Rocking the Case Study

first_imgI’m a huge fan of case studies. They’re an incredible tool to showcase your nonprofit’s work, demonstrate social proof, and gain more supporters. Jay Baer’s Youtility explains the power of case studies in greater detail, but here are a few ways you can use this approach to support your fundraising and marketing efforts: 1) Get testimonials. Tell the story of why people support your organization. Ask questions such as:Why are you passionate about this issue?When did you start learning about this issue?Why do you choose to support our organization?By gathering this information, you’ll not only have endorsements for your cause, but you can also use responses to inform your marketing and donor recruitment strategies.2) Document how you spent money. Did you dedicate a large portion of funds to operational expenses? Why? What impact did it have? Once you explain that to donors, they’ll better understand how you fulfill your mission, and why it’s important to have operational expenses. Every penny of your budget doesn’t have to go to on-the-ground work, but you do have to demonstrate how operations are vital to ensuring the services you provide are making a positive change. 3) Survey those you help. Ask your constituency how they’ve found your services. Do they see your nonprofit as a vital member of their community? Would they be able to get where they are without you?If those answers affirm your work, ask respondents if you can use a quote in your case study. Most will be happy to help. In some cases, if you provide them with links and social media messages, they’ll share the study with their network, too. If the answers bring up questions or poke holes in your work, pay attention to that. That’s a great opportunity to take feedback and turn it into something positive.Have you created a case study before? What were the results? How did you share it with supporters?last_img read more

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5 Ways to Use Email to Drive Participation at Your Next Fundraiser

first_imgRunning a successful fundraising event is easier said than done.You put in weeks of planning with the ultimate goal of getting as many people as involved as possible, and you want to make sure your hard work pays off.One of the most important tools you have to promote your next fundraising event is email marketing.With email campaigns, you can reach your audience members directly and send targeted messages that build enthusiasm and provide the information they need to get involved.Here are 5 ways you can use email to drive participation at your next fundraiser:1. Save-the-dateA successful event relies on advanced planning. Once you have a date nailed down for your event, make sure you get the word out so your guests can add it to their calendars ahead of time.This initial email doesn’t have to include all the details — the point is to give some notice and get your audience excited early so you can build on that interest in the weeks ahead.If the event is open to the public, you can also post about the date on your social media accounts. Encourage your social media fans to join your mailing list so they won’t miss any future details.2. Send a formal invitationAs more of the specifics come together, you’re ready to let your contacts know all about the great things you have planned.The more personalized you can make your invitation the better. For example, if your fundraiser is an annual event, start by following up with last year’s attendees with a “Hope to see you again this year!” themed message.Or, if you’re sending the event to media contacts, consider sending them a press release rather than a general email invite. Think about how you can deliver the right message to the right people for best results.Make sure all the information is clear, concise, and easy to read from a mobile device. Your invitation should also link to a landing page for more extensive details. This landing page can be hosted on your website, or you can build one through your Constant Contact account.3. Make your emails socialEmail and social media marketing work best when they’re working together. Each email you send out should include social share buttons that make it easy for your contacts to share your email and invite others.You should also encourage your contacts to forward your email to anyone they think might be interested in attending.4. Send last-minute remindersEven if you feel like you’ve been building up your event for weeks, don’t underestimate the power of a last-minute reminder. Even an email 24-48 hours in advance can drive some last-minute registrants.Make sure you’re subject line reflects the timeliness of the message by adding the event date or a countdown.This is also a good time to remind people that there’s more than one way to support your event. You can add a line to your email like: Can’t make the event? We’ll miss you! Consider supporting our event goal by making an online donation.”Hopefully some of your audience members that have a scheduling conflict will take you up on your offer!5. Follow up after the eventDon’t let the momentum of a successful event end when the event is over. Sending a thank you email or a quick recap will extend the life of all your hard work.If you didn’t quite hit your fundraising goal, this is also a good time to encourage contacts to help you out.Try to include multimedia in this email where you can. If you took pictures during the event, link off to an album. You want your registrants to relive the good times, and motivate those who didn’t attend to make it a priority the next time around!Incorporating these 5 tips into your email marketing strategy will ensure your fundraising event generates real results.Add these ideas to your calendar when promoting your next fundraiser and see which emails receive the highest opens, clicks, and registrations for you.Have any advice we didn’t cover? Let us know how email boosts event involvement for your organization by Tweeting to us: @Network4Good and @ConstantContactlast_img read more

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What’s Missing from Your Small Nonprofit’s Fundraising Plan

first_imgThe secret to better campaign results, more engaged donors, and board buy-in is a thoughtful and clear fundraising plan. While we all know we need a plan, sometimes it’s not always easy to make time to create a realistic plan and in many cases, we may not have the information we need to make the right strategic decisions. If you’re like most small nonprofits, it’s likely that your plan is missing a critical element—clean, accurate fundraising data.Your Fundraising Plan Must Be Based on Accurate Fundraising DataHaving the right data on your campaign performance, funding sources, donor history, and giving patterns will allow you to make smarter decisions on how to spend your time and resources going forward. Why is this so important?You’ll know what’s working, and what’s not.Sounds obvious, right? But most nonprofits are surprised when they see their aggregated fundraising results and campaign data. As trends emerge, you can make better decisions on what to do more of…and what to stop doing in the coming year. You can double down on the tactics and messages that work best for your supporters.You can identify donor segments and create strategies for them.Once you understand who your new, major, recurring, lapsed, and event donors are, you can develop tailored outreach to best reach and convert them. (Just getting started with donor segmentation? We have a simple planning template that will help you maximize your communications.)You’ll have more credibility with your board.You can feel more confident presenting your plan to your board when you have the data to back it up vs. relying on a hunch or opinions. Having a data-backed plan will also help you answer questions and fend off “creative tinkering” from well-meaning board members.You’ll know what you need to spend to meet your fundraising goals.Armed with the data about your past fundraising results and donor opportunities, you can project how much you’ll need to spend (and which resources to allocate) to make the plan happen.Need some help getting a better fundraising plan in place and figuring out how to collect, compile, and understand the data you need? Check out this upcoming webinar to learn simple steps for quickly creating a solid plan that will allow you to reach your small nonprofit’s funding goals this year.Register for this webinar now and learn How to Create Your 12-Month Fundraising Plan!last_img read more

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Understanding the Flow of Reproductive Health Knowledge in Ethiopia

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 1, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)K4Health recently published a needs assessment and network mapping of family planning and reproductive health information in Ethiopia. The overall goal of the assessment was to gain a better understanding of the accessibility and flow of information relating to family planning and reproductive health among key actors in Ethiopia.In Ethiopia, K4Health sought to explore the current family planning/reproductive health (FP/RH) knowledge management system; examine information flows and barriers at different levels of the health system; and identify areas to strengthen health information sharing and use. Using a novel, participatory approach (Net-Map) yielded a highly visual presentation of the data that identifies key FP/RH actors in Ethiopia, explores the nature of relationships among the actors, and examines the level of influence of the different actors with regard to reproductive health information exchange. Using the Net-Map approach, the researchers were able to identify bottle necks to information flow and opportunities to improve that flow across health system levels in Ethiopia.This body of research aimed to determine how to better meet health care professionals’ dynamic information needs so that they can provide better health care to the populations they serve. In Ethiopia, reproductive health indicators can be improved through better health information exchange. This report provides important recommendations that can help get the right information delivered to health care professionals when they need it and can help enhance the quality of health care programs countrywide.Read the full assessment here.Share this:last_img read more

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From the Economist, Four Reasons for Progress in Bangladesh

first_imgPosted on November 16, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On November 2nd, the Economist published an article, Out of the Basket, that explores reasons for progress in a country they describe as one of the most intriguing puzzles in development: Bangladesh.From the story:City states apart, it is the world’s most densely populated country, with around 150m people crammed onto the delta of the Ganges and the Brahmaputra, an area regularly swept by devastating floods. Its private sector is weak and its government widely perceived as corrupt and dysfunctional.And yet Bangladesh has done better than most countries at improving the basic standard of living of its people. Bangladeshis can expect to live four years longer than Indians even though they are much poorer. The country has achieved some of the largest reductions in early deaths of infants, children and women in childbirth ever seen anywhere.So that is the puzzle: Bangladesh combines economic disappointment with social progress. The Economist suggests four factors to explain why.Read the full story here.For a more detailed report on development in Bangladesh from the Economist, click here.Read the accompanying editorial here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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World Health Assembly Convenes With Focus on Post-2015 Global Development Agenda

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 20, 2013March 8, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The 66th World Health Assembly convened today, May 20 with addresses and discussions focused on the post-2015 global development agenda. The Assembly runs through May 28, and will feature numerous discussions and consideration of resolutions on issues that are critical to advancing maternal health.The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) has prepared an overview of side events on reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health. Among the highlights is “Securing the future: Saving the lives of women and children,” which will focus on success stories, as well as key challenges for the United Nations Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health and Every Woman Every Child movement. It will provide an opportunity for discussion of a proposed resolution on the ‘Implementation of the recommendations of the Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children.’ Other key events include a session on promoting accountability for maternal and child health, which will provide health ministers an opportunity to share perspectives on progress and challenges for MDGs 4 and 5, and to reflect on the “unfinished business” that will require attention past the 2015 MDG deadline; and a session on the importance of human resources for health.For more on the proceedings of the World Health Assembly, including the provisional agenda and highlights of each day’s proceedings, visit the World Health Organization media center. Share this:last_img read more

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Preconception Planning, Counseling and Care (PCC) is Important for All Couples, Including Those Affected by HIV

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 21, 2013March 6, 2017By: Dr. Jean Anderson, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Jhpiego; Kelly Curran, Jhpiego, MCHIP; Laura Fitzgerald, Jhpiego, MCHIPClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Decisions about whether a woman and her partner want to have children, how many they might want to have, and when they might want to have them, are not always clear-cut or predictable. Reproductive goals are often linked to a multitude of complicated and deeply personal hopes and beliefs. For this reason, healthcare providers have a responsibility to value clients as individuals with unique sets of life circumstances and priorities. All women, and all couples, deserve to access the information they need to make safe and informed choices…regardless of geography, regardless of socio-economic status, regardless of age, regardless of marital status, and regardless of the result of an HIV test.Safe family planning (FP) as well as preconception planning, counseling, and care (PCC) are important in the continuum of care for all couples, including those affected by HIV. These critical services:Prevent unintended pregnancy;Promote appropriate birth spacing;Optimize maternal health before pregnancy and maternal and fetal health during pregnancy;Prevent maternal to child transmission of HIV; andReduce the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected partner.A considerable unmet need for FP exists for women living with HIV.  In sub-Saharan Africa, for example, between 66 and 92 percent of HIV positive women do not want more children, but only 20 to 43 percent of women use contraception (Sarnquist et al. Curr HIV Res 2013;11:160). Irrespective of this need and of the safety of most FP methods for women living with HIV, some providers limit options for these women. Research demonstrates that providers are especially hesitant to recommend long acting reversible contraception or emergency contraception in the setting of HIV.Similarly, some providers do not feel comfortable when these women and their partners want to conceive.  Too many HIV positive women are told that intended pregnancies are irresponsible. All people have the right to respectful, quality care; not only do HIV positive women share similar feelings about motherhood as other women, but in the era of antiretroviral therapy, many also experience improvements in fertility.This is not to suggest that women living with HIV are without particular healthcare needs.  For instance, women who live with HIV may be more likely to experience violence within their intimate relationships.  They are also particularly vulnerable to co-infections with tuberculosis or malaria and to suffer from anemia.  Further, many of these women – up to 50 percent in a country like Kenya – are in serodiscordant relationships, and transmission to a partner is a concern. Appropriate PCC for couples allows for optimal prevention of transmission to HIV negative partners, as well as vertical transmission to children.PCC also offers an excellent opportunity to promote healthy behaviors.  PCC presents an opportunity to counsel couples about risk mitigation, FP, healthy eating habits, psychosocial and mental health issues, and long term care plans, as well as to address care and treatment of HIV and related issues.  Additionally, through PCC, underlying medical conditions – such as tuberculosis, other opportunistic infections, or other chronic conditions such as hypertension or diabetes – can be identified and treated, optimizing maternal health and pregnancy outcomes.Recent years have witnessed great strides in HIV prevention, care, and treatment.  People living with HIV enjoy longer and healthier lives. As a public health community, there is a pressing need to look beyond a narrow biomedical treatment lens, and to acknowledge clients’ fundamental life goals. Do couples want to postpone pregnancy to attain other educational, professional, or relational goals?  Do they want to conceive now, a year from now, five years from now, or not at all?  It is time to better understand how to integrate FP and PCC services into HIV care, and to look closely at their effectiveness in achieving better outcomes for women and their families.This post is part of a blog series on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS. To view the entire series, click here.For additional information about maternal health, HIV, and AIDS, visit our topic page. Share this:last_img read more

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mHealth for Maternal Health: Digital Health Solutions Addressing Rising Tide of Diabetes in Pregnancy

first_imgPosted on April 4, 2014August 18, 2017By: Dr. Jane Hirst, Nuffield Medical Fellow, University of OxfordClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes rise around the world, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is becoming increasingly common. GDM is a condition where blood glucose levels in pregnancy are too high, which has potentially serious consequences for both mother and baby, most commonly with the baby growing too large resulting in birth trauma. Keeping maternal blood glucose levels within the normal range can largely prevent complications of GDM. This is achieved through diet and exercise, often requiring the addition of medications such as insulin or metformin. More women with GDM has led to increasingly overcrowded outpatient clinics, with many women coming only for review of their blood glucose results.GDm-Health is an interactive remote blood glucose monitoring system developed in response to increasing numbers of women with GDM in the UK. The aim was to develop a digital solution to help women better monitor and control their blood glucose levels at home with less frequent outpatient appointments. The technology uses a Bluetooth enabled blood glucose meter to automatically transmit readings to a smartphone application and secure website. A midwife then reviews the results and can contact the women via SMS or phone call if any changes are required.Preliminary results from a service development cohort of 50 women were extremely encouraging. Women found the system convenient to use, appreciating the extra support from the health care team without the need for long waits in the outpatient department. For the success of any mHealth application, It is vital that users be involved at all stages in the development process. An example of this from our initiative was modification of the technology to improve bilateral communication with the introduction of a function for patients to signal to the midwife that they would like a phone call. Seemingly small additions like this can help improve compliance.A randomized controlled trial evaluating whether the system can actually improve clinical outcomes with the system is currently underway. If we can demonstrate that this technology can improve clinical outcomes as well as patient satisfaction, the next challenge will be effective scale up, both within the UK and abroad.While the uptake of smartphones isn’t a challenge to scale-up in our case given the setting, scaling faces several other challenges. Firstly, the security and confidentiality of the patient’s data must be paramount. Currently all information is hosted on a secure NHS server, however if the system were to be used elsewhere this would have to be negotiated. The second major consideration is the ongoing costs of the system. Blood glucose test strips compatible with the system are expensive, limiting enthusiasm for uptake. Additionally, the cost of data transmission via 3G networks must also be considered.And yet the key rate-limiting step to scale-up in many settings is likely to be gaining support of the health professionals required for the system to work. A phone itself does not save lives. It is the people using it and their experience and ability to effectively communicate advice through the technology.It is hoped that working with hospitals in our region, industry partners and learning from experiences abroad these issues will be able to be overcome and outcomes for women with GDM improved.Do you have an opinion on the role mHealth can play to improve maternal health? What do you see as the biggest advantages of mHealth? The limitations? If you are interested in submitting a blog post for our ongoing guest blog series on mHealth for Maternal Health, please email MHTF Research Assistant Yogeeta Manglani at ymm108@mail.harvard.edu.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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3 Ways Real People Can Bring Your Annual Report to Life

first_img “As a kid growing up, my opportunities were limited when it came to being able to go somewhere like the YMCA. As a YMCA employee for 23 years, I have seen benefits from the dollars United Way has provided for children’s programs. Now it’s like I’m on the outside looking in, seeing how awesome it is for these kids to have this kind of childhood experience. I have always been interested in kids, and 20 years ago, United Way was the organization I felt strongly about in being secure and taking action to create change.‘ I know I can count on United Way, and that the money is going to the agencies and not being spent frivolously. I have seen firsthand what United Way dollars have done to our community and feel they make a huge impact. If you build a strong community, then you have a better place to live. ”                              —Beth Alban, Donor since 1989, United Way of Greater Stark County “PATH accelerated the delivery of a vaccine against deadly Japanese encephalitis in Laos and Cambodia, and our vaccine technologies helped ensure the vaccine’s safe arrival in each community.” Type #2: Donor StoriesDonor stories engage supporters because they’re about people like them. These stories convey the subliminal feel-good message “people like me do are making a difference,” which motivates donors to stay close and give again.These stories are much more impactful than names on a donor list, but not enough organizations use them to model great giving.  Get inspired by this compelling donor story from the St. Elizabeth Hospital Foundation. I think you’ll see what I mean: Type #3: Beneficiary and Donor Testimonials Annual report content doesn’t get better than this! Beth’s testimonial works so well because it’s specificity brings her relationship with the United Way to life.Caveat: The most powerful testimonials aren’t about your organization, they’re about how someone like your donor has benefited being involved with your organization.If you’re not already banking stories and testimonials, now’s the time to get started. They’ll transform your annual report…and your donors’ response to it!P.S. Still putting your annual report plans into place? Check out this post to get off on the right foot: 2 Ways to Transform Your Annual Report from Dull to Dynamiccenter_img On the other hand, looking ahead stories demonstrate your organization’s potential impact. Piggyback on impact to date to give your donors a preview of what’s to come in the next year  (more of the same good work and success) thanks to their support. Here’s a great example from EcoJustice: Never underestimate the power of someone’s words in an annual report. To make the most of testimonials, include as much personal information as you can to bring them to life. The United Way of Greater Stark County does in this powerful testimonial: How Unforgettable Stories Motivate Giving & Keep Donors CloseWith budget and staffing challenges touching us all in some way, it’s hard not to evaluate how much time and money go into your annual report.I encourage you to consider this advice from master fundraiser Tom Ahern: “Think of your annual report as a once-a-year golden opportunity to deeply connect with your customers’ (e.g., donors’) feelings, dreams, aspirations, hidden and sometimes even embarrassing needs—like the need to be liked; or the need to do something good in the world, a need as common as the air in our lungs.”An annual  report that conveys your organization’s impact in a vibrant and memorable way fulfills your donors’ needs. It keeps them close and engaged. And engagement is the most reliable path there is to donor retention.So, what does this have to do with people’s stories? Rich, personal stories help fulfill your donors’ needs. They let them touch and see the good work they’re funding. Simply put, these stories (paired with vibrant photos, of course) are real, moving, and memorable.Below are the three key story types for annual reports.No single story type works for every donor. You may want to use your donor management database to segment donors by giving history and interests to get a clear sense of which stories will be most relevant for your primary annual report audiences.Type #1: Beneficiary Stories (a.k.a. success stories)I like to categorize success stories into two groups: retrospective stories and looking ahead stories. Retrospective stories show your impact to date and build credibility for your organization.These “our work in action” stories directly connect donors with the change they’ve generated. Be explicit! Link successes with your donors’ support. Give them the credit they deserve. Consider this example from PATH:last_img read more

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Increase Donor Loyalty with 5 Best Practices

first_imgWhat motivates donors to continue giving to an organization? Traditionally, research that’s focused on charitable giving has looked at how to motivate donors to give an initial gift. But are you doing everything you can to increase donor loyalty? After all, fundraising pros know that donor retention is the golden ticket. Apply these five best practices to your fundraising work and turn one-time donors into loyal, ongoing supporters.1) Build an Emotional ConnectionCompanies that optimize the emotional connection between their brand and their customers outperform competitors by 26 percent in gross margin and 85 percent in sales growth. Customers who feel emotionally connected to a brand are:At least three times more likely to recommendThree times more likely to re-purchaseEmotional connections are even more necessary in the nonprofit realm. A logical connection isn’t enough to go the distance. Emotional connections influence both the length and frequency of a donor’s engagement with your organization.2) Get FeedbackConsumer brands use post-interaction surveys to gather insightful feedback from customers. Set up your survey to ask any question you’d like to know the answer to. They can be especially helpful to nonprofits for gathering feedback on the online donation experience, for asking opinions on various issues, and for collecting ideas to improve the donor experience.3) Practice Social Listening and EngagementSurveys aren’t the only way to listen to your donors. Smart brands use social media to learn about their consumers. Engage with your supporters by responding to questions and sharing relevant information. Nonprofits can gain the same benefits by paying attention to what people are saying on both their organization’s social pages and individuals’ social pages. And they can build a relationship by responding in relevant, meaningful ways.4) Focus on the IndividualTo generate loyalty, you have to focus on each person as an individual. Consumers are used to getting customized communications that are personalized. Similarly, donors expect nonprofits to leverage what the organization knows about them to make their experience the best it can be. For example, find out what types of causes they support and share related programs they may be interested in. Learn how they prefer to give—whether via email, text, social media, or snail mail—and make the process easy for them. Find out when they like to give and time your requests appropriately.5) Show That You Appreciate ThemBrands often have customer appreciation events that are designed specifically to show customers that they’re valued. Appreciation doesn’t have to come in the form of a big event, however. Nonprofits can show appreciation to donors via letters, personalized videos, photo galleries of the project the donor has given to, etc.Ultimately, it comes back to building the relationship with your donors. They want to feel that they’re a valued part of the work that your organization does. They want to feel connected. As you focus on seeing your donors as individuals, you’ll be able to craft a donor experience program that results in loyal supporters.Learn why the donor experience is vital to a successful organization and how to implement an effective donor experience program by downloading “A Better Donor Experience: Is it the Cornerstone of Donor Loyalty?”last_img read more

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Save the Children Publishes 16th State of the World’s Mothers Report

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 6, 2015December 3, 2015Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Yesterday, Save the Children released the State of the World’s Mothers 2015 report, which focuses on the disadvantages of being poor in an urban setting.This report presents the latest and most extensive analysis to date of health disparities between rich and poor in cities. It finds that in most developing countries, the poorest urban children are at least twice as likely to die as the richest urban children. In some countries, they are 3 to 5 – or even more – times as likely to die.Read the full report here >>Share this:last_img read more

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Uganda Policy Makes Protecting Pregnant Mothers From Malaria a National Priority

first_imgPosted on April 23, 2015June 12, 2017By: Allen Namagembe, Research Coordinator, PATH Uganda OfficeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we gear up to celebrate World Malaria Day this Saturday, April 25th, we’ll be featuring posts that highlight work currently happening to protect women and their babies from malaria in pregnancy.Rachel Jocb, 28, who is pregnant with her second child, attends an antenatal clinic at the Kuje Primary Health Care Center. Photo: Evelyn Hockstein/PATHFor any expecting mother there are many things to worry about – from ensuring her growing baby’s health to making preparations to welcome him or her into the world. Imagine if one of those concerns was malaria. For the 1.6 million Ugandan women who live in areas where malaria is endemic, contracting malaria while pregnant is a dangerous reality.Malaria in pregnancy, or MiP, significantly increases the risk of serious health issues for both mother and baby, including maternal anemia, miscarriage, stillbirth, prematurity and low birth weight. Since 2001, the government of Uganda has been making strides to include malaria prevention for pregnant women in their health policies. In fact, they integrated a MiP policy into national malaria guidelines in 2011. However, the policies were loosely coordinated, not fully implemented and did not reflect the World Health Organization’s (WHO) 2014 revised recommendations for preventing MiP with a package of key supplies and interventions.One of the WHO-recommended supplies is a simple, cost-effective antimalarial drug called sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine that is used for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy, or IPTp-SP. In Uganda—even though 90 percent of pregnant women receive antenatal care—40 percent of those women do not receive this preventive treatment at the recommended level. WHO’s new guidelines increased the recommended preventive drug’s dosage for pregnant women from three doses to seven, creating an even wider gap in protection for expecting Ugandan mothers.A group of advocates, led by PATH and including WHO, Jhpiego, CHAI, and the President’s Malaria Initiative, knew that if Uganda’s MiP policy could be better coordinated and updated to align with global standards, it could help reduce malaria rates among pregnant women.The advocates sought to achieve these system improvements in three stages:Research and map MiP policies and responsibilities across government programs and departments to identify policy obstacles or gaps and identify key decision-makers and influencersForm an Action Group to develop a shared vision for MiP prevention across multiple governmental departments and define roles for MiP work within the Ministry of HealthConvene the government’s existing Maternal and Child Cluster working group to draft an addendum that would align Uganda’s policies across government ministries and update the recommended IPTp-SP dosage to match global recommendationsThe result of this advocacy work was a health triumph. The Ugandan government adopted this important addendum as national policy early this year. The advocates played a critical role by speeding up an otherwise lengthy process through active coordination and compiling and sharing evidence to convince policymakers that an innovative preventive treatment would improve health outcomes.The policy adoption makes MiP prevention a national priority and will ultimately help remove the burden of malaria among expecting mothers in Uganda.No woman should have to worry about malaria during pregnancy. Thanks to the Ugandan government, strong advocates and a simple drug with a complex name, Uganda is now on track to making that vision a reality.Learn more about PATH’s MiP advocacy efforts in Uganda here. For information about PATH’s advocacy capacity support, please visit sites.path.org/advocacyimpact.This post is part of the blog series “Increasing access to maternal and reproductive health supplies: Leveraging lessons learned in preventing maternal mortality,” hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition/Maternal Health Supplies Caucus, Family Care International and the USAID-Accelovate program at Jhpiego which discusses the importance and methods of reaching women with lifesaving reproductive and maternal health supplies in the context of the proposed new global target of fewer than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 births by 2030. To contribute a post, contact Katie Millar.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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21 New Positions in Maternal Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: AsiaCommunications Lead, India Country Program: PATH; New Delhi, IndiaResearch, Monitoring and Evaluation Manager: Abt Associates; NepalSustaining Health Outcomes through the Private Sector Plus (SHOPS Plus) Project India State Manager: Abt Associates; IndiaNorth AmericaDirector of Advocacy and Programs: The White Ribbon Alliance; Washington, D.C.International Communications Manager: Guttmacher Institute; New York NYKnowledge Management and Communications Intern: CORE Group; Washington, D.C.Knowledge Management and Learning Intern: EngenderHealth; New York, NYMalaria Team Leader – Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP): Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Principal Associate / Maternal, Newborn/Neonatal and Child Health Strategic Lead: Abt Associates; Bethesda, MDProgram Officer – Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program: Columbia University; New York, NY (Job Requisition Number 085732)Senior Advisor, Knowledge Management and Learning: FHI 360; Washington, D.C.Senior Digital Health Advisor – Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP): Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Senior Program Officer: CARE; Atlanta, GASocial and Behavior Change Working Group Internship: CORE Group; Washington, D.C.Technical Advisor II, Knowledge Management and Learning: FHI 360; Washington, D.C. (and West Africa)Technical Advisor for Child Health (Case Management Focus): CAMRIS International; Bethesda, MD Posted on January 6, 2017May 19, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child or adolescent health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaChief Innovation Officer: Jacaranda Health; Nairobi, KenyaChild and Newborn Health Senior Specialist: Management Sciences for Health; Nakuru, KenyaEvidence Advisor for E4A: MamaYe; NigeriaHuman Resources for Health (HRH) Management Senior Advisor: Management Sciences for Health; Baringo, KenyaProject Manager, Fistula Care Plus: EngenderHealth; Nigeriacenter_img —Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.Share this:last_img read more

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Winnipeg woman finds help at dropin centre after fire leaves her homeless

first_imgShaneen Robinson- Desjarlais APTN National NewsJess Mentuck had nowhere to go and found herself on the streets of Winnipeg.Going from shelter to shelter after a fire in her apartment complex a few months ago.Then Mentuck finally caught a break – at a drop-in centre.last_img

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TIM wins 5G licenses in Italy

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Italy’s TIM telecommunication company on Tuesday was awarded new national broadcast licenses for 5G frequencies for a total of 1.73 million euros ($1.99 million), the company said. Citation: TIM wins 5G licenses in Italy (2018, October 2) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-tim-5g-italy.html The company successfully bid for an 80MHz block of 3700 MHz (at a cost of 1.69 million euros) and a 200MHz block of 26 GHz (at a cost of 33 million euros), it said in a statement.The bids were in addition to the two blocks of 700 MHz it had already won. The frequencies will be available until 2037.”By securing all three band frequencies put on auction, TIM strengthens its network leadership in Italy,” TIM’s Chief Executive Officer Amos Genish was quoted as saying.”The 5G tests initiated in recent years by TIM are a unique case in Italy, which have already brought about tangible results,” he said.TIM said it will make immediate use of the higher frequency 5G blocks to leverage the testing already underway in Turin, Bari and Matera and in the Republic of San Marino.center_img © 2018 AFP TIM successfully bid for an 80MHz block of 3700 MHz (at a cost of 1.69 million euros) and a 200MHz block of 26 GHz (at a cost of 33 million euros) France launches 4G mobile license auctionlast_img read more

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