The number one villain in the way of good decisions

first_imgOne of the worst things we can do when making decisions is to frame them too narrowly. This can lead us to the wrong thought process – and false choices.As Dan Heath puts it in his new book, “The first villain of decision making, narrow framing, is the tendency to define our choices too narrowly, to see them in binary terms. We ask, ‘Should I break up with my partner or not?’ instead of ‘What are the ways I could make this relationship better?’ We ask ourselves, ‘Should I buy a new car or not?’ instead of ‘What’s the best way I could spend some money to make my family better off?’”Or – to put this in nonprofit terms – we ask, “Should we have an event or not? Should we blog or not? Should we get rid of that board member or not?”Dan’s new book Decisive is all about this kind of problem. Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work provides practical ways to beat narrow framing and other villains of decision making. Here are two of his tips (and I quote):1. Consider opportunity cost. If you are considering an investment of time or money, ask yourself, “What is the next best way I could spend this time/money?” If you can’t come up with any other combination that seems enticing, you should feel more confident that you’re making the right investment. 2. Multitrack your options. Always try to think AND not OR. Can you avoid choosing among your options and try several at once? For instance, if you’re deciding whether to invest time in Spanish lessons or ballroom dancing classes, do both for a while until one of them “wins.” Or, rather than hire one employee out of three candidates, could you give all three a 2-week consulting project so that you can compare their work on a real-world assignment?For more tips, join a free Network for Good webinar with Dan today at 1 pm Eastern. Register here.PS for fun, here is one of Dan’s great teaching videos on giving better presentations. It draws on his book, Made to Stick.last_img read more

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Build Your Online Presence with Pro Bono

first_imgWe know it’s hard to tackle the never ending list of tasks associated with building an online presence. Lucky for nonprofits, pro bono professionals are ready to help boost your online image via social media, online fundraising, email marketing, and SEO Because of organizations like the Taproot Foundation and Catchafire it’s much easier to find pro bono consultants who are willing to provide their talents at no charge to a nonprofit like yours.If pro bono is new to you, projects that are compartmentalized—photography, newsletter design, and copyediting—are great places to start. Projects like designing an entire website or creating a communication strategy are more complex and best approached when you are prepared to invest the time and staff resources to work with a pro bono consultant over a longer period of time. Although these projects are more advanced, they often result in long-lasting relationships with your consultants and can create invested champions for your cause.To start planning how you can use pro bono to maximize your online presence, download our chart to assess what pro bono projects your nonprofit is ready for.Once you’ve identified your projects, check out how you can secure pro bono help at the Taproot Foundation’s website.last_img read more

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Rocking the Case Study

first_imgI’m a huge fan of case studies. They’re an incredible tool to showcase your nonprofit’s work, demonstrate social proof, and gain more supporters. Jay Baer’s Youtility explains the power of case studies in greater detail, but here are a few ways you can use this approach to support your fundraising and marketing efforts: 1) Get testimonials. Tell the story of why people support your organization. Ask questions such as:Why are you passionate about this issue?When did you start learning about this issue?Why do you choose to support our organization?By gathering this information, you’ll not only have endorsements for your cause, but you can also use responses to inform your marketing and donor recruitment strategies.2) Document how you spent money. Did you dedicate a large portion of funds to operational expenses? Why? What impact did it have? Once you explain that to donors, they’ll better understand how you fulfill your mission, and why it’s important to have operational expenses. Every penny of your budget doesn’t have to go to on-the-ground work, but you do have to demonstrate how operations are vital to ensuring the services you provide are making a positive change. 3) Survey those you help. Ask your constituency how they’ve found your services. Do they see your nonprofit as a vital member of their community? Would they be able to get where they are without you?If those answers affirm your work, ask respondents if you can use a quote in your case study. Most will be happy to help. In some cases, if you provide them with links and social media messages, they’ll share the study with their network, too. If the answers bring up questions or poke holes in your work, pay attention to that. That’s a great opportunity to take feedback and turn it into something positive.Have you created a case study before? What were the results? How did you share it with supporters?last_img read more

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Four Essential Tips for Planning Year-End Email Campaigns

first_img1. Look for trends in recent response data.As you’re brainstorming your email strategy, spend some quality time digging into data on what’s been the most and least effective for you over the past few months. For example, if you notice that click-through rates are higher in your graphic-rich emails, design extra-visual appeals for year-end. If supporters don’t click on links at the bottom of your emails, make sure you keep all links in the first part of your message (especially your DonateNow button!).2. Consider your sending frequency and target your outreach.Carefully think about your email frequency—every fatigued subscriber who opts out in December is someone who won’t see your emails at all next year. Start ramping up your email frequency now and keep a close eye on the open and unsubscribe rates, then adjust your year-end campaign email frequency accordingly.3. Keep your emails social.People stay busy during the end of the year, but not too busy to keep up with their social networking. Make sure your subscribers have an easy way to share your emails with their friends and followers, and include easy-to-spot links to your organization’s social networking sites, too.4. Welcome new subscribers right away.When someone signs up for your email list, they’re probably interested in hearing from you right then and there. Build a strong relationship with new subscribers right away with an automatic welcome note. If you can set a great foundation now, you’ll have more loyal subscribers during prime giving season. Even though your donors might procrastinate, you can’t! Start planning your year-end email campaign now. Photo Source: The Digital Giving Index Did you know that year-end donations make up 30% of giving for the entire year? Because year-end fundraising goals are often so big, it’s important to start planning your year-end campaign now. When mapping out your email appeals, keep the following four topics in mind:last_img read more

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How the Benefit Concert is Shaping Philanthropy

first_imgMusic has been one of the most powerful ways causes, celebrities, and communities can connect to raise money for serious issues. We recently caught up with Art Taylor, president of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance, who shared his insight on why these events can be so successful for nonprofits of all sizes.Legacy of Aid: August is the Anniversary of the Benefit ConcertFor over forty years, the benefit concert has served as one of the most popular, easily recognizable forms of aid for charitable organizations. It all started back in August 1971 when George Harrison called a few friends—Ringo, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, to name a few—to play at the world’s first benefit concert. The Concert for Bangladesh played from Madison Square Garden with ticket and recording sales helping to raise $18 million. These stars likely didn’t realize they were forever changing charitable giving in time of a disaster. Concerts are now a popular vehicle for causes around the world to raise visibility and funds—often targeting a younger crowd or introducing their campaign to an audience not yet familiar with it. “Music is a universal pleasure that cuts across cultures and backgrounds,” says H. Art Taylor, president of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance. “Music is a unifying experience—it’s a natural choice for charities to turn to benefit concerts as a means to raise funds.” Star power can play a big role but doesn’t always spell success. In the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti, Wyclef Jean’s charity, Yele Haiti, came under scrutiny about its finances. This controversy underscores the importance for charities to make sure they are fully transparent and accountable before implementing a benefit concert which can attract a lot of media attention. And star power isn’t the only way to go. Charities across the country have seen great success with smaller scale benefit concerts ranging from high school bands to regional bands. The principles and watch-outs apply regardless of your headliner. 7 Do’s and Don’ts when planning a benefit concert for your organization:1. Know your partners. If you are co-hosting the benefit concert with another charity, take a moment to investigate them by pulling their report at Give.org. Don’t assume it is well managed just because it has a 501(c)(3) charitable tax exempt status. 2. Pay attention to regulations. Make sure any state regulatory requirements have been met, including verifying your ability to solicit. 3. Check tax deductibility disclosures.If the benefit concert tickets are sold in a charitable fundraising context, seek out a tax advisor to find out about tax deductibility disclosures that may need to be made. 4. Beware of cheaters. Take reasonable measures to reduce ticket scalping. Examples might be: limiting the number of tickets sold to a single purchaser and ensuring computer safeguards are in place to avoid someone “snatching” all the tickets as soon as they are made available. 5. Practice your FAQ.Make sure answers are readily available for reasonable questions about your mission, target amounts to be raised, and how collected funds will be used. 6. Be clear. If the intention is to collect funds restricted for a specific purpose (i.e., disaster relief) make sure that all charity participants agree to this restriction and are able to carry out this work as soon as possible.7. Be transparent about finances. Share information on the total amount collected, the cost to hold the concert, and how much went to the cause. Post this information on the charity’s and concert’s websites. The Future of Benefit Concerts“Charity benefit concerts will continue to play a role in generating funds and advocating issues,” says Taylor. “Large events work well in times of major crisis or when a big star has a personal stake in a cause. Smaller, targeted local events can be successful as well.”Whether packing a large event venue or a local concert hall, organizers should be creative and coordinate effectively to ensure that benefit concerts are a useful tool for raising awareness and charitable dollars. A benefit with local bands and resources combined with a coordinated effort between multiple nonprofits may be a good option for some charities. Whether large or small, however, the expense and coordination efforts for events can be prohibitive and should be considered carefully in terms of the investment of time and resources. Often charities will measure ROI through funds raised as well as impact to the audience. For more helpful tips on nonprofit collaboration, including information on accreditation, visit the BBB Wise Giving Alliance at Give.org. For advice on planning a successful fundraising event, download Network for Good’s guide to Hosting Your Most Fabulous Fundraising Event Ever.last_img read more

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Rev Up Your Data with Dashboards

first_imgCurrent status dashboard: Answers the question, “What’s our current status?” If you’re working on a capital campaign or have a specific target for your fall appeal, your dashboard can show your progress by date and the trajectory of where you need to be so your team doesn’t get complacent. For example, they’ll quickly see that they’ve raised $10,000 and have just three weeks to raise another $10,000. With this knowledge, the conversation at the staff or board meeting might revolve around “What action will we take?”Image Source: Mashable Blog: Is Give2ogether a Google Analytics for Philanthropy.Accountability dashboard: This one might feel scary! Let’s say you want at least 80% of your board members attending board meetings. Your accountability dashboard shows names, dates, and who attended. It gives you some one-on-one discussion points without making everyone feel bad: “Hey, Lynn, how can we support you? What’s keeping you from attending, because your board seat is really important and we want to make sure you’re able to do your duties as a board member.”Now that you know the value of dashboards for presenting important data quickly and sparking people to take action, why not try creating one that’s relevant to your organization’s numbers? For more in-depth guidance, examples, and useful resources, download a recording of the webinar for free.If you don’t have the ability to collect data to make a dashboard worthwhile, we can help! Do your hear crickets when you ask for help with donor engagement tasks, cultivation, or thank you calls? Are eyes glazing over when your board and staff review spreadsheets and donor lists? Fear not, there is hope!In our Nonprofit 911 webinar Change Your Data Story, Lori Jacobwith, president and co-founder of Ignited Fundraising and co-author of the Essential Fundraising Handbook for Small Nonprofits, shared how you can transform otherwise dull data into attractive and easy-to-understand dashboards that inspire everyone to action.What’s a Data Dashboard?The dashboard in your car gives you an at-a-glance update on some really important factors, like if you should slow down or stop for gas. Similarly, a data dashboard shows the important information your organization needs to know to achieve its strategic goals. The data should be arranged on a single screen so the information can be monitored as easily as the dashboard in your car.Data dashboards often show financials or various kinds of giving information, presented by day or month, year over year, zip code, and so on. Less common are board dashboards, but you’re likely to see a big jump in board engagement when you share data visually with this group.Why Use Dashboards?Good visual displays cause people to take action. Data dashboards:Bring attention to your priorities and help you reach your goals.Monitor performance and create accountability.Simplify information, such as complex financials.Fact: Humans are visually wired. Half of our brain is involved with visual processing. We remember 80% of what we see, 20% of what we read, and 10% of what we hear. Color increases our willingness to read something. In social media, for example, you know images are everything. The same is true when we present lots of numbers.You have just two goals when presenting any kind of data:Convey your story.Establish credibility.Some stories you might convey with data: Are we tracking adequately toward our goal? Do we need to fill our fundraising event with more people? Can we improve attendance at our board meetings? Dashboards drive these messages home quicker and more effectively than columns of numbers.Tip: Visual data displays should show information over time, not just year to date.3 Types of Nonprofit DashboardsThe varieties are endless, but here are a few dashboards to get you started.Business intelligence dashboard: Presents facts about your organization. The Indianapolis Museum of Art’s website features a live dashboard showing current totals of Facebook fans, endowment size, and active memberships. “Today’s Attendance” brings up a live tally of how many people passed through the main entrance, gift shop, special exhibitions gallery every two hours.Source: http://www.imamuseum.orglast_img read more

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Understanding the Flow of Reproductive Health Knowledge in Ethiopia

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 1, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)K4Health recently published a needs assessment and network mapping of family planning and reproductive health information in Ethiopia. The overall goal of the assessment was to gain a better understanding of the accessibility and flow of information relating to family planning and reproductive health among key actors in Ethiopia.In Ethiopia, K4Health sought to explore the current family planning/reproductive health (FP/RH) knowledge management system; examine information flows and barriers at different levels of the health system; and identify areas to strengthen health information sharing and use. Using a novel, participatory approach (Net-Map) yielded a highly visual presentation of the data that identifies key FP/RH actors in Ethiopia, explores the nature of relationships among the actors, and examines the level of influence of the different actors with regard to reproductive health information exchange. Using the Net-Map approach, the researchers were able to identify bottle necks to information flow and opportunities to improve that flow across health system levels in Ethiopia.This body of research aimed to determine how to better meet health care professionals’ dynamic information needs so that they can provide better health care to the populations they serve. In Ethiopia, reproductive health indicators can be improved through better health information exchange. This report provides important recommendations that can help get the right information delivered to health care professionals when they need it and can help enhance the quality of health care programs countrywide.Read the full assessment here.Share this:last_img read more

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Learning From Failures? Op-ed Calls for Better Use of Negative Findings

first_imgShare this: Posted on February 4, 2013March 21, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Last weekend, The New York Times featured an op-ed by journalist Sam Loewenberg on research published last summer in PLOS Medicine, “Community Mobilization in Mumbai Slums to Improve Perinatal Care and Outcomes: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.” For anyone interested in the challenges related to improving maternal health in cities, the PLOS article is a fascinating read and, in fact, it is part of the MHTF-PLOS collaboration on Maternal Health. Loewenberg highlights this article for a reason that comes up in many discussions of how to develop better maternal health interventions: the pressure to highlight only success, and, in particular, to downplay research findings that show interventions falling short of actually improving maternal and newborn health.As Loewenberg writes:                            The travails of the Newborn Health project aren’t unique. What is noteworthy is that when the project did not work as planned, the team reported it openly and in detail, providing potentially valuable information for other researchers.   It is a provocative point, and one that comes up often in our discussions of how to better address the biggest challenges for improving maternal health. In fact, it was a major topic at GMHC2013, as Lancet editor Richard Horton led the opening plenary session, which had the theme “Science for activism: How evidence can create a movement for maternal health. The session even included discussion of a hypothetical “journal of failures.”What is more, the op-ed provides an interesting follow-up to the initial research article:Last year they rebooted. They set up small centers that offer basic health services like immunization, feeding, family planning and help navigating the city’s convoluted health and social service systems. So far, providing concrete services, rather than just advice on collective organizing, seems to be more in tune with the needs of people in the slums.Clearly, with a new phase of work underway in Mumbai, it remains to be seen whether the work in Mumbai will yield results. In the meantime, it is worth revisiting the original article along with this weekend’s op-ed. Together, they touch on many of the most compelling challenges for the field today. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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PLOS Medicine Editorial Spotlights Access to Health Information as Central to Human Right to Health

first_imgPosted on May 2, 2013March 13, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In an editorial published this week in PLOS Medicine, the editors discuss the critical need for improved health information, particularly clear, accessible reference materials that enable health care providers to put the best evidence into practice and bolster health care in low and middle income countries. In their discussion of the critical need for high quality reference and educational materials, the authors single out the issue of postpartum hemorrhage.From the editorial: It is in the poorest settings where basic health information may prove most valuable. For example, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal death worldwide; yet despite being recommended by the WHO and other professional bodies, active management of the third stage of labor to prevent PPH was found to be correctly used in only 0.5% to 32% of observed deliveries in seven developing countries . Worryingly, six of the seven countries were found to have multiple guidelines and conflicting recommendations for active management of the third stage of labor.The authors go on to point out that while important sources of knowledge, expanding dissemination of the sort of evidence published in medical journals alone is not sufficient. Instead, the most critical resources may be those that translate evidence into forms that can be readily applied:Medical journals remain a key part of the knowledge translation process, almost exclusively dealing with the final stages of knowledge creation (primary research), distillation (systematic reviews and guidelines), and commentary (editorializing and contextualizing by experts) via peer review and finally dissemination. Although making research openly available to be both read and reused is an essential step toward a vision of wider access to healthcare knowledge, disseminating information on its own is not enough to ensure evidence is used in decision-making. In many settings it is access to secondary reference and educational materials based on the best available evidence that is severely lacking yet probably more crucial for clinical practice than the most recent observational study or clinical trial findings.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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PMNCH Launches New Resources on National Progress and Global Commitments to MDG Maternal and Child Health Targets

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 22, 2013February 2, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As world leaders gather at the UN General Assembly to review progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and considers the framework that will follow the 2015 MDG deadline, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) has released its annual review of commitments to the Global Strategy on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. This year’s edition of the report focuses on assessing whether and how the 213 partners that committed to the Global Strategy have followed up on their pledges. As PMNCH Executive Director Carole Presern wrote in the Huffington Post introducing the report, “The report shows that more organizations, governments and the private sector are making commitments to improve women’s and children’s health every year, and that those commitments are being followed up with real action.”Along with the review, PMNCH has also produced “Success Factors,” a series of 10 national case studies that present critical lessons learned for global efforts to advance maternal, newborn and child health. The case studies focus on a diverse group of countries that have achieved substantial progress in recent years, and highlight both common themes and country-specific examples of how effective approaches have been implemented to achieve dramatic effects on maternal and child health.From PMNCH:Success Factor Country Summaries highlight lessons learned from 10 countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Laos PDR, Nepal, Peru, Rwanda and Vietnam) that are well on the path to achieving the MDG targets for maternal and child health.These summaries present different types of policies and programmes that countries use in key areas known to influence the health of women and children.The lessons learned from the analysis of these 10 countries illustrate: The summaries are drawn from evidence collected as part of “Accelerating Progress for Women’s and Children’s Health,” an ongoing, multi-partner effort to answer the question “What can we learn about making progress on women’s and children’s health?” based on  large-scale vidence from 136 low- and middle-income countries over the past 50 years.Share this:center_img Political commitment overcomes challengesEvidence guides policy and investmentSustainable development accelerates progressStrong partnerships achieve goalslast_img read more

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How to Avoid Predatory Journals: A Five Point Plan

first_imgPosted on January 28, 2015May 9, 2017By: Jocalyn Clark, Executive Editor, Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition at icddr,bClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Increasingly, I’m asked to advise and assist with the problem of predatory journals. While it’s probably only an annoying nuisance to many in the developed world, the increasing number of spam emails inviting articles and conference participation is beginning to feel like a potentially serious problem for developing world scientists and institutions. This demands action, as Richard Smith and I argue in a recent editorial in The BMJ.That’s because these countries’ relative lack of development also extends, unsurprisingly, to scholarly publishing. Whereas in rich country institutions we would have training, supervision, and support that generate a level of literacy to discern predatory versus legitimate journals, this is often missing or nascent in developing country institutions. As a recent paper shows, the majority of authors in predatory journals are inexperienced and based in developing countries.Predatory journals (a term first coined by librarian Jeffrey Beall) are fake or scam journals that send phishing emails offering “open access” publication in exchange for payment, without providing robust editorial or publishing services. They have been discredited by the scientific community, and because they are not indexed in standard databases any research published in them is effectively lost. Their motive is financial gain, and their modus operandi is a corruption of the business model of legitimate open access publishing.Many organisations and universities around the world are facing this problem, but it appears predatory publishers may be particularly targeting institutions in the global south.I’m struck by how many more spam emails from predatory publishers I get to my Bangladesh institutional email than I do to my Canadian academic account. In a recent seven day trial, I received 14 predatory journal spam emails to my icddr,b account and six to my University of Toronto account; a colleague at Harvard in the same period got just two.This can’t be explained by inadequate junk mail filters, as the system we use at my organisation in Bangladesh is an industry standard.I recommend a five point plan for researchers to avoid predatory journals, which involves “doing your homework” to check the credibility of a journal or publisher, and always being sceptical of unknown journals. To distinguish legitimate from predatory journals, here are some useful sources of information—none of which are adequate on their own:Is the journal or publisher listed in Beall’s List? If so, it should be avoided, as this “blacklist” is regularly updated and specifies criteria for identifying predatory journals and publishers.If claiming to be an open access journal, is the journal in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)? This is a sort of “whitelist,” and journals here must meet specific criteria.Is the publisher a member of recognised professional organisations that commit to best practices in publishing, such as the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE); the International Association of Scientific, Technical, & Medical Publishers (STM); or the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)?Is the journal indexed? Do not accept the journal’s claims about being indexed. Instead verify these claims by searching for the journal in databases such as PubMedCentral (free) or the Web of Science (requiring subscription).Is the journal transparent and following best practices when it comes to editorial and peer review processes, governance, and ownership? Are there contact details for the journal and its staff (email, postal address, working telephone number)? Reputable journals have a named editor and editorial board comprised of recognised experts. Are the costs associated with publishing clear? Credible journals do not ask for a submission fee. Many bona fide open access journals require a publication charge, but this is levied after acceptance and through a process separate from the editorial process.To help with “doing your homework” authors can consult new guidance from COPE, which—along with the DOAJ, OASPA, and the World Association of Medical Editors—has set out principles of transparency and best practice that set apart legitimate journals and publishers from “non-legitimate” ones.These sources of information can help any researcher struggling to avoid predatory journals, but should supplement rather than supplant extensive discussions among co-authors about the right and reputable target journals for their papers.In addition, those of us who collaborate with and advocate health research from developing countries should lend our support to colleagues, especially junior colleagues, to spread publication literacy and to fight against the predatory journals.This post originally appeared on BMJ Blogs.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Top Nonprofit Fundraising Posts of 2017

first_imgIn 2017, the Network for Good blog covered a variety of topics ranging from fundraising strategies and planning to top campaigns and donor retention best practices. Here are the top five blog posts from our thousands of subscribers during 2017 – Enjoy!1) 8 Resources to Help with Fundraising PlanningIn this post by Liz Ragland, readers were given templates, resources, and tips to help get their plan ready and give your individual giving a boost in 2017.2) 3 Steps to Getting Corporate Sponsors for Your EventFundraising events take a fair amount of money to produce, and it’s easy to spend more money on the event than it actually raises. In this post we shared the secret to ensuring your event has a net financial gain, through corporate sponorships.3) Five Things Nonprofits Must Know to Keep DonorsThis post featured five top tips for planning donor retention strategies to grow individual giving this year. Did any of these strategies work for you?4) Five Tips for Launching a Smart and Successful Fundraising CampaignFundraisers are always looking for the secret to launching a smart and successful fundraising campaign. In this post, guest blogger Janet Cobb tackled how to set and achieve a SMART goal, laying out the five keys to success.5) 7 Tips to Make your Donors an Irresistible Fundraising OfferIn our last top post of 2017, guest blogger Claire Axelrad gave us some valuable tips on the “40-40-20 rule” Because if you don’t make it clear and easy for folks to take the exact action you desire, then the rest of your mailing has little purpose.What was your favorite blog post of the year? Do you have any topics you’d like to see us cover in 2018?last_img read more

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Save the Children Publishes 16th State of the World’s Mothers Report

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 6, 2015December 3, 2015Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Yesterday, Save the Children released the State of the World’s Mothers 2015 report, which focuses on the disadvantages of being poor in an urban setting.This report presents the latest and most extensive analysis to date of health disparities between rich and poor in cities. It finds that in most developing countries, the poorest urban children are at least twice as likely to die as the richest urban children. In some countries, they are 3 to 5 – or even more – times as likely to die.Read the full report here >>Share this:last_img read more

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Placenta Accreta Spectrum Disorders: A Critical Absence from the Cesarean Section Debate

first_imgPosted on May 8, 2018May 14, 2018By: Eric Jauniaux, Professor in Obstetrics and Fetal Medicine, EGA Institute for Women’s Health, Faculty of Population Health Sciences, University College London; Johan Vos, Chief Executive, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In the last two decades, cesarean section (c-section) has become the most common major surgical operation worldwide and its rates are an important measure of obstetric practices in the 21st century. Cesarean deliveries are not new. Historically performed to save the infant, despite occasional references to operations on living mothers, cesarean delivery was frequently used to retrieve the infant from a deceased or moribund woman. Improvements in patient care have progressively established c-section as a safe operation, both as an emergency and an elective procedure. Blood transfusions and the introduction of antibiotics and uterotonics after World War II substantially reduced poor outcomes due to c-section. Continuous advances in anesthesia and improvements in postoperative care have further contributed to declining mortality rates from c-section, first in economically developed/high-income countries and more recently in low- and middle-income countries.C-section rates around the worldIn the 1980s, the international health care community, led by the World Health Organization, defined the ideal c-section rate to be between 10% and 15%. The United Nations Millennium Declaration and the funding strategies have improved maternal and child outcomes in many low- and middle-income countries; however, in most sub-Saharan African countries, c-section rates have remained below the 10% target. By contrast, rates have increased substantially in Asia, Central America and South America, creating new c-section access inequalities, with low access to emergency obstetric care in the poorest countries and high levels of c-section without medical indication in well-resourced settings, in particular in middle-income countries. Evidence of this situation is striking in a country such as Brazil, which has one of the highest national rates of c-section in the world (53% in 2012 and rising) with a c-section rate of 43% in state-funded hospitals versus 85% in the private sector. Changes in maternal age at first birth in high-income countries and the worldwide epidemic of maternal overweight and obesity have had a direct impact on c-section rates since the beginning of this century, but these factors alone cannot explain national rates over 25% and certainly not rates over 30%.Placenta accreta and other complicationsA critical absence from the recent “c-section debate” has been the long-term health impact of excessively high c-section rates, in particular in populations with high fertility rates, such as Egypt (c-section rate 53% and fertility rate 37/1000 women) and Mexico (45% and 33/1000 women, respectively). A 2018 systematic review confirmed that women with previous c-section are at increased risk of miscarriage, unexplained stillbirth, placenta previa, placenta accreta and abruption (in which the placenta detaches from the uterus before delivery) in subsequent pregnancies. Placenta accreta spectrum is a complex disorder in which the placenta implants and develops on or inside the scar of a previous uterine surgical procedure. When undiagnosed before birth, attempts to remove the placenta at delivery result in massive obstetric hemorrhage and very high maternal morbidity and significant mortality rates. The deeper the invasion of the previous uterine scar, the higher the risks of maternal complications during childbirth, in particular in low- and middle-income countries where trained multidisciplinary surgical teams are not available and access to blood transfusions is limited.The rising rates of c-section are directly linked to the rising prevalence and incidence of placenta accreta spectrum disorder. A surgical operation designed to save the lives of women and babies may negatively impact maternal and neonatal outcomes under certain circumstances. This is a particular concern when c-section rates are above 20-25% and general obstetricians are inexperienced in managing the major surgical procedures associated with managing accreta placental tissue, which often require complex surgical skills.In March 2018, the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) published a special issue on placenta accreta spectrum disorders, including the new FIGO consensus guidelines on the epidemiology, prenatal diagnosis and surgical and conservative management of this condition, alongside a series of peer-reviewed original articles on placenta accreta spectrum that provide a comprehensive overview of this complex disorder. The XXII FIGO World Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics will take place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 14 to 19 October 2018, and will provide a unique opportunity to expand the debate on the consequences of high c-section rates for the many health care professionals around the world involved in maternal health care.—Learn more about the global epidemic of unnecessary cesarean sectionsShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Processing of Court Cases to Be Improved Through CISS

first_imgThe justice sector should see significant improvement in its processing of court cases, having implemented a Court Information Statistical System (CISS) in parish courts islandwide.The system allows for the tracking of matters as they move through the court system from initiation to disposition, which will result in faster determination of when a case falls into backlog.Statistics and Data Capture Consultant, Dr. Denarto Dennis, said CISS provides a mechanism which captures data at each stage of a case.“So the system would, for example, capture date of initiation, next date of hearing, reasons for adjournment, number of times the matter is mentioned, if a matter goes to trial and the dates that are set for trial,” he explained.Dr. Dennis told JIS News that the system is particularly effective in strengthening case management, as it captures the age of all matters active in the courts.“This means that at any given point you go on the system, you should be able to see the age, that is, how old each matter before the court is,” he said.The system was piloted in some parish courts beginning in July 2016 and was fully implemented by October. It was formally launched in January of this year.Ahead of the implementation, there was no electronic means of managing cases, except for the Half-Way Tree court, which had an older version of the system for a few years before. Cases were, therefore, being managed manually, which resulted in an ad hoc approach to tracking cases.“This system allows for a more centralised way of managing case flow and case progression. It makes the courts more efficient, in that we can now easily do historical searches for records, rather than having to scroll through warehouses and file inventory areas. CISS allows us to efficiently search for old cases, which helps in the day-to-day operations of the court and it being able to serve the public,” Dr. Dennis said.Parish courts have Case Progression Officers (CPOs) who work in tandem with data-entry personnel to monitor the progression of cases. The CPOs interface with the system, monitor the age of matters, monitor what is happening with the different matters, and then carry out the intervention necessary to get cases ready for court.Plans are under way to expand the CISS to civil courts. On June 5, the system was implemented for a pilot in the Corporate Area Civil Division. Following a successful pilot, it is to be rolled out islandwide in civil courts.“This programme adds tremendous value to the court system in the sense that what we will see in the coming years is a significant reduction in the length of time that it takes for cases to be disposed of,” Dr. Dennis said.This will be facilitated by the system allowing the courts to be able to better manage case flow and to inform the interventions necessary to strengthen the ability and capacity of the courts to handle their caseloads and to manage the readiness of matters for courts,” he added.Implementation of CISS is supported through the Justice Undertakings for Social Transformation (JUST) programme, which is funded by the Canadian Government.The programme aims to enhance the efficiency of case management and judicial processes in the court system.last_img read more

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This Is How Scary The Warriors Are With Kevin Durant

OAKLAND, Calif. — If we someday look back and can firmly say that the Golden State Warriors were the greatest team ever assembled, Thursday night’s 113-91 laugher over the Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 1 of the NBA Finals may be the moment that idea began coming into focus for the average fan.In the first half alone, Golden State missed a whopping 15 shots from inside the restricted area, which basically equates to point-blank range. Draymond Green, who logged 32 points, 15 rebounds and nine assists in a Game 7 loss last year, didn’t score a basket until there was just over a minute left in the third period. And Klay Thompson, arguably the second-best shooter in the world, finished the evening 3-of-16 from the floor. Just two Warriors finished the game as double-digit scorers.Yet while Golden State looked primed to roll a gutter ball, Kevin Durant’s performance acted as the ultimate bumper rail, and the Warriors prevailed by 22 points instead.The superstar finished with 38 points on 26 shots, and logged eight rebounds and eight assists without turning the ball over even once.1Shaquille O’Neal holds the Finals record for most points in a game without turning it over, having logged 41 during a contest in 2000. Michael Jordan had a 37-point game with no turnovers back in 1998. Durant had six dunks by himself, a number that was jarring when juxtaposed against the fact that the Warriors finished with just four turnovers as a team, tied for the fewest in a game in NBA Finals history.2Oddly enough, the other two teams to accomplish this — the 2013 San Antonio Spurs and the 2005 Detroit Pistons — both went on to lose their series. Honestly, think about that: Durant had more dunks than his team had turnovers.Durant was at times a playmaker, setting up his teammates.3He effortlessly logged his eight assists Thursday. Harrison Barnes, the man he replaced, has never had more than five in a game. He was a lethal 1-on-1 scorer when he wanted to be, undressing Richard Jefferson with a nasty stepback that nearly incinerated the old-timer’s shoe. But perhaps most importantly, he pushed the tempo and created defensive conundrums for Cleveland that basically break basketball logic.Twice during the second quarter, Durant dribbled the ball right down Main Street without a single Cavalier stepping up to challenge him.And while it’s easy to blame that on horrendous defense — Cleveland was the worst transition D in the NBA during the regular season, and many of us thought the team might struggle to get stops in this series — it isn’t as simple as the Cavs being lazy or afraid of defending Durant. Instead, they were most concerned about leaving Stephen Curry wide open for a corner three.On both of these plays, you’ll notice that the Cavs are moving to their right to make sure that Curry doesn’t get a clean look from that spot. In doing so, Durant waltzes in for the four easiest points he’ll ever score.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/durantclearlane.mp400:0000:0000:11Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/durantclearlane2.mp400:0000:0000:12Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Cavs coach Tyronn Lue suggested during his post-game press conference that it was a mistake to give Durant the easy looks in transition, because it allowed him to find a rhythm from outside. And there appeared to be some truth to that. KD shot just 1-of-5 from outside the paint in the first half but stayed afloat by shooting 9-of-13 from inside the painted area. He then went on to shoot 4-of-5 from outside that area after halftime, including a transition dagger where defenders, again, left him alone because of how focused they were on Curry.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/durantfrom3.mp400:0000:0000:11Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.It’s a night-and-day difference from Harrison Barnes, whom the Cavs were happy to ignore toward the end of last year’s series. Now, Cleveland gets burned for the slightest mistakes, while Golden State’s secondary players can be less perfect than they’ve ever been. The addition of Durant changed that dynamic, and given that this is happening in the Finals, it’s scary for the rest of the NBA.Golden State had LeBron driving to nowhereThe Cavaliers offense revolves around LeBron James getting to the rack and creating problems elsewhere, but in Game 1, those problems seemed to have been solved. According to player tracking data from NBA.com, James drove to the basket 21 times in Game 1 — he did so just 9.5 times per game in the regular season, and 11.1 times per game in the postseason before Thursday. Things didn’t go well on those plays.The Warriors’ ability to contain LeBron with just Durant and not compromise the rest of their defense threw the entire Cavaliers offense out of alignment. With the other Golden State defenders staying home on the Cleveland shooters, James had just one assist and compiled five of his eight turnovers on those plays. He went 2 for 8 on his drives — a significant drop off from the 62 percent he shot on his attempts off drives during the regular season.The entire Cleveland offense is premised on James’s ability to score efficiently at the rim and draw help. But Durant has been one of the best rim protectors in the league this season, allowing opponents to shoot just 48.7 percent at the rim in the regular season and 41.8 percent in the playoffs. Whether or not James can solve that, single coverage at the rim will be a big factor in whether or not the Cleveland offense looks any better going forward in the series.The Cavs were very, very bad — but they’re not deadFor a blowout to happen, it usually takes two teams playing at opposite ends of the spectrum. And as good as Golden State was at protecting the ball and scoring in transition, Cleveland’s offense was equally dreadful in just about every way.Take shooting: The Cavs’ 34.9 percent accuracy from the field was their second-worst single-game mark of the entire season, trailing only this January loss to the Blazers. (Factoring in 3-point shooting using effective field goal percentage only makes things marginally better — this was their fifth-worst game according to that metric.) They made just 14 of the 38 shots (37 percent) classified as “open” or “wide open” by the NBA’s player-tracking data (including 7-for-24 from downtown) and were 3-for-28 (11 percent) on shots that weren’t created by either James’s or Kyrie Irving’s shooting or passing. Neither Tristan Thompson, Deron Williams nor Kyle Korver scored (they shot 0-for-10); J.R. Smith made Cleveland’s first basket of the game and wasn’t heard from after that.Giveaways were also a major problem. Cleveland’s 17.1 percent turnover rate was tied for its seventh-highest of the entire season. The whole offensive package added up to a mere 91.4 points per 100 possessions, the Cavaliers’ fourth-least efficient game of the season — and by far the worst outing of the playoffs for a team that had gone into the Finals leading all teams in offensive rating.The good news for the Cavs is that, as bad as they looked in Game 1, they’re far from doomed. Just one year ago, they were beaten by a wider average margin (24 points) in their first two games than they lost by Thursday (22) … and we all know how that series ended. With its explosive 3-point shooting, the Cavs’ offense could heat up and make us all forget about their bad night. But by the same token, Cleveland can scarcely afford any more duds against an opponent that might be the greatest the game has ever seen. Like their odds of winning the series, the Cavs’ margin for error just became more razor-thin than ever.Check out our latest NBA predictions.CORRECTION (June 2, 1 p.m.): An earlier version of this article incorrectly said that Kevin Durant allowed opponents to shoot 41.8 percent at the rim during the regular season. That was the number for the playoffs. His regular-season number was 48.7 percent. The story has been updated. read more

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Not a captain but Chekwa leads by example for OSU

Cornerback Chimdi Chekwa entered this football season in the top three in games started on the team. The rest of the top three, offensive guard Bryant Browning and defensive end Cameron Heyward, were named captains. Chekwa was not. Considering the Buckeyes named six captains for only the second time in team history, some teammates were surprised Chekwa was left off the list. Captain selection “could have went a lot of ways. I kind of was a little surprised,” senior safety Aaron Gant said. “But you don’t have to be a captain to show or possess that quality.” Chekwa wasn’t bothered by being left off the list and has continued to do his best to lead, he said. “I was talking on the sideline like I was a proud father,” Chekwa told Scout.com’s Jeff Svoboda while sitting out of a practice. “I’ve tried to teach (the corners) everything I know.” The leadership of the cornerback was not lost on his head coach. “Chimdi Chekwa … continues to lead back there and play with a lot of energy and enthusiasm and play like a senior,” Jim Tressel said. “We’ve said a million times that you can have a good team if your seniors have their career best year and Chimdi certainly is on task to perhaps make that happen.” Leading by setting an example on the field has been Chekwa’s most successful method. “I’m not a very vocal guy but it depends on the situation. I’m not going to scream or anything. I let (safety) Jermale (Hines) handle the loud talking,” the 6-foot, 190-pound corner said. “But if something needs to be said, I’ll say it.” Though he may not be loud about it, teammates appreciate what Chekwa does. “He is always communicating and talking, making sure we’re on the same page,” Gant said. “He keeps us going, never letting us slack.” The tenacity comes in part from his experience on two teams that played for the national championship. Playing in the national championship game “helped a lot. Whenever you go out on the field and compete with other great players,” Chekwa said. “I learned from all of that.” He expects to use what he learned to get his team back to that game this year, captain or not, he said. read more

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Chievo coach adores Udinese goalkeeper Simone Scuffet

first_imgChievo Coach Lorenzo D’Anna has showered praises on the Udinese goalkeeper Simone Scuffet, calling his performance excellent as he was able to stop his side from getting back into the game.Rodrigo De Paul strike and Kevin Lasagna counter-attack led to Udinese 2-0 victory at Stadio Bentegodi.“It was a very even first half, while in the second we conceded a goal out of nowhere with that shot from 30 metres out just as we were pushing the hardest,” D’Anna told Rai Sport via Football Italia.VERONA, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 02: Lorenzo D'Anna head coach of Chievo looks on during the serie A match between Chievo Verona and Empoli at Stadio Marc'Antonio Bentegodi on September 2, 2018 in Verona, Italy. (Photo by Alessandro Sabattini/Getty Images)Lorenzo D’Anna: Chievo kept their focus Obinna Echi – September 16, 2018 Lorenzo D’Anna hailed the resolve of his players as they fought back to rescue a point in their 2-2 stalemate against Roma.The Flying Donkeys didn’t…“We reacted well and created many chances, but unfortunately a combination of our mistakes and the excellent performance of the goalkeeper stopped us getting back into the game.“Chievo put in the performance we needed to and a win would’ve shaken off this minus mark from our table, but we tried our best against a difficult side that countered dangerously.”The Flying Donkeys are on -2 points in the Serie A table at the moment as they were docked three points for false accounting.last_img read more

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Something has changed for Rodrigo De Paul

first_imgThe Argentinean winger is having his best time at his team since arriving at Italian Lega Serie A club Udinese in 2016Rodrigo Javier De Paul started his professional career in 2012 with Racing Club in his native Argentina.He was then transferred to Spanish La Liga side Valencia in 2014, with a small loan to Racing Club in 2016.And in the same year, he moved to Italian Lega Serie A club Udinese, with whom he has played the best years of his life.With Udinese, De Paul has scored eleven goals in 76 appearances, but this season seems to be his best one yet.Cristiano Ronaldo, JuventusSerie A Betting: Match-day 3 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Considering there is a number of perfect starts so early in the Serie A season, as well as a few surprisingly not-so perfect ones….“Last summer, Fiorentina was interested in me, I had to think about it because that offer was interesting. Then, Udinese has told me they strongly believed in me so I decided to stay,” he was quoted by Gianluca Di Marzio.“We’re playing a very entertaining football, a dynamic and intense one. Everyone has to learn to do everything, we’re convinced this is the type of playing style suited to our team.”“I’m finally putting into use what Iachini told me, and I’m trying more often to shoot from outside the box. Even if, because of my qualities, I prefer making assists,” he added.He took his time to also speak about fellow countryman Paulo Dybala from Juventus “who I knew in Palermo when I had to get the documents I needed. Paulo is really strong, Juve surely could get toe to toe with the best European teams.”“They’ve had 9 victories in a row but they still should be aware of this: we want to win points, we’re playing at home and you can never tell how a game is going to end in football. What’s sure is that at the end of the game, I should travel with Paulo to Saudi Arabia to reach our Argentinean teammates”.last_img read more

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Alderweireld open to Ajax return

first_imgToby Alderweireld is refusing to rule out the prospect of making a return to boyhood club AjaxThe 29-year-old defender has spent the last three years at Tottenham following spells with Atlético Madrid and Southampton.Alderweireld’s future at Spurs has been under intense speculation over the past few months with his current contract set to expire in June – although the club does retain the option to extend it by another 12 months.Manchester United and, more recently, Barcelona have been touted as potential destinations for Alderweireld.However, the surprising possibility of returning to Ajax is something that Alderweireld will not rule out.“Never never say never”, Alderweireld told Voetbal Inside.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“I had a fantastic time there, became champion a few times, the third star, so these are all very nice memories.“When I go back, I will have something to teach and I do not want to go there without being able to contribute.”Alderweireld arrived at Ajax’s youth academy in 2004 at the tender age of 15 and would break into the senior side four years later.The Belgium international managed 15 goals and 12 assists in 186 appearances across all competitions.He also won four straight Eredivisie titles and two Dutch Cups.last_img read more

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