What to do – and avoid – when people ignore your message

first_imgImagine this. You’ve had a bad day at work. For months, you’ve been trying to persuade everyone to recycle. No one is complying. In frustration, you send out a mass email. “Only 5% of staff is putting paper in the recycling bins. We need to do better,” you say.Bad move.Why? When we are deciding whether to do something, we typically look to see what others are doing (“social proof”). As Robert Cialdini has thoroughly documented, we’re compliant creatures. If we see everyone else is ignoring the recycling bins, we’ll ignore them too.If you lament that no one is listening, no one will listen. By emphasizing inaction, you discourage the very behaviors you’re seeking.If you want action, make people feel they are are part of something positive: “We’re aiming for 100% of paper recycled by Friday – and we’re on our way there.”If you’re at a nonprofit that’s attracted hundreds of donations when you wanted thousands, don’t say, “Fewer people have supported our cause this year. So many kids are going without lunch. We really need your help.”Say: “Your donation will provide a school lunch to Jason every day this year. Join the hundreds of donors supporting kids like him.”Here are three tips for turning your frustration over what isn’t working into a message that compels action – instead of more inaction.1. The number one thing you can do to overcome resistance is to celebrate and publicize the people who are taking action. It will help inspire the ones who aren’t.2. If you don’t have enough people to highlight, try getting just one – preferably a person who people respect (or who has authority). Ask that person to explain why he or she is taking action. Maybe you’re not the best messenger and that person would be better.3. Last, if you can’t succeed on those fronts, try to convert just regular one person. Then ask that person to explain why they changed their mind. Converted skeptics are the most motivating of any messenger for the people who have failed to act. The people who aren’t on your side are more likely to relate to someone who once felt like them.Bottom line? Accentuate the positive if you want a positive reaction.last_img read more

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The number one villain in the way of good decisions

first_imgOne of the worst things we can do when making decisions is to frame them too narrowly. This can lead us to the wrong thought process – and false choices.As Dan Heath puts it in his new book, “The first villain of decision making, narrow framing, is the tendency to define our choices too narrowly, to see them in binary terms. We ask, ‘Should I break up with my partner or not?’ instead of ‘What are the ways I could make this relationship better?’ We ask ourselves, ‘Should I buy a new car or not?’ instead of ‘What’s the best way I could spend some money to make my family better off?’”Or – to put this in nonprofit terms – we ask, “Should we have an event or not? Should we blog or not? Should we get rid of that board member or not?”Dan’s new book Decisive is all about this kind of problem. Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work provides practical ways to beat narrow framing and other villains of decision making. Here are two of his tips (and I quote):1. Consider opportunity cost. If you are considering an investment of time or money, ask yourself, “What is the next best way I could spend this time/money?” If you can’t come up with any other combination that seems enticing, you should feel more confident that you’re making the right investment. 2. Multitrack your options. Always try to think AND not OR. Can you avoid choosing among your options and try several at once? For instance, if you’re deciding whether to invest time in Spanish lessons or ballroom dancing classes, do both for a while until one of them “wins.” Or, rather than hire one employee out of three candidates, could you give all three a 2-week consulting project so that you can compare their work on a real-world assignment?For more tips, join a free Network for Good webinar with Dan today at 1 pm Eastern. Register here.PS for fun, here is one of Dan’s great teaching videos on giving better presentations. It draws on his book, Made to Stick.last_img read more

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#GivingTuesday Success with a Staff of One: Q&A with CASS

first_imgWhat surprised you the most about #GivingTuesday? Because I experience and witness street harassment in Washington, DC, I can see the immediate importance of CASS’ mission. CASS mobilizes the community, through online and offline activism, to end public sexual harassment and assault in the DC metropolitan area. The campaign caught my eye and I was inspired to donate to it on #GivingTuesday. After I became a donor, I was delighted to receive some of the best post-donation communication ever! CASS has become one of my favorite nonprofit customers that we serve in DC. Thank you, Zosia, for sharing these details with us! If you want to put on a great #GivingTuesday campaign in 2015, we can help. Sign up to get Network for Good’s #GivingTuesday resources sent directly to your inbox. ZS: We started reaching out to donors four weeks in advance with soft touches via email. A week or two before, we gave all of them a call and asked folks to pledge. During the campaign, we reached out via email and social media. Afterward, everyone who donated received a special thank you email and a handwritten card. Zosia Sztykowski: We set a very ambitious goal for our end-of year-campaign—triple what we had done in the previous year—and based on our experience, we knew we’d have to get a strong start on #GivingTuesday for that to work. #GivingTuesday and New Year’s Eve are always the best giving days for us. Last year, Network for Good customer Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS) had a great #GivingTuesday campaign and won our prize for Best Social Campaign. The organization raised more than $17,000, came in fourth on our leaderboard for number of donors, and exceeded its original goal by 43%. ZS: We’re planning to reach out to more big donors way in advance to build a lot of momentum for #GivingTuesday. ZS: Yup, just one—me! Needless to say, I had some pretty serious tunnel vision going in late November/early December. But our volunteers are one of our strongest assets. They get the word out and solicit people in their networks. Every time we run a campaign like this, we don’t just reach multiples of our dollar goal, we also multiply the length our donor list, and I think this is directly attributable to our grassroots strategy. If a volunteer team is well organized and engaged—trained, prepared with all the materials they need, and knowledgeable about the organization and its fiscal needs—then they will follow through. Better yet, they’ll make it fun. It’s really about starting a conversation with volunteers that continues throughout the process. Because CASS had such great success on #GivingTuesday 2014, I wanted to do a Q&A with Zosia Sztykowski, the nonprofit’s executive director, to find out how they put together an amazing campaign with just one paid staff member.center_img How did you plan and set goals? ZS: Plan, plan, plan. Read about others’ successful strategies. Get your emails and your social media materials ready well in advance. Know that you’ll need all hands on deck on #GivingTuesday. Have a schedule—but be prepared to throw it out the window if you come up with a better idea at the last minute. How did you manage it all with very few paid staff members? CASS only has one paid staff member, right? And how did you make sure volunteers followed through with their commitments to help make it great? What is the number one piece of advice you would give to nonprofits doing #GivingTuesday for the first time? What will you differently this year? ZS: It’s amazing how generous everyone is even when every other organization is asking for donations at the same time. There’s something very touching about that. It really is a day about giving in the broad sense of the word. In 2014, we managed to quadruple what we raised in 2013 on #GivingTuesday because of this generosity. How did you reach out to donors before, during, and after?last_img read more

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From the Economist, Four Reasons for Progress in Bangladesh

first_imgPosted on November 16, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On November 2nd, the Economist published an article, Out of the Basket, that explores reasons for progress in a country they describe as one of the most intriguing puzzles in development: Bangladesh.From the story:City states apart, it is the world’s most densely populated country, with around 150m people crammed onto the delta of the Ganges and the Brahmaputra, an area regularly swept by devastating floods. Its private sector is weak and its government widely perceived as corrupt and dysfunctional.And yet Bangladesh has done better than most countries at improving the basic standard of living of its people. Bangladeshis can expect to live four years longer than Indians even though they are much poorer. The country has achieved some of the largest reductions in early deaths of infants, children and women in childbirth ever seen anywhere.So that is the puzzle: Bangladesh combines economic disappointment with social progress. The Economist suggests four factors to explain why.Read the full story here.For a more detailed report on development in Bangladesh from the Economist, click here.Read the accompanying editorial here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Building Community Capacity for Maternal Health Promotion: An Important Complement to Investments in Health Systems Strengthening

first_imgPosted on October 23, 2014November 2, 2016By: Ellen Brazier, Senior Technical Advisor for Community Engagement, EngenderHealth; Moustapha Diallo, Country Director, EngenderHealth GuineaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)EngenderHealth’s Fistula Care Plus project recently published the results of two studies in Guinea, one examining factors associated with institutional delivery and another investigating the effect of an intervention to build the capacity of community-level volunteers to promote maternal health care-seeking.Community empowerment and participation has long been recognized as a fundamental component of good health programming and as a critical strategy for improving access to and use of health services. However, as Susan B. Rifkin notes in a 2014 review of the literature, evidence directly linking community participation to improved health outcomes remains weak.For maternal health, the evidence gap is particularly acute. A 2014 World Health Organization (WHO) report reviewed a community mobilization approach that involves training and supporting women’s groups to carry out an ongoing process of problem exploration, priority-setting and action planning. The report concluded that, while such participatory approaches appeared to have a strong effect on neonatal mortality, there was no evidence of effects on maternal mortality or on other critical maternal health indicators, such as institutional delivery, delivery with a skilled attendant, or receiving the recommended number of antenatal care visits.While important questions remain about what types of interventions are effective in improving maternal health, our recent research in Guinea found that women’s use of maternal health services was associated with the existence of strong support systems for maternal health within communities. Our study focused on villages where community volunteers had been trained to raise awareness about obstetric risks, including fistula, to monitor pregnancies, and to promote women’s routine use of maternal heath services. We assessed the extent to which community members were aware of and relied on community-level cadres as a main source of maternal health information and advice.We also found that women living in communities with a high score on our community capacity index were much more likely to use maternal health services than those living in communities with weak support systems. In fact, women living in villages with a high score on our community capacity index were more than twice as likely to attend at least four antenatal care visits during their pregnancies, to deliver in a health facility, and to seek care for perceived obstetric complications.Building the capacity of community cadres and volunteers to promote maternal heath and monitor maternal health care-seeking is challenging, and it does not occur overnight. However, our findings suggest that such capacity-building investments are worth it since community-level cadres can be important catalysts for changes in maternal health care-seeking when they have the training, support, and recongiztion they need to serve as a resource in their communities. Such investments are an important complement to ongoing efforts to improve the availability, accessibility, and quality of the continuum of maternal health services.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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How to Write Awesome Emails Your Donors Want to Read

first_imgWhen you want to contact your donors, chances are, you email them. And so does everybody else.Your donors, through no fault of their own, have inboxes that are constantly bogged down with messages from various organizations, businesses, stores, news outlets, and bloggers. And it’s a rare person who actually reads all of it.So, how do you “cut through the clutter?” Here are five tips to ensure your email reaches (and resonates) with your donors:Tip 1: Think Before You Write.Before you start typing, think about why you’re writing. What is the purpose of the email? Is it to get the word out about your nonprofit’s recent activities? Is it to invite donors to an event? Is it an appeal for donations? The most effective emails focus on one thing. In other words, don’t combine the invitation to join the peer-to-peer campaign with a program announcement and sign off with a donation request to fund a new roof.Sure, you have a lot of things to tell your donors, but unless this is your periodic newsletter (and formatted as such), keep each email to one topic. If the need is vital, it deserves its own email. Need help narrowing down your list? Write down what you want to say and prioritize the messages by need.Once you’ve finalized your email’s topic, it’s time to start an outline. “Outline?” you say. “It’s just an email. What do I need an outline for?” True – emails should be short – but again, we’re going for effectiveness here, and there’s nothing like an outline to keep your writing focused.Here’s what I’m suggesting: At the top of your outline, write the goal of this email (e.g. “get donations to the Spring campaign”). Then, jot down whatever supporting points or bits of information that you think will encourage your readers to take that action. Once you’ve got this bit figured out, you have my permission to start writing.Tip 2: Craft a Killer Subject Line.The hardest thing to write is always the first line. It’s no different when it comes to an email. And there’s a lot of pressure resting on this line, especially when 35% of people say that their decision to open an email comes from subject line alone. How do you write a subject line that convinces your donors to click?In the words of author Ann Handley, ask yourself: “WWYO – What Would You Open?”Many studies have investigated what makes a subject line effective, and they all seem to agree on a few key points:Keep it short, but on point. Too short and it’s not explicit enough, too long and you’ll lose your reader’s attention. Practically speaking, if the subject line is too long, it will probably get cut off in the recipient’s email reader. A good rule of thumb is to aim for 6-8 words.Personalization helps. People love reading their names. Use tokens to include your recipients’ name in the subject line, so it appears you’re addressing each person directly. And, in general, the subject line should relate to something that sets the sender apart or fits with a more narrow interest. For example, “How your dollars are making a difference?”Avoid sounding like spam. Certain words are spam triggers, and if you use them in a subject line, your donors’ email provider could move the message directly to the spam folder. Also, don’t use all caps in the subject line. Not only does it look like you’re shouting, but it also makes your message more likely to end up in the spam folder. Your subject line should relate to what it’s introducing.Tip 3: Make Your Copy Count.The writer’s classic, The Elements of Style, argues that every word of every sentence should serve a purpose, or be deleted. You don’t have to be quite so ruthless with your emails, but you should try to keep your messages short and succinct. Write no more (and no less!) than it takes to get your message across. Some studies show that the optimal email length is 50-100 words. Of course, some of your emails may need to be longer (like an appeal) but, the principle of brevity still applies.The email marketing platform in Network for Good’s donor management system has pre-built templates for appeals, acknowledgements, and more. Curious to see it up close? Click here to request a demo.And while we’re on the subject of your email copy, remember that you’re writing to humans. Humans have a sense of humor. You don’t have to be all business, all the time. If people find your emails warm, friendly, and even a little entertaining, they’re more likely to keep reading time after time.What else can you do to make sure your email is effective? Stay away from large “spray and pray” blasts to your entire list. Breaking your list into smaller segments allows you to write more effective messages. For example, the thank you message you send to recurring donors should probably be different than the one you send send to first-time donors.Tip 4: Have a Clear Call to Action.The body of your email serves one purpose, to draw your recipients to your Call To Action (CTA).Your CTA is what you want your recipient to do after reading the email. For example, if the goal is asking for donations, the CTA would be “Donate now.”Your email should always have one goal and one CTA. Let me repeat: it is always a bad idea to have more than one CTA. Why? Distraction. If you put multiple CTAs in an email, your audience is going to get confused and distracted. Worst of all, they’re not going take the action you want.Tip 5: Track and Tweak.How do you know if your emails are working? Your email marketing platform should show you two basic statistics: open rates and click rates. The open rate (what percentage of recipients opened your email) will tell you how successful your subject line was. The click rate will show you what percentage of recipients clicked a link in your email. To judge the effectiveness of your email copy, look at the click-to-open rate, which is the percentage of clicks from the people who opened the email.As a rule, always be testing. If that last subject line got a 20% open rate, see what you can do to bump it to 23%. If you had a high open rate and a really low click rate, review the copy and find ways to make it more compelling.There are a lot of options for email marketing systems, but only Network for Good donor management combines built-in email marketing with a personal fundraising coach to help you craft the perfect appeal. Develop targeted lists of donors from standard and custom filters. Then, draft your email from scratch or use one of our pre-built templates. All of the data from your email (opens, clicks, etc.) lives in your donor management, and your donor profiles are updated to show who got the email and how they responded. And acknowledgement tracking? That’s automatic. Click here to see it up close in a personal demo.last_img read more

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Women in Philanthropy Profile: Kim O’Brien

first_imgKim O’Brien, Executive Director of Network for Good customer, Nonprofit Leadership Initiative, works with nonprofit leaders in the Fox Valley area of Wisconsin to provide opportunities ​for leadership development and learning to ​better achieve their missions. Like most executive directors, O’Brien has 100 balls in the air on any given day, meeting with new executive directors and board members about the tools and resources NPLI provides.Building Stronger Nonprofits“I do a lot of connecting the dots. My work is about connecting nonprofit leaders to the resources in the community that can help them with whatever they’re working on at the time.”What does the NPLI do?We provide different programs for the nonprofits in our community, including Leadership Forums, a Leadership Institute, Board Effectiveness, and a quarterly Join a Board event.The centerpiece of our programs is our Leadership Institute, a year-long series of seminars equivalent to a master’s degree in nonprofit management. Each cohort consists of 14 people—a combination of executive directors and senior leaders such as development directors or program managers—who spend a full year together learning nonprofit leadership best practices. We start with a DiSC assessment to determine their individual leadership style. Throughout the year, an expert in the field is hired for each session, ranging from the role of nonprofit boards to finance to human resources and much more. The Institute creates a tight cohort among the 14 participants. When they leave the program, they have someone to call and talk to about similar programs or issues. There’s a lot of sharing in the class.In addition to the Institute, our Leadership Forums offer executives and board members expert training on everything from aligning human resources with their mission to leadership skills to board roles and responsibilities. Our Board Effectiveness program consists of small, facilitated group discussions with board chairs and vice chairs about their role and responsibilities—what a board is supposed to look like, self-assessments, hands on training, etc. Finally, our Join a Board program brings the whole community together on a quarterly basis to learn about what it means to be on a nonprofit board or committee. Our corporate partners—large companies in the area—send their employees to us to learn about board service. Employees who are engaged in the community, stay in the community. Plus, board or committee service helps grow their leadership skills by helping expand critical thinking and communications skills and improving the ability to work collaboratively and within a team. It benefits everyone.All of our trainings route leaders back to our Nonprofit Next platform. This is an information rich website offering tools, tips, templates, and local resources in one location. Nonprofit Next is hosted by the New Hampshire Center for Nonprofits and available to the nonprofits in our service area.For each program, our goal is to provide nonprofit leaders and board members a place to be in a room together, face to face, to build trust and relationships. They share their best practices and successes so other leaders can learn from them. It’s inspiring. Even though they’re competing for donor dollars, they’re sharing with each other quite a bit and building a trusting, collaborative relationship. Nothing builds up a community better than when the nonprofits take hold of this collaborative mindframe.How did the NPLI start?This work all came out of a group of funders in our local community who approached the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region to profess, “We are tired of funding failing nonprofits. What can you do to help?” United Way, the Community Foundation, Thrivent, and Community First Credit Union put together some money in the beginning to start us off. And now we’re coming up on three years in June. We’re an integral part of the community, helping to build stronger nonprofits and stronger leaders. Most of our nonprofits staff under 10 employees and they don’t put dollars aside for leadership or technology, so this helps them think a little differently about how they approach running their business.How long have you been with the organization?My background is in HR. I started in 2015 on a three-month part-time project, and a year later I was still a part-time employee. I wrote a job description in that first year for an executive director position. At the time I wasn’t interested in the job, but when they finally posted it I thought, “I have to apply for this. I really love this work.” And I got the job!What attracts you to nonprofit work?My mother started the Meals on Wheels program in my hometown and pulled us all in as kids to help. She instilled in me a belief in helping the community by helping the people who live and work in your neighborhood.  And according to my mother, everyone lives in our neighborhood. I volunteered for a nonprofit in college and then my first job was with a nonprofit, and it stuck. I’ve always worked for a nonprofit and can’t imagine myself in any other setting.The people I work with in the nonprofit community are highly passionate. Every day, we help our community by helping these leaders who are improving everyone around us and building a stronger community for all. I cannot advocate for them enough. The nonprofit leaders that I work with drive my own passion for this work.What advice do you have for other nonprofit leaders or aspiring leaders?It takes a village to make this work. I get to be collaborative and have conversations and bring the work of these nonprofits forward in a lot of different ways. I never turn down a coffee or a lunch request because you never know where it’s going to lead. In this industry, you need to stay open to collaboration in whatever form you can find it. The Fox Valley is a special place as it allows for the collaborative work we do as a community every day. That way we all succeed in the long run. Thus, my advice to nonprofit leaders is, “Everyone leads, so build strong relationships around you with everyone and anyone you can.”Women in Philanthropy is an ongoing blog series in celebration of Women’s History Month, featuring some of the incredible women Network for Good has the pleasure to work with. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

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21 New Positions in Maternal Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: AsiaCommunications Lead, India Country Program: PATH; New Delhi, IndiaResearch, Monitoring and Evaluation Manager: Abt Associates; NepalSustaining Health Outcomes through the Private Sector Plus (SHOPS Plus) Project India State Manager: Abt Associates; IndiaNorth AmericaDirector of Advocacy and Programs: The White Ribbon Alliance; Washington, D.C.International Communications Manager: Guttmacher Institute; New York NYKnowledge Management and Communications Intern: CORE Group; Washington, D.C.Knowledge Management and Learning Intern: EngenderHealth; New York, NYMalaria Team Leader – Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP): Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Principal Associate / Maternal, Newborn/Neonatal and Child Health Strategic Lead: Abt Associates; Bethesda, MDProgram Officer – Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program: Columbia University; New York, NY (Job Requisition Number 085732)Senior Advisor, Knowledge Management and Learning: FHI 360; Washington, D.C.Senior Digital Health Advisor – Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP): Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Senior Program Officer: CARE; Atlanta, GASocial and Behavior Change Working Group Internship: CORE Group; Washington, D.C.Technical Advisor II, Knowledge Management and Learning: FHI 360; Washington, D.C. (and West Africa)Technical Advisor for Child Health (Case Management Focus): CAMRIS International; Bethesda, MD Posted on January 6, 2017May 19, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child or adolescent health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaChief Innovation Officer: Jacaranda Health; Nairobi, KenyaChild and Newborn Health Senior Specialist: Management Sciences for Health; Nakuru, KenyaEvidence Advisor for E4A: MamaYe; NigeriaHuman Resources for Health (HRH) Management Senior Advisor: Management Sciences for Health; Baringo, KenyaProject Manager, Fistula Care Plus: EngenderHealth; Nigeriacenter_img —Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.Share this:last_img read more

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International Women’s Day 2017: Thirty Years of the Safe Motherhood Initiative

first_imgPosted on March 8, 2017March 13, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Today is a very special International Women’s Day because this year marks the thirtieth anniversary of the Safe Motherhood Initiative. The Safe Motherhood Initiative launched in 1987 at the Safe Motherhood Conference in Nairobi, Kenya as a global movement to reduce maternal mortality. The conference took place at a pivotal point in history for the maternal health community. Allan Rosenfield and Deborah Maine had just published their groundbreaking commentary, “Maternal mortality—a neglected tragedy: Where is the ‘M’ in MCH?” in which they astutely observed the lack of focus on the mother in global maternal and child health programs. Momentum was building among United Nations agencies and the World Health Organization (WHO) to address the fact that 500,000 women worldwide were dying from pregnancy and childbirth-related complications each year. The Safe Motherhood Conference provided an ideal opportunity to turn that momentum into action, and thus, the Safe Motherhood Initiative was established with the goal of reducing maternal mortality by 50% by 2000. Stakeholders identified three main strategies for meeting this goal:Strengthening community-based health care by improving the skills of community health workers and traditional birth attendants and screening high-risk pregnant women for referral to medical careImproving referral-level facilities to treat complicated cases and serve as a back-up to community-level careDeveloping an alarm and transport system to serve as a link between community and referral careMaternal health gained considerable attention following the launch of the Safe Motherhood Initiative at several conferences including the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in 1994, the Fourth World Conference for Women in Beijing in 1995 and the Social Summit in Copenhagen in 1995, but the goal of reducing maternal mortality by 50% was not achieved by 2000. Challenges included data collection and measurement, limited political will and a lack of consensus on strategies for intervention.In 2000, safe motherhood was reaffirmed as a global priority, as illustrated by its inclusion in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). One of the eight MDGs—MDG 5—was to improve maternal health, with two targets to accomplish by 2015:Target 5a: Reduce the maternal mortality ratio by three quartersTarget 5b: Achieve universal access to reproductive healthIn 2005, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health was formed to strengthen global advocacy, coordinate country-level action and promote a continuum of care perspective. The Lancet published its Maternal Survival series in 2006, which contained evidence-based strategies for reducing maternal deaths.Over the last decade, there have been substantial efforts to continue the work of the Safe Motherhood Initiative. For example, WHO has published and updated recommendations for improving the quality of maternal health care, the Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality working group was established and The Lancet published another series on Maternal Health. New targets for maternal mortality have been set for the Sustainable Development Goals period (2015-2030), strategies to meet the targets have been proposed and there has been renewed commitment to holding stakeholders accountable for results.The maternal health field has made considerable progress over the last 30 years, but more work is needed. The global maternal mortality ratio decreased by 44% between 1990 and 2015, but roughly 300,000 women around the world still die every year from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Ending preventable maternal deaths is possible with continued investment in maternal health research, programs and policy at the global, national and local levels.Join the International Women’s Day conversation on social media by using the hashtags #IWD2017 #WomensDay #BeBoldForChange.—Learn more about International Women’s Day.Explore trends in maternal mortality between 1990 and 2015.Read the “Strategies for Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality” report.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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World Malaria Day: Renewing Commitment to Addressing Malaria in Pregnancy

first_imgPosted on April 25, 2017May 19, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)According to the most recent Global Burden of Disease data, deaths due to malaria have decreased substantially over the past few decades. Global malaria mortality rates have dropped by 44% between 1990 – when malaria was the tenth most common cause death – and 2015 – when malaria was the 20th most common cause of death. Despite this progress, roughly half a million people died from malaria in 2015 alone, and 92% of those deaths occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. The Global Technical Strategy for Malaria (2016-2030) calls for a 40% reduction in malaria case incidence by 2020, but only half of malaria endemic countries are currently on track to achieve this goal.Pregnant women and newborns living in malaria endemic areas are especially vulnerable. Malaria in pregnancy (MiP) continues to play a large role in global maternal deaths. In 2015, malaria was the third most common cause of death among women of reproductive age in Africa. During that year, MiP was estimated to have been responsible for more than 400,000 cases of maternal anemia and approximately 15% of maternal deaths globally. Unfortunately, the women who are most vulnerable to malaria are often the least protected against it. MiP also poses a significant threat to newborns because it can cause spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, premature delivery, low birth weight and neonatal mortality.Coverage of malaria prevention, screening and treatment among pregnant women remains low in many areas of sub-Saharan Africa, despite investments in MiP and clear evidence of effective interventions. In order to combat MiP, intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) should start early in the second trimester of pregnancy (ideally at week 13) with three or more doses of the antimalarial sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and continue monthly over the course of the pregnancy until delivery. Based on available data, the percentage of eligible women receiving three or more doses of IPTp increased from 6% in 2010 to 31% in 2015. Still, much work is needed to ensure that pregnant women and newborns across the globe are protected against malaria.Access resources related to malaria in pregnancy>>Learn more about World Malaria Day>>Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Operating Costs Drop for Fifth Successive Year

first_imgzoom Total operating costs for the tanker, bulker and container ship sectors were all down in 2016, shipping adviser Moore Stephens said in its ship operating costs benchmarking tool OpCost 2017.On a year-on-year basis, the tanker index was down by 3 points, or 1.7%, while the bulker index also fell by 3 points, or 1.9%. The container ship index, meanwhile, was down by 1 point, or 0.6%. The corresponding figures in last year’s OpCost study showed falls of 6 points in both the bulker and container ship index, and of 4 points in the tanker index.There was a 0.4% overall average fall in 2016 crew costs, compared to the 2015 figure, which itself was 1.2% down on 2015. By way of comparison, the 2008 report revealed a 21% increase in this category.Tankers overall experienced a fall in crew costs of 1.8% on average, compared to the 1.3% fall recorded in 2015. For bulkers, the overall average fall in crew costs in 2016 was 0.6%, compared to 1.1% recorded 12 months ago.Expenditure on crew costs in the container ship sector, meanwhile, was up by 1.1% compared to the fall of 3.3% recorded for 2015.“This is the fifth successive year-on-year reduction in overall ship operating costs, although the reduction this time is less than half the figure recorded 12 months ago for 2015,” Richard Greiner, Shipping & Transport Partner, said.“The biggest cost reductions were those in the Insurance category,” Greiner said, adding that the fact that such costs continue to fall may be due in part to a reduction in the incidence of major casualties.“Most of the larger reductions in insurance costs tracked by OpCost, however, were recorded by bulk carriers, which are no strangers to the pages of the casualty reports. So cheaper insurance must also say much about the fierce competition for business which exists throughout marine underwriting markets worldwide.”Although 2016 was another difficult period for shipping, the year closed on a note of rising confidence, according to the Moore Stephens Shipping Confidence Survey. Owners and charterers were more confident, than for some time previously, of making new investments, and there were improved expectations of higher freight rates in all three main tonnage categories.That increased confidence, which has carried over into 2017, “should logically lead to greater activity, which will mean higher operating costs.”At present, however, owners and operators are not earning what they should be, or would like to be, from most of the markets in which they operate.“Shipping can certainly find encouragement in a fifth successive annual fall in operating costs. But nothing is for ever, and nothing is more certain than that the shipping industry will continue to be characterised by uncertainty, which can be both its strength and its weakness.”last_img read more

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Not a captain but Chekwa leads by example for OSU

Cornerback Chimdi Chekwa entered this football season in the top three in games started on the team. The rest of the top three, offensive guard Bryant Browning and defensive end Cameron Heyward, were named captains. Chekwa was not. Considering the Buckeyes named six captains for only the second time in team history, some teammates were surprised Chekwa was left off the list. Captain selection “could have went a lot of ways. I kind of was a little surprised,” senior safety Aaron Gant said. “But you don’t have to be a captain to show or possess that quality.” Chekwa wasn’t bothered by being left off the list and has continued to do his best to lead, he said. “I was talking on the sideline like I was a proud father,” Chekwa told Scout.com’s Jeff Svoboda while sitting out of a practice. “I’ve tried to teach (the corners) everything I know.” The leadership of the cornerback was not lost on his head coach. “Chimdi Chekwa … continues to lead back there and play with a lot of energy and enthusiasm and play like a senior,” Jim Tressel said. “We’ve said a million times that you can have a good team if your seniors have their career best year and Chimdi certainly is on task to perhaps make that happen.” Leading by setting an example on the field has been Chekwa’s most successful method. “I’m not a very vocal guy but it depends on the situation. I’m not going to scream or anything. I let (safety) Jermale (Hines) handle the loud talking,” the 6-foot, 190-pound corner said. “But if something needs to be said, I’ll say it.” Though he may not be loud about it, teammates appreciate what Chekwa does. “He is always communicating and talking, making sure we’re on the same page,” Gant said. “He keeps us going, never letting us slack.” The tenacity comes in part from his experience on two teams that played for the national championship. Playing in the national championship game “helped a lot. Whenever you go out on the field and compete with other great players,” Chekwa said. “I learned from all of that.” He expects to use what he learned to get his team back to that game this year, captain or not, he said. read more

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Bale admitted that he will probably leave to play regularly

first_imgGareth Bale managed to score two goals in yesterday’s final game but he claimed that it might have been his last game for Real Madrid as he needs to play every week.The Wales international was injured for the part of this season but even after that, he struggled to get enough game time and he admitted that it has been frustrating for him not to be in the starting eleven.The former Tottenham player spoke about his future as he said, according to Gianluca Di Marzio:divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“I’ve been disappointed about the exclusion in the first moment because I was playing well at that time. I deserved to be an important player, I’m a player and I know football is about the team so I got at my teammates’ disposal. I need to play every week and that didn’t happen.”“I’ve had an injury at the beginning of the season but I’m fine now. I need to talk with my agent to decide what to do about my future. Today’s finale is a dream come true. If I can’t play every week at Real, I’ll find somewhere else to do so. I now have a lot of time to think about my future and I’ll do so.”last_img read more

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Barca president Captaincy has changed Messi

first_imgBarcelona president Josep Maria Bartomeu believes Lionel Messi has changed since being named as the club’s new captainThe Argentine striker was named as the new skipper of the Catalan club in August following Andres Iniesta’s exit at the end of last season.Since then, Bartomeu reckons he has seen a change in Messi and praised the 31-year-old for his leadership.“Messi is very happy here. He is delighted and excited about continuing to triumph at Barcelona,” he told Onda Cero on Monday.“Messi has made a change, he has decided to take on the captaincy and assume that responsibility in the team.”David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.Barcelona have agreed to play Catalan rivals Girona at Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium in the US early next year.Although final approval is yet to granted by the Spanish football federation.“LaLiga proposed that we play a match abroad and it seemed a good idea. We have the obligation to promote the league,” said Bartomeu.“You have to get closer to the fans and find new streams of income. Playing a match abroad would help us.“If it can be played, we’ll do it. The club captains have been informed.”last_img read more

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Chievo coach adores Udinese goalkeeper Simone Scuffet

first_imgChievo Coach Lorenzo D’Anna has showered praises on the Udinese goalkeeper Simone Scuffet, calling his performance excellent as he was able to stop his side from getting back into the game.Rodrigo De Paul strike and Kevin Lasagna counter-attack led to Udinese 2-0 victory at Stadio Bentegodi.“It was a very even first half, while in the second we conceded a goal out of nowhere with that shot from 30 metres out just as we were pushing the hardest,” D’Anna told Rai Sport via Football Italia.VERONA, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 02: Lorenzo D'Anna head coach of Chievo looks on during the serie A match between Chievo Verona and Empoli at Stadio Marc'Antonio Bentegodi on September 2, 2018 in Verona, Italy. (Photo by Alessandro Sabattini/Getty Images)Lorenzo D’Anna: Chievo kept their focus Obinna Echi – September 16, 2018 Lorenzo D’Anna hailed the resolve of his players as they fought back to rescue a point in their 2-2 stalemate against Roma.The Flying Donkeys didn’t…“We reacted well and created many chances, but unfortunately a combination of our mistakes and the excellent performance of the goalkeeper stopped us getting back into the game.“Chievo put in the performance we needed to and a win would’ve shaken off this minus mark from our table, but we tried our best against a difficult side that countered dangerously.”The Flying Donkeys are on -2 points in the Serie A table at the moment as they were docked three points for false accounting.last_img read more

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Witsel praises Pulisic and Sancho

first_imgThe Borussia Dortmund midfielder says his teammates have the potential to become two of the best wingers in the worldBorussia Dortmund is currently enjoying a good run in the German Bundesliga, thanks to seven wins and three draws.Dortmund is the only team that has yet to be defeated in the tournament.And for midfielder Axel Witsel, his teammates Christian Pulisic and Jadon Sancho can become two of the world’s best.“We have a lot of new players and the way we are playing right now, usually it takes more time,” he told ESPN.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“I cannot explain why we are doing really well and this is good for us, and we will, of course, do our best to keep going like this.”“The coach, the message he gives to us, everybody listens to him, and this is important. The way we play now on the pitch is because of the players but also the message the coach gives every day in training,” he added.“[Pulisic and Sancho are] young but really talented.”2If they keep going like this, they can be — I will not say the best winger — but they can become one of, because they’re really talented, but they need to keep working hard, and I hope we will keep them for a few years,” he explained.last_img read more

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Canon places winning bid to acquire Toshiba Medical for over 6B

first_imgToshiba granted Canon exclusive negotiating rights Wednesday to acquire its medical equipment arm as the Japanese electronics giant’s financial landscape looks pale after a $1.3-billion accounting scandal last year. Canon’s bid to buy one of Toshiba’s prized assets in the healthcare division surpassed Â¥700 billion ($6.2 billion), which the suitors were told to exceed, as per Bloomberg’s sources.Canon’s proposal to buy Toshiba Medical earned the company exclusive rights until March 18, during which the two companies would reach a final agreement, according to Toshiba’s statement quoted by Bloomberg Wednesday. Other suitors for the business, the world’s second-largest manufacturer of CT scan machines, in the second round of bidding included Fujifilm and Konica Minolta, which had joined hands with UK-based Permira, the Wall Street Journal had said earlier.According to Japanese business daily Nikkei, the board members find Canon a suitable buyer for Toshiba Medical not only because of the size of its offer, but also due to the limited overlap between the two companies’ medical operations, which would lead to smoother antitrust proceedings.The publication adds Canon has been keen to explore a new source of revenue in addition to its camera and office equipments. The Tokyo-based camera manufacturer is already present in the medical field, but on a limited scale, with products like retinal cameras. By acquiring Toshiba’s extensive medical unit, Canon can expand into diagnostic imaging equipments such as CT scanners and MRI machines.As the global medical equipment market is expected to grow significantly from Â¥40 trillion in 2013 to cross Â¥50 trillion in 2018, Canon’s investments would be rightly served.”The acquisition of Toshiba Medical will allow Canon to create a new business pillar, on top of cameras and office equipment businesses,” Kazuyoshi Saito, senior analyst at IwaiCosmo Securities, told Reuters. “It might be a little pricey, but will generate profits in the first year. It is more reasonable than Hon Hai paying about the same for Sharp.”As for Toshiba, the deal will help the company rebuild its finances that suffered a major setback from the accounting scandal, when the company had admitted to overstating profits from 2009. Since then, the Japanese tech giant faced record losses and job cuts. The company had projected a loss of Â¥700 billion for its fiscal year ending March.Toshiba’s health care division recorded Â¥409.5 billion worth sales in the last 12 months and an operating income of Â¥23.9 billion, Bloomberg data revealed.last_img read more

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NDTV India Hindi to be taken off air for a day due

first_imgUnion Information and Broadcasting Ministry has ordered Hindi TV news channel NDTV India to go off air for a day for allegedly revealing ‘strategically-sensitive’ details while covering the Pathankot terrorist attack.The move follows recommendations of an inter-ministerial committee and may now ask the channel to be taken off air on November 9. This is the first of its kind order against a broadcaster over its coverage of terrorist attacks.On January 2, a heavily armed group had attacked the Pathankot Air Force Station, part of the Western Air Command of the Indian Air Force.Commenting on the coverage of the attack, the committee members said that “such crucial information” could have been readily picked by terrorist handlers and had the potential to “cause massive harm not only to the national security, but also to lives of civilians and defence personnel.”The sensitive information allegedly released by the channel during the operation in January included information on the ammunition stockpiled at the Indian Air Force station, MIGs, fighter planes, rocket launchers, mortars, helicopters and fuel tanks. “It could have been used by the terrorists or their handlers to cause massive harm,” sources said.According to official sources, the channel was submitted a show cause notice after it was felt that the content aired by the broadcaster was violative of programming norms. In response, the channel said that the government used “subjective interpretation,” besides arguing that the bulk of the information was already in public domain in print, electronic and social media.In its order, however, the committee points that the channel “appeared to give out the exact location of the remaining terrorists with regard to the sensitive assets in their vicinity” when they telecast in real time.”Such crucial information could have been readily picked by their handlers, which had the potential to cause massive harm not only to the national security, but also to lives of civilians and defence personnel,” the committee said while disagreeing with the channel’s arguments, according to Times of India.NDTV was also under the scanner when it and some other channels were considered responsible for jeopardising the lives of National Security Guard commandos during the 26/11 attacks in Mumbai. In the aftermath, the Central government had decided to put certain protocols and safeguards for live coverage of security operation by media houses.last_img read more

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Albiero Downs 200 Butterfly Record Cardinals Qualify Four to Finals on Day

first_imgThe Cardinals also secured a spot in the A final of the 400 free relay as Albiero (42.49), Andrej Barna (42.53), Bartosz Piszczorowicz (42.81) and Zach Harting (41.81) combined for a time of 2:49.64 to finish seventh overall. Louisville has now qualified four relays to the NCAA A final for the first time in program history. In the 200 fly, Harting finished 19th with a time of 1:42.17. Also competing for the Cardinals was Daniel Sos, who stopped the clock in a time of 1:47.02. Evgenii Somov secured a spot in his second final of the weekend, finishing 14th in the 200 breast with a time of 1:53.28. He will compete in tonight’s B final, the first NCAA final of his career in the event. Saturday Finals Heat Sheet AUSTIN, Texas – Nicolas Albiero took down his own school record and qualified second overall in the 200 butterfly to lead the University of Louisville men’s swimming and diving team through the final day’s prelims at the NCAA Championships on Saturday morning. In total, the Cardinals qualified four events to tonight’s finals.Louisville enters the final session in fifth place with 149 points, trailing California (372), Texas (329), Indiana (277.5) and NC State (215). The Cards are 13 points ahead of Florida with 136.  In the 200 back, freshman Mitchell Whyte qualified for the first NCAA final of his career, finishing 15th overall with a time of 1:40.62. Nikos Sofianidis posted a season-best time in the event, placing third in his heat with a 1:42.45.center_img Prelims Results Albiero toppled the previous record in the 200 fly by over a half-second, winning his heat with a time of 1:40.16. Tonight marks the first time in program history the Cardinals will have a swimmer in the A final of the event.   Story Links Senior Marcelo Acosta will kick of the evening for the Cards in the timed finals of the 1650 free at approximately 5:54 p.m. ET. Finals will commence at 7 p.m. ET. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Police catch motorist rolling cigarette while driving through roadworks on M6

first_imgGet the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailPolice have stopped a motorist for rolling a cigarette this morning – while driving through roadworks on the M6. The Central Motorway Police Group (CMPG) stopped the driver on the motorway near Stafford earlier today (Saturday April 13). A CMPG spokesman said:  ” We’ve just reported a driver for not being in proper control of his vehicle as he was travelling on the M6 through the roadworks in Stafford and rolling a cigarette. “This offence carries three points and £100 fine.” Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLive Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Driver named following fatal collision Police search for missing womancenter_img Punter found hiding in bushes Want to tell us about something going on where you live? Let us know – Tweet us   @SOTLive   or message us on   our Facebook page  . And if you have pictures to share, tag us on Instagram at   StokeonTrentLive  .last_img read more

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