet editor Richard Horton led the opening plenary session, which had the theme “Science for activism: How evidence can create a movement for maternal health. The session even included discussion of a hypothetical “journal of failures.”What is more, the op-ed provides an interesting follow-up to the initial research article:Last year they rebooted. They set up small centers that offer basic health services like immunization, feeding, family planning and help navigating the city’s convoluted health and social service systems. So far, providing concrete services, rather than just advice on collective organizing, seems to be more in tune with the needs of people in the slums.Clearly, with a new phase of work underway in Mumbai, it remains to be seen whether the work in Mumbai will yield results. In the meantime, it is worth revisiting the original article along with this weekend’s op-ed. Together, they touch on many of the most compelling challenges for the field today. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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