Our Sporting Future 2010 set to Challenge and Inspire

first_imgSCORS comprises of representatives from State and Territory Departments of Recreation and Sport.OSF 2010 will provide an in-depth analysis of the business of sport, with real examples of successful sports business models. Participants will have the opportunity to examine the sustainability of sport and how it can meet any current and future challenges.The forum will provide participants with relevant information, ideas and strategies on building a better national sports system. The program will explore new thinking, risk taking and innovation in the development of sports policy to effect change.There will also be a topical panel discussion that addresses current issues in Australian sport, stimulates new ideas, challenges current ways of thinking, and provides practical information that can be applied to sporting organisations.The forum will feature keynote speakers Bernard Petiot, Vice-President of casting and performance for Cirque Du Soleil and Peter Holmes à Court, one of Australia’s most respected entrepreneurs and businessmen.Other keynote speakers include Avril Henry who is regarded as one of Australia’s leading thinkers and speakers on Generational Diversity and Leadership and Li Cunxin whose bestselling autobiography, Mao’s Last Dancer, tells a remarkable story about his extraordinary life. To register for OSF 2010 visit the event website www.ausport.gov.au/OSF2010osf10@eventplanners.com.aulast_img read more

Read More

Four Essential Tips for Planning Year-End Email Campaigns

first_img1. Look for trends in recent response data.As you’re brainstorming your email strategy, spend some quality time digging into data on what’s been the most and least effective for you over the past few months. For example, if you notice that click-through rates are higher in your graphic-rich emails, design extra-visual appeals for year-end. If supporters don’t click on links at the bottom of your emails, make sure you keep all links in the first part of your message (especially your DonateNow button!).2. Consider your sending frequency and target your outreach.Carefully think about your email frequency—every fatigued subscriber who opts out in December is someone who won’t see your emails at all next year. Start ramping up your email frequency now and keep a close eye on the open and unsubscribe rates, then adjust your year-end campaign email frequency accordingly.3. Keep your emails social.People stay busy during the end of the year, but not too busy to keep up with their social networking. Make sure your subscribers have an easy way to share your emails with their friends and followers, and include easy-to-spot links to your organization’s social networking sites, too.4. Welcome new subscribers right away.When someone signs up for your email list, they’re probably interested in hearing from you right then and there. Build a strong relationship with new subscribers right away with an automatic welcome note. If you can set a great foundation now, you’ll have more loyal subscribers during prime giving season. Even though your donors might procrastinate, you can’t! Start planning your year-end email campaign now. Photo Source: The Digital Giving Index Did you know that year-end donations make up 30% of giving for the entire year? Because year-end fundraising goals are often so big, it’s important to start planning your year-end campaign now. When mapping out your email appeals, keep the following four topics in mind:last_img read more

Read More

How the Benefit Concert is Shaping Philanthropy

first_imgMusic has been one of the most powerful ways causes, celebrities, and communities can connect to raise money for serious issues. We recently caught up with Art Taylor, president of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance, who shared his insight on why these events can be so successful for nonprofits of all sizes.Legacy of Aid: August is the Anniversary of the Benefit ConcertFor over forty years, the benefit concert has served as one of the most popular, easily recognizable forms of aid for charitable organizations. It all started back in August 1971 when George Harrison called a few friends—Ringo, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, to name a few—to play at the world’s first benefit concert. The Concert for Bangladesh played from Madison Square Garden with ticket and recording sales helping to raise $18 million. These stars likely didn’t realize they were forever changing charitable giving in time of a disaster. Concerts are now a popular vehicle for causes around the world to raise visibility and funds—often targeting a younger crowd or introducing their campaign to an audience not yet familiar with it. “Music is a universal pleasure that cuts across cultures and backgrounds,” says H. Art Taylor, president of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance. “Music is a unifying experience—it’s a natural choice for charities to turn to benefit concerts as a means to raise funds.” Star power can play a big role but doesn’t always spell success. In the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti, Wyclef Jean’s charity, Yele Haiti, came under scrutiny about its finances. This controversy underscores the importance for charities to make sure they are fully transparent and accountable before implementing a benefit concert which can attract a lot of media attention. And star power isn’t the only way to go. Charities across the country have seen great success with smaller scale benefit concerts ranging from high school bands to regional bands. The principles and watch-outs apply regardless of your headliner. 7 Do’s and Don’ts when planning a benefit concert for your organization:1. Know your partners. If you are co-hosting the benefit concert with another charity, take a moment to investigate them by pulling their report at Give.org. Don’t assume it is well managed just because it has a 501(c)(3) charitable tax exempt status. 2. Pay attention to regulations. Make sure any state regulatory requirements have been met, including verifying your ability to solicit. 3. Check tax deductibility disclosures.If the benefit concert tickets are sold in a charitable fundraising context, seek out a tax advisor to find out about tax deductibility disclosures that may need to be made. 4. Beware of cheaters. Take reasonable measures to reduce ticket scalping. Examples might be: limiting the number of tickets sold to a single purchaser and ensuring computer safeguards are in place to avoid someone “snatching” all the tickets as soon as they are made available. 5. Practice your FAQ.Make sure answers are readily available for reasonable questions about your mission, target amounts to be raised, and how collected funds will be used. 6. Be clear. If the intention is to collect funds restricted for a specific purpose (i.e., disaster relief) make sure that all charity participants agree to this restriction and are able to carry out this work as soon as possible.7. Be transparent about finances. Share information on the total amount collected, the cost to hold the concert, and how much went to the cause. Post this information on the charity’s and concert’s websites. The Future of Benefit Concerts“Charity benefit concerts will continue to play a role in generating funds and advocating issues,” says Taylor. “Large events work well in times of major crisis or when a big star has a personal stake in a cause. Smaller, targeted local events can be successful as well.”Whether packing a large event venue or a local concert hall, organizers should be creative and coordinate effectively to ensure that benefit concerts are a useful tool for raising awareness and charitable dollars. A benefit with local bands and resources combined with a coordinated effort between multiple nonprofits may be a good option for some charities. Whether large or small, however, the expense and coordination efforts for events can be prohibitive and should be considered carefully in terms of the investment of time and resources. Often charities will measure ROI through funds raised as well as impact to the audience. For more helpful tips on nonprofit collaboration, including information on accreditation, visit the BBB Wise Giving Alliance at Give.org. For advice on planning a successful fundraising event, download Network for Good’s guide to Hosting Your Most Fabulous Fundraising Event Ever.last_img read more

Read More

4 Actions You Can Take to Grow and Sustain Your Email List

first_imgWhether you’re starting from scratch or have been building your email list for years, you know it’s important to actively promote your email list and encourage your existing contacts to engage with your organization.After all, a dedicated email list can have serious payoffs for your nonprofit — including everything from better event attendance to increased web traffic and larger donations at your next fundraiser.The key to successful email list is to see your contacts as people. Grow your list — one name at a time— and once they’ve subscribed provide them with a quality experience, just as you would in-person.Here are 4 tips for growing and sustaining your email list:1. Choose a reliable email providerThe first step of building a loyal email list is making sure you have a safe place to store your contacts’ information and an easy way to send them mailings.If you’re just getting started, take a look at what other organizations are using, and think about what kind of tools and features will be important for your organization. Will you need access to reports to see how your emails are performing? What about support to help with any technical questions you have?You may also want to think about what solutions work with products you are already using. Constant Contact easily integrates with Network for Good so that you can launch campaigns, organize contacts, and manage your campaigns from a central location.2. Make sign-up simpleMost people aren’t going to seek out your mailing list on their own; it’s up to you to encourage them to sign up and make it easy for them to do so.Here’s a great example of a website sign-up form from Canadian nonprofit, The Local Good. Not only do they make sign-up super simple, they also provide a useful description of what their newsletter will include and how often they send.Subscribers will be more likely to sign up if they know what to expect from you.There are also handy tools you can use so that subscribers can sign up on social media or even through a mobile device.3. Deliver a personal experienceBuilding a list is half the challenge, sustaining that relationship is just as important. To build long-lasting relationships with your subscribers, you’re going to have to think beyond your organization and think about how you can deliver a great experience for your contacts.Start by answering a few questions like:Who are your contacts?What are they interested in?How often do they want to hear from you?The more information you can collect and store about your contacts the better. For example, if you collect email addresses at an event, make note of that so you can reach out to them with a targeted follow-up soon after.The timing of your emails is important — you want to make a good first impression on new contacts so that they read your future messages. You can also use this information to reach out to them if you are holding a similar event in the future.4. Don’t send carelesslyThis includes sending with a set schedule and goal in mind, but also checking back in to see how each mailing performed, and making changes when necessary. Using email reports, you have access to important information like open and click-through rates, which will show you what messages are attracting interest and getting your readers to interact with your content.You don’t want your email marketing strategy to become static. Spend some time thinking about little tweaks you can try. What happens to your open rate if you ask a question in your subject line? Does your click-through rate increase if you link to a YouTube video?Seeing what works best for your audience will ensure you are getting the return on investment you’re looking for from email marketing. Taking a few extra minutes to try something new could mean reengaging contacts that have fallen out of touch.last_img read more

Read More

Social Media Content Is Sitting Right in Front of You

first_imgContent for your social media channels is sitting right in front of you. Really! Your website, donor appeals, and newsletters are just waiting to be translated into a Facebook post, tweet, or YouTube video. Repurposing content can take some time, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll start thinking of ideas to feed your social channels in your sleep. To help get your creative juices flowing, here are some quick tips and content ideas for Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram: Try experimenting with videos and picture slideshows. Quick tips: Do share candid images. Don’t share stock photos. Ideas for posts: Quick tips: Don’t be afraid to retweet. Share content that is relevant to your audience. Repurpose a success story from an appeal letter. Do some research on hashtags. Does your issue area or local community have a hashtag? Post images of your team prepping for an event. Ideas for posts: Twitter Quick tips: Invite people to join your email list. Think visual. Studies show that posts with images perform much better than posts without. Post a photo from an past year’s event for #tbt (Throwback Thursday). Which posts have done well in the past? Try to repeat what works well but with a fresh twist. Facebook Share opinion pieces from your staff or experts from your issue area. Even more than on Twitter, hashtags can help you connect with new audiences. Share stats from your annual report. Instagram Don’t be afraid to be fun. Organizations are made up of people, and your Facebook fans know that. Step outside the box every once in a while and let your personality shine. Create an image of your mission statement. (We like Canva for projects like this.) Share a photo of your volunteers in action. Post pics of the thank you notes your organization sends (or receives). Live tweet an event, rally, or staff luncheon. Share a glimpse into the day-to-day life of staff, clients, and volunteers. Remind everyone what a $25 donation will accomplish. Ideas for posts: Follow back. You can’t have a conversation if you aren’t following your followers. Get more ideas (101, in fact!) for social media posts by downloading 101 Social Media Posts and watching our archived webinar The Art of Social Media, with social media expert and author Guy Kawasaki. And if you aren’t following us on our favorite social channels, what are you waiting for? TwitterFacebookInstagramlast_img read more

Read More

Global Maternal Health Conference 2013: Join the Global Team of Guest Bloggers!

first_imgPosted on December 3, 2012August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Are you presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013 in Arusha, Tanzania? Do you plan to tune in to the live stream to view sessions remotely?Join the team of guest bloggers for the conference! With GMHC2013 right around the corner, the MHTF is looking forward to a lively online scientific dialogue about issues presented at the conference sessions. In an effort to fuel this conversation, we hope to engage a variety of perspectives–from various geographic regions and sub-fields–by connecting with health and development bloggers around the world.You might be interested in writing a guest blog post if:You would like to connect with a broader audience about the work you are presenting at GMHC2013,You work in global health and development and would like to share your thoughts on how the issues discussed in the sessions relate to your work in your specific context,You are working on similar issues to those discussed in the sessions, and would like to share your insights,You have a passion for global health and writing, and would like to help synthesize lessons learned from the sessions.Guest posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.If you are participating in the conference (either in Tanzania or remotely via live webcast) and would like to guest blog about the work you are presenting or the sessions you attend, please submit a brief statement of interest or a sample blog post of less than 300 words to Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu).Please also get in touch if you plan to blog on your own blog or your organization’s blog or website. We would love to discuss linking to your posts and cross-posting content.Take a look at the posts from the first Global Maternal Health Conference.For more information, contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu).Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More

Moving Beyond the Numbers

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 24, 2014November 7, 2016By: Renuka Motihar, Independent Consultant and member of the Executive Committee of the White Ribbon Alliance IndiaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, what does the future hold for international maternal mortality targets? The MHTF is pleased to be hosting a blog series on post-2015 maternal mortality goal setting. Over the next several weeks, we will be featuring responses and reactions to proposed targets from around the world. Please share your thoughts with us!In India, there has been considerable economic progress, but the country is still grappling with inequities and the basic right to safe childbirth. There are about 30 million pregnancies; 27 million deliveries and about 56,000 women are lost in childbirth each year. This accounts for 19 percent of maternal deaths around the world. Most of these can be prevented. India still has a way to go to reach MDG 5, which would require reducing the maternal mortality ratio (MMR)  to 109 deaths per 100,000 births  by 2015. There has been some progress in the country in the last decade. The MMR has fallen from about 390 to 212 deaths per 100,000 live births in about 10 years, approximately 67 percent decrease. There are some areas in the country, such as states of Assam, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh/Uttarakhand that still have MMRs greater than 300 deaths per 100,000 live births. Social determinants such as early age of marriage and early and repeated childbearing are also contributing factors. Thirty-six percent of Indian women are malnourished and about 55 percent are anemic. Bodies are ill prepared to handle childbirth with poor nutrition, stunting with negative outcomes for maternal health. The main causes of death in India have been found to be heavy bleeding (hemorrhage) and eclampsia (high blood pressure).The Government of India has policies and programs to improve outcomes for maternal health. Janani Suraksha Yojana, a safe motherhood cash assistance scheme, and now the Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakarm (JSSK) have facilitated the shift of births from homes to health facilities. Births in clinics and hospitals have increased over 75 percent in the last 5 years; however the maternal mortality ratios have only declined by approximately 25 percent. But the question arises: Are the health facilities equipped with the desired quality to handle the onset of numbers? Is there adequate inter-partum care and emergency care for complicated deliveries? Is the poorest woman being able to reach services? Is it inclusive and equitable?To address quality of care issues, quality protocols are being developed — for the labor room, antenatal care and postnatal care by the government and there is an effort to standardize. There is an attempt to strengthen supportive supervision, task shifting (reduce dependence on doctors and train a cadre of health workers for providing services), strategic skilling, respectful maternal care and maternal death reviews. However, challenges still remain: India is a vast country, and problems of supplies of essential drugs, medicines, inadequate human resources, inaccessible terrain, socio-cultural factors, and translating policies/programs into action persist. The government of India is grappling with all these issues and is focusing on improving quality of services. There is a realization that only looking at numbers is not enough. Improving quality of services is critical. As Anuradha Gupta, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW), Government of India and Mission Director, National Rural Health Mission has said in a recent meeting, “We need a shift in the focus on achieving numbers to achieving quality of care”. The global targets for preventing maternal deaths are useful in providing goals to aspire for a country. They have acted as a catalyst to accelerate progress. However, the targets currently only reflect maternal mortality. They do not reflect maternal morbidities or the fact that for every woman dying in childbirth, many more women suffer long-lasting and debilitating illnesses, which are now being neglected. For countries, a relative or percentage target may be more useful; and those countries that are on track should also examine the reaching of targets sub-nationally. However, within countries, focusing only on numbers is not enough. Efforts need to go beyond numbers to reflect on enhancing the quality of services, and, in turn, improving the lives of women and children.If you would like to submit a guest post for to our ongoing series exploring potential goals for maternal health in the post-MDG development agenda, please contact Andrea Goetschius: goetschi@hsph.harvard.eduShare this:last_img read more

Read More

Increase Donor Loyalty with 5 Best Practices

first_imgWhat motivates donors to continue giving to an organization? Traditionally, research that’s focused on charitable giving has looked at how to motivate donors to give an initial gift. But are you doing everything you can to increase donor loyalty? After all, fundraising pros know that donor retention is the golden ticket. Apply these five best practices to your fundraising work and turn one-time donors into loyal, ongoing supporters.1) Build an Emotional ConnectionCompanies that optimize the emotional connection between their brand and their customers outperform competitors by 26 percent in gross margin and 85 percent in sales growth. Customers who feel emotionally connected to a brand are:At least three times more likely to recommendThree times more likely to re-purchaseEmotional connections are even more necessary in the nonprofit realm. A logical connection isn’t enough to go the distance. Emotional connections influence both the length and frequency of a donor’s engagement with your organization.2) Get FeedbackConsumer brands use post-interaction surveys to gather insightful feedback from customers. Set up your survey to ask any question you’d like to know the answer to. They can be especially helpful to nonprofits for gathering feedback on the online donation experience, for asking opinions on various issues, and for collecting ideas to improve the donor experience.3) Practice Social Listening and EngagementSurveys aren’t the only way to listen to your donors. Smart brands use social media to learn about their consumers. Engage with your supporters by responding to questions and sharing relevant information. Nonprofits can gain the same benefits by paying attention to what people are saying on both their organization’s social pages and individuals’ social pages. And they can build a relationship by responding in relevant, meaningful ways.4) Focus on the IndividualTo generate loyalty, you have to focus on each person as an individual. Consumers are used to getting customized communications that are personalized. Similarly, donors expect nonprofits to leverage what the organization knows about them to make their experience the best it can be. For example, find out what types of causes they support and share related programs they may be interested in. Learn how they prefer to give—whether via email, text, social media, or snail mail—and make the process easy for them. Find out when they like to give and time your requests appropriately.5) Show That You Appreciate ThemBrands often have customer appreciation events that are designed specifically to show customers that they’re valued. Appreciation doesn’t have to come in the form of a big event, however. Nonprofits can show appreciation to donors via letters, personalized videos, photo galleries of the project the donor has given to, etc.Ultimately, it comes back to building the relationship with your donors. They want to feel that they’re a valued part of the work that your organization does. They want to feel connected. As you focus on seeing your donors as individuals, you’ll be able to craft a donor experience program that results in loyal supporters.Learn why the donor experience is vital to a successful organization and how to implement an effective donor experience program by downloading “A Better Donor Experience: Is it the Cornerstone of Donor Loyalty?”last_img read more

Read More

Women in Philanthropy Profile: Janet Cobb

first_imgA native of California, Janet Cobb currently serves as one of Network for Good’s Personal Fundraising Coaches. She has lived and worked in Oregon, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, before finally calling Chicago home. Cobb has thoroughly enjoyed her professional experiences in the culinary arts, in the high school classroom, and in fundraising and development; not to mention the gift of being a wife and a mother to three children who have become phenomenal young adults.Coaching NonprofitsWhat’s involved with your coaching process?In my role, I work with small nonprofits across the country to help them strategize around their fundraising efforts, particularly through the effective use of online fundraising, donor management, and communication tools. Together, we coordinate an integrated communication and fundraising plan that is data-driven and right-sized to fit each individual organization’s capacity to implement. I offer strategic and practical advice along with encouraging and supportive accountability.How long have you been a fundraising consultant?I’ve engaged in various aspects of fundraising throughout my career in the nonprofit arena and transitioned into coaching and consulting in 2013.How did you get started in nonprofit work?I’ve been a “do-gooder” my entire life and have worked within the nonprofit industry—in programming, administration, and fundraising—in some capacity my entire career. Working primarily in smaller nonprofits and schools, the program staff was often responsible for fundraising efforts. I remember in the 1980’s, conducting a ‘monthly giving’ program via snail mail when our donors mailed in $1 bills each month, sorting bulk mailings by zip code on tables in the retreat house dining hall, and sponging stamps long before self-stick existed. In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, I was heavily involved with strategic planning and grant-writing focused on transforming outdated classrooms and libraries into 21st century learning environments. By 2004, I moved more directly into fundraising and development work. Since then, I’ve been responsible for donor communications, database management, special events, major gifts, strategic planning, and capital campaigns—sometimes all at once.What keeps you in the nonprofit sector?I believe in the power of empowering others. The nonprofit sector declares that “we” are all in this together instead of “every ‘man’ for himself.” I believe in the interdependence of the community that fosters the independence of individuals within that community.What do you enjoy most about coaching fundraisers?Through coaching, I get to work with so many fabulous nonprofits that do great work in their own corner of the universe—doing good to make the world a better place. Fundraising is about engaging in conversation with others who care about what you care about, so that the donor has the opportunity to make an impact in a way that is meaningful to them. I enjoy sharing the skills I’ve acquired with others to make a positive impact.What’s your proudest accomplishment with the organization?My proudest accomplishment as a coach is that I’ve been able to support the fundraising efforts of more than 150 small and early-stage nonprofits who have a passion for their mission but can benefit from encouraging and supportive accountability around fundraising. I get to help bring their vision to reality!Women in Philanthropy is an ongoing blog series in celebration of Women’s History Month, featuring some of the incredible women Network for Good has the pleasure to work with.Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Read More

Wilson Center Event: How Zika Is Shaping the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Agenda

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 30, 2016February 26, 2018Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)We are excited to announce the upcoming dialogue, How Zika Is Shaping the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Agenda, on Tuesday, April 12 in Washington, DC. This event is part of the Maternal Health Task Force’s Advancing Dialogue on Maternal Health Series, in partnership with UNFPA and the Wilson Center.As an international public health emergency with strong links to birth defects, the rampant spread of the Zika virus has garnered significant attention in the maternal health community. With both the transmission and implications of the virus intrinsically tied to the most disadvantaged women and their sexual and reproductive health and rights, the Zika outbreak presents an opportunity to set the conversation on access, quality, and equity of sexual and reproductive health care in affected countries.Interested in attending? See the invitation from the Wilson Center below to learn more details and register for the event.When: Tuesday, April 12, 2016 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm EDT. Light fare included.Where: The Wilson Center, 6th Floor Auditorium, Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, One Woodrow Wilson Plaza, 1300 Pennsylvania, Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20004On February 1, the World Health Organization declared the cluster of microcephaly cases associated with the Zika virus an international public health emergency. The virus is spreading throughout more than 20 countries and territories in the Americas predominantly via the Aedes mosquito, but sexual transmission is also possible. Some governments of affected countries, such as Brazil and El Salvador, have issued advisories to women to avoid pregnancy – in El Salvador’s case, for the next two years.However, women in many of these countries have limited if any access to contraceptive and reproductive health services to prevent pregnancy. If they do become pregnant, finding and using maternal and newborn health services is equally challenging. The outbreak is especially detrimental to the most disadvantaged women in low income and rural areas, where sanitation is poor and resources are low.How can the global health community frame and lead the dialogue about women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights in Zika-infected areas? How can the Zika response be an opportunity to bolster health infrastructure and capacity in affected countries? Join us April 12 at the Wilson Center as we explore these questions and discuss solutions.PresentationsMarcia Castro, Associate Professor of Demography, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthJaime Nadal Roig, Representative to Brazil, United Nations Population FundPanelAlaka Basu, Senior Fellow, United Nations FoundationAnne Burke, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineChloë Cooney, Director of Global Advocacy, Planned Parenthood Federation of AmericaFrançoise Girard, President, International Women’s Health CoalitionRepresentative from the Pan American Health Organization (Invited)ModeratorsLaura Laski, Chief of Sexual and Reproductive Health, United Nations Population FundRoger-Mark De Souza, Director of Population, Environmental Security, and Resilience, Wilson CenterRemarksCongressman Eliot Engel, U.S. Member of the House of Representatives, New York 16th Congressional DistrictEvent DetailsRegister for the event here.Want to attend but can’t?Tune in to the live or archived webcast at WilsonCenter.org (archived webcasts go up after the meeting).Media guests, including TV crews, should RSVP directly with Francesca Cameron. Media bringing heavy electronics MUST indicate this in their response so they may be admitted into the building.Join the conversation on Twitter at @NewSecurityBeat and @MHTF and by following #MHdialogue. To find more coverage of these issues on the Wilson Center’s blog, NewSecurityBeat.org.See a video of the event>>Share this:last_img read more

Read More

World Malaria Day: Renewing Commitment to Addressing Malaria in Pregnancy

first_imgPosted on April 25, 2017May 19, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)According to the most recent Global Burden of Disease data, deaths due to malaria have decreased substantially over the past few decades. Global malaria mortality rates have dropped by 44% between 1990 – when malaria was the tenth most common cause death – and 2015 – when malaria was the 20th most common cause of death. Despite this progress, roughly half a million people died from malaria in 2015 alone, and 92% of those deaths occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. The Global Technical Strategy for Malaria (2016-2030) calls for a 40% reduction in malaria case incidence by 2020, but only half of malaria endemic countries are currently on track to achieve this goal.Pregnant women and newborns living in malaria endemic areas are especially vulnerable. Malaria in pregnancy (MiP) continues to play a large role in global maternal deaths. In 2015, malaria was the third most common cause of death among women of reproductive age in Africa. During that year, MiP was estimated to have been responsible for more than 400,000 cases of maternal anemia and approximately 15% of maternal deaths globally. Unfortunately, the women who are most vulnerable to malaria are often the least protected against it. MiP also poses a significant threat to newborns because it can cause spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, premature delivery, low birth weight and neonatal mortality.Coverage of malaria prevention, screening and treatment among pregnant women remains low in many areas of sub-Saharan Africa, despite investments in MiP and clear evidence of effective interventions. In order to combat MiP, intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) should start early in the second trimester of pregnancy (ideally at week 13) with three or more doses of the antimalarial sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and continue monthly over the course of the pregnancy until delivery. Based on available data, the percentage of eligible women receiving three or more doses of IPTp increased from 6% in 2010 to 31% in 2015. Still, much work is needed to ensure that pregnant women and newborns across the globe are protected against malaria.Access resources related to malaria in pregnancy>>Learn more about World Malaria Day>>Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More

Collaboration and Creative Communication: How the WOMAN Trial Findings Translated Into Maternal Health Policy Change

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on December 11, 2017December 12, 2017By: Haleema Shakur-Still, Associate Professor of Clinical Trials, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Project Director, WOMAN TrialClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)When our research team first started exploring whether an off-patent drug called tranexamic acid could reduce the number of people—mainly young men—who bled to death as a result of trauma, I never imagined that more than a decade later I would be surrounded by maternal health experts discussing how this treatment could help new mothers around the world. But that’s exactly where I found myself at a special event at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) titled, “How can we stop women bleeding to death in childbirth?”Six months after results from the WOMAN trial were published, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated its guidelines to include the use of tranexamic acid for prevention of PPH. Our hopes for the WOMAN trial came to fruition, demonstrating the protective effect of tranexamic acid on postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), a devastating complication that kills roughly 100,000 women every year—or one woman approximately every six minutes. We found that tranexamic acid, when administered within three hours of delivery, reduced a woman’s risk of death due to bleeding by one-third.All too often we scientists focus our energy on conducting high quality medical research and collecting more and more evidence to improve health outcomes—and this is important. However, research doesn’t have an impact on people’s health unless the information reaches clinicians and policymakers who can implement the findings. As Professor Joy Lawn, Director of the MARCH Centre at LSHTM and chair of the event highlighted, “Tonight is about time. Time that we take a stand to say that women shouldn’t be dying from something preventable, like bleeding.”As I reflect on the discussions, I have thought about two keys that have helped the WOMAN trial results lead to better maternal health outcomes and more effective policies: collaboration and creative communication.CollaborationThe WOMAN trial was a collaboration on an epic scale, involving 20,060 women from 193 hospitals in 21 countries and thousands of doctors, midwives and nurses. We were delighted to have representatives from some of these groups at the event, including Sir Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, former president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, and Her Excellency Toyin Saraki, Founder-President of the Wellbeing Foundation Africa and ambassador for the International Confederation of Midwives.In addition, recognizing the importance of including representation from professional bodies, maternal health advocacy groups and policymaking organizations, the WOMAN trial steering committee elicited feedback from WHO colleagues from the beginning.Involving numerous stakeholders from different sectors throughout the process helped ensure that the findings would translate into maternal health policy change.Creative communicationAs researchers, we need to be creative about how we share findings to reach a target audience. Some strategies for effective communication include letters, fact sheets and presentations at conferences. Harnessing the power of social and digital media by translating research findings and information into a story is another opportunity. In the past, the WOMAN trial collaborators and I have produced cartoons and animations to illustrate how tranexamic acid works. We have found videos to be another effective vehicle to tell the stories of women who experienced severe blood loss during childbirth and how it impacted their lives.At the event, we unveiled a new communication tool—the Blood Clock—which will remain on display at LSHTM until February 2018. The Blood Clock is a unique art installation whose aim is to raise awareness about PPH and the need for urgent treatment, illustrating that every six minutes, somewhere in the world, a woman dies from PPH. It was created by Consultant Obstetrician Dr. Graham Tydeman, who regularly deals with the problem of blood loss in childbirth.Now we need to keep the momentum going. I call on providers, policymakers and other members of the global maternal health community to act on these findings and educate others about tranexamic acid. No woman should die from preventable causes on the day she gives birth.—Watch a video of the Blood Clock.Read the findings from the WOMAN trial.Share this:last_img read more

Read More

Midwives on the Edge—Providing Essential Care in Crisis Settings

first_imgPosted on June 26, 2018June 29, 2018By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Sera Bonds, CEO/Founder, Circle of Health InternationalAcross many settings, midwives are key players in the maternal health workforce. The Maternal Health Task Force’s Kayla McGowan recently had the pleasure of interviewing Sera Bonds, Founder/CEO of Circle of Health International, for her insight into successes, challenges and the role of midwifery in crisis settings.KM: Please describe your background and work in maternal health.SB: I have an undergraduate degree in women’s studies. I went to midwifery school, direct entry—I’m not a licensed or practicing midwife, but I have training in midwifery. I have a Masters in Public Health; I went to Boston University where I focused my studies on complex humanitarian emergencies and reproductive health. I founded Circle of Health International in 2004 in response to a gap that we saw in the sector of disaster management and complex humanitarian emergencies—that midwives were not included and prioritized in those responses. That did not make a lot of sense given that outside of the United States, midwives deliver most of the world’s babies. And if you are introduced to communities through the midwives in that community, that introduction is embedded with a level of trust that really can’t be replicated for someone from the outside coming in. Midwives are privy to a lot of information outside of things like the number of pregnancies, how breastfeeding went, that sort of thing. They know [about intimate partner violence], who lives in poverty, whose kids go to bed hungry, they know family histories. When you know those people in a community, you know immediately so much more about their needs than you would if you just came in from the outside or went to the ministry or different folks in the community. We really prioritize midwives—that’s where we started in 2004.KM: Could you talk specifically about your work related to midwifery in crisis settings?SB: Over the last 14 years, the organization has worked in 22 different countries, and the crisis settings have ranged from acute conflicts—we’ve been working in Syria for seven years—to rural Tanzania where they have high rates of teen pregnancy and HIV as well as poverty. We have been working in south Texas on the Mexico border for the last four years supporting a refugee clinic, though most of the folks that come to the clinic are asylees or migrants. The clinic sees people immediately upon their release from border patrol, so we are their first stop.We’ve also been doing a lot of disaster work in America as hurricane seasons pick up and up and up. Our primary responses last year were Hurricane Harvey in Texas and Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. Because of the populations that we work with, we also do some work related to human trafficking.We have been engaged in human trafficking advocacy and training for different social service agencies, medical schools, and clinics to help those who are working in clinical settings in places where there are high instances of human trafficking support survivors. The more you can know about a person—not just their clinical history—the better the care.KM: Can you describe the impact so far?SB: Over the last 14 years, we have reached over three million women and children with services or support either directly or through our local community-based partners. We have trained over 7,000 health care providers—including medical students—and we have provided well over one million dollars in supplies and equipment.We really try to have all of the work we do be informed and led by the people who are directly impacted. As part of our response in Texas after Hurricane Harvey, for example, we hired a local evacuee woman who had been relocated to Austin. She led our evacuee efforts on a short contract and has now become a staff member. We try to pull locally when we can. We try, when possible, to purchase everything locally, too.KM: What are some key takeaways regarding the role of midwifery in these settings?SB: So many of the world’s displaced people are women and children—with the majority of them experiencing some interaction with family planning, menstrual health and hygiene, domestic violence, sexual assault, pregnancy, breastfeeding or raising children, etc. Midwives are uniquely positioned to address and support most of those needs, and they’re cost-effective. A midwife’s scope of work could meet the needs of most women in these displaced settings.We are continually surprised with how little women in any place know about their own bodies. As we’ve grown as an organization, we have learned about all of the intersections we need to be educating about as well, such as sexual consent, menstrual health and hygiene, domestic violence, sexual assault, gender issues in conflict settings and others, so our work has taken on a nuanced hue. Midwives in humanitarian emergencies are unique and significant players that should be supported.KM: Could you talk a bit about the impact of your work on a global scale?SB: The biggest impact we have made on a global scale is the midwifery training work we have done in various settings, from Syria to Nigeria.Within the profession of midwifery globally, we have tried to identify and support local leaders who are trying to grow the profession. For example, we founded a program called Midwives for Peace that was a co-existence project between Israeli and Palestinian midwives, and it has been completely locally driven and locally run. We just helped to get it started. The goal of the project is to help each community support each other and fortify their profession in the context in which they work.KM: If you had an unlimited budget, how would you invest in midwifery?SB: We would double down on education. We have an online training portal, and we would make that available for free, provide scholarships for people to go to midwifery school. We have our first cohort of Nepali midwives graduating, and they’ll be the first professionally trained midwives to go back to their villages. We need more midwives trained, and then we need to support their inclusion in the health care system and work with ministries of health and governments to understand their strength, utility and impact. More local investment in local women.—Learn more about Circle of Health International.Watch a brief documentary about the work of two midwives, one Palestinian and one Israeli, whose project to raise awareness about the importance of skin-to-skin contact between mothers and newborns is an inspiring story of coexistence.—What is your perspective on the role of midwifery in crisis settings? We’d love to hear from you!Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More

Trudeau is just the worst Manitoba teacher investigated for insulting PM

first_imgThe Canadian Press MIAMI, Man. — A rural Manitoba school division says it is investigating after a gym teacher posted a photo to Facebook showing him holding a sign insulting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.The photo was taken after an event attended by Conservative MP Candice Bergen at the kindergarten to Grade 12 school in Miami, Man.In an interview with CTV Winnipeg, physical education teacher Brent Unrau says he asked for a photo with Bergen and in it, the two hold signs that together read: “Trudeau is just the worst.”Unrau says in hindsight he should not have posted the photo and he removed it from social media three hours later.He says he doesn’t consider himself political and he was not trying to push a political agenda on any students.The Prairie Rose School Division says it is investigating the posting.“This interaction occurred after the planned events and was an unscheduled meeting/interaction,” reads a statement from the division. “The posting does not reflect the views of the division and the division does not condone this type of political partisanship.”Bergen also posted the photo to her Instagram and detailed what happened.In the post, the MP says a “constituent” asked her to hold a sign with his feelings about Trudeau and that she agreed because “a lot of people feel the same way you do Brent!”Bergen’s Instagram post has since been deleted.Area residents are split on the matter.Tina Waldner, whose children all go to Miami School, says that while the post surprised her, she found it funny.“I kind of chuckled at first. I mean a lot of us maybe carry the same opinion. It was just pretty bold,” Waldner says.But Kerri Wiebe, who attended Miami School growing up, reached out to the school division after seeing the post. She says a teacher should be non-partisan and should not endorse any political candidate on school grounds.“As an MP she should be setting an example for children, and doing this childish name calling in a school — she should have known better,” Wiebe says.Miami is about 115 kilometres southwest of Winnipeg. (CTV Winnipeg)last_img read more

Read More

Winnipeg woman finds help at dropin centre after fire leaves her homeless

first_imgShaneen Robinson- Desjarlais APTN National NewsJess Mentuck had nowhere to go and found herself on the streets of Winnipeg.Going from shelter to shelter after a fire in her apartment complex a few months ago.Then Mentuck finally caught a break – at a drop-in centre.last_img

Read More

Baseball Full circle for Nanci Coolen on Ohio State Senior Day

Bo Coolen (center) walks with his mom Nanci (right), sister Demi (left) and father (back) to be honored before the start of Ohio State’s game against Purdue on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Nanci brought lei for all the moms of graduating seniors, all the players, coaches and coaches’ wives. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Editor-in-ChiefThere seemed to be only one way to truly send out the seniors on Ohio State’s baseball team.Give everyone a lei.At least, that’s what Nanci Coolen thought. The mother of senior first baseman Bo Coolen thought the best way to honor her son would be to bring some of his home state culture up to him. She said lei are given out for everything just like “giving a birthday card for a birthday gift” for everything from weddings, retirements, birthdays or graduations.She had to order them all only a couple days in advance because as real lei, made from purple orchid, they would wilt after too long.So she bought 30 lei and had them all shipped to Columbus. A lei for each player, mother, coach and coach’s wife. It wasn’t enough just to have one for the players and coaches. After all, it wasn’t just Senior Day for Ohio State. It was Mother’s Day.“Oh it’s perfect,” Demi Coolen, Nanci’s daughter said. “Two birds, one stone, our whole family gets to be together and celebrate both of their days.”Ohio State made sure to celebrate both days in style, sending Bo and his family out happy with a dominant 16-6 win against Purdue to give the Buckeyes the series victory and clinch a spot in the Big Ten tournament.It’s a particularly special day for the whole family. Nanci, a P.E. and health teacher at Punahou School, has been in Columbus since March — she’s lived in a pair of AirBnBs during her three-month stay — finishing up work on a sabbatical while Bo plays for Ohio State. Bob, her husband, has been back in Honolulu, Hawaii, coaching the Hawaii softball team and Demi has been working as an engineer for Boeing.It’s the first time the whole family has been together since Christmas.“It’s just great because we don’t always get to be together,” Nanci said. “But for that to happen on Mother’s Day in Columbus, to culminate, the whole thing is amazing. And then we’re actually going after the game to Eddie George’s [Grille] because that’s where they took him on his recruiting trips, so full circle and we haven’t been yet.”Nanci Coolen and her daughter Demi cheer on Nanci’s son, senior first baseman Bo Coolen, as he bats during the third inning of Ohio State’s game against Purdue on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Editor-in-Chief——“Let’s get a hit here, Bo-Bo!” Nanci screams from her picnic table down the third base-line as her son steps into the batter’s box in the third inning of Sunday’s game, her last chance to watch her son play at Bill Davis Stadium.This isn’t something unusual for Bo, a role player with a .209 batting average in 29 games, and he said he’s gotten used to it. In fact, he welcomes it. She was only able to attend two of his games during his first year at Ohio State in 2017 after he transferred from Cypress College. He said after a year watching the other players greet their mothers down the sideline after the games ended, it was a comforting feeling to have her there because “I got to go hug someone.”She did not always welcome him with hugs though. Other times, he was met with critiques. After starting Wednesday against Campbell, Coolen came away hitless with an 0-for-3 night. As he was leaving with senior designated hitter and fellow Cypress College transfer Noah McGowan, Bo said his mother had some things to say. She questioned why he took so many pitches during his at-bats.“Mom, it was a good pitch, I don’t know what you want me to do,” Bo recalled saying. “Well, I want you swinging at everything whether it’s a strike or not,” she responded. Since then, Bo said he has taken a much more aggressive approach to the plate.Senior first baseman Bo Coolen takes a swing at a pitch during the third inning of Ohio State’s game against Purdue on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Editor-in-ChiefAs a coach’s wife and former softball player, Nanci is no stranger to providing this type of feedback. Bob said she is often hanging around the Hawaii softball team, not just providing them with someone to talk with for life advice, but someone to talk with about the game. Bob said she has helped inspire in his players a mental toughness that he often has trouble relaying.“She becomes not a mother-figure, but a real figure for the young ladies that I have that they can talk to her and she’s so chipper and cheery and positive and it just was tough not having her around for my whole season,” Bob said. “She was there in Vegas when we played and we did well, we ended up going 5-2 and then after that it went all downhill.”——Moving to Columbus from Hawaii in March, Nanci had a bit of an adjustment period.March in Hawaii is warm weather. Surely, Columbus couldn’t be too much worse, right?So Nanci came without any big jackets, assuming that whatever cold she might be initially greeted with would change before too long.It did not. Bo had warned her. “Mom, the heavier the better,” he remembered telling her. Without any winter clothing, Nanci was forced to borrow some of Bo’s until eventually she went with him to buy  “some puffy coats” and “some real winter boots,” Bo said.But the one thing Nanci enjoyed about the weather that she hadn’t seen much in Hawaii was a real change of season. The transition from the winter to the spring was fun to watch, she said.“I saw the leaves come up and the green and all of that,” Nanci said. “It’s just been fabulous.”Still, Nanci has tried to go out and enjoy all the city has to offer. And that “big-city element” was one of the biggest reasons Bo wanted to come to Ohio State. She said he never wanted to go to a small school. He wanted to go to a big school that had a football team and where he could really enjoy the college experience.He didn’t get that in his first year at Pepperdine, so his mom advised him to go to junior college and try for a bigger school. That sophomore year when he was being recruited by other schools, Bo received offers from plenty of smaller schools. She said he continued to put off his decision until eventually Ohio State sent an offer his way.She remembers him saying that it was his “perfect dream school.”But for the family, it meant Bo would be much farther away from home. This was sort of the expectation, Nanci said. Most kids from Hawaii leave for the mainland at some point. She had already gone through it once with Demi leaving for the University of Southern California and Bo had already spent two years on the mainland.This would be the furthest from home he had been, however. Bo said it’s a three-stop process to get to Columbus from Hawaii: fly six hours to California, another three to Chicago or Texas and then a couple more hours to Columbus. In total, Nanci said it’s about $1,000 to fly one person to and from Hawaii. One time, Nanci tried to shorten the number of stops Bo had to make on his return trip home. She had him go from Columbus to Newark, New Jersey, and then straight to Honolulu. That flight from Newark was 12 1/2 hours.“Don’t ever do that again,” Bo told his mom.——-When Senior Day finally arrived, Bo had started to catch on about his mother’s planned surprise. He had seen the package arrive earlier and remarked on its odd shape, at the time, not 100 percent sure what exactly it held. On Sunday morning, he finally saw what the mysterious package held in store: those colorful circles to celebrate his final home game at Ohio State.Nanci Coolen, senior Bo Coolen’s mother, watches her son play at first base during Ohio State’s game against Purdue on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Editor-in-Chief“As soon as I saw her holding all of them, I was like, ‘Wow’ because it felt like senior day back in Hawaii with all the leis,” Bo said.The ceremony itself was surreal, Nanci said. She had been to so many for the Hawaii softball players, so she knew what it would be like. But she couldn’t believe the one for her son had finally arrived . She couldn’t believe her son, whom she would make wear a helmet even during tee-ball, was preparing to graduate from college.Two years ago, Bo went to Eddie George’s Grille for dinner with the Ohio State coaching staff while head coach Greg Beals recruited him to transfer from junior college. He committed on the spot.Now, after Bo finished Senior Day with the win, the family will again head out to that same restaurant to celebrate Mother’s Day. Just like that day, he plans to order a buffalo chicken sandwich. He will recommend his mom do the same. It will all come full circle for Nanci. read more

Read More

Sports fashion and media giant IMG Worldwide has

first_imgSports, fashion and media giant IMG Worldwide has acquired a minority stake in LiveClips, which provides technology that enables sports viewers to watch content on multiple platforms.IMG Worldwide will be using LiveClips’ platform to create and deliver personalized game highlights to its customers.According to LiveClips, the investment will allow it to continue expanding its cloud based technological capabilities while pursuing similar partnerships with other sports broadcasters, rights holders and licensees.LiveClips works with rights owners, broadcasters and digital media publishers, capturing live, post-game and archived content, applying metadata, preparing it for digital distribution and then delivering it to multiple devices.“IMG’s investment and their decision to entrust our technology to power the delivery of personalized video content to broadcasters around the world is as good as it gets for a company like ours,” said Lewis Bakes, chairman and CEO of LiveClips. “IMG negotiates, distributes and delivers sports content to hundreds of customers around the world.Through our relationship with IMG, we have been provided a unique opportunity to capitalize on the explosive global demand for video content on smartphones, tablets, smart televisions and mobile computing devices.”last_img read more

Read More

Web Pioneer Tim BernersLee Wins Computings Highest Award

first_img 2 min read World Wide Web pioneer Tim Berners-Lee just chalked up another accolade, and it’s one of his greatest yet. The Association for Computing Machinery has given him the 2016 Turing Award, frequently considered the Nobel Prize of the computing industry. He’s receiving the award not just for inventing the basics of the web, but designing them in an elegant way. His concepts for links (URLs and URIs) were simple and easy to implement, while making HTML the heart of the web helped anyone publish info in a practical format.The award also pays tribute to Berners-Lee’s efforts in the years after getting the web off the ground. He fostered the early web by distributing open source code, and he shaped groups like the World Wide Web Consortium (the standards body), World Wide Web Foundation (promoting the web as a basic right) and Web Science Trust (which studies the web’s social effects). The web “is what it is today” because of him, according to the ACM, and he’s still involved in supporting it.The prize isn’t just about the honorifics — Google also offers $1 million. And it’s safe to say that it’s well-earned in this case. While the internet certainly existed before Berners-Lee fired up the first public web server in 1991, it wasn’t until then that it found a simple framework that could catch on with the mainstream. Modern commerce, news and politics almost certainly wouldn’t be the same without him. –shares Web Pioneer Tim Berners-Lee Wins Computing’s Highest Award Next Article April 5, 2017 Image credit: Henry Thomas/ACM via engadget Technology Add to Queue Jon Fingas Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. This story originally appeared on Engadget Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business It’s recognition for building the basics of the modern internet. Register Now »last_img read more

Read More

Most YouTube Influencers Still Dont Disclose Sponsored Deals Study Says

first_img Next Article Same goes for Pinterest influencers, according to this Princeton study. Add to Queue It’s been almost a year since the FTC warned social media influencers that they should “clearly and conspicuously [disclose]” if they’re being paid for a post or video. But according to a new Princeton University research, most YouTube and Pinterest influencers still don’t add proper disclaimers to the content they produce.The researchers analyzed over 500,000 YouTube videos and over 2.1 million unique Pinterest pins from August to September 2017 for the study. They found that 3,472 videos and 18,237 pins in the bunch had affiliate links, but only 10 and seven percent, respectively, contained written disclosures.Those that did have disclosures didn’t even follow the FTC’s guidelines, which recommend lengthier explanations than “hey, these are affiliate links.” The FTC wants influencers to be very clear in their wording: for instance, as Wired said, they can write “I make a small commission every time you purchase through these links.”According to lead author Arunesh Mathur, his study doesn’t even represent all types of undisclosed affiliate partnerships, since they didn’t take coupon codes and other linkless deals into account. That said, the researchers also didn’t take into account any disclosure YouTubers mention in the video and those written in languages other than English. Mathur, however, is “fairly confident that only a tiny fraction of content creators disclose affiliate links at places other than the description.”Advertising on social media without the proper disclosure has become a huge issue in recent years. Just take a look at celebrities’ accounts, and you’ll see them promoting products without saying whether they’re getting paid for the post. It’s not the advertisements themselves that are the problem, it’s that without the proper label, people won’t know whether influencers are simply recommending a product they like or if they’re getting paid to praise it.Instagram, YouTube and Facebook have labels influencers can use to indicate sponsorship, but they’re a bit too subtle for the FTC. Things might change as more and more social media superstars pop up. Mathur and his team, for one, believe the answer lies in browsers: they plan to develop an extension that can automatically detect and highlight affiliate marketing campaigns. Image credit: Getty via engadget Most YouTube Influencers Still Don’t Disclose Sponsored Deals, Study Says 2 min read Mariella Moon Social Media This story originally appeared on Engadget Register Now » March 28, 2018 Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. –shareslast_img read more

Read More