GAME DEVELOPMENT POSITION IN NT

first_imgGAME DEVELOPMENT OFFICERTouch Football Australia is recruiting a Game Development Officer for the Northern Territory.  The successful applicant will deliver a range of development programs and services to affiliated Touch Football Associations. Remuneration will be in the range of $30 – $45K plus superannuation.Applications addressing selection criteria must be sent via email to nttouch@octa4.net.au or  mailed to P.O. Box 42193, CASUARINA, NT  0811 by no later than Thursday 13 April 2006.For more information phone 08 89816963 bhTo view the Game Development position description, please click here: GAME DEVELOPMENT NT- POSITION DESCRIPTIONlast_img

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Track and compare year-end giving

first_imgNetwork for Good is once again providing year-end giving data for The Chronicle of Philanthropy’s 2013 Year-End Online Giving Tracker. You can use this resource to see how online giving is stacking up each day of December and to compare those numbers with the last few years. To supply the data for the tracker, we looked at a set of 14,300 charities who received donations through Network for Good’s online giving platform. You can view this data by month, by week, or look at the entire span of information from November 1st through the end of the year. Check it out by visiting The Chronicle’s site, and let us know how the trends compare to your own year-end fundraising results.last_img

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4 Actions You Can Take to Grow and Sustain Your Email List

first_imgWhether you’re starting from scratch or have been building your email list for years, you know it’s important to actively promote your email list and encourage your existing contacts to engage with your organization.After all, a dedicated email list can have serious payoffs for your nonprofit — including everything from better event attendance to increased web traffic and larger donations at your next fundraiser.The key to successful email list is to see your contacts as people. Grow your list — one name at a time— and once they’ve subscribed provide them with a quality experience, just as you would in-person.Here are 4 tips for growing and sustaining your email list:1. Choose a reliable email providerThe first step of building a loyal email list is making sure you have a safe place to store your contacts’ information and an easy way to send them mailings.If you’re just getting started, take a look at what other organizations are using, and think about what kind of tools and features will be important for your organization. Will you need access to reports to see how your emails are performing? What about support to help with any technical questions you have?You may also want to think about what solutions work with products you are already using. Constant Contact easily integrates with Network for Good so that you can launch campaigns, organize contacts, and manage your campaigns from a central location.2. Make sign-up simpleMost people aren’t going to seek out your mailing list on their own; it’s up to you to encourage them to sign up and make it easy for them to do so.Here’s a great example of a website sign-up form from Canadian nonprofit, The Local Good. Not only do they make sign-up super simple, they also provide a useful description of what their newsletter will include and how often they send.Subscribers will be more likely to sign up if they know what to expect from you.There are also handy tools you can use so that subscribers can sign up on social media or even through a mobile device.3. Deliver a personal experienceBuilding a list is half the challenge, sustaining that relationship is just as important. To build long-lasting relationships with your subscribers, you’re going to have to think beyond your organization and think about how you can deliver a great experience for your contacts.Start by answering a few questions like:Who are your contacts?What are they interested in?How often do they want to hear from you?The more information you can collect and store about your contacts the better. For example, if you collect email addresses at an event, make note of that so you can reach out to them with a targeted follow-up soon after.The timing of your emails is important — you want to make a good first impression on new contacts so that they read your future messages. You can also use this information to reach out to them if you are holding a similar event in the future.4. Don’t send carelesslyThis includes sending with a set schedule and goal in mind, but also checking back in to see how each mailing performed, and making changes when necessary. Using email reports, you have access to important information like open and click-through rates, which will show you what messages are attracting interest and getting your readers to interact with your content.You don’t want your email marketing strategy to become static. Spend some time thinking about little tweaks you can try. What happens to your open rate if you ask a question in your subject line? Does your click-through rate increase if you link to a YouTube video?Seeing what works best for your audience will ensure you are getting the return on investment you’re looking for from email marketing. Taking a few extra minutes to try something new could mean reengaging contacts that have fallen out of touch.last_img read more

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Understanding the Flow of Reproductive Health Knowledge in Ethiopia

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 1, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)K4Health recently published a needs assessment and network mapping of family planning and reproductive health information in Ethiopia. The overall goal of the assessment was to gain a better understanding of the accessibility and flow of information relating to family planning and reproductive health among key actors in Ethiopia.In Ethiopia, K4Health sought to explore the current family planning/reproductive health (FP/RH) knowledge management system; examine information flows and barriers at different levels of the health system; and identify areas to strengthen health information sharing and use. Using a novel, participatory approach (Net-Map) yielded a highly visual presentation of the data that identifies key FP/RH actors in Ethiopia, explores the nature of relationships among the actors, and examines the level of influence of the different actors with regard to reproductive health information exchange. Using the Net-Map approach, the researchers were able to identify bottle necks to information flow and opportunities to improve that flow across health system levels in Ethiopia.This body of research aimed to determine how to better meet health care professionals’ dynamic information needs so that they can provide better health care to the populations they serve. In Ethiopia, reproductive health indicators can be improved through better health information exchange. This report provides important recommendations that can help get the right information delivered to health care professionals when they need it and can help enhance the quality of health care programs countrywide.Read the full assessment here.Share this:last_img read more

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Woman-Centered Maternity Care, Family Planning, and HIV: Principles for Rights-Based Integration

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 6, 2013March 6, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our colleagues at the Wilson Center Global Health Initiative are hosting a discussion with experts on rights-based maternity care and the intersection with family planning and HIV. The event will take place on June 11th from 3-5pm at the Wilson Center in Washington DC.About the event:Increasingly, family planning and HIV programs are seeking to expand their services to include maternal health care. The movement to integrate health services provides an important opportunity to share lessons learned across the different communities on their experiences with rights-based care. Join us for a discussion with experts in rights-based maternity care and its intersection with family planning and HIV.Click here for the list of speakers for the event.Click here to RSVP.Click here for directions to the Wilson Center.Learn more about this topic by visiting the MHTF’s topic pages focused on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS and respectful maternity care.For a compilation of the latest news and publications on maternal health, HIV and AIDS, click here. For a compilation of the latest news and publications on respectful maternity care, click here.Explore the MHTF’s ongoing blog series on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS and respectful maternity care.Share this:last_img read more

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New Research: Examining Maternal Health in the Context of Women’s Health Throughout the Lifespan

first_imgPosted on October 16, 2013February 2, 2017By: Kate Mitchell, Manager of the MHTF Knowledge Management System, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Each year, the Maternal Health Task Force and PLOS Medicine work together to organize an open access collection of research and commentary on maternal health. The two organizations team up to identify a specific and critical theme that merits further exploration within the broader context of maternal health. The Year 2 Collection, titled ‘Maternal Health is Women’s Health‘, launched in November and focuses on establishing a stronger understanding of how the health of women and girls before pregnancy influences maternal health—and also considers the impact of maternal health on women’s health more broadly even beyond the reproductive years. Today, the MHTF and PLOS Medicine are delighted to announce the addition of 12  articles to the Year 2 collection. The articles include research on the effect of prophylactic oxytocin for postpartum hemorrhage delivered by peripheral health workers in Ghana, a commentary that calls for the prioritization of cervical cancer in the post-2015 era, as well as an article that explores the impact of maternal deaths on living children in Tanzania, and much more. Our colleagues at PLOS Medicine shared a blog post on their blog, Speaking of Medicine, about the additions to the collection. In this excerpt, they describe in more detail the theme for the Year 2 collection:This theme was created to highlight the need to consider maternal health in the context of a women’s health throughout her lifespan. While pregnancy is limited to women of reproductive age, maternal health is influenced by the health of women and girls before pregnancy. The effects of key health issues such as the impact of poor nutrition, poverty, lack of available quality healthcare and low socioeconomic status can occur during childhood, adolescence, throughout the pregnancy and beyond. These issues can heavily influence a woman’s maternal health, heightening the risk of complications in pregnancy, such as obstructed labour in adolescent girls or increasing the likelihood of HIV infections due to a woman’s physical susceptibility and her relative disempowerment.Read the post on Speaking of Medicine.The following new articles from PLOS Medicine and PLOS ONE have been added to the MHTF-PLOS collection on maternal health:Preconception Care in Low and Middle Income Countries:  new opportunities and a new metric by Joel G. Ray and colleagues.Reproductive and maternal health in the post-2015 era: cervical cancer must be a priority by Ruby Singhrao and colleaguesEffect on postpartum hemorrhage of prophylactic oxytocin by peripheral health personnel in Ghana: a community-based, cluster-randomized trial by Cynthia K. Stanton and colleaguesSetting Research Priorities for Preconception Care in Low-and Middle-income Countries: Aiming to Reduce Maternal and Child Mortality and Morbidity by Sohni Dean and colleaguesFactors Affecting the Delivery, Access, and Use of Interventions to Prevent Malaria in Pregnancy in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis by Jenny Hill and colleaguesHIV and the Risk of Direct Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis by Clara Calvert and Carine RonsmansAntenatal depression in Sri Lanka and the factor structure of the Sinhalese version of Edinburgh Post Partum Depression Scale among pregnant women by Suneth Buddhika Agampodi and Thilini Chanchala AgampodiComorbidities and Lack of Blood Transfusion May Negatively Affect Maternal Outcomes of Women with Obstetric Hemorrhage Treated with NASG by Alison El Ayadi and colleaguesCosts of Inaction on Maternal Mortality: Qualitative Evidence of the Impacts of Maternal Deaths on Living Children in Tanzania by Alicia Ely Yamin and colleaguesAcute Maternal Infection and Risk of Pre-eclampsia: a Population-Based Case-Control Study by Caroline Minassian and colleaguesRepresentation of women and pregnant women in HIV research: a systematic review by Daniel Westreich and colleaguesAttitudes Toward Family Planning Among HIV-Positive Pregnant Women Enrolled in a Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission Study in Kisumu, Kenya by Shirley Lee Lecher and colleaguesCommunity Health Workers and Health Care Delivery: Evaluation of a Women’s Reproductive Health Care Project in a Developing Country by Abdul Wajid and colleaguesAnalysis of the Maternal and Child Health Care Status in Suizhou City, Hubei Province, China, from 2005 to 2011 by Hui-Ping Zhang and colleaguesWhen Women Deliver with No One Present in Nigeria: Who, What, Where and So What? by Bolaji M. Fapohunda and Nosakhare G. OrobatonTo learn more about the MHTF-PLOS Collection on Maternal Health, contact Kate Mitchell.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Moving Beyond the Numbers

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 24, 2014November 7, 2016By: Renuka Motihar, Independent Consultant and member of the Executive Committee of the White Ribbon Alliance IndiaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, what does the future hold for international maternal mortality targets? The MHTF is pleased to be hosting a blog series on post-2015 maternal mortality goal setting. Over the next several weeks, we will be featuring responses and reactions to proposed targets from around the world. Please share your thoughts with us!In India, there has been considerable economic progress, but the country is still grappling with inequities and the basic right to safe childbirth. There are about 30 million pregnancies; 27 million deliveries and about 56,000 women are lost in childbirth each year. This accounts for 19 percent of maternal deaths around the world. Most of these can be prevented. India still has a way to go to reach MDG 5, which would require reducing the maternal mortality ratio (MMR)  to 109 deaths per 100,000 births  by 2015. There has been some progress in the country in the last decade. The MMR has fallen from about 390 to 212 deaths per 100,000 live births in about 10 years, approximately 67 percent decrease. There are some areas in the country, such as states of Assam, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh/Uttarakhand that still have MMRs greater than 300 deaths per 100,000 live births. Social determinants such as early age of marriage and early and repeated childbearing are also contributing factors. Thirty-six percent of Indian women are malnourished and about 55 percent are anemic. Bodies are ill prepared to handle childbirth with poor nutrition, stunting with negative outcomes for maternal health. The main causes of death in India have been found to be heavy bleeding (hemorrhage) and eclampsia (high blood pressure).The Government of India has policies and programs to improve outcomes for maternal health. Janani Suraksha Yojana, a safe motherhood cash assistance scheme, and now the Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakarm (JSSK) have facilitated the shift of births from homes to health facilities. Births in clinics and hospitals have increased over 75 percent in the last 5 years; however the maternal mortality ratios have only declined by approximately 25 percent. But the question arises: Are the health facilities equipped with the desired quality to handle the onset of numbers? Is there adequate inter-partum care and emergency care for complicated deliveries? Is the poorest woman being able to reach services? Is it inclusive and equitable?To address quality of care issues, quality protocols are being developed — for the labor room, antenatal care and postnatal care by the government and there is an effort to standardize. There is an attempt to strengthen supportive supervision, task shifting (reduce dependence on doctors and train a cadre of health workers for providing services), strategic skilling, respectful maternal care and maternal death reviews. However, challenges still remain: India is a vast country, and problems of supplies of essential drugs, medicines, inadequate human resources, inaccessible terrain, socio-cultural factors, and translating policies/programs into action persist. The government of India is grappling with all these issues and is focusing on improving quality of services. There is a realization that only looking at numbers is not enough. Improving quality of services is critical. As Anuradha Gupta, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW), Government of India and Mission Director, National Rural Health Mission has said in a recent meeting, “We need a shift in the focus on achieving numbers to achieving quality of care”. The global targets for preventing maternal deaths are useful in providing goals to aspire for a country. They have acted as a catalyst to accelerate progress. However, the targets currently only reflect maternal mortality. They do not reflect maternal morbidities or the fact that for every woman dying in childbirth, many more women suffer long-lasting and debilitating illnesses, which are now being neglected. For countries, a relative or percentage target may be more useful; and those countries that are on track should also examine the reaching of targets sub-nationally. However, within countries, focusing only on numbers is not enough. Efforts need to go beyond numbers to reflect on enhancing the quality of services, and, in turn, improving the lives of women and children.If you would like to submit a guest post for to our ongoing series exploring potential goals for maternal health in the post-MDG development agenda, please contact Andrea Goetschius: goetschi@hsph.harvard.eduShare this:last_img read more

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Building Community Capacity for Maternal Health Promotion: An Important Complement to Investments in Health Systems Strengthening

first_imgPosted on October 23, 2014November 2, 2016By: Ellen Brazier, Senior Technical Advisor for Community Engagement, EngenderHealth; Moustapha Diallo, Country Director, EngenderHealth GuineaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)EngenderHealth’s Fistula Care Plus project recently published the results of two studies in Guinea, one examining factors associated with institutional delivery and another investigating the effect of an intervention to build the capacity of community-level volunteers to promote maternal health care-seeking.Community empowerment and participation has long been recognized as a fundamental component of good health programming and as a critical strategy for improving access to and use of health services. However, as Susan B. Rifkin notes in a 2014 review of the literature, evidence directly linking community participation to improved health outcomes remains weak.For maternal health, the evidence gap is particularly acute. A 2014 World Health Organization (WHO) report reviewed a community mobilization approach that involves training and supporting women’s groups to carry out an ongoing process of problem exploration, priority-setting and action planning. The report concluded that, while such participatory approaches appeared to have a strong effect on neonatal mortality, there was no evidence of effects on maternal mortality or on other critical maternal health indicators, such as institutional delivery, delivery with a skilled attendant, or receiving the recommended number of antenatal care visits.While important questions remain about what types of interventions are effective in improving maternal health, our recent research in Guinea found that women’s use of maternal health services was associated with the existence of strong support systems for maternal health within communities. Our study focused on villages where community volunteers had been trained to raise awareness about obstetric risks, including fistula, to monitor pregnancies, and to promote women’s routine use of maternal heath services. We assessed the extent to which community members were aware of and relied on community-level cadres as a main source of maternal health information and advice.We also found that women living in communities with a high score on our community capacity index were much more likely to use maternal health services than those living in communities with weak support systems. In fact, women living in villages with a high score on our community capacity index were more than twice as likely to attend at least four antenatal care visits during their pregnancies, to deliver in a health facility, and to seek care for perceived obstetric complications.Building the capacity of community cadres and volunteers to promote maternal heath and monitor maternal health care-seeking is challenging, and it does not occur overnight. However, our findings suggest that such capacity-building investments are worth it since community-level cadres can be important catalysts for changes in maternal health care-seeking when they have the training, support, and recongiztion they need to serve as a resource in their communities. Such investments are an important complement to ongoing efforts to improve the availability, accessibility, and quality of the continuum of maternal health services.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Video: Segmenting Donors for Better Engagement

first_imgIf you’re just getting started with donor segmentation, or need new ideas on how to segment donors for better outreach, our Donor Segmentation Cheat Sheet offers great tips on how to generate donor lists by giving level, donation date, and campaign fund. Use the template to record your donor totals, date of list, and any notes for data analysis. Getting to know your donors takes a little extra effort; but you’ll see the benefits in engagement levels, donor retention, and ROI. Donor segmentation is an essential part of every fundraiser’s work. Segmenting is the first step to knowing your donors better. Grouping donors by certain criteria or segments gives you a better idea of who is in your donor management system based on giving habits, location, involvement, and more.Segmentation not only tells you who is in your system, but also helps you send relevant, personal communications to each group of donors. From your e-newsletter to your direct mail appeals, you can never segment your audience too much. The more personal you can make your outreach, the more your supporters will feel connected to your work.At Network for Good, we encourage the same approach in getting to know your donors, volunteers, and other supporters. Network for Good’s donor management system helps nonprofits quickly and confidently target their donors with the right appeal, and send it out at the right time. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

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Calling for an Integrated Approach to Maternal and Newborn Health: Strategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 15, 2015October 25, 2016By: Amy Boldosser-Boesch, Interim President and CEO, Family Care InternationalClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Next week at the 68th World Health Assembly, the Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM) Working Group — led by WHO in partnership with Family Care International (FCI), the Maternal Health Task Force, UNICEF, UNFPA, USAID, the Maternal Child Survival Program, and the White Ribbon Alliance — will launch its much-anticipated report, Strategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM). For FCI and our partners, this report presents an important opportunity to highlight the critical linkages between the health of a woman and that of her newborn baby.One of the core strategies recommended in the EPMM paper is integration of maternal and newborn service delivery, with a particular focus on the mother-baby relationship. FCI has been a long-standing advocate for integrated care for women and newborns. A research study we conducted with Aga Khan University identified the many interventions that affect the health of both a woman and her newborn.  These research findings underscored the many important ways that maternal, fetal, and newborn health are strongly interconnected.More recently, in collaboration with the International Center for Research on Women and the KEMRI-CDC Research and Public Health Collaboration, FCI conducted research in Kenya to document the immediate and longer-term effects of maternal death on children, households, and communities. The consequences of a mother’s death, the study found, are devastating. The first result, far too often, is the death of the newborn, another tragic sign of maternal-neonatal interconnection. But maternal deaths also cause other profound and long-term social and economic harms, as surviving daughters are forced to leave school, families suffer under huge medical and funeral costs and lost income, households break down, and communities lose the presence and contributions of some of their most productive members. The tragic costs of a maternal death, for newborns and their families, are highlighted in the study’s title, A Price Too High to Bear.Collectively, these studies make a compelling case for the creation of stronger linkages between health services for women and for their newborns. Together, the maternal health and newborn health communities must work to ensure that research, policies, health services, and advocacy all support an integrated approach to maternal and newborn survival — one that helps finally to put an end to the preventable deaths of women and their babies.This blog also appears at The FCI Blog.Share this:last_img read more

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Accounting for 1 in 3 Maternal Deaths, Health Disparities Persist in South Asia

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on April 30, 2015June 12, 2017By: Linnea Bennett, Intern, Environmental Change and Security Program, Woodrow Wilson CenterClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As part of the Advancing Policy Dialogue on Maternal Health Series, the MHTF, along with UNFPA, supported the Wilson Center to host South Asia Consultation on Maternal Health: Regional Dialogue and Way Forward, to address neglected topics in maternal health.The state of maternal health in South Asia is difficult to assess. Although rates of maternal mortality are declining between 2 and 2.5 percent a year overall, the region’s massive population – one fifth of the world and over 1 billion people in India alone – means it still accounts for one out of three maternal deaths. [Video Below]Quality of care fluctuates wildly. Some countries, like Sri Lanka, have made major improvements while others, like Afghanistan and Pakistan, still struggle to meet baseline needs, said Dr. Linda Bartlett, an associate scientist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. There are major disparities within countries as well, noted Dr. Pallavi Gupta, health program coordinator of Oxfam India. “Even in southern states [of India] that are advanced, you have pockets that are extremely backwards,” she said. In Pakistan, the overall maternal mortality rate is 276 per 100,000 live births, but in the province of Balochistan the rate is as high as 785, with less than 10 percent of pregnant women receiving adequate vaccines and immunizations. “It seems horrifying that a country with nuclear capability can only vaccinate less than 10 percent of pregnant women in a whole big region of their country,” Bartlett said.Bartlett, Gupta, and other panelists at the Wilson Center on March 31 were participants in a February conference on the state of maternal health in South Asia sponsored by Oxfam India. Delegates from each South Asian country convened in Nepal for discussions on recurring problems, highlighting four persistent challenges as well as recommendations for improving results.Amid Data Craze, Gaps PersistDespite an emphasis on data since the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), there are major blind spots, said Gupta. “We have had instances where maternal deaths have happened but they were not on the record of the government.” Sources can also be quite different from one another. For example, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation estimates average maternal mortality in South Asia to be 311 per 100,000 live births, but the UN reports 190. “Personally I’m not a very great fan of statistics,” Gupta said, “because I don’t really trust that the statistics we produce actually represent the reality on the ground.”Even when concrete and useful numbers are produced, they are often inaccessible or incomprehensible to the communities that need them most, and aggregation can cover up marginalized groups who are consistently left out of overall gains. And surveyors largely ignore qualitative data regarding user experience, which Gupta believes is critical to successful health programs.To close the data gap, the panel called for a more robust collection process led by surveyors who better understand the issues they are dealing with. “Frontline health workers who provide data should be trained to look at the perspective of service improvement, not just asked to fill in a data collection sheet,” Gupta said. She also suggested limiting surveys by external groups to reinforce in-country capacity and encouraging more collaboration between existing efforts by NGOs and funding agencies. When possible, data should be disaggregated too by religion, caste, ethnicity, and education, she said, to help discern which communities are in most need of programs and care.Respectful CareWhile data plays a critical role, Bartlett pointed out that maternal health is inherently a human rights issue. Providing care with dignity, informed consent, and open communication about options may be difficult to measure, but plays a major role in whether women take advantage of health care when it’s available. “It only takes one bad experience in a labor or delivery room to make you very aware of it,” she said.Instances of obstructive violence, corruption, violations of patients’ rights, and disrespect and abuse in the labor room are not uncommon. Patriarchal societies, and religious and ethnic differences often cause systematic discrimination, said Bartlett. She recommended it become mandatory for health workers – from physicians to midwives to those who operate the front door – to take basic training on respectful care. She also suggested using local celebrities to bring attention within the broader context of violence against women, noting that celebrity status can spread messages wider and faster among the South Asian diaspora than it might elsewhere in the world.Measuring Morbidity and Expanding Private CareWhere mortality measures the instances of maternal death in a country, morbidity looks at the general health and wellbeing of women. For every woman who dies from pregnancy-related causes, between 20 and 30 are left with acute or chronic health conditions, yet “there is no South Asian country besides Sri Lanka that tracks morbidity data,” said Dr. Jahangir Hossain, program director for health at CARE Bangladesh.Reducing morbidity will require a better trained workforce. In Bangladesh, Hossain said CARE has been helping to create innovative public-private partnerships that bring more skilled workers to communities in need.In Sunamganj, a flood-prone district in Bangladesh, pockets of the population were experiencing maternal mortality rates almost double that of the national average of 190 per 100,000 live births. Women on average paid 67 percent of their health care costs out of pocket. CARE partnered with the Bangladesh Ministry of Health and a private company to train 168 community-based, private care providers. Workers were also linked to commodity suppliers to facilitate better access to supplies. These providers were then distributed across 10 sub-regions and 50 remote areas in Sunamganj in which 68 percent of the people served were “poor” or “ultra-poor.”By December of 2014, 34 percent of babies in the region were delivered by the new, privately trained providers while only 15 percent were delivered by providers who had been in place before. The privately trained providers were also earning ample wages and showing signs of financial stability. The program’s results showed that private providers can complement public efforts and fill in gaps in areas where the public health system is not functioning adequately.Connecting to a “Bigger Picture”Barbara Stilwell, senior director of health workforce solutions at the NGO Intrahealth International, served as a discussant, commenting on the conclusions of the Nepal conference. She agreed that programs like CARE’s are important because they “bring in parts of the population that wouldn’t otherwise get in.”Stilwell has evaluated how people enter and exit the health work force, looking for the best ways to improve quality and retention in poor resource settings. She cites a lack of secondary school, particularly for women, as an issue in low- and middle-income countries that prevent workers from qualifying for advanced degrees. People may also be driven away from education because of costs or, if they have the money, migrate abroad to practice instead of staying in the country where they were trained.Stilwell and her colleagues are looking at ways to increase the number of skilled providers by bringing job enrichment to all levels of the workforce. This includes encouraging peer to peer mentoring – not only to expand training capacity but to empower the mentors. “We’ve been involved in India in a mentoring project where some very skilled nurses have been trained to be mentors in Karnataka,” she said. “What we found is that not only have the nurse midwives become much better at giving care, but they’ve also shown [more] initiative.”Connecting health care to a “bigger picture” purpose can give health workers incentive and motivation, Stilwell said, especially when they see data that says quality of care makes a difference in their patients’ lives. Allowing people to master their professions gives them a career ladder and an opportunity to advance their work. According to the 2014 State of the World’s Midwifery Report, midwives could deliver 87 percent of all essential and needed care to mothers and newborns worldwide if given the right training.“In India, nurse midwives do not [do] more than making beds and giving the injections that they are asked to do,” Gupta said. “But that kind of capacity building and empowerment, that would take care of so much more.”Event Resources:Linda Bartlett’s PresentationPallavi Gupta’s PresentationJahangir Hossain’s PresentationBarbara Stilwell’s PresentationPhoto GalleryVideoSources: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, UN Population Fund, World Health Organization.Photo Credit: Midwives wait inside the birthing center in Dhaka, Bangladesh, courtesy of Conor Ashleigh/Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.This post originally appeared at The New Security Beat, the blog of Environmental Change and Security Program at The Wilson Center.Share this:last_img read more

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New Opportunities in Maternal Health

first_imgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 3, 2017November 6, 2017By: Staff, Maternal Health Task ForceClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child or adolescent health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaChief of Party: Management Sciences for Health (MSH); Benin-CotonouCommunity Health Systems Technical Advisor: MSH; Benin-CotonouDeputy Chief of Party, Improving Market Partnerships and Access to Commodities Together (IMPACT): Population Services International (PSI); Antananarivo, MadagascarMonitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Director: Jhpiego; MadagascarM&E Technical Advisor: MSH; Benin-CotonouTechnical Director: Jhpiego; MadagascarAsiaDeputy Chief of Party, Cambodia: PSI; Phnom Penh, CambodiaNorth AmericaDirector, Provincial Registry, Surveillance, Performance & Analytics: Perinatal Services BC; Vancouver, BCMaternal and Child Health Monitoring and Evaluation Intern: Global Health Fellows Program II/USAID; Washington, D.C./Arlington, VAMaternal and Child Health Research Intern: Global Health Fellows Program II/USAID; Washington, D.C./Arlington, VAPerformance Monitoring and Accountability 2020 (PMA2020) Research Data Manager: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Baltimore, MDPMA2020: Senior Research Assistant: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Baltimore, MDProgram Coordinator (Limited term): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Seattle, WAProject Assistant – Willows Reproductive Health Research Project: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston, MARegistered Nurse – Nurse-Family Partnership: Saint Louis County Department of Public Health; St. Louis, MOSenior Communications and Knowledge Management Specialist: Abt Associates; Bethesda, MDSenior Manager, Women Deliver 2019 Conference: Women Deliver; New York, NYTechnical Specialist, Adolescents and Youth: UNFPA; New York, NY—Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.last_img read more

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Measuring Person-Centered Maternal Health Care

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on February 14, 2018February 15, 2018By: Dominic Montagu, Associate Professor, University of California, San Francisco; Katie Giessler, Research Analyst, University of California, San FranciscoClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Access to high quality health care is not only an inherent human right but also a critical component underpinning positive maternal health outcomes. This was indicated clearly by the World Health Organization (WHO) Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health, which found that while a base of essential interventions is necessary to manage severe complications, above this minimum level of equipment and trained staff, more technological infrastructure is not associated with better maternal health outcomes.The BetterBirth study, a more recent large-scale randomized controlled trial, looked specifically at the technical processes that make up management of pregnancies, including handwashing and use of gloves, early referral for at-risk women and magnesium for hypertension. The trial was conducted over one year in 60 hospitals in Uttar Pradesh, India to support medical staff in adhering to the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist. The BetterBirth trial results showed that the coaching-based program was associated with significantly higher adherence to essential birth practices, but this led to no significant improvement in maternal mortality, the primary outcome indicator of the study.In 1966, Avedis Donabedian proposed a simple framework for understanding health care quality, dividing the observable components into structure, process and outcomes. The implication is that structure plus process must equal outcomes. The evidence from the WHO Multicountry Survey and the BetterBirth Study suggests that improvements in structure or technical process alone will not lead to improvements in outcomes. Two recent publications lay the groundwork for studying a third key component of maternal health: patients themselves. WHO and the Institute of Medicine explicitly address the importance of “patient centered care” in current guidance, and this concept is increasingly being changed to “person-centered care” (PCC) so as to include those who are not ill—women attending an antenatal care session, for example. PCC incorporates the human-rights dimensions of respectful maternity care and adds domains of knowledge exchange and experience of care (privacy, predictability of costs, cleanliness, etc.) that, when combined with patient-provider interaction, make up the key non-clinical aspects of care. PCC provides a framework for examining maternal health that starts from the perspective of the person receiving care.Based on existing analytic models of patient experience, quality of care, health seeking-behavior and other areas of health, researchers have developed a new model of the key domains of PCC for reproductive health.Domains of Person-Centered Care. Sudhinaraset et al. 2017After conducting qualitative data collection, expert reviews, cognitive interviews, iterative testing and revisions, surveys and psychometric analysis, researchers have translated this framework into a validated scale for measuring person-centered maternity care (PCMC). The PCMC scale is a standardized tool that researchers, program managers from government or health facilities and health providers themselves can use to measure the whole patient experience. The scale, which has been adapted for different contexts, consists of 30 questions in the Kenya-specific scale and 27 in the India-specific iteration. A shorter multi-setting version has been developed with only 12 questions.The PCMC scale has been applied in studies and interventions in Kenya, India and Ghana thus far. With it, researchers are now able to identify and better address the aspects of care that matter most to ensure positive patient experiences. The scale can also identify where these areas of care fall short and inform what practices must change to improve the quality of care as a whole. Both the framework and the scale are important as pragmatic, actionable steps to understanding patient care during childbirth. The improvements being made to infrastructure and medical processes need to be matched by improvements in the respect, empowerment, support and overall women-centered experiences that are at the center of every birth.Donabedian proposed that structure plus process drives outcomes. The experiences of BetterBirth and the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health may seem to have challenged this assumption, at least for hospital-based maternity care and in the geographies they examined. But perhaps it was because a key aspect of process was missing from this work. Donabedian identified process to include technical as well as human components, noting that “the interpersonal process is the vehicle by which technical care is implemented and on which its success depends.” PCMC brings these interpersonal processes to the forefront of maternal health care.Perfect information is not necessary for improvement, although searching for good information when there are unknowns will lead to a better understanding of the complexities of health care and through that to improvements. The recent advances in person-centered care for maternal health, and the development of models and tools to understand patient experiences more accurately, come at a time when WHO’s initiative on Quality, Equity and Dignity is bringing new attention to the same issues. The growing attention to this issue will help us understand both how to improve person-centered Care and how doing so might change both experiences and outcomes for women.—Read the full paper and access the validated scale for measuring person-centered maternity care: Development of a tool to measure person-centered maternity care in developing settings: Validation in a rural and urban Kenyan populationLearn more about measuring women’s childbirth experiences.Share this:last_img read more

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Wilmington Youth Soccer Announces Field Day 3v3 Tournament For September 15

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Youth Soccer will hold its 8th Annual Field Day and 3v3 Tournament on Sunday, September 15, 2019 (rain date September 22th) from 10am to 4pm at the Shawsheen School fields.As part of Field Day, Wilmington Youth Soccer will be holding its Annual 3v3 Soccer Tournament. All athletes from Grades 1-8 are welcome; players do not have to be enrolled in Wilmington Youth Soccer to participate. Teams can include 3 to 6 players with a registration fee of $120 per team – which includes Field Day entry for all players and coaches. For more information, visit http://wilmingtonyouthsoccer.org. Registration will be open on the website soon.Proceeds will benefit the Wilmington Youth Soccer Association.(NOTE: The above information is from the Wilmington Youth Soccer.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedCOMING SOON: Wilmington Youth Soccer’s Field Day & 3v3 Tournament Set For September 15In “Community”Wilmington Youth Soccer Announces Field Day & 3v3 Tournament For September 10In “Sports”Wilmington Youth Soccer Announces Field Day & 3v3 Tournament For September 9In “Sports”last_img read more

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Saluting our heroes

first_imgThe exhibition titled ‘Shauryanjali’ celebrating the Golden Jubilee of Indo-Pak War of 1965, opened at the India Gate lawns on Wednesday. The exhibition has recreated the battle scene in various sectors beginning from Rann of Kutch to the ceasefire and Tashkent Summit. The NCC enclosure in ‘Shauryanjali’, turned out to be one of the most popular enclosures.  Most of the school children thronged the NCC enclosure and were all praise for it. During the inauguration of ‘Shauryanjali’, the Defence Minister, Manohar Parrikar and Finance Minister, Arun Jaitley heard the briefing of the cadets and appreciated the effort put in by NCC cadets during the 1968 War.  Admiral RK Dhowan, PVSM, AVSM, YSM, ADC, Chief of the Naval Staff also visited the enclosure and had an informal discussion with the cadets. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Arun Jaitley, the Minister of Finance, Corporate Affairs and Information and Broadcasting said that India scored a decisive victory in the War. Jaitley described it as a nostalgic occasion and recalled the overwhelming, emotional and material support that it generated nationwide for the Armed Forces. He said, “the enemy was shown its place by the professionalism of our Armed Forces.”  A special brochure was also released on the occasion. The Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar said that he was deeply influenced by the heroism of Company Quarter Master Havildar (CQMH) Abdul Hamid. He added that this was first major war that India won hands-down. He said a nation that remembers its history and its martyrs is a developed and secure country.  The event was attended, among others, by Chairman Chiefs of Staff Committee and Chief of Air Staff Air Chief Marshal Arup Raha and Chief of Naval Staff Admiral RK Dhowan.last_img read more

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Govt asks PWD engineers to inspect bridges with care

first_imgKolkata: Engineers of the state Public Works Department (PWD) were directed to carry out inspection of bridges with “care” by the state government.It may be mentioned that as per inspections carried out in July, 20 bridges across the state were identified as “severely damaged”.Later, it was noticed during a monthly review meeting held on September 11 at Nabanna Sabhaghar that some more bridges also need to be inspected and included in the list of “severely damaged” ones. As a result, all executive engineers and superintendent engineers have been requested to inspect all the bridges under their jurisdiction.At the same time, the zonal chief engineers have to inspect the 20 bridges that have already been identified as “severely damaged”.It has been stated in an order of the state PWD that “care should be taken while inspection and preparation of the list.”Moreover, a report in connection with the “health” of the bridges of Kolkata Metropolitan Development Authority (KMDA) has been submitted at the Urban Development and Municipal Affairs department. Four bridges have been stated to be in good condition.Sources said that Firhad Hakim, the state Urban Development and Municipal Affairs minister, will be visiting the rest of the bridges that are under KMDA’s supervision, on Thursday.Meanwhile, the state Finance department has issued a memorandum on the role of the Departmental Tender Committee.The departments that deal with engineering works have already constituted their Department Tender Committees. Now all the departments will be having the same and the committee “shall be responsible for evaluation and recommendation of tender related works, including but not limited to scrutinising all the tender related documents to ascertain whether all the basic principles of public procurement have been followed and to ensure that the necessary formalities as per guidelines issued by the Finance department from time to time, have duly been observed by the Tender Inviting Authority.”last_img read more

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HC summons N 24Pgs SP on Nov 26

first_imgKolkata: The Calcutta High Court on Wednesday directed the Superintendent of Police (SP) of North 24-Parganas district to appear before it on November 26 to explain the police’s failure to record the statement of two police constables in connection with a murder case. A division bench comprising justices Joymalyo Bagchi and R K Kapur directed the SP to supervise investigation into the case as the investigating officer (IO) failed to carry out the court’s direction to examine the police personnel and record their statements, who were on guard duty at the premises of an accused. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe IO has also been summoned to appear before the court on November 26, along with the SP. The bench directed that statements of the two constables be now recorded before a magistrate. Asim Bhattacharya was murdered in Bongaon in North 24-Parganas district on July 13. Rakesh Bairagi, a resident of the area, was accused of complicity in the murder of Bhattacharya and applied for anticipatory bail before the high court. His lawyer Suman Shankar Chatterjee said that Asim Bhattacharya was an accused in the murder of Rakesh Bairagi’s son Himangshu on March 9, 2014. Seeking anticipatory bail for Rakesh, Chatterjee claimed before the court that he was falsely implicated in the murder of Asim Bhattacharya as the latter was an accused in his son’s murder. Chatterjee said that on February 2, 2015, the high court had directed the district police to provide police protection in the residence of Rakesh Bairagi following his son’s murder. The petitioner claimed that without recording the statements of the two constables, chargesheet had been filed in the murder of Asim Bhattacharya and Rakesh Bairagi was named in the document.last_img read more

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Vaso Lleno opens the door hundreds of stories of sexual abuse pour

first_imgRelated posts:Vaso Lleno hosting event for sexual abuse survivors Costa Rica reports lower cancer mortality rates Seed festival is a gardener’s dream come true Óscar Arias, Costa Rica’s former president and a Nobel Prize winner, accused of sexual assault, per reports Everything was perfect.Cris Gomar had a good job and was living with friends in Colorado. She was snowboarding and having fun. Then, one day, when she was out snowboarding, she felt colder than normal. Then she couldn’t breathe. Gomar entered a state of shock and was taken to the hospital. She showed signs consistent with an asthma attack, but she never had asthma before.Gomar went home to Costa Rica and spent weeks in pain. They tested her heart and lungs, after weeks of feeling terrible and hospital exams, they found nothing physically wrong with her.Now Gomar, 29, recognizes what happened to her. It was an anxiety attack, an avalanche of mental stress that manifested itself physically. Mental illness runs in Gomar’s family, but she didn’t know that because no one ever spoke about it. “Vaso Lleno is my experience living with anxiety and depression,” Gomar said.Vaso Lleno started as a thesis project in 2010 and became a social outreach initiative that raises awareness about mental illness through inclusion, conversation, workshops and an openness about the mental health that Gomar says is severely lacking in Costa Rica. Gomar is hoping to turn Vaso Lleno into a foundation soon.Vaso Lleno translates to “Full Glass.”“It’s not half empty, it’s not half full, but always full,” Gomar said. “There’s always something positive you can learn from bad experiences and transform it.”Gomar used her experiences as the foundation for a TEDx talk in Costa Rica. She talked about her experiences with depression, anxiety and laid out her insecurities. “After [the talk] people started taking pictures and thanking me,” Gomar said. “People started writing to me on Facebook and I kept wondering, why are you thanking me?“I didn’t say anything new. I didn’t overcome terrible cancer or something. I just said things we all think but are afraid to say out loud.”Gomar said she realized how important the need was for people to talk about these issues. She said people would come up to her at bars and tell her about their suicide attempts. So one day she opened up a public forum on Facebook for people to share their stories with her. She was amazed by the response she got, especially with people who told her that it was the first time they were sharing their stories. “There’s a real need when someone trusts a social network more than they trust someone close to them,” Gomar said.That’s why when the news about Oscar Arias’s alleged sexual misconduct broke last month, opened up another anonymous forum and let people share their stories. Gomar says she received nearly 450 responses in a few days.“I noticed this is a problem in every household in Costa Rica,” Gomar said. “It’s not about legal [aspects of abuse], it’s about education, about creating consciousness.”A lot of the women who sent their stories didn’t know what happened to them at the time was abuse, Gomar said. Many men, she suspects, might not have known their actions constituted abuse either. It was different, they were at a party, she didn’t say no, Gomar says justifications abound. “My obsession with exposing these stories is that people hear about women facing abuse, but they don’t know what that looks like,” Gomar said.  “When people here about sexual abuse they think about the construction working raping a woman in a field.“But they don’t think about the 6-year-old whose grandfather puts his hand up her skirt. They don’t think about the 11-year-old whose cousin asks her for oral sex.”The sheer volume of the stories has also had a healing effect for the women who’ve submitted them. Gomar says she’s received messages from women saying they no longer feel alone, that they feel better by writing and sharing their stories. Gomar wants this to have a lasting effect: to help nip the problem at the bud and prevent future assaults from happening. “I feel this is the perfect moment to rock the boat and make people conscious of what’s wrong,” Gomar said. “Gossip lasts 15 minutes and I don’t want this conversation to end here.”Gomar wants to expand her project. She wants to organize an event for women in late March. She’s planning on going back to school to study psychology and also wants to help women navigate Costa Rica’s complicated legal system, which can be overwhelming for victims of abuse. Gomar also wants to address toxic masculinity in Costa Rica, which she says is a root cause for a lot of abuse.“Lots of women have tried to kill themselves after [sexual abuse], some turned to drugs and others still aren’t comfortable around their partners,” Gomar said. “I hope this isn’t a fad because of Oscar Arias, but a chance to change culture.“If we can change behavior, we can change a lot of things.”You can find Vaso Lleno’s form to submit stories of sexual abuse here. They are also on Facebook and Instagram.This story was made possible thanks to The Tico Times 5% Club. If only 5 percent of our readers donated at least $2 a month, we’d have our operating costs covered and could focus on bringing you more original reporting from around Costa Rica. We work hard to keep our reporting independent and groundbreaking, but we can only do it with your help. Join The Tico Times 5% Club and help make stories like this one possible.Support the Tico Times Facebook Commentslast_img read more

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HUD Addresses Affordable Housing Crisis

first_img May 6, 2016 615 Views in Daily Dose, Government, Headlines, News HUD has announced the allocation of nearly $174 million to states through the National Housing Trust Fund (NHTF) in order to address the ongoing affordable housing crisis in America.The NHTF is a new affordable housing production program that complements existing programs with the intent of preserving and increasing the nation’s supply of affordable rental housing for low income households, according to HUD. Contributions by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will capitalize the NHTF, and HUD will administer the fund.“Today, we offer another tool to help states confront a growing affordable rental housing crisis in this country,” HUD Secretary Julián Castro said. “The Housing Trust Fund will be an enduring resource designed to producing more housing that is affordable to our most vulnerable neighbors.”The Housing and Trust Fund was created in 2008 out of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) and it was to be capitalized by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. But the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which took the GSEs into conservatorship in September 2008, suspended the allocation of GSE money to the Housing Trust Fund in November 2008 before any allocations were made.In December 2014, FHFA Director Mel Watt lifted the suspension of GSE allocations to the Housing Trust Fund, a move that drew harsh criticism from some Republican lawmakers who believed it was wrong to allocate GSE money to the trust fund while the GSEs remain in conservatorship and taxpayers are on the hook. Rep. Ed Royce (R-California) even introduced legislation in January 2015 to try and prevent the allocations.“In today’s housing market, many Americans who work hard still can’t afford their rents. Affordable housing helps workers live closer to their jobs and spend more time with their families. A healthy housing market is key to vibrant communities and future economic growth, and these federal funds will help states expand the supply of affordable homes and strengthen our communities,” said Senator Jack Reed (D-Rhode Island), who wrote the 2008 law establishing the National Housing Trust Fund. “I commend HUD for making these funds available and helping states take a tailored, cost-effective approach to increasing the supply of affordable housing.”Each state is allocated a minimum of $3 million by law, and state affordable housing planners will use the funds for eligible activities that include:Real property acquisitionSite improvements and development hard costsRelated soft costsDemolitionFinancing costsRelocation assistanceOperating cost assistance for rental housing (up to 30 percent of each grant)Reasonable administrative and planning costs“Today is a historic day for millions of Americans who struggle to find affordable housing,” Diane Yentel, President and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. “We applaud Secretary Castro for his leadership in paving the way to make the National Housing Trust Fund a reality. We look forward to working with the administration and our state partners as we put these dollars to work building affordable homes for the lowest income people.”Click here for a list how much money was allocated to each state. Sharecenter_img Affordable Housing Crisis HUD National Housing Trust Fund 2016-05-06 Seth Welborn HUD Addresses Affordable Housing Crisislast_img read more

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