Nimba Bar Against Call for Justice Ja’neh’s Impeachment

first_imgThe embattled Associate Justice, Kabineh Ja’nehSays it is political and without proofThe leadership of the Nimba County Bar Association has taken serious exception to the planned impeachment of Justice Kabineh Ja’neh by the House of Representative.The president of the Bar, Cllr. Roland Dahn, who spoke at the program marking the retirement of Judge Emery S. Paye recently in Sanniquellie on July 20, said there is no evidence that shows Justice Ja’neh has done any wrong in order to be impeached.“Nimba County Bar does not endorse the decision initiated by certain people in the legislature, because the law is clear on how justice is dispensed,” Dahn said.“You can only remove justices or judges on proof of misconduct, reasonable charges and other behavior that are clearly prohibited by the Liberian Constitution,” he explained.The Bar also acknowledges that the authority of the legislature to impeach a justice of the Supreme Court should be in pursuance of Article 71 of the Constitution; but the Nimba Bar said it is not aware that Justice Ja’neh has committed any act(s) as prohibited by Article 71 of the Constitution to warrant his impeachment.According to Article 71, “a justice can only be impeached for proven misconduct, gross breach of duty, inability to perform the functions of his/her office or conviction in a court of law for treason, bribery or other infamous crimes.”The Nimba Bar furthered that advocates for Justice Ja’neh’s impeachment have not identified any act done by the learned jurist that could form a basis for any person of sound mind and good judgment to engage in such an advocacy.Accordingly, the Bar regards the call for Justice Ja’neh’s impeachment as a mere false alarm to the public, an unnecessary and misguided attempt to distract the attention of the learned jurist from the performance of his sacred duty of dispensing justice.The leadership of Nimba Bar is the second largest legal association in the country, with over 100 legal practitioners in Montserrado County.“We are of the strongest conviction that there is not a scintilla of evidence  to show that Justice Ja’neh has in any way breached Article 71 of Liberia’s Constitution to be impeached,” an embittered Cllr. Dahn maintained.The Bar has, therefore, called on all elected officials to be careful, thoughtful and confine themselves to the Constitution of Liberia in what they say or do at all times, to protect and preserve the dignity of their offices, and sustain peace and harmony among the citizens.“While we the Nimba Bar respect the views and rights of all Liberians to speak freely about all government functionaries, we denounce, deprecate, deplore and condemn statements that are emotional, malicious, reckless and without any regard for truth and outside the ambit of the law,” said the Bar in its statement released to the press at the end of the ceremony.“Nimba Bar urges all those in authority, especially those in elected positions, to speak the truth and uphold the law at all times,” the statement  said.Meanwhile, Cllr. Dahn said he observed that the decision calling for Ja’neh’s impeachment has an Executive backing, “and so I consider the action as a complete harassment against the judiciary.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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With New Climate Plans, Adaptation Is No Longer an Overlooked Issue

first_imgAs the Paris COP approaches, national climate action plans—known as Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs)— and their associated emissions reductions have captured headlines. Less attention has been paid to the important fact that 121 countries – 86 percent of those who submitted INDCs — also include an adaptation component in their plans.  These components outline goals, activities and needs for countries to cope with increased drought, stronger storms, sea level rise and other consequences of a warming planet. Including adaptation in INDCs was optional, and the fact that almost all countries did so reflects the growing importance that nations—especially developing nations—are placing on adaptation as part of their response to climate change. As adaptation rises on the global agenda, the adaptation content of INDCs provides insight into issues that are likely to be key in finalizing and implementing the Paris agreement. Here are a few adaptation trends we’ve noticed in analyzing countries’ INDCs:Click to enlarge Articulating National Adaptation Goals in INDCsMost INDC adaptation components include a clear set of adaptation goals, though those goals take many different forms.  We identified three ways that countries frame their adaptation goals:Outcomes:  These goals articulate a particular adaptation outcome that a country aims to achieve.  These goals are the most likely to be quantitative, such as Mexico’s ambitious goal to achieve 0 percent deforestation by 2030, conserving the biodiversity and ecosystem services that are central to the country’s adaptation strategy.Processes:  Adaptation to climate change will require an ongoing, iterative process over a span of decades.  Many countries’ INDCs created goals to set in motion or complete particular elements of this long-term process. This was the most common type of adaptation goal we found in our review.  For example, Gambia intends to mainstream climate change adaptation into national development frameworks, such as its Program for Accelerated Growth and Employment and sectoral policies in agriculture, forests and fisheries. Vision Statements:  Some INDCs articulate an overarching vision for adaptation in their country, either in combination with outcome and process goals, or in lieu of them. For example, Seychelles aims “to minimize the impacts of climate change through concerted and proactive action at all levels of society.”The diversity of adaptation goals in the INDCs reflects the fact that adaptation needs, priorities and activities vary greatly from country to country.  This means the Paris agreement needs to promote flexibility and country-driven approaches in how and what countries commit to do on adaptation. Drawing Adaptation Priorities from National Planning and PolicyFor many countries, the impacts of climate change touch on all aspects of the economy, ranging from infrastructure to ecosystems to tourism. Many INDCs reflect this reality in long lists of sectoral activities needed for adaptation. Most commonly cited activities are in water, agriculture and human health.Given this need to work across sectors, plus the short timeframe for preparing INDCs, few countries have truly used the INDCs to plan for adaptation.  Rather, the INDCs mainly synthesize and communicate adaptation activities identified and planned for in other national policies, plans or strategies—such as National Adaptation Programs of Action (NAPAs), national development plans or sectoral plans.  For example, Ethiopia draws heavily on its Growth and Transformation Plan and the Ethiopian Programme of Adaptation to Climate Change.  The Philippinesdraws on several national strategies and plans, including its National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan.Going into COP21, it is important to recognize the INDC adaptation component as a communications document instead of a plan because of the concerns expressed by developing countries that the Paris agreement might create onerous planning and reporting burdens. Experience with the INDCs suggests that communicating about adaptation actions and plans doesn’t need to be burdensome, and many countries can relatively quickly synthesize existing adaptation activities, plans and priorities into a short “snapshot.”Linking Adaptation to Capacity, Technology and FinanceThe adaptation components in most INDCs are valuable because they clearly identify existing gaps, barriers and resource needs that must be addressed to foster effective action. In some cases, countries go so far as to estimate the costs of adaptation and the likely economic impact of climate change absent adaptation. For example, South Africa’s INDC places the cost of its adaptation planning process at $170 million per year, and estimates costs of adaptation action for the post-2020 period under two specific mitigation scenarios. As with mitigation, some INDCs indicate adaptation actions they can undertake with their own resources, and specify others for which they will require international support. For example, Central African Republic’s INDC includes a table of prospective adaptation measures, alongside the amount of funding they can cover from their own resources and the amount that will be required from international sources for full implementation.INDCs Are a Roadmap for Global Adaptation Action and SupportCollectively, the adaptation content of INDCs begins to form a roadmap for the ways in which global cooperative efforts can most effectively and efficiently support and enhance adaptation action over time. Synthesizing this nationally determined information can help to identify global priorities and guide adaptation investment.By building on the INDCs, the global community has the opportunity to create an iterative process—some call it a “cycle of improvement” for adaptation—through which periodic national adaptation communications can collectively inform decisions about ongoing international support.  This process of communicating national efforts followed by new commitments for supporting adaptation action moving forward will need to be a central element of the Paris negotiations.last_img read more

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Armed robbery on UM campus sparks police search

first_imgCORAL GABLES, FLA. (WSVN) – Police are actively searching for at least two suspects involved in an armed robbery of a woman on the University of Miami’s campus, Tuesday.Police said the victim, in her 40s, was approached from behind by a hooded man and put in a chokehold by the Watsco Center, near Dauer Drive and Ponce De Leon Boulevard.“Two individuals, we believe,” said Coral Gables Police Chief Edward Hudak. “One individual got out and approached a woman from behind, put her in a chokehold and removed some property from her purse.”Police believe it was two people who worked together to snatch the victim’s phone and rings, then took off running south, down Ponce De Leon Boulevard.“This is alarming and myself, I run here early mornings at about 4:30 in the morning, down the same path, so I’m gonna keep my eyes peeled,” said Isabelle Yaniz, who lives nearby.Many UM students heard about the incident as they prepare for the fall semester. “I feel pretty safe around here, of course not after dark,” said UM student Nadia Naany.According to authorities, although the robbery happened on UM’s campus, the woman was not a student. “The incident occurred on UM campus,” said Hudak. “We know from the video surveillance that the vehicles and the subject left the campus. The campus is safe.”UM student Robbie Silverberg admits that late night walking isn’t the safest. “Walking late at night sometimes can be a bit scary,” he said.Naany said that although walking at night can be intimidating, help isn’t far away. “There’s the UM police around here that surrounds the area most of the time,” she said, “and whenever there’s something wrong, we can just call them. There’s escorts also in the campus.”Police said the suspects were wearing black sweatpants and gray hoodies, and were seen leaving campus in a black Nissan with tinted windows.Officers later stopped a vehicle that fit that description and made two arrests. However, those two individuals were detained for unrelated crimes. “We identified and ruled out these two individuals as part of that robbery,” said Hudak. “However, there are other incentives that were involved in the stop that’s gonna lead probably to an arrest on subsequent charges but not related to the robbery.”If you have any information on this robbery, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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