PLOS Medicine Editorial Spotlights Access to Health Information as Central to Human Right to Health

first_imgPosted on May 2, 2013March 13, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In an editorial published this week in PLOS Medicine, the editors discuss the critical need for improved health information, particularly clear, accessible reference materials that enable health care providers to put the best evidence into practice and bolster health care in low and middle income countries. In their discussion of the critical need for high quality reference and educational materials, the authors single out the issue of postpartum hemorrhage.From the editorial: It is in the poorest settings where basic health information may prove most valuable. For example, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal death worldwide; yet despite being recommended by the WHO and other professional bodies, active management of the third stage of labor to prevent PPH was found to be correctly used in only 0.5% to 32% of observed deliveries in seven developing countries . Worryingly, six of the seven countries were found to have multiple guidelines and conflicting recommendations for active management of the third stage of labor.The authors go on to point out that while important sources of knowledge, expanding dissemination of the sort of evidence published in medical journals alone is not sufficient. Instead, the most critical resources may be those that translate evidence into forms that can be readily applied:Medical journals remain a key part of the knowledge translation process, almost exclusively dealing with the final stages of knowledge creation (primary research), distillation (systematic reviews and guidelines), and commentary (editorializing and contextualizing by experts) via peer review and finally dissemination. Although making research openly available to be both read and reused is an essential step toward a vision of wider access to healthcare knowledge, disseminating information on its own is not enough to ensure evidence is used in decision-making. In many settings it is access to secondary reference and educational materials based on the best available evidence that is severely lacking yet probably more crucial for clinical practice than the most recent observational study or clinical trial findings.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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The Global Stage Needs a Global Audience

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 23, 2014November 7, 2016By: Lennie Kamwendo, White Ribbon Alliance Global Board MemberClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, what does the future hold for international maternal mortality targets? The MHTF is pleased to be hosting a blog series on post-2015 maternal mortality goal setting. Over the next several weeks, we will be featuring responses and reactions to proposed targets from around the world. Please share your thoughts with us!The importance of the global attention that maternal health was given when world leaders recognised that MDG5 was (and still is) the most offtrack goal of all is evident. The $70bn pledged since 2010 to ‘The Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health’ is pivotal in the history of maternal, newborn and child health, and pledges which may not have been made without the broad MDG target and tracking of progress. We, as advocates for maternal and newborn health welcomed this fantastic news – finally women’s childbirth rights were being prioritised – but we know the real work comes when pushing for these promises to be delivered.Indeed, a main challenge that civil society faces when pushing for such promises to be delivered is just how much any of these commitments are discussed in our parliaments and our media. Targets are useful, and absolute targets relative to the reality in the country are even more useful. As we move towards the deadline of the MDGs, we have lessons to learn from blanket targets being set in the international arena with little regard for whether they are attainable in the country. When targets are obviously not going to be achieved it can be demoralizing, even when progress is being made. Perhaps this is a contributory reason as to why accountability is so low on the commitments our governments make on the international stage. The targets are unattainable as are the promises made on how to achieve them, creating a cyclical process of underachievement.The general consensus in Malawi is that our politicians, for the most part, are not even aware of the promises made on their behalf. Our President has been a champion for maternal health and has made impressive commitments to Malawi’s women and children, ensuring free care, strengthening of human resources for health and attaining the WHO standard for emergency obstetric care. Yet there are no numerical targets attached to these commitments, no clear plan as to how they will be achieved and weak accountability at the national level on commitments made. As a Global Board member of The White Ribbon Alliance, I am consistently hearing the same story from our members in many other countries where maternal deaths are high. Perhaps 2014 will see a tangible balance between targeted creation of demand for skilled care for childbearing women and the supply of all the necessary aspects of maternity care. We need the full package from adequate, well qualified and competent human resource to an enabling environment for the provision of quality care.Targets are important. Commitments are encouraging. But we need the international community to invest in building civil society’s capacity to call their leaders and governments to account on making these promises a reality. Now is the time to build on the targets already set and drive home that unmet promises are not acceptable. We know change can happen when civil society pushes for accountability. The global stage needs a global audience.Share this:last_img read more

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Perspectives on Post-MDG Targets From on the Ground and Around the World

first_imgPosted on January 17, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Members of the White Ribbon Alliance contributed the following comments regarding post-MDG maternal mortality targetsAs we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, what does the future hold for international maternal mortality targets? The MHTF is pleased to be hosting a blog series on post-2015 maternal mortality goal setting. Over the next several weeks, we will be featuring responses and reactions to proposed targets from around the world. Please share your thoughts with us!By Rahmatullah Niazmal, Consultant for PDM 1 & 2 and Overall Supervisor for RHP2, JICA-Reproductive Health Project Phase 2, Ministry of Public Health, AfghanistanAfghanistan is one of the countries which has high maternal mortality ratio (MMR). The current MMR is about 327/100000 live births. Respectively under-five mortality is 97 /1000 live births and, and the infant mortality rate is 77/1000 live births, according to the Afghanistan Mortality Survey, and the contraceptive prevalence rate is about 20 percent. The Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) has committed to improving access to maternal and reproductive health care; and enhancing the quality reproductive health care services is one the MoPH’s top priorities. However, still, there are challenges that MoPH has been competing with. Despite huge efforts that have been put by MoPH for the last one decade, much work remains to be done to maintain the current progress and improve further.The following are the goals for reaching beyond 2015:Increase access and utilization of quality reproductive health servicesIncrease deployment and distribution of trained SBA at national levelDecrease the number of home deliveries – which currently account for a greater proportion of births than institutional deliveriesFill the gap between knowledge(>90%) and utilization (20%) of family planning servicesLower the adolescent birth rate and reduce child marriage in the country.Build capacity at the national level about breast and cervical cancer for early prevention and treatmentEnhance capacity for obstetric fistula treatment, prevention and re-integration at the national levelRaise awareness about STIs, HIV and AIDS among adolescents and vulnerable populations.By Ronald Wonder, Managing Partner, PLUS CONSULTS, UgandaMy thinking on this issue is that targets are useful in driving progress in countries including Uganda but absolute targets are much better. It should then go further to set quotas for respective districts, starting with those with high mortality rates and trickle down to household in the sub counties.This would give more meaning to policy makers, individual and civil society organization making an effort to curb this problem among expectant mothers in Uganda.Keep the fight on to protect our mothers.By Jonas Fadweck, Youth Director and patron of Thuchila Youth Empowerment Programme, Project Officer of WHCCA-Malawi, member to White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood, and Girl Rising Regional Ambassador, UgandaIn order to improve maternal health in countries such as Malawi, I believe the following should be made priorities under the next development agenda:To increase rural bicycle ambulances for easy transport, especially in the community, for pregnant women: many women die before reaching the hospital, and many others deliver on the road before reaching a health facility – which is a disaster.To train other community members and/or increase expertise in the field in order to reduce the work load for nurses and midwives.To establish community mobilization campaigns to help people realize the importance of women to deliver at the hospital, attending antenatal clinics, and the consequences of teenage pregnancies.To introduce and increase maternity wings to health centres that now have no maternity services.To promote and encourage transparency and accountability.These are some of the contributions we can make to enshre more women and reach target goals.By Kezaabu Edwidge, Project Coordinator, Health Community Empowerment Project, UgandaThere is a great concern on maternal health and the situation is alarming: mothers are still dying in labour and post delivery due to problems related to pregnancy, labor and pueperium. Involvement of all stakeholders is of paramount importance. In Uganda, young people, in particular adolescents and youths engaged in unprotected sex – who face unwanted pregnancy – require more attention. This is important to address the issue of teenage pregnancy, and related concerns such as abortion. The issue of male involvement at all levels starting with the families, then to managers and leaders of all categories. Family planning is also a concern as most people shun off services because of ignorance, the myths and misconception and the unmet need.By Jonathan LugemwaA percentage target is appropriate: taking into account previous methodologies used in communities before these formal interventions came into practice because our current surveys describe that formal interventions which are brought to the people in a provisional standards without their consent are less eligible to create permanent change so its very much vital to include especially the local populations.By Uhawenimana Thierry Claudien, Public Relations and Communications Officer, University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health SciencesThere are considerable efforts underway to reduce neonatal mortality and maternal mortality in Rwanda, which now has a maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 340 deaths per 100,000 live births. However, a lot needs to be done in order to ensure no mother or child should die as a result of child birth or pregnancy complications.In some rural areas in Rwanda – mainly in the mountainous areas that are hard to reach – I have noticed that the physical settings may be the leading factor in maternal and child deaths. Some villages are far from the health facilities (7-8 kms) and the roads leading there are not well furnished. This leads some pregnant mothers to not complete the four recommended antenatal care (ANC) visits, which are vital to the safe pregnancy and delivery. Some women deliver along the way to the health center due to circumstances leading to the delay at home, and the delay to reach the health facility.Thus I would like that in the next targets to reduce maternal and child mortality, governments should put much emphasis on making the population aware of the birth preparedness and complication readiness; and also removing the barriers that impede the population from accessing obstetric services in a timely way, such as reducing the distance to the health facilities in areas that are hard to reach, availing ambulances at health centers that are far from the district hospitals, increasing the community health workers’ skills and knowledge to deal with some pregnancy related complications.As the number of adolescent girls who become pregnant increases in Rwanda, there is a need to educate them on health policies, including on how they can receive adolescent friendly services near them; and mobilize the whole community to go beyond the limits of culture and religion and support the sexual and reproductive health information on behalf of the adolescent. By doing this, no adolescent girl will be stigmatized because she has used contraceptives, and those who will accidentally get pregnant will not hide it; something that put them under the risk of death or injury. In addition, the rate of abortion will be reduced among this age group.There is a need to involve men in maternal and child health initiatives by giving them the knowledge and necessary skills required for them to support mothers and babies, as well as helping them understand their interests in embracing that role. Thus, there will play a key role in empowering the girls to be confident of themselves and to say no to unwanted sexual intercourse pulses, or will not seek to exploit you girls sexually.As for family planning, there is a need to train more professionals in providing services of family planning and who are experts in contraception usage. There is a tendency nowadays that nurses or midwives only administer any method of FP to a woman and at the end of the day, she faces side effects some of which may be fatal. But, if we have experts in contraceptives’ administration and counseling, some of the issues and myths preventing people from accessing the services will be kept at arm’s length. In addition to this, there is a need to keep on increasing the number of skilled birth attendants so that they be proportional to the number of deliveries taking place in health centers and hospitals. This will improve the service delivery given to the mothers and will reduce some of the risks associated with overloading the health personnel.Lastly, laws related to maternal and child health should be incorporated in the country’s legal framework and on top of that, the existing laws should be revised and even hold accountable men who impregnate girls and abandon them or those who refuse to support their pregnant partners among many others.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Making Real Change for Maternal Health Through Advocacy in Uganda

first_imgPosted on May 15, 2014November 4, 2016By: Robina Biteyi, National Coordinator, White Ribbon Alliance UgandaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In Uganda we are witnessing a recent increase in maternal deaths . We once reported that 16 women die every day in our country, but that number has now increased to 17. White Ribbon Alliance is tackling this trend by pushing the government to invest adequately in Emergency Live Saving Care. Ugandan citizens are stepping up and demanding that action should be taken. Together, we pushed the government to make a commitment to the UN Secretary General’s Global Strategy for Women and Children to save maternal and child lives. That commitment was made, and the real work has begun in making sure the Ugandan government follows through with their commitment.We know our women and their babies are dying due to lack of emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC). This is why we pushed the government to commit to provide this care, and they did. In 2011, the Government of Uganda stated that all health centres would provide basic emergency obstetric and newborn care (BEmONC) and 50% would provide comprehensive obstetric and newborn care (CEmONC).As White Ribbon Alliance, we campaign for this promise to be delivered. We carried out assessments and collected evidence on the provision of care, and we brought together many different leaders in our society for us to collectively decide what the focus needed to be of our campaign and how we would achieve our goals.Our assessments in 43 health centres across three very diverse districts have shown us that not one of the three districts is currently meeting the minimum requirement for BEmONC nor CEmONC. We collected the stories of the challenges people were facing to try to access the care they needed and made a film to show our policy makers.The assessments carried out to assess maternal health service delivery have brought both anticipated and unexpected successes. As expected, they allowed us to bring real evidence into discussions and campaigns. Also, as we engaged with health workers, district officials and community leaders to complete the assessment, it was reported that this process broke down some of the communication barriers that existed before the assessment. The communication facilitated by the assessment process has led to local actions now being taken to make improvements.As we moved through the districts, people voiced their experiences and we recorded them and connected with local media to document what was happening. We petitioned the district leadership based on the evidence collected and they addressed the petitions in their meetings. Since this engagement with the district leaders, we have already seen real increase in budget allocation for these essential services. Without our evidence and campaigning, the facts would not be known.We are also bridging the gaps between national administration and district councils. The provision of equipment and supplies are critical components of EmONC. To address bottlenecks in these supply chains, we are in discussions with the National Medical Stores and district teams. In addition to addressing the supply chain, we are amplifying the district demands for an increased budget commitment at the national level. We are doing this by pushing through our national networks and media so that emergency care gets the focus it needs in the national budget priorities.We know that if we work together to link citizens’ demands with national leaders, we can save mothers and babies lives. Nobody wants to lose a mother, and no couple wants to lose their baby. We know what works and we know with the right investment in emergency care, we can make the same progress that is happening in other countries around the world. We are calling on all partners in Uganda and beyond to join us in advocating for this government commitment. Please track our progress and get in touch with us through our blog page and Facebook. Please join us to #ACTNOWTOSAVEMOTHERS.If you would like to share your in-country story with us, please email Natalie Ramm or join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Video: Segmenting Donors for Better Engagement

first_imgIf you’re just getting started with donor segmentation, or need new ideas on how to segment donors for better outreach, our Donor Segmentation Cheat Sheet offers great tips on how to generate donor lists by giving level, donation date, and campaign fund. Use the template to record your donor totals, date of list, and any notes for data analysis. Getting to know your donors takes a little extra effort; but you’ll see the benefits in engagement levels, donor retention, and ROI. Donor segmentation is an essential part of every fundraiser’s work. Segmenting is the first step to knowing your donors better. Grouping donors by certain criteria or segments gives you a better idea of who is in your donor management system based on giving habits, location, involvement, and more.Segmentation not only tells you who is in your system, but also helps you send relevant, personal communications to each group of donors. From your e-newsletter to your direct mail appeals, you can never segment your audience too much. The more personal you can make your outreach, the more your supporters will feel connected to your work.At Network for Good, we encourage the same approach in getting to know your donors, volunteers, and other supporters. Network for Good’s donor management system helps nonprofits quickly and confidently target their donors with the right appeal, and send it out at the right time. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

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Calling for an Integrated Approach to Maternal and Newborn Health: Strategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 15, 2015October 25, 2016By: Amy Boldosser-Boesch, Interim President and CEO, Family Care InternationalClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Next week at the 68th World Health Assembly, the Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM) Working Group — led by WHO in partnership with Family Care International (FCI), the Maternal Health Task Force, UNICEF, UNFPA, USAID, the Maternal Child Survival Program, and the White Ribbon Alliance — will launch its much-anticipated report, Strategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM). For FCI and our partners, this report presents an important opportunity to highlight the critical linkages between the health of a woman and that of her newborn baby.One of the core strategies recommended in the EPMM paper is integration of maternal and newborn service delivery, with a particular focus on the mother-baby relationship. FCI has been a long-standing advocate for integrated care for women and newborns. A research study we conducted with Aga Khan University identified the many interventions that affect the health of both a woman and her newborn.  These research findings underscored the many important ways that maternal, fetal, and newborn health are strongly interconnected.More recently, in collaboration with the International Center for Research on Women and the KEMRI-CDC Research and Public Health Collaboration, FCI conducted research in Kenya to document the immediate and longer-term effects of maternal death on children, households, and communities. The consequences of a mother’s death, the study found, are devastating. The first result, far too often, is the death of the newborn, another tragic sign of maternal-neonatal interconnection. But maternal deaths also cause other profound and long-term social and economic harms, as surviving daughters are forced to leave school, families suffer under huge medical and funeral costs and lost income, households break down, and communities lose the presence and contributions of some of their most productive members. The tragic costs of a maternal death, for newborns and their families, are highlighted in the study’s title, A Price Too High to Bear.Collectively, these studies make a compelling case for the creation of stronger linkages between health services for women and for their newborns. Together, the maternal health and newborn health communities must work to ensure that research, policies, health services, and advocacy all support an integrated approach to maternal and newborn survival — one that helps finally to put an end to the preventable deaths of women and their babies.This blog also appears at The FCI Blog.Share this:last_img read more

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Insight Into Maternal Health in Humanitarian Crisis Settings

first_imgPosted on June 20, 2018August 1, 2018By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Arcade Ndoricimpa, Chantal Inamahoro, Esther Achandi and Anne Marie from the rural area of Kayanza working with Congolese refugee women in Bujumbura conducting concept mappingThe Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)’s Kayla McGowan recently had the pleasure of interviewing Jocelyn Finlay, a Research Scientist in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Finlay is the principal investigator of a project based in Burundi working on empowering young women in their reproductive health, using a mixed methods approach to create youth-made and youth-targeted interventions. With support from the MHTF, Finlay is also investigating the provision and use of maternal health services in an urban setting and within refugee camps in Burundi.KM: Describe your work in maternal health. Could you talk a bit about your collaboration with research partners? JF: We are looking at maternal health service provision and use within humanitarian crisis settings, specifically looking at refugees that migrate from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to Burundi. It is a unique setting because Burundi has its own humanitarian crisis at the moment. We see a lot of outflow of refugees from Burundi because of their own political crisis. Its neighbor, DRC, has about half a million refugees, and it has really accelerated. We are working within refugee camps which tend to be very remote.Given this unusual migration from one conflict setting to another we wanted to look into the maternal health services that are provided and what is used. We are using a mixed methods approach, so the qualitative work is helping us see whether we are asking the right questions in the first place. An initial question was: Is there a gap between provision and use? We wanted to hear about the maternal health services offered, and used, and see if the gap is generated by lack of supply or lack of demand.KM: What have you learned so far?JF: Having the qualitative research component has meant that we are better able to shape the research question, to make sure we ask the most important question. We have conducted two types of qualitative interviews. One is on the supply side, interviewing key informants about what kind of maternal health services are offered, whether people use them and what they think are the limitations. We are always asking about both problems and solutions.The second type is community participatory work with refugees. We use a technique called concept mapping, a workshop where people are grouped by age and interviewed. We are interviewing women between the ages of 15-49, divided into five- or 10-year age groups. The women get to talk about problems and solutions associated with provision and use of maternal health care services. Both the providers and the women get to discuss their thoughts about problems and solutions.We’ve conducted the qualitative work in an urban setting and in refugee camps.Two shortfalls that were cited as particularly acute for those in the camps were that there is some basic antenatal care, but there is not really any postnatal care. As my colleague says, “Women who give birth or miscarry are largely left to cure on their own.”There are doctors within the camps, but they are completely overwhelmed. If there are complications and women have to travel outside the camps, it is a very difficult journey since the camps are often very isolated. Again, to quote my colleague, “Imagine a three-kilometer [or much longer] journey in rough terrain for a mother experiencing labor complications.”Based on previous conversations, another point that emerged is that the needs within maternal health reflect broader health systems issues. Sanitation issues, such as not having enough soap, are really important to the refugee women. During delivery, sometimes there is not even soap for providers to wash their hands. Another issue is access to prescription medication—for maternal health purposes, newborn care and other issues. They are not confident about the quality of the drugs they are receiving, if they are the right quantity and there are also concerns about prescription medication cost and antibiotic resistance.KM: What is the biggest takeaway regarding maternal health in this setting?JF: A key takeaway that has emerged is that there are not enough maternal health guidelines for emergency situations in humanitarian crisis settings. For example, there is the Minimum Initial Service Package as well as guidelines for gender-based violence by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee. However, there is little available for maternal health in refugee settings specifically. There is a need for a short document containing lifesaving guidelines or step-by-step instructions for addressing emergency obstetric care in these settings. The World Health Organization has a “Key Steps” document, but it is not clear if these guidelines should be applied within the camps.KM: Could you talk a bit about the impact of your work on a global scale?JF: I hope that we shed light on a refugee situation in such a complex humanitarian situation of Congolese refugees in Burundi. We hope to bring voice to Burundi as a host community, and Congolese refugees.KM: If you had an unlimited budget, how would you invest in maternal health? JF: I would say strengthening the health care system within Burundi more broadly. Doing this would then translate to a strengthened health care system for refugees.Photo credit: Jocelyn Finlay—Access key resources related to sexual, reproductive and maternal health in humanitarian settings>>Read our series profiling maternal and newborn health in humanitarian settings:[Part 1] Ebola Virus Outbreak[Part 2] 2015 Nepal Earthquake[Part 3] Conflict in SyriaLearn more about revising the global standards for the 2018 Inter-agency field manual on reproductive health in humanitarian settingsLearn more about World Refugee Day and join the conversation on social media using #WorldRefugeeDay and #WithRefugees.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Airbus shakes up top management amid legal woes

first_imgPARIS – Airbus said Friday that its CEO, Tom Enders, will step down in 2019, as the European airplane maker shakes up management amid multiple corruption investigations.The company said Enders, who will have been at the helm of Airbus and defence firm EADS for 14 years, won’t seek another term when his current term expires.Enders has been a key figure as Airbus has jockeyed with U.S. rival Boeing over the past decade to be the world’s top-selling plane maker.The 59-year-old was quoted Friday as saying Airbus needs “fresh minds for the 2020s” and that he would use the remainder of his time to ensure a smooth transition and to strengthen the company’s ethics and compliance programs.The governments of France and Germany, which have stakes in Airbus and used to have seats on its board, are paying close attention to the management changes and the legal probes.“We obviously need to keep an eye on our strategic interests and (Airbus) governance, which must be exemplary,” French President Emmanuel Macron told reporters in Brussels on Friday.Speaking alongside German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Macron insisted that their governments won’t “interfere politically to return to a role in the daily management of the company” — but said he wants the Airbus board to provide clarifications in the coming weeks about the executive shakeup.Also leaving is the chief operating officer and president of the commercial aircraft division, Fabrice Bregier, who will step down next February.He will be succeeded by Guillaume Faury, currently CEO of Airbus Helicopters. Enders described Faury as part of “the next generation of leaders,” which could suggest he is being groomed to eventually take over as CEO of the overall Airbus Group.The announcement came weeks after Airbus announced it is replacing its combative, long-serving sales chief, John Leahy. He’s being replaced by an outside executive, from Rolls Royce.The big challenge for incoming Airbus management will be legal investigations.Authorities in Britain and France are investigating alleged fraud and bribery related to Airbus’ use of outside consultants in commercial plane sales. Airbus has warned that the investigations could lead to “significant penalties” and promised to stop working with middlemen.Meanwhile, Austria is investigating suspected fraud in the government’s purchase of Airbus combat aircraft.It’s a bumpy time for Airbus, which recently saw a major deal with Gulf carrier Emirates for A380 superjumbos fall apart at the last minute at the Dubai Air Show. The airline handed the contract to Boeing instead.Shares were little changed Friday, as management changes were expected.Airbus had revenues of 67 billion euros ($79 billion) last year and employs 134,000 staff worldwide.last_img read more

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City of Fort St John considers feminine hygiene products at public facilities

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – At Monday’s Regular Council meeting Councillor Byron Stewart made a notice of motion regarding public facilities and free feminine hygiene products.Councillor Stewart inquired if free feminine hygiene products were available in public facilities in response to the news of the provincial government now offering free hygiene products in schools.“Wondering if we have a policy in place regarding feminine hygiene products in our public facilities,” said Councillor Stewart, “going forward with that in my mind it’s part of our bodies regular functioning as much as toilet paper, water and paper towel.” The provincial government issued a press release Friday, April 5th, 2019, under a ministerial order, that all B.C. public schools will be required to provide free menstrual products for students in school washrooms by the end of 2019.Education Minister Rob Fleming said it’s time to normalize and equalize access to menstrual products in schools, helping to create a better learning environment for students.“Students should never have to miss school, extracurricular, sports or social activities because they can’t afford or don’t have access to menstrual products,” said Fleming, adding that current research indicates that one in seven students has missed school due to their periods because they cannot afford products.“This is a common-sense step forward that is, frankly, long overdue. We look forward to working with school districts and communities to make sure students get the access they need with no stigma and no barriers.”The ministerial order – takes effect immediately but allows districts until the end of 2019 to comply – comes with $300,000 in provincial startup funding. Over the coming months, the ministry will continue to work with school districts, community and education partners to look at the needs of each district, identify gaps and ensure they have the funding needed to meet this new requirement.last_img read more

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Centennial Park playground now open to the public

first_imgTo view more on Capital Projects, CLICK HERE Ryan Harvey, Communications Director for the City of Fort St. John shares the Parkour Park will open later this week.“We want to remind people that the majority of the park is still under construction and ask that they stay out of the construction zones,” said Harvey.The budget for the project was $5.5 million for the redevelopment of the park to facilitate a new permanent stage, picnic shelter, a pedestrian walkway, formal garden, washroom, and two playgrounds. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The new playground at Centennial Park is now open to the public for use.last_img

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J&K: Over 55 security men already dead, 95 died in 2019

first_imgNew Delhi: It’s not even three months of this year and body count of soldiers has been steadily rising in Jammu and Kashmir to make it one one of the most violent periods in recent times.The Army alone has lost 10 men, five of them before the tragic car bombing in Pulwama killing 40 Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) troopers on February 14. Since Pulwama, five more Army men and eight other security personnel have died.Last year was one of the bloodiest for the security forces as around 100 of them were killed. The number has crossed 55 in the first two months of this year. Also Read – Squadrons which participated in Balakot air strike awarded citations on IAF DayBut the number of terrorists killed in operations is also rising. Till February 14, 28 terrorists were killed and another 16 have been eliminated after Pulwama.Reflecting in the tough times and extremely tense situation is the stark rise in ceasefire violations on the Line of Control (LoC).There were 267 ceasefire violations before February 14 and since then 228 of such breaches have been reported, signalling that the guns have been blazing across the border. Also Read – SC declines Oil Min request to stay sharing of documents on Reliance penaltyComparisons are being drawn with 2018 which saw security forces scoring major successes against terrorists killing 260 of them, including some big names such as Lashkar-Taiba head Naveed Jatt. The number of kills in 2018 was the highest in eight years. The last major successful year was 2010 when 270 terrorists were killed.2011 saw 119 killing, 2012 saw 84, 110 in 2014, 113 in 2015, 165 in 2016 and 218 in 2017.The number of security forces killed in 2018 was 95 while 83 had died in 2017.According to south Asia terrorism portal, 56 security personnel have died in Jammu and Kashmir this year and 44 terrorists have been killed.last_img read more

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Culinary Art India: Budding chefs take the spotlight

first_imgOne of the most loved food-related festivals, Culinary Art India, is known for its thrilling competitions among the chefs. The four-day event saw over 500 chefs from across the country participating in various activities and competitions. It not only welcomed the professional chefs to showcase their creative culinary skills, but also gave a platform to housewives as well as students to put their best foot forward.First day of event saw 45 chefs demonstrating their culinary expertise and competing in Authentic Indian Regional Cuisine, Fruit and Vegetable Carving and Live Cooking category. Second day saw Petit Fours and Pralines, Artistic Bakery Showpiece along with Three Tier Wedding Cake prepration. On the third day, 57 chefs exhibited their artistic side in the categories of Artistic Pastry Showpiece, Plated Appetizers, Live cooking and Contemporary Sushi Platter. On the fourth and last day of culinary challenge, 82 chefs competed in three competetd in Three course set dinner, Plated Desserts, Mocktails and Live cooking. “The culinary art India has been in existence for 14 years and the objective of this event was to create a platform where students, fellow chefs, professionals, can display their culinary skills, and get rewarded. The festival give them the necessary exposure and groom them to compete at the global level,” said Davinder Kumar, President of Indian Culinary Forum, adding, “The response from the audience as well as participants has been phenomenal this year. We have witnessed a large number of entries by college students, who were confident about their work at such a young age.” A visual treat for foodies, culinary artistry attracted a lot of crowd across all ages, however, youngsters – with high ambitions of making big in the culinary and hotel industry – were seen at large throughout the festival. One such student of hotel management, who also won the first prize for ‘plated dessert competition’, finds solace in baking. Speaking about his love for cooking, he said, “I am a first year student of International Institute of Culinary art. Though I enjoy every aspect of cooking, baking is something that fills me with happiness and joy. I want to get specialised in the art of baking and learn as much as I can. For this competition, I tried to give my 100 percent and bring up something new for the jury. I got four ingredients with which I prepared four different recipes in the ‘Plated dessert competition’, and won gold for the same,” said 19-year-old student, Nikhil Bhatia.last_img read more

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Blistering heat to pose major challenge for the voters

first_imgKolkata: Voters from the western districts of the state may have a tough time while standing at the queue as the temperatures may touch 42-43 degree Celsius on May 12 when elections would be held in eight Lok Sabha constituencies.The Regional Meteorological Centre in Alipore said western districts such as East Midnapore, West Midnapore, Jhargram, Purulia and Bankura may experience heat wave till May 12, if there is no change in the weather system. The mercury may rise by 2-3 degree Celsius in many South Bengal districts, including the city, in the next 48 hours. There is no prediction of rainfall by the weather office in South Bengal as of now. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaElections will be held in eight constituencies — Tomluk, Kanthi, Ghatal, Jhargram, Midnapore, Purulia, Bankura and Bishnupur on May 12. There is good news for people in North Bengal districts as the MeT office predicted thunder shower in five districts in next couple of days. According to a weather official, heat waves are entering the western parts of the state from Bihar and Jharkhand. Both the neighbouring states are reeling under heat wave conditions. The temperatures in the Western districts of Bengal may hover between 40 and 43 degree Celsius. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayThe weather office also predicted that during the night the temperature will be higher than the normal. The high-level of humidity in the air will also add to the discomfort. A low pressure turf has formed in North Bengal which will bring light to moderate rainfall accompanied with thunderstorm later this week. “The humidity level will be on higher side in South Bengal districts. The temperatures may rise up to 38 degree Celsius in the next few days,” deputy director general of Alipore weather office Sanjib Bandyopadhyay said. City doctors gave some suggestions to battle the blistering heat. They advised people not to drink water or fruit juices from the road-side eateries. People should have fruits at home. The fruits that are cut and sold on the streets must be avoided. The doctors also advised people to drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. They asked people to avoid spicy and restaurant foods and stay away from direct sunlight while on the streets. People, who go out in the sun should wear caps or use umbrellas and they should wear cotton clothes to get some respite from the humidity. It may be mentioned that CESC successfully handled the highest-ever demand of consumers during the summer. According to a CESC spokesman, the power demand reached its peak at 3:30 pm on Wednesday when CESC successfully supplied 2262 MW. In June last year, CESC met a demand of 2,131 MW. The highest demand recorded on June 19, 2017 reached up to 2,159 MW. “We are happy that CESC has successfully met this demand without any interruption. About 2,262 MW demand is the highest in the history of CESC. Over the past five years, CESC has been experiencing demand of more than 2,000 MW during summer,” a CESC spokesperson said.last_img read more

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August 30 2006 Welcome to the August 27 2006

first_imgAugust 30, 2006 Welcome to the August 27. 2006 seminar-week and workshop participants: back row from left: Nick and Neil Holloway [seminar week], Gabriele Falconi, Peter Ingraham, Mario Nuzzolese and Zeev Shilor [seminar week]. front row from left: Brendan Maloney, Callie Russell, Laszlo Kerekes, Tucker Zenski, Michal Shilor [seminar week], Annie Suzanne Murray-Bissonn and Austin Vanaria [seminar week], [Photo & text: sa]last_img

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House approves Coles bill ensuring aircraft safety

first_imgThe Michigan House of Representatives approved today state Rep. Triston Cole’s legislation ensuring aircraft safety by requiring all weather towers be marked with orange and white alternating stripes to safeguard pilot visibility. Rep. Cole, R-Mancelona, was joined on the House floor today during session by his wife, Stacy Cole, right, as the House voted overwhelmingly to pass House Bill 4727. HB 4727 will further safeguard Michigan’s farmers and crop dusters by eliminating the possibility of a collision with one of these meteorological towers.###### 28Oct House approves Cole’s bill ensuring aircraft safety Tags: #SB, Ag, Cole, cropdusters, farmers, HB4727, METs, weather towers center_img Categories: Cole News,Featured news,Newslast_img

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A Trump administration effort to shift family plan

first_imgA Trump administration effort to shift family planning funding away from organizations that offer comprehensive reproductive health services, including abortion, could cripple federal efforts to stop a dramatic increase in sexually transmitted diseases in the U.S., some public health officials fear.”This is the perfect storm, and it comes at absolutely the worst time,” says Daniel Daltry, program chief of the HIV/AIDS, STD and Viral Hepatitis Program at the Vermont Department of Health.In 2016, the most recent year with reported federal data, there were more than 2 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis reported to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It was the highest number of reported cases ever.This month, the Trump administration proposed new funding changes to the Title X program, which provides grants to programs in family planning, STD screening and breast and cervical cancer screening at nearly 4,000 sites nationwide. The program primarily serves low-income, young women, although a growing number of men also receive services at clinics that get Title X money.Title X funds have never been permitted to be used for abortions. But the president and other Republicans have vowed to cut off all federal funding for Planned Parenthood and other organizations that provide abortions. President Trump’s new rules, if adopted in their current form, would require that Title X services be physically and financially separate from abortion services.Daltry and other public health officials fear these changes will make testing and treatment for STDs harder to get.Many family planning clinics are committed to offering comprehensive services, including contraception and abortion referrals, said David C. Harvey, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors, a membership group of public health department STD directors and community organizations.”These principles are near and dear to them,” he says, “and if the changes are enacted we fear many programs would decide not to take Title X funding.”And with less federal money, he says, these clinics would have fewer resources for STD screening, treatment and outreach.Young people ages 15 through 24 accounted for half of all new STD cases in 2016, according to CDC data. And at least one in 4 four adolescent girls who were sexually active had a sexually transmitted disease; many of those infected don’t have obvious symptoms.STDs are generally easy to cure with antibiotics, but without treatment can cause serious, lasting health problems, including pelvic inflammatory disease, which can lead to infertility.Even if young people have insurance coverage through a parent’s health plan, surveys show many avoid using that coverage, out of concern that their parents will learn that they’ve been tested or treated for an STD.Instead, young people often take their concerns about STDs to a health clinic that gets Title X funding, where they can get confidential services and pay for the visit on a sliding scale, based on their income.The number of STD clinics funded by local or state governments has dwindled over the past decade, Harvey says, and many states now rely on other providers — such as Planned Parenthood — for testing and treatment.With 12 sites in Vermont, “Planned Parenthood has operated as our STD clinic,” says Daltry. Access to these clinics is very important, he adds, noting that while there are other providers throughout the state, they might not offer the same continuum of care.However, advocates of the Trump administration’s plan point out that some new clinics may also now get Title X funding. Earlier this year, the administration made a point of encouraging providers that emphasize fertility awareness methods for family planning to apply for money.The Catholic Medical Association, for example, applied for Title X funding this year. According to a written statement from the organization, “The CMA supports all types of natural family planning; we do not support artificial contraception of any type; nor do we support abortion for any indication, but support appropriate treatments for both mother and baby as indicated by medical circumstances.”Similarly, Dr. Anne Nolte, a family physician at St. Peter’s Gianna Center, a gynecology and infertility practice in New York City, says doctors in her practice don’t prescribe birth control pills or other FDA-approved methods of contraception. But “patients are welcome to come to us for STD screening and treatment,” she says. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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A note from the editor Please consider making a v

first_imgA note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS… A senior Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) official has told MPs that a highly-critical UN report on poverty in the UK was “factually correct” and “made a lot of good points”, despite ministers repeatedly attacking its accuracy.Donna Ward, DWP’s policy director for children, families and disadvantage, told the work and pensions select committee yesterday (Wednesday) that the report by Professor Philip Alston, the UN’s special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, made “really good points” on issues such as austerity and cuts to local government spending.Ministers have consistently dismissed Alston’s report, with minister for disabled people Sarah Newton, who has since resigned, claiming last November – following the publication of his preliminary report – that he had made “factual errors”.And in May, after Alston published his final report, DWP described it as “a barely believable documentation of Britain, based on a tiny period of time spent here” that “paints a completely inaccurate picture of our approach to tackling poverty”.Amber Rudd, the work and pensions secretary, reportedly claimed that Alston had not carried out enough research and apparently threatened to lodge a formal complaint with the UN.But Ward (pictured) has now told MPs on the committee – during an evidence session on the impact of universal credit – that DWP has carried out a “fact check” on the report and has concluded that Alston “made a lot of good points” and that his report was “factually correct”.She said: “I think where the secretary of state took issue with it and where I as a civil servant can’t be involved was the political interpretation of a lot of what’s happened.“But in terms of the facts, in terms of austerity, and cuts to local government funding, in terms of the reliance that we have on the labour market and the risk that we have if there was a recession, all of those things were really good points that we have taken on board, we should take on board.”SNP’s Chris Stephens said Ward’s comments were “quite revealing” because the rapporteur’s report was “very often pooh-poohed” by ministers and some Tory backbenchers.Will Quince, the junior minister for family support, housing and child maintenance, said he took such reports “incredibly seriously”.He said: “I’m not going to say I don’t regret the quite inflammatory language and in some cases quite overtly political tone of the report but there are areas in there that of course I recognise and I know that we need to do a considerable amount of work on and any report of that nature is always going to highlight areas.”Alston said in his preliminary and final reports that government policies such as cuts to public spending and “highly regressive” changes to taxes and benefits suggested that the UK government had breached the “principle of non-discrimination enshrined in international law”.He also said that figures from the Social Metrics Commission showed that 14 million people, a fifth of the population, were living in poverty and nearly half of them were from families in which someone was disabled.And he said that many disabled people’s families had been “driven to breaking point” by cuts to social care.last_img read more

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What Businesses in NYC Need to Know About Discrimination Against Transgender Workers

first_img December 28, 2015 Legal What Businesses in NYC Need to Know About Discrimination Against Transgender Workers 3 min read Entrepreneur Staff –shares 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Apply Now » Staff Writer. Covers leadership, media, technology and culture. Image credit: Shutterstock.com Next Article Businesses in New York City, be warned: If you intentionally and repeatedly refer to a transgender worker as a “he” when the person prefers “she,” you could be setting yourself up to face a discrimination lawsuit.The NYC Commission on Human Rights recently released updated guidelines to clarify what actions are considered discrimination on the part of business owners, particularly with regard to transgender and gender non-conforming employees in the workplace. Under the rules, employers are required to use the employee’s chosen name, pronoun and title “regardless of the individual’s sex assigned at birth, anatomy, gender, medical history, appearance, or the sex indicated on the individual’s identification.”Related: When Company Culture Becomes DiscriminationFor transgender and gender non-conforming people, preferred pronouns can include he/him/his, she/her/hers, they/them/theirs or ze/hir. If you are unsure what someone’s preferred pronoun is, it is within your right to ask. The NYC Commission on Human Rights notes that checking with an employee to make sure you have the correct name and pronoun is not a violation of the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL).An action that does constitute a violation of the law, however, is the withholding an employee benefit like health insurance because of someone’s gender or gender identity. In accordance with the NYCHRL, health plans that are offered must include coverage for “transition-related care or gender-affirming care.” In that same vein, for something like medical leave, employers are required to “treat leave requests to address medical or health care needs related to an individual’s gender identity in the same manner as requests for all other medical conditions.”Related: How Entrepreneurs Can Spot Subtle BiasUnder the law, employers cannot prevent an individual from using a restroom, locker room or any customarily single-sex facility that aligns with their gender identity, regardless of that person’s sex at birth. For instance, a transgender woman cannot be barred from using the women’s restroom nor be forced to use a single-occupancy restroom. And when it comes to dress codes or uniform standards, instituting a rule that is based on sex stereotyping, like one that requires men to wear ties or women to wear high heels in the office, is prohibited. The NYC Commission on Human Rights recommends creating gender neutral requirements for professional attire.Those who break the law can be landed with a civil penalty of up to $125,000, but the NYC Commission on Human Rights explains that violations of the NYCHRL “that are the result of willful, wanton, or malicious conduct” can be fined up to $250,000.Related: It’s Time to Close the Workplace Gender GapWhile sex has been a federally protected class for decades, in 2002 the New York City Council added the Transgender Bill of Rights to the NYCHRL to extend that protection to gender identity and gender expression. New York City is not the only city — or state — that has legislative protections in place for transgender and gender non-conforming individuals. The American Civil Liberties Union says 19 states including the District of Columbia, and at least 200 cities across the country have their own varying laws on the books. The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Add to Queue Nina Zipkinlast_img read more

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