Track and compare year-end giving

first_imgNetwork for Good is once again providing year-end giving data for The Chronicle of Philanthropy’s 2013 Year-End Online Giving Tracker. You can use this resource to see how online giving is stacking up each day of December and to compare those numbers with the last few years. To supply the data for the tracker, we looked at a set of 14,300 charities who received donations through Network for Good’s online giving platform. You can view this data by month, by week, or look at the entire span of information from November 1st through the end of the year. Check it out by visiting The Chronicle’s site, and let us know how the trends compare to your own year-end fundraising results.last_img

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#GivingTuesday Success with a Staff of One: Q&A with CASS

first_imgWhat surprised you the most about #GivingTuesday? Because I experience and witness street harassment in Washington, DC, I can see the immediate importance of CASS’ mission. CASS mobilizes the community, through online and offline activism, to end public sexual harassment and assault in the DC metropolitan area. The campaign caught my eye and I was inspired to donate to it on #GivingTuesday. After I became a donor, I was delighted to receive some of the best post-donation communication ever! CASS has become one of my favorite nonprofit customers that we serve in DC. Thank you, Zosia, for sharing these details with us! If you want to put on a great #GivingTuesday campaign in 2015, we can help. Sign up to get Network for Good’s #GivingTuesday resources sent directly to your inbox. ZS: We started reaching out to donors four weeks in advance with soft touches via email. A week or two before, we gave all of them a call and asked folks to pledge. During the campaign, we reached out via email and social media. Afterward, everyone who donated received a special thank you email and a handwritten card. Zosia Sztykowski: We set a very ambitious goal for our end-of year-campaign—triple what we had done in the previous year—and based on our experience, we knew we’d have to get a strong start on #GivingTuesday for that to work. #GivingTuesday and New Year’s Eve are always the best giving days for us. Last year, Network for Good customer Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS) had a great #GivingTuesday campaign and won our prize for Best Social Campaign. The organization raised more than $17,000, came in fourth on our leaderboard for number of donors, and exceeded its original goal by 43%. ZS: We’re planning to reach out to more big donors way in advance to build a lot of momentum for #GivingTuesday. ZS: Yup, just one—me! Needless to say, I had some pretty serious tunnel vision going in late November/early December. But our volunteers are one of our strongest assets. They get the word out and solicit people in their networks. Every time we run a campaign like this, we don’t just reach multiples of our dollar goal, we also multiply the length our donor list, and I think this is directly attributable to our grassroots strategy. If a volunteer team is well organized and engaged—trained, prepared with all the materials they need, and knowledgeable about the organization and its fiscal needs—then they will follow through. Better yet, they’ll make it fun. It’s really about starting a conversation with volunteers that continues throughout the process. Because CASS had such great success on #GivingTuesday 2014, I wanted to do a Q&A with Zosia Sztykowski, the nonprofit’s executive director, to find out how they put together an amazing campaign with just one paid staff member.center_img How did you plan and set goals? ZS: Plan, plan, plan. Read about others’ successful strategies. Get your emails and your social media materials ready well in advance. Know that you’ll need all hands on deck on #GivingTuesday. Have a schedule—but be prepared to throw it out the window if you come up with a better idea at the last minute. How did you manage it all with very few paid staff members? CASS only has one paid staff member, right? And how did you make sure volunteers followed through with their commitments to help make it great? What is the number one piece of advice you would give to nonprofits doing #GivingTuesday for the first time? What will you differently this year? ZS: It’s amazing how generous everyone is even when every other organization is asking for donations at the same time. There’s something very touching about that. It really is a day about giving in the broad sense of the word. In 2014, we managed to quadruple what we raised in 2013 on #GivingTuesday because of this generosity. How did you reach out to donors before, during, and after?last_img read more

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Understanding the Flow of Reproductive Health Knowledge in Ethiopia

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 1, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)K4Health recently published a needs assessment and network mapping of family planning and reproductive health information in Ethiopia. The overall goal of the assessment was to gain a better understanding of the accessibility and flow of information relating to family planning and reproductive health among key actors in Ethiopia.In Ethiopia, K4Health sought to explore the current family planning/reproductive health (FP/RH) knowledge management system; examine information flows and barriers at different levels of the health system; and identify areas to strengthen health information sharing and use. Using a novel, participatory approach (Net-Map) yielded a highly visual presentation of the data that identifies key FP/RH actors in Ethiopia, explores the nature of relationships among the actors, and examines the level of influence of the different actors with regard to reproductive health information exchange. Using the Net-Map approach, the researchers were able to identify bottle necks to information flow and opportunities to improve that flow across health system levels in Ethiopia.This body of research aimed to determine how to better meet health care professionals’ dynamic information needs so that they can provide better health care to the populations they serve. In Ethiopia, reproductive health indicators can be improved through better health information exchange. This report provides important recommendations that can help get the right information delivered to health care professionals when they need it and can help enhance the quality of health care programs countrywide.Read the full assessment here.Share this:last_img read more

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Woman-Centered Maternity Care, Family Planning, and HIV: Principles for Rights-Based Integration

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 6, 2013March 6, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our colleagues at the Wilson Center Global Health Initiative are hosting a discussion with experts on rights-based maternity care and the intersection with family planning and HIV. The event will take place on June 11th from 3-5pm at the Wilson Center in Washington DC.About the event:Increasingly, family planning and HIV programs are seeking to expand their services to include maternal health care. The movement to integrate health services provides an important opportunity to share lessons learned across the different communities on their experiences with rights-based care. Join us for a discussion with experts in rights-based maternity care and its intersection with family planning and HIV.Click here for the list of speakers for the event.Click here to RSVP.Click here for directions to the Wilson Center.Learn more about this topic by visiting the MHTF’s topic pages focused on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS and respectful maternity care.For a compilation of the latest news and publications on maternal health, HIV and AIDS, click here. For a compilation of the latest news and publications on respectful maternity care, click here.Explore the MHTF’s ongoing blog series on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS and respectful maternity care.Share this:last_img read more

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PMNCH Launches New Resources on National Progress and Global Commitments to MDG Maternal and Child Health Targets

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 22, 2013February 2, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As world leaders gather at the UN General Assembly to review progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and considers the framework that will follow the 2015 MDG deadline, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) has released its annual review of commitments to the Global Strategy on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. This year’s edition of the report focuses on assessing whether and how the 213 partners that committed to the Global Strategy have followed up on their pledges. As PMNCH Executive Director Carole Presern wrote in the Huffington Post introducing the report, “The report shows that more organizations, governments and the private sector are making commitments to improve women’s and children’s health every year, and that those commitments are being followed up with real action.”Along with the review, PMNCH has also produced “Success Factors,” a series of 10 national case studies that present critical lessons learned for global efforts to advance maternal, newborn and child health. The case studies focus on a diverse group of countries that have achieved substantial progress in recent years, and highlight both common themes and country-specific examples of how effective approaches have been implemented to achieve dramatic effects on maternal and child health.From PMNCH:Success Factor Country Summaries highlight lessons learned from 10 countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Laos PDR, Nepal, Peru, Rwanda and Vietnam) that are well on the path to achieving the MDG targets for maternal and child health.These summaries present different types of policies and programmes that countries use in key areas known to influence the health of women and children.The lessons learned from the analysis of these 10 countries illustrate: The summaries are drawn from evidence collected as part of “Accelerating Progress for Women’s and Children’s Health,” an ongoing, multi-partner effort to answer the question “What can we learn about making progress on women’s and children’s health?” based on  large-scale vidence from 136 low- and middle-income countries over the past 50 years.Share this:center_img Political commitment overcomes challengesEvidence guides policy and investmentSustainable development accelerates progressStrong partnerships achieve goalslast_img read more

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Overmedicalization of Birth: Why Are Cesarean Section Rates so High in the U.S.?

first_imgPosted on May 16, 2014November 4, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Some view the rate of Cesarean sections as ubiquitous, others scarce. Either way, rates that deviate far from the WHO’s recommended rate of 15 percent are undesirable and pose health risks to both moms and babies. To highlight this fact, the birth story of the MHTF’s very own Kate Mitchell was recently featured in PRI’s article, “Why are Cesarean sections so common when most agree they shouldn’t be?” From the PRI story:Kate’s birth story“‘I constantly meet women who have very similar experiences to me,’ says Mitchell, ‘where they were committed to having a low-intervention vaginal birth, and their providers were also committed to support them in that, and somehow they still ended up having a C-section. That’s the mystery to me. I don’t understand how that happens… The evidence suggests that a C-section is a more risky route of delivery than a vaginal birth,’ she says. ‘So why are we delivering more and more babies in a risky way?’”Lack of clear clinical guidelines“One problem, experts say, has been a lack of clear guidelines specifying the circumstances under which a C-section is medically necessary, leading to a wide variation in the prevalence of Cesareans across hospitals. A study published in March of last year found that the C-section rates across Massachusetts ranged from 14 to 39 percent, with no differences in the condition of the patients that might explain the variation. ‘It really comes down to a difference in styles across hospitals,’ says Sakala. ‘We need to rein in those differences.’In an attempt to do that, this February the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued joint guidelines that call on doctors and hospitals to avoid Cesarean sections, even if it means letting first-time mothers remain in labor longer and push harder. The guidelines recommend letting first-time mothers push for three hours or more during labor. They also recommend using forceps to get the baby out vaginally.”Kate’s story is not uncommon. While the under medicalization of birth is a problem in many countries, so is over medicalization. A combination of legal, clinical, and cultural factors have brought us to a dangerous new normal for birth. To review the implications of an increase in Cesarean sections on maternal health and rights, see our previous post.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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3 Ways Real People Can Bring Your Annual Report to Life

first_img “As a kid growing up, my opportunities were limited when it came to being able to go somewhere like the YMCA. As a YMCA employee for 23 years, I have seen benefits from the dollars United Way has provided for children’s programs. Now it’s like I’m on the outside looking in, seeing how awesome it is for these kids to have this kind of childhood experience. I have always been interested in kids, and 20 years ago, United Way was the organization I felt strongly about in being secure and taking action to create change.‘ I know I can count on United Way, and that the money is going to the agencies and not being spent frivolously. I have seen firsthand what United Way dollars have done to our community and feel they make a huge impact. If you build a strong community, then you have a better place to live. ”                              —Beth Alban, Donor since 1989, United Way of Greater Stark County “PATH accelerated the delivery of a vaccine against deadly Japanese encephalitis in Laos and Cambodia, and our vaccine technologies helped ensure the vaccine’s safe arrival in each community.” Type #2: Donor StoriesDonor stories engage supporters because they’re about people like them. These stories convey the subliminal feel-good message “people like me do are making a difference,” which motivates donors to stay close and give again.These stories are much more impactful than names on a donor list, but not enough organizations use them to model great giving.  Get inspired by this compelling donor story from the St. Elizabeth Hospital Foundation. I think you’ll see what I mean: Type #3: Beneficiary and Donor Testimonials Annual report content doesn’t get better than this! Beth’s testimonial works so well because it’s specificity brings her relationship with the United Way to life.Caveat: The most powerful testimonials aren’t about your organization, they’re about how someone like your donor has benefited being involved with your organization.If you’re not already banking stories and testimonials, now’s the time to get started. They’ll transform your annual report…and your donors’ response to it!P.S. Still putting your annual report plans into place? Check out this post to get off on the right foot: 2 Ways to Transform Your Annual Report from Dull to Dynamiccenter_img On the other hand, looking ahead stories demonstrate your organization’s potential impact. Piggyback on impact to date to give your donors a preview of what’s to come in the next year  (more of the same good work and success) thanks to their support. Here’s a great example from EcoJustice: Never underestimate the power of someone’s words in an annual report. To make the most of testimonials, include as much personal information as you can to bring them to life. The United Way of Greater Stark County does in this powerful testimonial: How Unforgettable Stories Motivate Giving & Keep Donors CloseWith budget and staffing challenges touching us all in some way, it’s hard not to evaluate how much time and money go into your annual report.I encourage you to consider this advice from master fundraiser Tom Ahern: “Think of your annual report as a once-a-year golden opportunity to deeply connect with your customers’ (e.g., donors’) feelings, dreams, aspirations, hidden and sometimes even embarrassing needs—like the need to be liked; or the need to do something good in the world, a need as common as the air in our lungs.”An annual  report that conveys your organization’s impact in a vibrant and memorable way fulfills your donors’ needs. It keeps them close and engaged. And engagement is the most reliable path there is to donor retention.So, what does this have to do with people’s stories? Rich, personal stories help fulfill your donors’ needs. They let them touch and see the good work they’re funding. Simply put, these stories (paired with vibrant photos, of course) are real, moving, and memorable.Below are the three key story types for annual reports.No single story type works for every donor. You may want to use your donor management database to segment donors by giving history and interests to get a clear sense of which stories will be most relevant for your primary annual report audiences.Type #1: Beneficiary Stories (a.k.a. success stories)I like to categorize success stories into two groups: retrospective stories and looking ahead stories. Retrospective stories show your impact to date and build credibility for your organization.These “our work in action” stories directly connect donors with the change they’ve generated. Be explicit! Link successes with your donors’ support. Give them the credit they deserve. Consider this example from PATH:last_img read more

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How to Harness Emotion as You Get Ready for Giving Season

first_imgLast week, we introduced a series on four lessons learned from fundraising for real nonprofits in Baltimore. This week, we’re diving into the first lesson: the emotional nature of giving.We’ve said it before– giving is an emotional act. Donors give when they can feel a connection – when they know they are doing something to help something (or someone) that they care deeply about. They could care less about your goal to reach $10,000 by midnight – what they really care about is ending hunger, ending systemic poverty, destroying the school to prison pipeline, providing safe shelter for women in need, or making recess fun again.When the Network for Good team went out to help real nonprofits, we learned this first-hand. The team that raised the most did so by leveraging the already-emotionally driven assets of the nonprofit (Wide Angle Youth Media), and sent them out to all of their family and friends. This double shot of an emotional appeal combined with personal connections between the donors and fundraisers themselves resulted in over $2440 in a 12-hour period.What can other nonprofits take from this?Tell a Good StoryWhen the Network for Good team ambushed Wide Angle Youth Media (WAYM) at their office in Baltimore, their initial plan was to create a video in the spirit of what WAYM does. The team quickly discovered that a project like that would take much too long, so they decided to use WAYM’s existing assets.The team watched one of WAYM’s videos and used that as inspiration to create a giving page.A successful giving page is one that creates a compelling story as to why the donor should give. To do that, use the five C’s of storytelling:Core message: The core message is that one thing you want people to remember after hearing your story. When developing your story, ask yourself three questions:What do I want donors to think?What do I want them to feel?What do I want them to do?The answers will help you uncover your core message and how to structure your email campaign. They’ll also guide you through the logical and emotional sides of crafting your story and engaging donors with the copy.Connection: Powerful stories are about creating an emotional and authentic connection with readers. This often happens in the beginning of a story (“Call me Ishmael.”)  The same goes for an email. Think carefully about your message’s salutation and the first sentence. How will you hook a reader and get them to stick with you through the end? A great example is personalization. Using a donor’s first name in the salutation (e.g. “Dear Sarah”) is a powerful way to build a connection.Character: This is often the person writing the email, or it might be a monthly donor talking about why she was moved to offer ongoing support, or the story of a person served by your programs. It could even be the story of a shelter dog finding a forever home. The sky’s the limit.Conflict: Conflict is crucial in fundraising. It creates a sense of urgency, which encourages people to respond (and give) to help you resolve the conflict. “These villagers have to walk five miles a day for fresh water. Donate now to build a new well.” Conflict and call to action are intertwined.Call to action: A call to action is the thing you want people to do. A good call to action is very specific and active: Click here to give. Donate now. Use active and affirmative phrases that motivate people to follow through.Work your networkAfter creating a stellar donation page, the Network for Good team of fundraisers did everything they could to spread the work to their networks. This meant Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, as well as personal appeals to potential large donors. At the end of the day, over $2440 was raised.Why did this work? Donors are three times more likely to give when asked by someone they know. Imagine, if you asked 5 people to give, and each of them asked five more people, right away that’s 30 potential donors. And this is perhaps the strongest argument we can give for why you should consider making a peer-to-peer campaign as part of your giving season strategy. More importantly though, it’s why you need to spend time now building up your relationships with the donors in your database already. When you’ve spent more time fostering a meaningful connection with your donors, they’re much more likely to be ready to give come December.For more ways to build an emotional connection with donors, grab a copy of 7 Ideas to Engage Your Donors Before Year-End.Check back next week as we dive into the second learning from our day in Baltimore, and how local nonprofits can take steps to overcome the time and capacity challenges that threaten their success.last_img read more

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Top Nonprofit Fundraising Posts of 2017

first_imgIn 2017, the Network for Good blog covered a variety of topics ranging from fundraising strategies and planning to top campaigns and donor retention best practices. Here are the top five blog posts from our thousands of subscribers during 2017 – Enjoy!1) 8 Resources to Help with Fundraising PlanningIn this post by Liz Ragland, readers were given templates, resources, and tips to help get their plan ready and give your individual giving a boost in 2017.2) 3 Steps to Getting Corporate Sponsors for Your EventFundraising events take a fair amount of money to produce, and it’s easy to spend more money on the event than it actually raises. In this post we shared the secret to ensuring your event has a net financial gain, through corporate sponorships.3) Five Things Nonprofits Must Know to Keep DonorsThis post featured five top tips for planning donor retention strategies to grow individual giving this year. Did any of these strategies work for you?4) Five Tips for Launching a Smart and Successful Fundraising CampaignFundraisers are always looking for the secret to launching a smart and successful fundraising campaign. In this post, guest blogger Janet Cobb tackled how to set and achieve a SMART goal, laying out the five keys to success.5) 7 Tips to Make your Donors an Irresistible Fundraising OfferIn our last top post of 2017, guest blogger Claire Axelrad gave us some valuable tips on the “40-40-20 rule” Because if you don’t make it clear and easy for folks to take the exact action you desire, then the rest of your mailing has little purpose.What was your favorite blog post of the year? Do you have any topics you’d like to see us cover in 2018?last_img read more

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Tax Reform and Charitable Giving for Nonprofits

first_img“In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” Ben Franklin’s wit aside, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) will impact every individual and organization. The issue we hear about the most from our customers is how the increase in the standard deduction amount will effect giving. If the standard deduction is more beneficial than itemizing and donors find they can’t write off their donation anymore, will they still give as much? The truth is, only time will tell. But recent history gives us hope.Americans Reach New High in GivingAccording to Giving USA’s annual report on philanthropy, American individuals, estates, foundations and corporations contributed an estimated $390.05 billion to U.S. charities in 2016, surpassing 2015 and 2014, when charitable donations hit a record high. Americans continually prove that they want to make a difference and are dedicated to contributing to the causes that matter to them.TCJA’s Impact on GivingThe key changes under the TCJA include:Increase in the standard deduction to $12,000 for individuals and $24,000 for joint filers.Elimination of personal exemptions.Limitation on State and Local Taxes (SALT) of $10,000 (inclusive of income and property taxes).Reduction in the corporate income tax rate.Reduction of five of the seven tax brackets (marginal rates).At Network for Good, we specialize in fundraising best practices, not tax policy. So the best piece of advice we can offer you about how the TCJA will affect your nonprofit is to talk to your accountant and make a plan that includes donor engagement. But to help us break down the TCJA changes, we reached out to Network for Good Fundraising Coach and Founder of Fundraising Strategies, John Gilchrist, FAHP, CFRE, who joined us for a recent webinar “3 Ways the New Tax Reform Act Impacts the Nonprofit Community.” You can also read some of John’s insights on these changes and their effect on nonprofits in our other blog post here.Keep Calm and Carry OnChange can be scary, but the worst thing you can do is overreact. The key factors that drive giving still exist. Professors Sara Konrath and Femida Handy, experts in giving-related topics in psychology and economics, respectively, conducted a study on why people give to charity. Through their findings, they developed a ‘motives to donate’ scale, highlighting five key factors for why people give to nonprofits: altruism, trust, social, egoism, and taxes.As you can see, altruism is the number one reason—far surpassing taxes—which supports our belief at Network for Good that the desire to help others is stronger than any personal tax benefits.Take ActionAt the heart of every nonprofit is the desire to change the status quo. You don’t throw up your hands and capitulate. You roll up your sleeves and make things happen. Even tax laws can’t break that spirit. Giving habits may change as a result of the TCJA, but Americans have proven over and over again that we are a philanthropic society. Even at the height of the Recession, charitable giving in the U.S. exceeded $300 billion.The changes put into effect by the TCJA offer nonprofits an opportunity to lean in and revisit the conversation with donors about how you’re improving the community you serve. The fact that they may not receive a tax break makes their gift that much more significant and shows their commitment to the work you do. Now is the time to talk to your donors about how their gift directly affects the change they want to see in their community. Find additional inspiration for donor engagement in our “10-Point Checklist to Make the New Tax Laws Work for Your Nonprofit.”We know that altruism is the driving factor for why people donate. The generosity of your donors is what makes your work possible. Let them know how much you appreciate them and you’ll all share in the success of your organization. Use Network for Good’s donor management system and our personal coaches to analyze your data in order to put your organization’s energy and funds where it will do the most good. Continue to cultivate the loyalty of your donors that give small gifts; the donors that may not be affected by itemized taxes. Look at their giving history. How long have they been with you? Perhaps now is the time to ask them to expand their giving? If you depend on midlevel donors, allocate resources for marketing and outreach to them in order to engage a broad spectrum of donors. In conversations with your major donors, discuss with them the importance of their gifts and remind them, throughout the year, of the impact they have.Interested in hearing more about how the new tax laws will impact nonprofits? Register today for our upcoming webinar “Tax Reform – Impacts on Nonprofits and Giving.”last_img read more

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Maternity Waiting Homes: A Viable Solution for Rural Women?

first_imgPosted on November 8, 2017November 13, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)A brief historyDistance to a health facility has long been discussed as a key barrier to maternal health care utilization in rural areas, and researchers have explored innovative models for improving access. One of these models is the use of maternity waiting homes (MWHs), residential facilities located near a maternity clinic where pregnant women—often those at high risk of developing obstetric complications—can go during their third trimester and await labor and delivery. MWHs existed in rural areas of Northern Europe, Canada and the United States in the early 20th century and were introduced soon thereafter in other areas including Cuba, Nigeria and Uganda.Since then, MWHs have been established all over the world to increase skilled attendance at birth and improve maternal and newborn health outcomes.“The distance, it’s difficult for the woman to walk when she feels the labor pains from home coming here. It’s better for her to come here and stay.” [MWH user, Zambia]The use of MWHs has been linked to reductions in maternal and perinatal mortality in Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, Liberia and Zimbabwe. However, due to a lack of strong evidence in this area, researchers have not been able to conclude definitively that MWHs lead to fewer maternal deaths. Furthermore, some studies have found that MWHs did not result in a higher proportion of facility-based deliveries, indicating that the success of MWHs often depends on the local context.Barriers to utilizationThere are several challenges that can limit the effectiveness of MWHs including:No knowledge that MWH existsFood insecurity at MWHsHigh cost of traveling to MWHLack of culturally appropriate careLow decision-making autonomy and dependence on family supportInability to leave children at homeLimited space at MWHsConfusion about estimated delivery datePoor health worker attitudesRoom for improvementSeveral factors contribute to the successful implementation of MWHs, such as male involvement, financial sustainability, strong management, standardized indications for MWH admission, community engagement, functioning referral systems and, above all, the quality of the services provided. An adequate supply of essential resources and a properly-trained health workforce are critical to ensuring that women receive high quality, respectful maternity care once they arrive at the facility from the MWH.When possible, communities should be involved in the design, implementation and monitoring of MWHs. With careful consideration of these factors as well as the barriers to utilization outlined above, MWHs have the potential to reduce inequities in access to skilled birth attendance. Additional research to evaluate the effects of MHWs in rural areas is needed to assess whether they can result in better outcomes for moms and babies.—Check out a presentation from the 2015 Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, “Developing Sustainable Maternity Homes in Zambia: Formative Research With Women, Communities and Stakeholders in Luapula Province.”Learn more about distance as a barrier to maternal health on the Maternal Health Task Force blog.Read the World Health Organization’s “Recommendations on Health Promotion Interventions for Maternal and Newborn Health,” which include MWHs.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Placenta Accreta Spectrum Disorders: A Critical Absence from the Cesarean Section Debate

first_imgPosted on May 8, 2018May 14, 2018By: Eric Jauniaux, Professor in Obstetrics and Fetal Medicine, EGA Institute for Women’s Health, Faculty of Population Health Sciences, University College London; Johan Vos, Chief Executive, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In the last two decades, cesarean section (c-section) has become the most common major surgical operation worldwide and its rates are an important measure of obstetric practices in the 21st century. Cesarean deliveries are not new. Historically performed to save the infant, despite occasional references to operations on living mothers, cesarean delivery was frequently used to retrieve the infant from a deceased or moribund woman. Improvements in patient care have progressively established c-section as a safe operation, both as an emergency and an elective procedure. Blood transfusions and the introduction of antibiotics and uterotonics after World War II substantially reduced poor outcomes due to c-section. Continuous advances in anesthesia and improvements in postoperative care have further contributed to declining mortality rates from c-section, first in economically developed/high-income countries and more recently in low- and middle-income countries.C-section rates around the worldIn the 1980s, the international health care community, led by the World Health Organization, defined the ideal c-section rate to be between 10% and 15%. The United Nations Millennium Declaration and the funding strategies have improved maternal and child outcomes in many low- and middle-income countries; however, in most sub-Saharan African countries, c-section rates have remained below the 10% target. By contrast, rates have increased substantially in Asia, Central America and South America, creating new c-section access inequalities, with low access to emergency obstetric care in the poorest countries and high levels of c-section without medical indication in well-resourced settings, in particular in middle-income countries. Evidence of this situation is striking in a country such as Brazil, which has one of the highest national rates of c-section in the world (53% in 2012 and rising) with a c-section rate of 43% in state-funded hospitals versus 85% in the private sector. Changes in maternal age at first birth in high-income countries and the worldwide epidemic of maternal overweight and obesity have had a direct impact on c-section rates since the beginning of this century, but these factors alone cannot explain national rates over 25% and certainly not rates over 30%.Placenta accreta and other complicationsA critical absence from the recent “c-section debate” has been the long-term health impact of excessively high c-section rates, in particular in populations with high fertility rates, such as Egypt (c-section rate 53% and fertility rate 37/1000 women) and Mexico (45% and 33/1000 women, respectively). A 2018 systematic review confirmed that women with previous c-section are at increased risk of miscarriage, unexplained stillbirth, placenta previa, placenta accreta and abruption (in which the placenta detaches from the uterus before delivery) in subsequent pregnancies. Placenta accreta spectrum is a complex disorder in which the placenta implants and develops on or inside the scar of a previous uterine surgical procedure. When undiagnosed before birth, attempts to remove the placenta at delivery result in massive obstetric hemorrhage and very high maternal morbidity and significant mortality rates. The deeper the invasion of the previous uterine scar, the higher the risks of maternal complications during childbirth, in particular in low- and middle-income countries where trained multidisciplinary surgical teams are not available and access to blood transfusions is limited.The rising rates of c-section are directly linked to the rising prevalence and incidence of placenta accreta spectrum disorder. A surgical operation designed to save the lives of women and babies may negatively impact maternal and neonatal outcomes under certain circumstances. This is a particular concern when c-section rates are above 20-25% and general obstetricians are inexperienced in managing the major surgical procedures associated with managing accreta placental tissue, which often require complex surgical skills.In March 2018, the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) published a special issue on placenta accreta spectrum disorders, including the new FIGO consensus guidelines on the epidemiology, prenatal diagnosis and surgical and conservative management of this condition, alongside a series of peer-reviewed original articles on placenta accreta spectrum that provide a comprehensive overview of this complex disorder. The XXII FIGO World Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics will take place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 14 to 19 October 2018, and will provide a unique opportunity to expand the debate on the consequences of high c-section rates for the many health care professionals around the world involved in maternal health care.—Learn more about the global epidemic of unnecessary cesarean sectionsShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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The Latest Macron takes part in wreathlaying in Germany

first_imgFRANKFURT — The Latest on the French president’s visit to Germany (all times local):1 p.m.French President Emmanuel Macron has taken part in a wreath-laying ceremony at Germany’s memorial to the victims of war and dictatorship.Macron stood with folded hands and bowed head alongside German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Frank-Walter Steinmeier at the Neue Wache memorial in Berlin as part of a national day of remembrance.Macron is visiting as both he and Merkel are lagging in the polls and need some mutual reinforcement and support.Merkel has backed Macron’s proposal for a European army someday, saying it would show the world that there will never again be war between European nations. The two are meeting before a December summit intended to decide limited reforms of the shared euro currency to make it more resistant to financial and economic crises.___8:40 a.m.French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, both limping in the polls, are looking for common approaches to Donald Trump and fixing the flaws in the euro currency.Macron speaks in the German parliament in Berlin on Sunday on an annual day of remembrance for victims of war and dictatorship, a week after the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, and then consults with Merkel on European and international issues.Merkel last week echoed Macron’s call for a European army, a long-term prospect that drew tweeted criticism of Macron from Trump. Merkel said a European force would save money and agreed with Macron that Europe must be able to defend itself on its own. The two also face a December summit on limited reforms to the euro currency.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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RJD releases manifesto, promises reservation

first_imgPatna: The RJD on Monday released its manifesto, titled ‘Pratibadhta Patra’, promising reservation for SCs, STs, EBC and OBCs in proportion of their population in the private sector and the higher judiciary.The ceiling – a 50 per cent cap – had been broken after giving 10 per cent quota to the weaker sections among the general category so the people belonging to these categories (SCs, STs, EBC and OBCs) should be given reservation on the basis of their population, party leader Tejashwi Yadav said while releasing the manifesto here. The apex court had fixed a cap of 50 per cent on total reservation and the Centre last month justified in Supreme Court its recent law granting 10-per cent quota for Economically Weaker Sections (EWSs), saying it was brought in to promote “social equality”. Advocating extension of quota for them in higher judiciary and the private sector, the manifesto also vowed to carry out caste-based census in 2020-21. Pointing out that the RJD, also agrees with the Congress manifesto, it said, the party “completely endorses” the ‘Nyay’ scheme of the Congress, which would be beneficial to states like Bihar. Tejashwi Yadav was accompanied by Rajya Sabha member and party’s national spokesman Manoj Jha, Bihar RJD chief Ram Chandra Purve and others at the release of the party’s manifesto. The RJD also demanded from the Centre to make public the Socio Economic Caste Census (SECC) data, carried out by the UPA government. Releasing the manifesto, Tejashwi Prasad Yadav, also the leader of the opposition in the state, said that “it is not the manifesto of RJD, rather it is a ‘pratibadhta patra’ (commitment document) of the party”. A helpline number would be launched and a help centre set up in major cities of the country for the people of Bihar living outside the state, the manifesto said. The party would ensure that six per cent of gross domestic product be spent on education and four per cent on health, he said. “If our (party’s) government is formed in Bihar, then we will remove the ‘illegal’ tag on toddy and make it ‘legal’….The move to make toddy illegal has rendered many belonging to economically weaker sections jobless. “My father Lalu Prasad, when he was the chief minister, had abolished tax on toddy,” the RJD leader said. Replying to a query on his elder brother Tej Pratap Yadav’s recent activities, Tejashwi evaded a direct reply, saying “the press conference has been organized for releasing the manifesto today”.last_img read more

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Columbus Crew acquired by Precourt Sports Ventures

Courtesy of MCTNew England Revolution midfielder Chris Tierney takes a corner kick against the Columbus Crew in unfriendly territory in Crew Stadium in Columbus, Ohio, Saturday, July 20, 2013. The Revolution scored two goals in stoppage time to win the match, 2-0.Effectively immediately, new ownership will lead the Columbus Crew, the city’s MajorLeague Soccer franchise, as announced during a press conference at Crew StadiumJuly 30.Precourt Sports Ventures, LLC, has acquired the team from the Hunt Sports Groupfor an undisclosed purchase price and is now a 100 percent stakeholder. AnthonyPrecourt is the managing partner of PSV and attended the press conference as thefirm’s representative.Columbus mayor Michael Coleman and Clark Hunt, chairman of HSG and CEO of theKansas City Chiefs of the NFL, joined Precourt on stage.In the context of that watershed event, Hunt spoke of his family’s role in the galvanizingof Major League Soccer as an American mainstay.“There was one thing that propelled the League on to success, to where it is today.Against the odds, and against the momentum of the League, my family made thedecision to build Crew Stadium. And as a result, today there are 14 soccer-specificstadiums in Major League Soccer,” said Hunt.Hunt said his company had only been looking for minority investors in the team whenPrecourt made the offer to buy the entire franchise earlier this summer.“We were initially very taken aback by his interest, but after we got to know Anthony,we concluded that he was the right guy to lead the Columbus Crew, that he would be agreat fit for the city of Columbus, that he would be somebody that would push the teamto be successful on the field,” said Hunt.Precourt said his company “will respectfully and diligently try to uphold Lamar’s (ClarkHunt’s father) vision for Major League Soccer and the Crew. And further, we will honorhis fan-first mentality.”Precourt used the platform to formally greet the Greater Columbus community and toexpress his anticipation of working toward success in “a dynamic, growing city withincredible soccer heritage and a passionate soccer supporters’ fan base.”Mayor Coleman agreed by saying “the Columbus Crew is a vital part of the fabric andthe future of the city.”He laid out specifics of the role the Crew has played in financially bolstering the city’sbottom line: “$400 million in direct spending, the hundreds of area jobs, the 3.5 millionpeople who have attended soccer matches and other events here, the millions of taxrevenue.”The mayor said Precourt assured him during talks in the days preceding the pressconference that the team would remain in Columbus.When the panel concluded their remarks and opened the floor for questions, onereporter asked if Precourt had any plans of relocation.Precourt surprised the reporters by saying, “I do live in Northern California now, and Iintend to be here on a regular basis. I’m not sure we’ll be moving here full time, but I’llbe here very, very regularly and have a second home here.”Continuing to speak on his vision for the team to succeed athletically, Precourt said,“We have a competitive fire, and our intent is to run this club with a single mission: tocreate the resources to win over the short run and the long run…We want to be a playoffteam every year.”Precourt fielded questions about his ownership style, given that it will be his family’sfirst journey into sports management after extensive operational experience in finance,natural gas pipelines and facilities.“First and foremost, I want a great culture…I want more horizontal structure wherepeople are empowered. I guess you’d say I’ll be hands-on and attentive and involved,and over time, I will empower our employees to do their jobs well,” said Precourt.Beyond the scope of the business aspects of the acquisition, Precourt was careful toemphasize his goals for fostering a winning franchise that draws fans and gets themexcited about soccer in Columbus.“A full stadium is a lot more exciting than a two-thirds-full stadium. There are 17 homegames, and we should fill the stadium for all 17 games,” said Precourt.As a father, Precourt has coached youth soccer in U6 and U8 competition, but he saidhe said he will stay out of the day-to-day soccer operations of the Columbus Crew.Hunt said his company will “continue to be the investor-operator of [MLS franchise] FCDallas and plan on doing so for many years to come. Like Anthony, we’re a big believerin where Major League Soccer is headed and excited to still be part of the League andto now be a partner of Anthony’s through the League.” read more

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Chievo coach adores Udinese goalkeeper Simone Scuffet

first_imgChievo Coach Lorenzo D’Anna has showered praises on the Udinese goalkeeper Simone Scuffet, calling his performance excellent as he was able to stop his side from getting back into the game.Rodrigo De Paul strike and Kevin Lasagna counter-attack led to Udinese 2-0 victory at Stadio Bentegodi.“It was a very even first half, while in the second we conceded a goal out of nowhere with that shot from 30 metres out just as we were pushing the hardest,” D’Anna told Rai Sport via Football Italia.VERONA, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 02: Lorenzo D'Anna head coach of Chievo looks on during the serie A match between Chievo Verona and Empoli at Stadio Marc'Antonio Bentegodi on September 2, 2018 in Verona, Italy. (Photo by Alessandro Sabattini/Getty Images)Lorenzo D’Anna: Chievo kept their focus Obinna Echi – September 16, 2018 Lorenzo D’Anna hailed the resolve of his players as they fought back to rescue a point in their 2-2 stalemate against Roma.The Flying Donkeys didn’t…“We reacted well and created many chances, but unfortunately a combination of our mistakes and the excellent performance of the goalkeeper stopped us getting back into the game.“Chievo put in the performance we needed to and a win would’ve shaken off this minus mark from our table, but we tried our best against a difficult side that countered dangerously.”The Flying Donkeys are on -2 points in the Serie A table at the moment as they were docked three points for false accounting.last_img read more

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Alderweireld open to Ajax return

first_imgToby Alderweireld is refusing to rule out the prospect of making a return to boyhood club AjaxThe 29-year-old defender has spent the last three years at Tottenham following spells with Atlético Madrid and Southampton.Alderweireld’s future at Spurs has been under intense speculation over the past few months with his current contract set to expire in June – although the club does retain the option to extend it by another 12 months.Manchester United and, more recently, Barcelona have been touted as potential destinations for Alderweireld.However, the surprising possibility of returning to Ajax is something that Alderweireld will not rule out.“Never never say never”, Alderweireld told Voetbal Inside.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“I had a fantastic time there, became champion a few times, the third star, so these are all very nice memories.“When I go back, I will have something to teach and I do not want to go there without being able to contribute.”Alderweireld arrived at Ajax’s youth academy in 2004 at the tender age of 15 and would break into the senior side four years later.The Belgium international managed 15 goals and 12 assists in 186 appearances across all competitions.He also won four straight Eredivisie titles and two Dutch Cups.last_img read more

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Gary Neville tips Pochettino for United job

first_imgSky Sports pundit Gary Neville believes that Tottenham manager Mauricio Pochettino is the right man to take the United job after Jose Mourinho was sacked on Tuesday.Mourinho was fired by Manchester United on Tuesday after a poor start to the season, and assistant manager Michael Carrick will act as interim manager until a new temporary boss is appointed within the next two days.Former Real Madrid manager Zinedine Zidane has long been linked with the job, but Neville says Pochettino would be perfect to take over.“I said last season that the next manager of Man Utd should be Pochettino,” Neville told Sky Sports.“If I look at the values of United, you look at Pochettino’s belief in young players at Southampton and with Tottenham.“You look at his performance levels and style of play, the way in which he carries himself at all times – publicly and in private – I have been fortunate enough to spend two or three days at Tottenham’s training ground and for me, he just feels like the most ideal candidate.“There will be others who say ‘no’, but Man Utd have tried managers who have won European Cups, managers who have won multiple leagues, managers who have had that solid grounding in the Premier League.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.“My view is they need someone who meets the three key principles of that football club – the promotion of youth, entertaining football and to win football matches.“So at this moment in time, I see him – and people will suggest that he has not won a trophy yet at Tottenham, but with a net spend of -£29m, or something over the last four years, he could not have done more. He has done the most incredible job and I do think he is the person who is the most outstanding candidate.“But if you are a Tottenham Hotspur fan, you will not appreciate me saying that. If you are Daniel Levy at Tottenham Hotspur, you will be grabbing and holding on to him for dear life because you are moving into a new stadium.“But he is the individual who fits the profile of what Man Utd need in terms of what he has done in the Premier League over the last five, six, seven years at both clubs.”last_img read more

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