BLOG: Early Detection Helped Tom and Could Make the Difference for You, Too

first_imgBLOG: Early Detection Helped Tom and Could Make the Difference for You, Too Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf February 24, 2016 First Lady Frances Wolf,  The Blog Tom and I announced this morning that Tom has been diagnosed with a treatable form of prostate cancer.Tom’s doctors made the diagnosis after a regular checkup revealed abnormalities.We are very thankful that Tom’s doctors caught this cancer quickly and have worked to plan a treatment schedule that will address his medical issues and allow him to serve the people of Pennsylvania.You can learn more about prostate cancer and early detection from the Department of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Cancer Institute.Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Early detection is important and promising research shows accurate screening tests and preventive measures should help reduce the risk of death from prostate cancer.The American Cancer Society recommends that starting at age 50, men should talk to a healthcare provider about the pros and cons of testing so they can decide if testing is the right choice for them.But early detection can help make other types of cancer and many diseases much more manageable for you and your family. Learn more about early detection of all types of cancer from the American Cancer Society.We encourage everyone in Pennsylvania to make sure you schedule regular checkups with their doctors and be aware of screening guidelines so early detection and treatment can be possible.Take a moment today to schedule a checkup with your doctor. It made a huge difference for our family – it could for you too.center_img By: First Lady Frances Wolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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UEFA/CAF Tourney: Eaglets tackle host Turkey in opener

first_imgRelatedPosts UEFA changes venue of Player of the Season award ceremony, Champions League draw UEFA returning N259bn to broadcasters due to COVID-19 European Super Cup: UEFA in talks with Hungary following border closure The Turkey Technical Centre in Istanbul will witness some interesting football when five-time world champions, Golden Eaglets of Nigeria, file out against their counterparts from Turkey, host nation of the UEFA/CAF U17 International Tournament, on Sunday.Eaglets and their officials arrived in Istanbul on Friday and had their first training session at the Turkey Technical Centre on Saturday morning before the officials proceeded to attend a technical meeting of all the eight participating teams at the tournament.Speaking after the technical meeting, Manu Garba, Head Coach of the team, insisted that the tournament is a perfect opportunity to test the readiness of the players for the task ahead at the FIFA U17 World Cup starting next month in Brazil.“I am very optimistic that the tournament will come good for the players to stand the test of time in Brazil. Playing Turkey will definitely be a strong test for the team.” Manu stated.Angola will battle Scotland in another game on Sunday.The eight participating teams at the UEFA/CAF U17 International Tournament are host Turkey, Nigeria, Scotland, Angola, Cameroon, Senegal, Paraguay and Guatemala.This year’s FIFA U17 World Cup finals will hold October 26 to November 17 in Brazil.21 EAGLETS IN TURKEY FOR UEFA/CAF TOURNEYGoalkeepers: Joseph Oluwabusola; Sunday Stephen; Suleiman ShaibuDefenders: Shedrack Tanko; Ikenna Ferdinand; Usman Mohammed; Charles Etim; David OdukoMidfielders: Samson Tijani; Mubaraq Adeshina; Shuaibu Abdulrazaq; Akinkunmi Amoo; Olatomi Olaniyan; Peter Agba; Ibraheem Jabaar; Fawaz Abdullahi; Suleiman LawalForwards: Olakunle Olusegun; Mayowa Abayomi; Wisdom Ubani; Divine Nwachukwu. Tags: UEFAlast_img read more

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WIN FREE MIKE DENVER TICKETS AND OVERNIGHT STAY FOR TWO AT VILLA ROSE HOTEL

first_imgScoil Mhuire, Stranorlar in conjunction with the Villa Rose Hotel are giving one lucky reader the opportunity to win FREE Mike Denver Tickets AND an overnight Stay for TWO at the Villa Rose Hotel, Ballybofey.To enter simply share this story on your Facebook page and you will automatically be entered into the draw to WIN!Scoil Mhuire, Stranorlar are delighted to present Mike Denver and his band who will be playing a Fundraising Dance in the Villa Rose Hotel on the 11th of December 2014. This fundraiser is vitally important, as all money raised will be going towards the purchase of a set of class tablets and improvements needed in the Junior Yard.All involved have been working on this projects for a number of months and are hoping the fundraiser will make a huge difference.Organisers are asking for people from both near and far to support this dance on the night as every ticket counts and it is sure to be an enjoyable and lively occasion.The Villa Rose Hotel are offering a package deal with Tickets and Dinner for only €39pp or an Overnight stay with Tickets & Dinner for only €79pp, this is the ideal pre-Christmas night out. Tickets can be purchased from hotel reception or over the phone on 074-9132266.Entries for the draw close on 09/12/14. Prize is for 2 people sharing. Competition T&C apply.Log on to www.villarose.net/event/5099/Dancing-to-Mike-Denver-15 for full details. WIN FREE MIKE DENVER TICKETS AND OVERNIGHT STAY FOR TWO AT VILLA ROSE HOTEL was last modified: December 4th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:EntertainmentFeaturesnewslast_img read more

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Anglican church launches campaign against abuse

first_img“Faith gives South Africa a foundation to build a violence-free country,” says South Africa’s Anglican archbishop, Thabo Makgoba.(Image: Anglican Church of Southern Africa)Veena O’Sullivan of global Christian relief and development agency Tearfund says faith-based organisations have an obligation to work to end sexual violence against women and children.(Image: Sulaiman Philip)MEDIA CONTACT• Veena O’Sullivan Team LeaderTearfund+27 31 266 8469Sulaiman PhilipThe rape and murder of cousins Yonelisa (2) and Zandile (3) Mali in the poor settlement of Diepsloot north of Johannesburg in October enflamed the crime-ridden community, and led to violent reprisals. The community burnt the suspects’ homes to the ground.Every day, South Africans face reports of dreadful violence against women and children: the rape of a 90-year-old grandmother, or of a three-week-old child. Each new horror rouses people’s anger. But, until now, that anger has had no outlet. The rape and murder of the Mali toddlers was just one of 64 000 reported cases of sexual violence that take place in South Africa in a single year. It’s a shockingly high number. And according to to Breaking The Silence, a report released by global Christian relief and development agency Tearfund, those reported cases make up a mere 5% of all sexual assaults committed in a year.Tearfund’s report spurred the agency to set up We Will Speak Out, with the support of Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, the Anglican archbishop of Cape Town. Launched at St Albans the Martyr Church in Pretoria on Monday 25 November, the intention of the campaign is to help combat sexual violence through the more active involvement of the church.Some 35-million South Africans identify themselves as Christian, out of a population of 51-million. Christian South Africans, Makgoba said, have a history of fighting injustice. Desmond Tutu, South Africa’s only archbishop emeritus, won the Nobel Peace Prize for his campaign to end apartheid using economic sanctions.“We have done mighty things before, and we can do it again,” Makgoba said. “Together, we can draw a line and move forward towards a different future.”Veena O’Sullivan, Tearfund team leader, said the involvement of the worldwide Anglican Communion would help stop the stigma against rape survivors, and break the silence that allows sexual violence to continue. “We needed a champion, a strong voice that will be heard and listened to,” she said. “Reverend Makgoba is that man who can bring together leaders of all religions.”Multi-denominationalFor now, the campaign involves only the Christian community. But Tearfund hopes that within a year all faiths will be join it. The NGO’s research found that survivors believed it was time people of faith proved themselves. A common assertion among survivors interviewed for the study was the belief that the church was far too concerned with theology and did not see tackling sexual violence as part of its biblical mandate.Tearfund’s research involved interviews with survivors of sexual assault, many of whom were clear in their feeling that the church had failed them as women and then again as victims. Researchers in Bredasdorp, where teenager Anene Booysen was brutally raped and murdered, found a negative perception regarding the role of the church when it came to victims of sexual assault.“The church is the anchor of the community but they run from victims. They sweep it under the rug. Or they stigmatise victims, isolating them,” an anonymous survivor told the researchers.O’Sullivan has worked with survivors in Democratic Republic of Congo, where rape is used as a weapon of war, but is shocked by the cyclical nature of sexual violence in South Africa. “The culture of rape is so cyclical in this country. We found families where the grandmother and mother had been raped; now the child as well.”Sexual violence has become normalised in some communities, the report suggests, and O’Sullivan argues that there is a real danger that these perceptions will become ingrained and intractable. “There is a culture of silence that comes from that; an acceptance that it is inevitable. That is what we must bring an end to.”Four-point planWith this as a guiding principle, Tearfund and the Anglican Church formulated a four-point plan that forms the basis of We Will Speak Out:● Faith communities will speak out and act: despite the negative perception that some survivors have of the church, they still feel that religious communities are a refuge. The church has a unique role to offer lifelong support to survivors. A church in Bredasdorp is showing the way by setting up a neighbourhood watch scheme. It spreads safety messages and offers counselling and home visits to survivors.● Churches will become safe spaces for survivors: beyond praying for an end to sexual violence and offering a safe space for healing, congregations are encouraged to become non-judgemental sanctuaries for survivors. Male church leaders need to highlight and spread the message that women in their congregation share the same rights as men and that the blame for sexual violence cannot be laid at the door of the victim.● Survivors’ movement will influence policy and practice: the church’s response to the epidemic of sexual violence will be shaped by survivors. The church has undertaken to work with the authorities to understand the procedures involved in reporting rape and to offer assistance to any victim who asks for it.● Men will be involved in preventing sexual violence: the faith community has access to a pool of dedicated volunteers who can mentor men and boys about their role in relationships and society. They are often also the only source of positive role models in a community and these should be tapped to spread the message that sexual violence must end.O’Sullivan admits that the findings did not come as a surprise, but she says that it is a reflection of the inherent good of South Africans that they are embracing a programme hoping to make a change. “South Africa is an amazing country but on the ground there is so much pain and suffering. Communities are willing to join hands, to collaborate. There is hope.”last_img read more

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How AI Can Shape the Future of UX

first_imgRelated Posts Brad AndersonEditor In Chief at ReadWrite How to Avoid Being Part of 90% of Failed Companies Why Your Company’s Tech Transformation Starts W… Building a Workplace for the Next 100 Years Brad is the editor overseeing contributed content at ReadWrite.com. He previously worked as an editor at PayPal and Crunchbase. You can reach him at brad at readwrite.com. Tags:#design Artificial intelligence (AI) gathers data to interpret and predict human behavior, and user experience (UX) does the same thing — it reads human behavior to anticipate what people will do next.With the same end goal in mind, AI has the power to shape the future of UX, offering new insights and context to the experiences brands build for users. The predictive analytics underpinning both AI and UX creates an intersection that will benefit both consumers and the companies hoping to cater to them.“UX is still the center,” explains Sandy Marsico, the founder and CEO of Sandstorm Design, a brand experience agency. “AI and predictive analytics are helping to determine what the user wants, needs, or does next. AI assists in adding insights, but it doesn’t tell the whole story.”Marsico and her team at Sandstorm see AI as a tool, not a replacement for human analysis, and they welcome it. “We’re all trying to predict the future,” she says. “AI won’t figure out the problems we need to solve — AI helps us have a deeper understanding of our user so we can tailor our content and messaging to anticipate motivations and behaviors.”Developing a Deeper UnderstandingMarsico’s right — AI gives us information to help solve problems, but it still takes humans to identify the problems in the first place. Humans have the unique ability to understand the context of AI’s insights and how they might impact UX design; humans are the ones capable of developing empathy for other users.Sandstorm’s usability testing and user research are designed to remove subjectivity from its work and ensure UX decisions are based on data rather than assumptions. Marsico says this has represented an important shift in a creative arena like marketing, where the work has traditionally been highly subjective. But she cautions that data alone would produce uniformity and a profound lack of inspiration.“Imagine AI learns how to build the perfect website — would they all start to look exactly the same? Would all text be black on a white background as that has the highest contrast?” she asks. “Humans don’t actually require, nor desire, perfection 100 percent of the time. We’re naturally attuned to variety.”In general, Sandstorm’s director of analytics and technology, Nick Meshes, says machine learning requires a human trainer to feed data to its algorithms and then review the results, adjust the strategy, and guide the progression of the AI. Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and Google’s Captcha efforts are examples of tools leveraging user experiences to improve artificial intelligence. “AI can’t manage complex interactions that aren’t built on simple mechanics or clear correct/incorrect grading — like judging a mobile experience as engaging — so we need humans to make that assessment,” Meshes says.Meshes points to some of the designs currently being built by AI as examples of the significant limitations of treating AI as an all-encompassing solution when it comes to UX. “LogoJoy creates functional logos, but it’s auto-designing based on limited inputs and lacks an opportunity to provide thoughtful brand direction to differentiate from competitors,” he says. It’s a cost-effective solution for the solopreneur who doesn’t have the budget for a branding agency, but it offers proof that machines can’t do everything. Making Our Way to What’s NextThis all points to a future in which UX uses insights from AI but isn’t driven by them. Marsico sees AI being widely accepted in the UX world as people recognize its value: “We currently aggregate insights from multiple and mixed research methods such as in-depth user research, ethnography/netnography, usability studies, card sorting, competitive and trend research, heuristic analysis, and big data, to name a few, to pull together our strategic thinking and UX approach,” she says. “In the future, brand experience agencies will include AI as another integral part of their process.”By relying on AI to do some of the data collection and number crunching — which it’s capable of doing more rapidly than human beings — UX experts will be freed up to do higher-level analysis of the data gathered. Like Uber, SpotHero, and those before it, AI will be treated as an outsourced service provider. “Embracing advanced technology, automating processes, and leveraging data are critical to how we operate, but at the end of the day, we focus on a deep understanding of user behaviors, which requires human interaction — so it’s a balance,” explains Karen Bartuch, Sandstorm’s director of strategy and research.“AI can be used to create a tailored message to each consumer — what we might call an ‘audience of one’ — going beyond a set list of offerings based on the individual’s previous activities and preferences to assemble a personalized message built in real time, including machine-generated text, image selection, and even video created on demand,” Meshes says. “Consumers would grow to expect that every message they receive would always be tailored to their personal interests and the current context of where they are and what they’re doing, solving the exact problem they have at that moment.”Current UX techniques address these emerging capabilities by breaking down elements into individual components, applying intuitive design principles, and assembling them into engaging layouts. This process can be adapted as the granularity and number of variations increase by applying rules to the overall layout, then using optimization testing for the AI to refine the results.One example of artificial intelligence impacting user experience is an algorithm featuring a specific piece of content. “Google’s ‘featured snippet,’ where it displays the excerpt of a webpage above all other ranked page results on a search query, makes that result the de facto authoritative source for that topic,” Meshes says. “These are coveted spots that can have a magnifying effect on driving more engagement and sales. It’s fair to assume that voice interfaces will take the ‘featured snippet’ concept and distill it to being the only possible search result, much like how Amazon features one product for a given category, called “Amazon’s Choice.’”This presents new questions for brands: How do you design the structure and layout of content so it will become the only answer selected and delivered by a machine? How do you sell a product to an algorithm that essentially does the purchasing on behalf of the consumer? And how do you continue to incorporate input from users when the machines are doing all the work? “We are excited about the opportunity AI will afford UX, but also very sensitive to maintaining that human connection,” Bartuch says. In fact, Tesla CEO Elon Musk recently said humans are “underrated” and that he regretted using robots to build the Model 3. Trapped in “manufacturing hell,” he explained that Tesla’s production had actually been slowed down by its machinery, which had complicated the process. Even tech powerhouses have discovered that robots sometimes know too much for their own good — and need human insight to achieve balance.AI and UX both aim to understand users and supply what they need, making AI a technology ripe for impacting the experiences brands build for users. UX will still need to bring a human touch to what AI supplies, applying concepts from one domain to another. Apart, their abilities to interpret behavior are limited; together, they’ll fuel unlimited possibilities. Why Your eCommerce Business Should Have a Pop-U…last_img read more

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