PH boxer Moralde overcomes early knockdown, deals Ugandan foe 1st loss

first_imgDave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations LATEST STORIES Japan’s Nishikori plays 1st Grand Slam match since Wimbledon Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water recedingcenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) PLAY LIST 02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)04:07SEA Games: John Marvin 1st Filipino boxer to crash out, bows to Vietnam bet03:24PH’s James Palicte boxing light welterweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award The 24-year-old Moralde earned a hard-fought unanimous decision victory, 76-74, 76-74, 77-73, to improve his record to 20-1, with 10 knockouts after coming off a loss to American Toka Kahn Clary five months ago in Rhode Island.Muwendo, 29, was dealt with his first setback after starting his professional career with 19 wins, 12 coming by knockout.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownThe eight-rounder fought at a catchweight of 132 pounds was part of the undercard of the Jerwin Ancajas-Jonas Sultan main event  that featured two Filipinos in a world title fight for the first time in 93 years.Ancajas dominated Sultan en route to a unanimous decision win, 119-109, 119-109, 117-111. Filipino John Moralde shook off an early knockdown to beat Ismail Muwendo of Uganda Sunday (Manila time) at Save Mart Center in Fresno, California, USA.Moralde recovered after getting dropped in the first round and returned the favor to Muwendo, who tasted the canvas in the fifth round.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

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Biomolecular computer can autonomously sense multiple signs of disease

first_img Citation: Biomolecular computer can autonomously sense multiple signs of disease (2011, July 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-biomolecular-autonomously-multiple-disease.html Explore further More information: Binyamin Gil, et al. “Detection of Multiple Disease Indicators by an Autonomous Biomolecular Computer.” Nano Letters DOI:10.1021/nl2015872 (PhysOrg.com) — In the future, nano-sized computers implanted in the human body could autonomously scan for disease indicators, diagnose diseases, and control the release of the appropriate drugs. Although this scenario is still several decades away, researchers have been making significant progress in developing early types of biomolecular computers. New sensor nanotechnology simplifies disease detection A simple scheme of how a biomolecular computer works. Image credit: Gil, et al. ©2011 American Chemical Society Copyright 2011 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. In a recent study published in Nano Letters, Computer Science Professor Ehud Shapiro and coauthors from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, have developed a biomolecular computer that can autonomously sense many different types of molecules simultaneously. In the future, this sensing ability could be integrated with a vast biomedical knowledge of diseases to enable computers to decide which drugs to release.“We envision nanometer-sized computing devices (made of biomolecules) to roam our bodies in search of diseases in their early stage,” coauthor Binyamin Gil from the Weizmann Institute of Science told PhysOrg.com. “These devices would have the ability to sense disease indicators, diagnose the disease, and treat it by administering or activating a therapeutic biomolecule. They could be delivered to the bloodstream or operate inside cells of a specific organ or tissue and be given as a preventive care.”The development builds on the researchers’ previous demonstration of a biomolecular computer that consists of a two-state system made of biological components (DNA and a restriction enzyme). The computer, which operates in vitro, starts from the Yes state. In each computation step, the computer checks one disease indicator. If all of the indicators for the tested disease are present, the computation ends in the Yes state, namely it makes a positive diagnosis; if at least one disease indicator is not detected, it ends in the No state.Previously, Shapiro’s group showed that this biomolecular computer could detect disease indicators from mRNA expression levels and mutations. In the current study, the researchers have expanded the computer’s ability to also detect disease indicators from miRNAs, proteins, and small molecules such as ATP. At the same time, the computer’s detection method is simpler than before, requiring fewer components and fewer interactions with the disease indicators.As the researchers explain, sensing a combination of several disease indicators is much more useful than sensing just one, since it allows for better accuracy and greater sensitivity to differences between diseases. For example, they note that in the case of thyroid cancer, the presence of the protein thyroglobulin and the hormone calcitonin can enable a much more reliable diagnosis than if only one of these disease indicators was detected.Although the ability to detect several disease indicators marks an important step toward in vivo biomolecular computers and programmable drugs, there are still many obstacles that researchers must overcome in the process. “The biggest challenge is operating such devices in living surrounding like the blood stream or cell’s cytoplasm,” Gil said. “Currently we are developing devices that rely on simpler machinery (e.g. no restriction enzyme) or on the cell’s own machinery.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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