How the Benefit Concert is Shaping Philanthropy

first_imgMusic has been one of the most powerful ways causes, celebrities, and communities can connect to raise money for serious issues. We recently caught up with Art Taylor, president of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance, who shared his insight on why these events can be so successful for nonprofits of all sizes.Legacy of Aid: August is the Anniversary of the Benefit ConcertFor over forty years, the benefit concert has served as one of the most popular, easily recognizable forms of aid for charitable organizations. It all started back in August 1971 when George Harrison called a few friends—Ringo, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, to name a few—to play at the world’s first benefit concert. The Concert for Bangladesh played from Madison Square Garden with ticket and recording sales helping to raise $18 million. These stars likely didn’t realize they were forever changing charitable giving in time of a disaster. Concerts are now a popular vehicle for causes around the world to raise visibility and funds—often targeting a younger crowd or introducing their campaign to an audience not yet familiar with it. “Music is a universal pleasure that cuts across cultures and backgrounds,” says H. Art Taylor, president of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance. “Music is a unifying experience—it’s a natural choice for charities to turn to benefit concerts as a means to raise funds.” Star power can play a big role but doesn’t always spell success. In the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti, Wyclef Jean’s charity, Yele Haiti, came under scrutiny about its finances. This controversy underscores the importance for charities to make sure they are fully transparent and accountable before implementing a benefit concert which can attract a lot of media attention. And star power isn’t the only way to go. Charities across the country have seen great success with smaller scale benefit concerts ranging from high school bands to regional bands. The principles and watch-outs apply regardless of your headliner. 7 Do’s and Don’ts when planning a benefit concert for your organization:1. Know your partners. If you are co-hosting the benefit concert with another charity, take a moment to investigate them by pulling their report at Give.org. Don’t assume it is well managed just because it has a 501(c)(3) charitable tax exempt status. 2. Pay attention to regulations. Make sure any state regulatory requirements have been met, including verifying your ability to solicit. 3. Check tax deductibility disclosures.If the benefit concert tickets are sold in a charitable fundraising context, seek out a tax advisor to find out about tax deductibility disclosures that may need to be made. 4. Beware of cheaters. Take reasonable measures to reduce ticket scalping. Examples might be: limiting the number of tickets sold to a single purchaser and ensuring computer safeguards are in place to avoid someone “snatching” all the tickets as soon as they are made available. 5. Practice your FAQ.Make sure answers are readily available for reasonable questions about your mission, target amounts to be raised, and how collected funds will be used. 6. Be clear. If the intention is to collect funds restricted for a specific purpose (i.e., disaster relief) make sure that all charity participants agree to this restriction and are able to carry out this work as soon as possible.7. Be transparent about finances. Share information on the total amount collected, the cost to hold the concert, and how much went to the cause. Post this information on the charity’s and concert’s websites. The Future of Benefit Concerts“Charity benefit concerts will continue to play a role in generating funds and advocating issues,” says Taylor. “Large events work well in times of major crisis or when a big star has a personal stake in a cause. Smaller, targeted local events can be successful as well.”Whether packing a large event venue or a local concert hall, organizers should be creative and coordinate effectively to ensure that benefit concerts are a useful tool for raising awareness and charitable dollars. A benefit with local bands and resources combined with a coordinated effort between multiple nonprofits may be a good option for some charities. Whether large or small, however, the expense and coordination efforts for events can be prohibitive and should be considered carefully in terms of the investment of time and resources. Often charities will measure ROI through funds raised as well as impact to the audience. For more helpful tips on nonprofit collaboration, including information on accreditation, visit the BBB Wise Giving Alliance at Give.org. For advice on planning a successful fundraising event, download Network for Good’s guide to Hosting Your Most Fabulous Fundraising Event Ever.last_img read more

Read More

What’s Missing from Your Small Nonprofit’s Fundraising Plan

first_imgThe secret to better campaign results, more engaged donors, and board buy-in is a thoughtful and clear fundraising plan. While we all know we need a plan, sometimes it’s not always easy to make time to create a realistic plan and in many cases, we may not have the information we need to make the right strategic decisions. If you’re like most small nonprofits, it’s likely that your plan is missing a critical element—clean, accurate fundraising data.Your Fundraising Plan Must Be Based on Accurate Fundraising DataHaving the right data on your campaign performance, funding sources, donor history, and giving patterns will allow you to make smarter decisions on how to spend your time and resources going forward. Why is this so important?You’ll know what’s working, and what’s not.Sounds obvious, right? But most nonprofits are surprised when they see their aggregated fundraising results and campaign data. As trends emerge, you can make better decisions on what to do more of…and what to stop doing in the coming year. You can double down on the tactics and messages that work best for your supporters.You can identify donor segments and create strategies for them.Once you understand who your new, major, recurring, lapsed, and event donors are, you can develop tailored outreach to best reach and convert them. (Just getting started with donor segmentation? We have a simple planning template that will help you maximize your communications.)You’ll have more credibility with your board.You can feel more confident presenting your plan to your board when you have the data to back it up vs. relying on a hunch or opinions. Having a data-backed plan will also help you answer questions and fend off “creative tinkering” from well-meaning board members.You’ll know what you need to spend to meet your fundraising goals.Armed with the data about your past fundraising results and donor opportunities, you can project how much you’ll need to spend (and which resources to allocate) to make the plan happen.Need some help getting a better fundraising plan in place and figuring out how to collect, compile, and understand the data you need? Check out this upcoming webinar to learn simple steps for quickly creating a solid plan that will allow you to reach your small nonprofit’s funding goals this year.Register for this webinar now and learn How to Create Your 12-Month Fundraising Plan!last_img read more

Read More

From the Economist, Four Reasons for Progress in Bangladesh

first_imgPosted on November 16, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On November 2nd, the Economist published an article, Out of the Basket, that explores reasons for progress in a country they describe as one of the most intriguing puzzles in development: Bangladesh.From the story:City states apart, it is the world’s most densely populated country, with around 150m people crammed onto the delta of the Ganges and the Brahmaputra, an area regularly swept by devastating floods. Its private sector is weak and its government widely perceived as corrupt and dysfunctional.And yet Bangladesh has done better than most countries at improving the basic standard of living of its people. Bangladeshis can expect to live four years longer than Indians even though they are much poorer. The country has achieved some of the largest reductions in early deaths of infants, children and women in childbirth ever seen anywhere.So that is the puzzle: Bangladesh combines economic disappointment with social progress. The Economist suggests four factors to explain why.Read the full story here.For a more detailed report on development in Bangladesh from the Economist, click here.Read the accompanying editorial here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More

Preconception Planning, Counseling and Care (PCC) is Important for All Couples, Including Those Affected by HIV

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 21, 2013March 6, 2017By: Dr. Jean Anderson, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Jhpiego; Kelly Curran, Jhpiego, MCHIP; Laura Fitzgerald, Jhpiego, MCHIPClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Decisions about whether a woman and her partner want to have children, how many they might want to have, and when they might want to have them, are not always clear-cut or predictable. Reproductive goals are often linked to a multitude of complicated and deeply personal hopes and beliefs. For this reason, healthcare providers have a responsibility to value clients as individuals with unique sets of life circumstances and priorities. All women, and all couples, deserve to access the information they need to make safe and informed choices…regardless of geography, regardless of socio-economic status, regardless of age, regardless of marital status, and regardless of the result of an HIV test.Safe family planning (FP) as well as preconception planning, counseling, and care (PCC) are important in the continuum of care for all couples, including those affected by HIV. These critical services:Prevent unintended pregnancy;Promote appropriate birth spacing;Optimize maternal health before pregnancy and maternal and fetal health during pregnancy;Prevent maternal to child transmission of HIV; andReduce the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected partner.A considerable unmet need for FP exists for women living with HIV.  In sub-Saharan Africa, for example, between 66 and 92 percent of HIV positive women do not want more children, but only 20 to 43 percent of women use contraception (Sarnquist et al. Curr HIV Res 2013;11:160). Irrespective of this need and of the safety of most FP methods for women living with HIV, some providers limit options for these women. Research demonstrates that providers are especially hesitant to recommend long acting reversible contraception or emergency contraception in the setting of HIV.Similarly, some providers do not feel comfortable when these women and their partners want to conceive.  Too many HIV positive women are told that intended pregnancies are irresponsible. All people have the right to respectful, quality care; not only do HIV positive women share similar feelings about motherhood as other women, but in the era of antiretroviral therapy, many also experience improvements in fertility.This is not to suggest that women living with HIV are without particular healthcare needs.  For instance, women who live with HIV may be more likely to experience violence within their intimate relationships.  They are also particularly vulnerable to co-infections with tuberculosis or malaria and to suffer from anemia.  Further, many of these women – up to 50 percent in a country like Kenya – are in serodiscordant relationships, and transmission to a partner is a concern. Appropriate PCC for couples allows for optimal prevention of transmission to HIV negative partners, as well as vertical transmission to children.PCC also offers an excellent opportunity to promote healthy behaviors.  PCC presents an opportunity to counsel couples about risk mitigation, FP, healthy eating habits, psychosocial and mental health issues, and long term care plans, as well as to address care and treatment of HIV and related issues.  Additionally, through PCC, underlying medical conditions – such as tuberculosis, other opportunistic infections, or other chronic conditions such as hypertension or diabetes – can be identified and treated, optimizing maternal health and pregnancy outcomes.Recent years have witnessed great strides in HIV prevention, care, and treatment.  People living with HIV enjoy longer and healthier lives. As a public health community, there is a pressing need to look beyond a narrow biomedical treatment lens, and to acknowledge clients’ fundamental life goals. Do couples want to postpone pregnancy to attain other educational, professional, or relational goals?  Do they want to conceive now, a year from now, five years from now, or not at all?  It is time to better understand how to integrate FP and PCC services into HIV care, and to look closely at their effectiveness in achieving better outcomes for women and their families.This post is part of a blog series on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS. To view the entire series, click here.For additional information about maternal health, HIV, and AIDS, visit our topic page. Share this:last_img read more

Read More

mHealth for Maternal Health: mHealth Pilotitis – Time for Recovery or Relapse?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 31, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)mHealth for Maternal Health is an ongoing blog series that aims to share the knowledge and experiences of academics, implementers and funders from the mHealth and maternal health communities. As part of the series, we reached out to experts to gain insight on pressing questions around financing, partnerships, challenges and innovations in mHealth for Maternal Health. The post below includes responses by Patty Mechael, Executive Director of the mHealth Alliance and Ken Warman, Senior Program Officer at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.The last few years have seen a proliferation of mHealth pilots, particularly in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. A review published in PLOS Medicine showed that more often than not, these pilots failed to reach scale, leading to the coining of the term “mHealth pilotitis”.Due to a lack of coordination between organizations, pilots often lead to duplication of efforts and can take scarce time and resources away from local governments. Uganda’s decision in 2012 to place a moratorium on mHealth pilots was a wake-up call for the ICT4D community that perhaps it was time to take a step back and reconsider the scatter-shot approach that had become the norm. However, while organizations are eager to scale up their mHealth interventions, it has quickly become apparent that there might not be an easy cure for pilotitis. Despite the number of pilots, there is a lack of a strong evidence base and consensus regarding what would work at scale.To gauge where the mHealth community should focus its efforts moving forward, we asked experts and donors the following question: Do we still need more pilots in mHealth or do we know enough to say what works and should be scaled?According to Patty Mechael, Executive Director of the mHealth Alliance, “When asked the question on whether we need more pilots- my general response is absolutely not – except in the increasingly rare case of a completely new use of mobile technology within the health sector or for health promotion that has never been tried.  We do know a great deal about what works.  The reality is that, you can make almost anything work in a pilot phase with enough undivided attention and resources.Rather than viewing the development of a successful mHealth intervention as a binary transition between the pilot phase and scale-up, organizations should be willing to take an iterative approach. Mechael adds, “The latest thinking is to design for scale from the outset and approach implementation as well as complementary monitoring and evaluation in phases- similar to any technology development and/or program life cycle- where by assessments of each phase informs the next- including the decision to abandon course or adapt when something does not seem to be working in the early stages.”In the poetic words of Samuel Becket, “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.”However, for an organization to successfully adopt an iterative approach, it is critical that donors also shift their mindset. According to Ken Warman, Senior Program Officer at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, “Many mHealth interventions take several iterations to become operational and integrated into a health workers daily routine.  Most pilots are not sufficiently funded to reach this milestone so they are never really adopted and embraced for going to scale.  I feel we, the mService community are still focused on vertical, niche applications and are not yet paying enough attention to larger, systemic issues and working towards an integrated ecosystem servicing a broad array of user needs.”For mHealth to move to the next phase in its development and become integrated into health systems, there need to be collective efforts by developers, implementers, donors and governments to work together to collect robust evidence about what works, and act nimbly to adapt and improve programs at different phases in their life-cycle.Do you have an opinion on the role mHealth can play to improve maternal health? What do you see as the biggest advantages of mHealth? The limitations? If you are interested in submitting a blog post for our ongoing guest blog series on mHealth for Maternal Health, please email MHTF Research Assistant Yogeeta Manglani.Share this:last_img read more

Read More

mHealth for Maternal Health: Digital Health Solutions Addressing Rising Tide of Diabetes in Pregnancy

first_imgPosted on April 4, 2014August 18, 2017By: Dr. Jane Hirst, Nuffield Medical Fellow, University of OxfordClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes rise around the world, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is becoming increasingly common. GDM is a condition where blood glucose levels in pregnancy are too high, which has potentially serious consequences for both mother and baby, most commonly with the baby growing too large resulting in birth trauma. Keeping maternal blood glucose levels within the normal range can largely prevent complications of GDM. This is achieved through diet and exercise, often requiring the addition of medications such as insulin or metformin. More women with GDM has led to increasingly overcrowded outpatient clinics, with many women coming only for review of their blood glucose results.GDm-Health is an interactive remote blood glucose monitoring system developed in response to increasing numbers of women with GDM in the UK. The aim was to develop a digital solution to help women better monitor and control their blood glucose levels at home with less frequent outpatient appointments. The technology uses a Bluetooth enabled blood glucose meter to automatically transmit readings to a smartphone application and secure website. A midwife then reviews the results and can contact the women via SMS or phone call if any changes are required.Preliminary results from a service development cohort of 50 women were extremely encouraging. Women found the system convenient to use, appreciating the extra support from the health care team without the need for long waits in the outpatient department. For the success of any mHealth application, It is vital that users be involved at all stages in the development process. An example of this from our initiative was modification of the technology to improve bilateral communication with the introduction of a function for patients to signal to the midwife that they would like a phone call. Seemingly small additions like this can help improve compliance.A randomized controlled trial evaluating whether the system can actually improve clinical outcomes with the system is currently underway. If we can demonstrate that this technology can improve clinical outcomes as well as patient satisfaction, the next challenge will be effective scale up, both within the UK and abroad.While the uptake of smartphones isn’t a challenge to scale-up in our case given the setting, scaling faces several other challenges. Firstly, the security and confidentiality of the patient’s data must be paramount. Currently all information is hosted on a secure NHS server, however if the system were to be used elsewhere this would have to be negotiated. The second major consideration is the ongoing costs of the system. Blood glucose test strips compatible with the system are expensive, limiting enthusiasm for uptake. Additionally, the cost of data transmission via 3G networks must also be considered.And yet the key rate-limiting step to scale-up in many settings is likely to be gaining support of the health professionals required for the system to work. A phone itself does not save lives. It is the people using it and their experience and ability to effectively communicate advice through the technology.It is hoped that working with hospitals in our region, industry partners and learning from experiences abroad these issues will be able to be overcome and outcomes for women with GDM improved.Do you have an opinion on the role mHealth can play to improve maternal health? What do you see as the biggest advantages of mHealth? The limitations? If you are interested in submitting a blog post for our ongoing guest blog series on mHealth for Maternal Health, please email MHTF Research Assistant Yogeeta Manglani at ymm108@mail.harvard.edu.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More

How to Harness Emotion as You Get Ready for Giving Season

first_imgLast week, we introduced a series on four lessons learned from fundraising for real nonprofits in Baltimore. This week, we’re diving into the first lesson: the emotional nature of giving.We’ve said it before– giving is an emotional act. Donors give when they can feel a connection – when they know they are doing something to help something (or someone) that they care deeply about. They could care less about your goal to reach $10,000 by midnight – what they really care about is ending hunger, ending systemic poverty, destroying the school to prison pipeline, providing safe shelter for women in need, or making recess fun again.When the Network for Good team went out to help real nonprofits, we learned this first-hand. The team that raised the most did so by leveraging the already-emotionally driven assets of the nonprofit (Wide Angle Youth Media), and sent them out to all of their family and friends. This double shot of an emotional appeal combined with personal connections between the donors and fundraisers themselves resulted in over $2440 in a 12-hour period.What can other nonprofits take from this?Tell a Good StoryWhen the Network for Good team ambushed Wide Angle Youth Media (WAYM) at their office in Baltimore, their initial plan was to create a video in the spirit of what WAYM does. The team quickly discovered that a project like that would take much too long, so they decided to use WAYM’s existing assets.The team watched one of WAYM’s videos and used that as inspiration to create a giving page.A successful giving page is one that creates a compelling story as to why the donor should give. To do that, use the five C’s of storytelling:Core message: The core message is that one thing you want people to remember after hearing your story. When developing your story, ask yourself three questions:What do I want donors to think?What do I want them to feel?What do I want them to do?The answers will help you uncover your core message and how to structure your email campaign. They’ll also guide you through the logical and emotional sides of crafting your story and engaging donors with the copy.Connection: Powerful stories are about creating an emotional and authentic connection with readers. This often happens in the beginning of a story (“Call me Ishmael.”)  The same goes for an email. Think carefully about your message’s salutation and the first sentence. How will you hook a reader and get them to stick with you through the end? A great example is personalization. Using a donor’s first name in the salutation (e.g. “Dear Sarah”) is a powerful way to build a connection.Character: This is often the person writing the email, or it might be a monthly donor talking about why she was moved to offer ongoing support, or the story of a person served by your programs. It could even be the story of a shelter dog finding a forever home. The sky’s the limit.Conflict: Conflict is crucial in fundraising. It creates a sense of urgency, which encourages people to respond (and give) to help you resolve the conflict. “These villagers have to walk five miles a day for fresh water. Donate now to build a new well.” Conflict and call to action are intertwined.Call to action: A call to action is the thing you want people to do. A good call to action is very specific and active: Click here to give. Donate now. Use active and affirmative phrases that motivate people to follow through.Work your networkAfter creating a stellar donation page, the Network for Good team of fundraisers did everything they could to spread the work to their networks. This meant Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, as well as personal appeals to potential large donors. At the end of the day, over $2440 was raised.Why did this work? Donors are three times more likely to give when asked by someone they know. Imagine, if you asked 5 people to give, and each of them asked five more people, right away that’s 30 potential donors. And this is perhaps the strongest argument we can give for why you should consider making a peer-to-peer campaign as part of your giving season strategy. More importantly though, it’s why you need to spend time now building up your relationships with the donors in your database already. When you’ve spent more time fostering a meaningful connection with your donors, they’re much more likely to be ready to give come December.For more ways to build an emotional connection with donors, grab a copy of 7 Ideas to Engage Your Donors Before Year-End.Check back next week as we dive into the second learning from our day in Baltimore, and how local nonprofits can take steps to overcome the time and capacity challenges that threaten their success.last_img read more

Read More

4 Essential Nonprofit Messaging Secrets

first_imgWant to know a secret? There’s a trick to crafting the perfect marketing message for your nonprofit. Put your audience first.We all know people who are all about “me, me, me.” We tolerate them when we need to, but we avoid them as much as we can. On the other hand, we gravitate towards people who show interest in our lives, while also sharing information about themselves. It’s a reciprocal relationship that feels good.Crafting a message for your nonprofit follows the same rule of thumb. “You” marketing centers around your organization. “Me” marketing focuses on the benefits of what you are offering to people. How do you speak to their needs? How can you be of service to them?Craft Your MessageThese simple touchstones will help you create campaigns that are Connected, Rewarding, Actionable, and Memorable (CRAM), so you can catch your donors’ attention.Connect to things your audience cares about; such as making a difference, being part of a community, feeling good about themselves, feeling heard, etc.Reward people for taking action, both emotionally and tangibly. The most effective rewards are immediate, personal, credible, and reflective of your audience’s values.Action that is specific, easy to do, and measurably advances your mission offers an immediate sense of gratification.Memorable campaigns are unique, catchy, personal, tangible, desirable, and closely tied to your cause.Once they’ve taken action, thank them for participating. Encourage them to tell their friends about their support of your campaign or organization by providing a link to share on Facebook, Twitter, and email.OK, that’s one secret. Want to know the other three? Check out Insights, our new line of fundraising resources. These short bursts of information offer quick tips on how to make your nonprofit marketing and fundraising a success.Download 4 Essential Nonprofit Messaging Secrets today!last_img read more

Read More

Measuring Person-Centered Maternal Health Care

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on February 14, 2018February 15, 2018By: Dominic Montagu, Associate Professor, University of California, San Francisco; Katie Giessler, Research Analyst, University of California, San FranciscoClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Access to high quality health care is not only an inherent human right but also a critical component underpinning positive maternal health outcomes. This was indicated clearly by the World Health Organization (WHO) Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health, which found that while a base of essential interventions is necessary to manage severe complications, above this minimum level of equipment and trained staff, more technological infrastructure is not associated with better maternal health outcomes.The BetterBirth study, a more recent large-scale randomized controlled trial, looked specifically at the technical processes that make up management of pregnancies, including handwashing and use of gloves, early referral for at-risk women and magnesium for hypertension. The trial was conducted over one year in 60 hospitals in Uttar Pradesh, India to support medical staff in adhering to the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist. The BetterBirth trial results showed that the coaching-based program was associated with significantly higher adherence to essential birth practices, but this led to no significant improvement in maternal mortality, the primary outcome indicator of the study.In 1966, Avedis Donabedian proposed a simple framework for understanding health care quality, dividing the observable components into structure, process and outcomes. The implication is that structure plus process must equal outcomes. The evidence from the WHO Multicountry Survey and the BetterBirth Study suggests that improvements in structure or technical process alone will not lead to improvements in outcomes. Two recent publications lay the groundwork for studying a third key component of maternal health: patients themselves. WHO and the Institute of Medicine explicitly address the importance of “patient centered care” in current guidance, and this concept is increasingly being changed to “person-centered care” (PCC) so as to include those who are not ill—women attending an antenatal care session, for example. PCC incorporates the human-rights dimensions of respectful maternity care and adds domains of knowledge exchange and experience of care (privacy, predictability of costs, cleanliness, etc.) that, when combined with patient-provider interaction, make up the key non-clinical aspects of care. PCC provides a framework for examining maternal health that starts from the perspective of the person receiving care.Based on existing analytic models of patient experience, quality of care, health seeking-behavior and other areas of health, researchers have developed a new model of the key domains of PCC for reproductive health.Domains of Person-Centered Care. Sudhinaraset et al. 2017After conducting qualitative data collection, expert reviews, cognitive interviews, iterative testing and revisions, surveys and psychometric analysis, researchers have translated this framework into a validated scale for measuring person-centered maternity care (PCMC). The PCMC scale is a standardized tool that researchers, program managers from government or health facilities and health providers themselves can use to measure the whole patient experience. The scale, which has been adapted for different contexts, consists of 30 questions in the Kenya-specific scale and 27 in the India-specific iteration. A shorter multi-setting version has been developed with only 12 questions.The PCMC scale has been applied in studies and interventions in Kenya, India and Ghana thus far. With it, researchers are now able to identify and better address the aspects of care that matter most to ensure positive patient experiences. The scale can also identify where these areas of care fall short and inform what practices must change to improve the quality of care as a whole. Both the framework and the scale are important as pragmatic, actionable steps to understanding patient care during childbirth. The improvements being made to infrastructure and medical processes need to be matched by improvements in the respect, empowerment, support and overall women-centered experiences that are at the center of every birth.Donabedian proposed that structure plus process drives outcomes. The experiences of BetterBirth and the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health may seem to have challenged this assumption, at least for hospital-based maternity care and in the geographies they examined. But perhaps it was because a key aspect of process was missing from this work. Donabedian identified process to include technical as well as human components, noting that “the interpersonal process is the vehicle by which technical care is implemented and on which its success depends.” PCMC brings these interpersonal processes to the forefront of maternal health care.Perfect information is not necessary for improvement, although searching for good information when there are unknowns will lead to a better understanding of the complexities of health care and through that to improvements. The recent advances in person-centered care for maternal health, and the development of models and tools to understand patient experiences more accurately, come at a time when WHO’s initiative on Quality, Equity and Dignity is bringing new attention to the same issues. The growing attention to this issue will help us understand both how to improve person-centered Care and how doing so might change both experiences and outcomes for women.—Read the full paper and access the validated scale for measuring person-centered maternity care: Development of a tool to measure person-centered maternity care in developing settings: Validation in a rural and urban Kenyan populationLearn more about measuring women’s childbirth experiences.Share this:last_img read more

Read More

Insight Into Maternal Health in Humanitarian Crisis Settings

first_imgPosted on June 20, 2018August 1, 2018By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Arcade Ndoricimpa, Chantal Inamahoro, Esther Achandi and Anne Marie from the rural area of Kayanza working with Congolese refugee women in Bujumbura conducting concept mappingThe Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)’s Kayla McGowan recently had the pleasure of interviewing Jocelyn Finlay, a Research Scientist in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Finlay is the principal investigator of a project based in Burundi working on empowering young women in their reproductive health, using a mixed methods approach to create youth-made and youth-targeted interventions. With support from the MHTF, Finlay is also investigating the provision and use of maternal health services in an urban setting and within refugee camps in Burundi.KM: Describe your work in maternal health. Could you talk a bit about your collaboration with research partners? JF: We are looking at maternal health service provision and use within humanitarian crisis settings, specifically looking at refugees that migrate from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to Burundi. It is a unique setting because Burundi has its own humanitarian crisis at the moment. We see a lot of outflow of refugees from Burundi because of their own political crisis. Its neighbor, DRC, has about half a million refugees, and it has really accelerated. We are working within refugee camps which tend to be very remote.Given this unusual migration from one conflict setting to another we wanted to look into the maternal health services that are provided and what is used. We are using a mixed methods approach, so the qualitative work is helping us see whether we are asking the right questions in the first place. An initial question was: Is there a gap between provision and use? We wanted to hear about the maternal health services offered, and used, and see if the gap is generated by lack of supply or lack of demand.KM: What have you learned so far?JF: Having the qualitative research component has meant that we are better able to shape the research question, to make sure we ask the most important question. We have conducted two types of qualitative interviews. One is on the supply side, interviewing key informants about what kind of maternal health services are offered, whether people use them and what they think are the limitations. We are always asking about both problems and solutions.The second type is community participatory work with refugees. We use a technique called concept mapping, a workshop where people are grouped by age and interviewed. We are interviewing women between the ages of 15-49, divided into five- or 10-year age groups. The women get to talk about problems and solutions associated with provision and use of maternal health care services. Both the providers and the women get to discuss their thoughts about problems and solutions.We’ve conducted the qualitative work in an urban setting and in refugee camps.Two shortfalls that were cited as particularly acute for those in the camps were that there is some basic antenatal care, but there is not really any postnatal care. As my colleague says, “Women who give birth or miscarry are largely left to cure on their own.”There are doctors within the camps, but they are completely overwhelmed. If there are complications and women have to travel outside the camps, it is a very difficult journey since the camps are often very isolated. Again, to quote my colleague, “Imagine a three-kilometer [or much longer] journey in rough terrain for a mother experiencing labor complications.”Based on previous conversations, another point that emerged is that the needs within maternal health reflect broader health systems issues. Sanitation issues, such as not having enough soap, are really important to the refugee women. During delivery, sometimes there is not even soap for providers to wash their hands. Another issue is access to prescription medication—for maternal health purposes, newborn care and other issues. They are not confident about the quality of the drugs they are receiving, if they are the right quantity and there are also concerns about prescription medication cost and antibiotic resistance.KM: What is the biggest takeaway regarding maternal health in this setting?JF: A key takeaway that has emerged is that there are not enough maternal health guidelines for emergency situations in humanitarian crisis settings. For example, there is the Minimum Initial Service Package as well as guidelines for gender-based violence by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee. However, there is little available for maternal health in refugee settings specifically. There is a need for a short document containing lifesaving guidelines or step-by-step instructions for addressing emergency obstetric care in these settings. The World Health Organization has a “Key Steps” document, but it is not clear if these guidelines should be applied within the camps.KM: Could you talk a bit about the impact of your work on a global scale?JF: I hope that we shed light on a refugee situation in such a complex humanitarian situation of Congolese refugees in Burundi. We hope to bring voice to Burundi as a host community, and Congolese refugees.KM: If you had an unlimited budget, how would you invest in maternal health? JF: I would say strengthening the health care system within Burundi more broadly. Doing this would then translate to a strengthened health care system for refugees.Photo credit: Jocelyn Finlay—Access key resources related to sexual, reproductive and maternal health in humanitarian settings>>Read our series profiling maternal and newborn health in humanitarian settings:[Part 1] Ebola Virus Outbreak[Part 2] 2015 Nepal Earthquake[Part 3] Conflict in SyriaLearn more about revising the global standards for the 2018 Inter-agency field manual on reproductive health in humanitarian settingsLearn more about World Refugee Day and join the conversation on social media using #WorldRefugeeDay and #WithRefugees.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More

MSME’s Encouraged to Raise Funding Through Capital Market

first_img Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) are being encouraged to explore the possibility of raising funding through capital market options, such as the Jamaica Stock Exchange (JSE).“The active steps include having your plan and the goal to be a listed company. Begin by keeping proper records, start to prepare a business plan, and actively surround yourselves with persons who have taken the journey and have succeeded. It can be done, and we await your entrance,” JSE Managing Director, Marlene Street Forrest, stated.She was speaking at the Small Business Association of Jamaica’s (SBAJ) second regional MSME Conference, held recently at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in New Kingston.Managing Director of the Jamaica Stock Exchange (JSE), Marlene Street Forrest, addresses the Small Business Association of Jamaica’s (SBAJ) second regional MSME Conference, held recently at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in New Kingston. She was speaking at the Small Business Association of Jamaica’s (SBAJ) second regional MSME Conference, held recently at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in New Kingston. “The active steps include having your plan and the goal to be a listed company. Begin by keeping proper records, start to prepare a business plan, and actively surround yourselves with persons who have taken the journey and have succeeded. It can be done, and we await your entrance,” JSE Managing Director, Marlene Street Forrest, stated. Mrs. Street Forrest noted that despite foreign exchange rate fluctuations, “we have very favourable market conditions, with business and consumer confidence high, a low rate of inflation and over- subscription in all of our Initial Public Offerings (IPOs), which signal an interest in the stock market.”“These factors are good for business, and we believe that the MSMEs should now be engaged,” she further stated.For his part, Wisynco Group Chairman, William Mahfood, noted that financing is becoming easier for the MSME sector.“Many banks are taking more risks and investing in small businesses across Jamaica,” he indicated.The conference was held to highlight new trends in business development and management; promote success stories among MSMEs; examine the MSME Policy within a macroeconomic context and its impact on business profitability; provide an interactive forum to explore opportunities for national, regional and global business collaboration; and expose participants to new technologies, research and development in agriculture, and climate smart innovation.center_img Story Highlights Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) are being encouraged to explore the possibility of raising funding through capital market options, such as the Jamaica Stock Exchange (JSE).last_img read more

Read More

Not a captain but Chekwa leads by example for OSU

Cornerback Chimdi Chekwa entered this football season in the top three in games started on the team. The rest of the top three, offensive guard Bryant Browning and defensive end Cameron Heyward, were named captains. Chekwa was not. Considering the Buckeyes named six captains for only the second time in team history, some teammates were surprised Chekwa was left off the list. Captain selection “could have went a lot of ways. I kind of was a little surprised,” senior safety Aaron Gant said. “But you don’t have to be a captain to show or possess that quality.” Chekwa wasn’t bothered by being left off the list and has continued to do his best to lead, he said. “I was talking on the sideline like I was a proud father,” Chekwa told Scout.com’s Jeff Svoboda while sitting out of a practice. “I’ve tried to teach (the corners) everything I know.” The leadership of the cornerback was not lost on his head coach. “Chimdi Chekwa … continues to lead back there and play with a lot of energy and enthusiasm and play like a senior,” Jim Tressel said. “We’ve said a million times that you can have a good team if your seniors have their career best year and Chimdi certainly is on task to perhaps make that happen.” Leading by setting an example on the field has been Chekwa’s most successful method. “I’m not a very vocal guy but it depends on the situation. I’m not going to scream or anything. I let (safety) Jermale (Hines) handle the loud talking,” the 6-foot, 190-pound corner said. “But if something needs to be said, I’ll say it.” Though he may not be loud about it, teammates appreciate what Chekwa does. “He is always communicating and talking, making sure we’re on the same page,” Gant said. “He keeps us going, never letting us slack.” The tenacity comes in part from his experience on two teams that played for the national championship. Playing in the national championship game “helped a lot. Whenever you go out on the field and compete with other great players,” Chekwa said. “I learned from all of that.” He expects to use what he learned to get his team back to that game this year, captain or not, he said. read more

Read More

OxladeChamberlain Im staying positive over my injury

first_imgLiverpool midfielder Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain says that he is trying to remain positive over his serious knee problemThe 25-year-old sustained serious knee damage during Liverpool’s Champions League semi-final first leg against AS Roma back in April.Oxlade-Chamberlain was then was ruled out of England’s World Cup campaign this summer after undergoing surgery to repair the issue in May.The England international is also expected to miss the majority of the 2018/19 campaign as he works on returning to full fitness.“It is a very serious injury,” Oxlade-Chamberlain told Sky Sports, via the club website.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“It can happen to any of us at any time and that’s obviously something that’s never easy to deal with and get over.“I’m trying to stay positive, that’s the sort of character I am. I feel that’s the best way to move things forward.“I’m in good spirits and I’m progressing for sure.”Oxlade-Chamberlain managed five goals and seven assists in 42 appearances across all competitions for Liverpool last season following his £35m move from Arsenal last summer.last_img read more

Read More

Barca president Captaincy has changed Messi

first_imgBarcelona president Josep Maria Bartomeu believes Lionel Messi has changed since being named as the club’s new captainThe Argentine striker was named as the new skipper of the Catalan club in August following Andres Iniesta’s exit at the end of last season.Since then, Bartomeu reckons he has seen a change in Messi and praised the 31-year-old for his leadership.“Messi is very happy here. He is delighted and excited about continuing to triumph at Barcelona,” he told Onda Cero on Monday.“Messi has made a change, he has decided to take on the captaincy and assume that responsibility in the team.”David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.Barcelona have agreed to play Catalan rivals Girona at Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium in the US early next year.Although final approval is yet to granted by the Spanish football federation.“LaLiga proposed that we play a match abroad and it seemed a good idea. We have the obligation to promote the league,” said Bartomeu.“You have to get closer to the fans and find new streams of income. Playing a match abroad would help us.“If it can be played, we’ll do it. The club captains have been informed.”last_img read more

Read More

Something has changed for Rodrigo De Paul

first_imgThe Argentinean winger is having his best time at his team since arriving at Italian Lega Serie A club Udinese in 2016Rodrigo Javier De Paul started his professional career in 2012 with Racing Club in his native Argentina.He was then transferred to Spanish La Liga side Valencia in 2014, with a small loan to Racing Club in 2016.And in the same year, he moved to Italian Lega Serie A club Udinese, with whom he has played the best years of his life.With Udinese, De Paul has scored eleven goals in 76 appearances, but this season seems to be his best one yet.Cristiano Ronaldo, JuventusSerie A Betting: Match-day 3 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Considering there is a number of perfect starts so early in the Serie A season, as well as a few surprisingly not-so perfect ones….“Last summer, Fiorentina was interested in me, I had to think about it because that offer was interesting. Then, Udinese has told me they strongly believed in me so I decided to stay,” he was quoted by Gianluca Di Marzio.“We’re playing a very entertaining football, a dynamic and intense one. Everyone has to learn to do everything, we’re convinced this is the type of playing style suited to our team.”“I’m finally putting into use what Iachini told me, and I’m trying more often to shoot from outside the box. Even if, because of my qualities, I prefer making assists,” he added.He took his time to also speak about fellow countryman Paulo Dybala from Juventus “who I knew in Palermo when I had to get the documents I needed. Paulo is really strong, Juve surely could get toe to toe with the best European teams.”“They’ve had 9 victories in a row but they still should be aware of this: we want to win points, we’re playing at home and you can never tell how a game is going to end in football. What’s sure is that at the end of the game, I should travel with Paulo to Saudi Arabia to reach our Argentinean teammates”.last_img read more

Read More

Craig Gordon remembers the time he broke his arm

first_imgThe Celtic goalkeeper broke his arm while battling for the ball with Jermain Defoe and he was out for three monthsExactly nine years ago, Craig Gordon was Sunderland’s goalkeeper and he got his arm broken after a collision with Tottenham Hotspur Jermain Defoe.“I got to the ball first and he got their second and broke my arm. That was a bad break and I had to get a metal plate inserted in my arm,” Gordon told The Chronicle Live.“I was out for another three months and came back and played the rest of the season with the metal plate.”“That summer I got the metal taken out of my arm and very soon into pre-season the arm broke again and that was another three months when it got put back in again,” he added.Mikey Johnston, CelticJohnston is disappointed after being injured Manuel R. Medina – September 11, 2019 Celtic winger Mikey Johnston was disappointed to miss Scotland Under 21 national team’s victories over San Marino and Croatia, and he hopes he can return to play soon.“That was the third operation on my arm and that was frustrating. The metal plate is still in there today so I have not had any more trouble with it.”“Every time I felt like I was getting to a point where I was putting in good, consistent performances, something else would come up,” he commented.“I was starting to play in games where I probably wasn’t fit and I was starting to think whether this would ever be fixed.”“This was a very long-term thing and perhaps it was something I wouldn’t come back from,” he added.“There had been so many things that had gone wrong I felt I had to leave.”last_img read more

Read More

Gary Neville tips Pochettino for United job

first_imgSky Sports pundit Gary Neville believes that Tottenham manager Mauricio Pochettino is the right man to take the United job after Jose Mourinho was sacked on Tuesday.Mourinho was fired by Manchester United on Tuesday after a poor start to the season, and assistant manager Michael Carrick will act as interim manager until a new temporary boss is appointed within the next two days.Former Real Madrid manager Zinedine Zidane has long been linked with the job, but Neville says Pochettino would be perfect to take over.“I said last season that the next manager of Man Utd should be Pochettino,” Neville told Sky Sports.“If I look at the values of United, you look at Pochettino’s belief in young players at Southampton and with Tottenham.“You look at his performance levels and style of play, the way in which he carries himself at all times – publicly and in private – I have been fortunate enough to spend two or three days at Tottenham’s training ground and for me, he just feels like the most ideal candidate.“There will be others who say ‘no’, but Man Utd have tried managers who have won European Cups, managers who have won multiple leagues, managers who have had that solid grounding in the Premier League.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.“My view is they need someone who meets the three key principles of that football club – the promotion of youth, entertaining football and to win football matches.“So at this moment in time, I see him – and people will suggest that he has not won a trophy yet at Tottenham, but with a net spend of -£29m, or something over the last four years, he could not have done more. He has done the most incredible job and I do think he is the person who is the most outstanding candidate.“But if you are a Tottenham Hotspur fan, you will not appreciate me saying that. If you are Daniel Levy at Tottenham Hotspur, you will be grabbing and holding on to him for dear life because you are moving into a new stadium.“But he is the individual who fits the profile of what Man Utd need in terms of what he has done in the Premier League over the last five, six, seven years at both clubs.”last_img read more

Read More

With Potential Sale Looming Executive Editors to Exit Entrepreneur

first_imgUPDATE: Austin Ventures to Acquire Entrepreneur MediaFollowing the departure of longtime editor Rieva Lesonsky, executive editors Maria Valdez Haubrich and Karen Axelton also are leaving Entrepreneur magazine, FOLIO: has learned. Haubrich and Axelton resigned on June 9, Axelton confirmed in an e-mail to FOLIO:. The pair will remain in their roles until July 3. These departures come only days after parent company Entrepreneur Media named former WiesnerMedia business development vice president Amy Cosper as vice president and editor-in-chief, replacing Lesonsky. Entrepreneur Media named Charles Muselli as director of business development, replacing Chuck Fuller, who also left the company.Entrepreneur Media president Neil Perlman did not immediately return a request for comment.These exits come as Entrepreneur Media is said to have completed the final bidding stage of its acquisition and has moved to the due diligence phase with a Boston-based private equity firm, sources who are familiar with the process tell FOLIO:. Talks have slowed recently, according to the sources, due to the recent departures and challenges in the financing market. As long as the talks continue, sources say the deal could be finalized as early as mid- to late-July.Entrepreneur went to market in February with the first round of bids having come in April. The asking price reportedly is $200 million—translating to a multiple three times revenue, since Entrepreneur Media is about a $60 million company. Financial-services firm A.G. Edwards as well as Dow Jones, R.H. Donnelley and USA Today were said to have interest in acquiring the company..Entrepreneur’s first quarter ad revenues were $25.4 million, down about 6 percent from the same period in 2007, according to Publishers Information Bureau figures. Ad pages were down 7.2 percent.last_img read more

Read More