CBL Blamed for Increment in Forex Rate

first_imgAssistant Secretary General of the National Foreign Exchange Bureau of Liberia (NAFIBOL), Nimely Saye, frowns on the CBL’s continuous failure to address the exchange rate issue on the Liberian market. But Ex SG of Money Changers Association Blames Supply and DemandThe assistant secretary general of the National Foreign Exchange Bureau of Liberia (NAFIBOL), Nimely Saye, has blamed the Central Bank of Liberia (CBL) for the high increase in the US-Liberian dollar exchange rate on the Liberian market, because of its inability to regulate the forex market.Saye made the remarks yesterday in an exclusive interview with the Daily Observer at his forex bureau on Broad Street, when he indicated that the supervision and regulations department at the CBL has failed to work in the interest of legal foreign exchangers, thereby leaving the market open.He said if the CBL does not put the situation under control now, the exchange rate would reach L$150 to US$1 by July, “because of the current open market situation.”Saye, who has been in the forex business for over 15 years, indicated that the situation continues to hamper legal exchangers in paying their taxes, rent, salaries, and other fees.He said despite a series of meetings with authorities of the bank to intervene in the ongoing situation on the Liberian market, they (bank authorities) appear unmoved by their concerns.“We are not benefiting under Governor Milton A. Weeks’ administration, because there are many illegal foreign exchangers in the various street corners that are changing at their own rate, including cement depots, gas stations, rice depots, supermarkets, and stores thereby hampering the legal forex business,” Saye said.According to him, the protection of legal exchangers by the Central Bank of Liberia can easily stabilize the exchange rate on the market in the shortest possible time.He said, “We had a blissful time with the Dr. J. Mills Jones administration, because of his ability to listen and willingness to work with the legal bureaus and the association.“This led to a stable rate on the Liberian market that would last for three to four months consistently without any daily or weekly increment, from L$88, 89, and 90 to US$1.”According to him, there are many illegal forex businesses than legal ones which, he said, deserves serious attention by the government, particularly the CBL, adding, “We have only 103 registered bureaus across the country.”“The CBL takes seven to eight months nowadays before coming to get rid of illegal foreign exchangers. The bank needs to get rid of them on the market or press on them to legalize their status and operate under CBL regulations.“Everyone is changing money without any restriction, which has a serious consequence on the economy and the country. We are the middlemen between the commercial bank, Central Bank, and business people, but we are not given the opportunity to play our role well,” he said.Saye said commercial banks, cement depots, gas stations, and rice depots do not have the right to engage in the money exchange business due to the lack of license from the CBL, but they nonetheless continue to do such a business, which is currently affecting the country.He said the association is confident that the Weah administration will work to have the situation addressed, stating, “We can only get a better result in the country and the economy if the CBL takes action against illegal forex businesses.”Saye called on President George Weah to issue an Executive Order, which he believes will help to reduce or stabilize the exchange rate and also ensure that those who are not licensed to operate as money exchangers in the country are barred from doing so.“We all observed that few hours to President Weah’s State of the Nation Address, the rate dropped because money exchangers didn’t have money. If the business people hold on to their money, it will be a serious problem,” he stated.“In 1999, the Central Bank of Liberia enacted a law establishing the Foreign Exchange Bureau and since the act was created, we have been protected according to the laws.”However the first secretary general of the Liberia Money Changers Association, Mr. Idrissa Kaba has objected to the claim that the CBL is responsible for the high exchange rate of the Liberian dollar to the US dollar.“Every student of economics,” Kaba said, “will realize that what is happening between the US dollar and the Liberian dollar is the issue of supply and demand and not because there are what someone will describe as ‘illegal money changers’ in the country.”Kaba said “The supply of the US dollar is lower than that of the Liberian dollar on the market and that is the reason the demand for the US dollar has affected the Liberian dollar.” He added that if the Liberian government can provide dollars to all major foreign businesses, including the huge supermarkets, Club Beer, Coco Cola, CEMENCO, among others, the pressure would naturally reduce on the Liberian dollar and it will normalize the exchange rate.Central Bank of Liberia in a release issued by Mr. Cyrus Wleh Badio, Head of Corporate Communications, said yesterday that despite an end-of-year press conference on December 21, 2017 on the state of the Liberian economy, stories still linger about alleged illegal capital transfers. These stories linger because the statistics that the Central Bank of Liberia (CBL) has released have been taken out of context and/or simply misunderstood.“It is therefore important, that the CBL clarifies these stories to prevent speculations that have the propensity to undermine the credibility and stability of the financial sector and by extension present wrong signals to the public including our development partners, current and potential investors, among others.“During the December 2017 Press Conference, the CBL disclosed that between November 2016 and October 2017, outward personal remittances amounted to US$449.41 million while during that same period, Liberia received US$545.78 million in inward personal remittance, representing a net gain of US$96.37 million.“The US$449 million mentioned comprised all transfers in cash made by residents to non-residents and transfers between resident and non-resident individuals on one hand. On the other hand, it also comprised transfers of income of border, seasonal, and other short-term workers who are employed in the economy where they are not resident. It is the total of all monies remitted through Western Union, MoneyGram, Ria (another money transfer operator) and via SWIFT1 by individuals and/or businesses to the rest of the world.“Furthermore, reporting that there was US$449.41 in outward personal remittance in 2017 does not in any way suggest that the money was transmitted directly from the CBL or transmitted to unidentified foreign accounts. The CBL wishes to emphasize that the sources of the monies that were remitted were not from the Central Bank of Liberia. In addition, nowhere in the CBL publication does the issue of unidentified foreign accounts arise.“For the calendar year 2017 (i.e. January-December, 2017), provisional statistics show that the total outflows of personal remittances amounted to US$445.3 million. Of this amount, about 31.5 percent was transferred through Money Transfer Operators (i.e. Western Union, MoneyGram, and RIA) while the remaining 68.5 percent were through banks using SWIFT. Most of the SWIFT transactions (which constituted 68.5 percent of the total outflows) were carried out by businesses engaged in construction activities, rice and frozen food importation, auto parts, supermarkets and trading businesses, among others.“Over the last 2 years, preceding the elections period, the total outflows of personal remittances grew from US$293.4 million in 2015 to US$304.6 million in 2016. The growth in total outflow in 2017 largely reflects responses within the economy to uncertainty that may have been associated with the then impending elections. Where there is uncertainty, there will be outflow of funds. It is important, however, to once again emphasize that the total outflow of remittances mentioned is an aggregate of personal remittances from various sources and NOT transfers made by officials of Government or to unknown accounts as is being wrongly perceived.“The Central Bank of Liberia welcomes public scrutiny, especially from the media, but this must be done in good faith,” the statement said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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MK Dons v QPR: Phillips on bench

first_imgMatt Phillips is on the bench for QPR at MK Dons, where Conor Washington, Nasser El Khayati and Daniel Tozser are brought into the starting line-up.Washington replaces Sebastian Polter up front, while Junior Hoilett is absent and Massimo Luongo will operate in a more advanced midfield role.Meanwhile, MK Dons goalkeeper David Martin returns after injury.MK Dons: Martin; Baldock, McFadzean, Kay, Lewington; Potter, Forster-Caskey; Murphy, Williams, Bowditch; Revell.Subs: Cropper, Spence, Carruthers, Reeves, Powell, Hall, Maynard.QPR: Smithies, Onuoha, Angella, Hall, Perch, Henry, Tozser, El Khayati, Luongo, Chery, Washington.Subs: Ingram, Konchesky, Faurlin, Phillips, Diakite, Petrasso, Polter.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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Paper View:  Why SETI Hears Only a “Great Silence”

first_imgEnrico Fermi posed a curious question in 1950: “Where is everybody?”  If life emerges on planets as a consequence of evolution, there should be other intelligent civilizations out there, and some of them must have colonized other worlds.  He thought there must have been plenty of time for galactic colonizers to achieve technologies far beyond our own by billions of years, and therefore to have reached every corner of the Galaxy by now, including Earth.  Where are they?  This innocuous question, named “Fermi’s Paradox” (though others had asked it, too) has troubled advocates of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) ever since.  Though SETI technicians patiently eavesdrop on more and more stars each year in the half-century since SETI began, the Great Silence seems ominous.     Milan M. Cirkovic and Robert J. Bradbury think they know why.  Their ideas, published in New Astronomy July 2006,1 call for nothing less than a complete overhaul of SETI thinking: Hereby, we would like to propose a novel solution, based on the astrophysical properties of our Galactic environment on large scales, as well as some economic and informational aspects of the presumed advanced technological civilizations (henceforth ATCs).  In doing so, we will suggest a radically new perspective on the entire SETI endeavor. Traditional SETI, listening for radio signals from biological life, is “fundamentally flawed,” they claim.  Think post-biological.  Life will not remain content with the limitations of flesh, they reason.  Borrowing from the speculations of science historian Steven J. Dick, they believe biology will eventually give way to technology.  Advanced technical civilizations will be composed of machines.  They quote Dick: In sorting priorities, I adopt what I term the central principle of cultural evolution, which I refer to as the Intelligence Principle: the maintenance, improvement and perpetuation of knowledge and intelligence is the central driving force of cultural evolution, and that to the extent intelligence can be improved, it will be improved. Not “whatever can go wrong, will go wrong,” in other words.  At least until the universe runs down, the Intelligence Principle will triumph over Murphy’s Law.  This is the foundational principle of their proposal.  Life will gravitate toward maximum information processing, subject to the constraints of physical laws. A natural extension of the Intelligence Principle is what can be called the digital perspective on astrobiology: After a particular threshold complexity is reached, the relevant relations between existent entities are characterized by requirements of computation and information processing.  It is related to the emergent computational concepts not only in biology, but in other fields such as fundamental physics, cosmology, neuroscience, and social sciences. Here’s a brief synopsis of their scenario.  Life emerges on a planet, evolves to a state of intelligence, then gravitates toward more efficient information processing and computation, till it transcends the biological and becomes strictly technological.  A machine civilization is not going to care about communicating with beings like us.  Its priority will be to maximize information processing.  To do this, the entities will have to have to migrate from the places where they first evolved as biological life forms.  This is due to simple constraints of physics.  The warmth of a summer sun may be valuable to biological organisms like us, but heat is an enemy of computation.  Galaxies have a galactic temperature gradient: hot at the center, cooler at the edges.  It’s at the outskirts of the galaxy, therefore, where a machine civilization would migrate.  That, however, is not where traditional SETI is looking, and that is the reason for the Great Silence.     In their scenario, we need to drastically modify our search strategy.  Whether artifacts of technology would be detectable at the edges of the Milky Way or external galaxies, they are not sure.  Perhaps aliens would send inscriptions (see 09/01/2004).  They are quite certain, though, that radio is not on the broadcast schedule: We conclude that the conventional radio SETI assuming beamed broadcasts from targets – selected exclusively on the basis of the old-fashioned biological paradigm – within the vicinity of our Solar System … is ill-founded and has minuscule chances of success on the present hypothesis.  It is a clear and testable prediction of the present hypothesis that the undergoing SETI experiments using this conservative approach will yield only negative results. (Italics theirs.)  How can their prediction indeed be tested?  If conventional SETI does get a radio signal, the prediction might fail; otherwise, how long would they have to wait in silence to feel vindicated?  Traditional SETI researchers would probably argue this point.  But Cirkovic and Bradley also put forth a falsification test: look for evidence of technological artifacts at the outer fringes of nearby galaxies.  That, unfortunately, will probably be very difficult without more advanced technology.  Nonetheless, they are quite adamant that traditional SETI thinking is parochial.  It’s oblivious to the physical constraints that would drive life toward information processing.  “In a sense the problem has nothing to do with the universe itself, and everything to do with our ignorance and prejudices,” they state accusingly.  “In this special sense, the flaws in the currently prevailing views on SETI are much less excusable.”     In their paper, the authors acknowledged the contribution of Guillermo Gonzalez (along with Peter Ward and Donald Brownlee) to the extension of ideas about planetary “habitable zones” to galactic scales: the Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ).2  They extended this concept further to a Galactic Technological Zone (GTZ), where machines could optimize their computational power.  This zone would be the outer reaches of a spiral galaxy – but not so far out that heavy elements would be lacking.  They were also honest about their assumptions: There is no meaningful scientific hypothesis for resolving Fermi’s Paradox – or, indeed, any problem of importance in science – without a set of assumptions.  In building of the migrational solution to Fermi’s puzzle, we have relied on the following set of assumptions: The Copernican principle continues to hold in astrobiology, i.e. there is nothing special about the Earth and the Solar System when considerations of life, intelligent observers or ATCs are made.2 Laws of physics (as applied to the classical computation theory and astrophysics) are universally valid. Naturalistic explanations for the origin of life, intelligence and ATCs are valid. The Milky Way galaxy exhibits well-established gradients of both baryonic matter density and equilibrium radiation field temperature. Habitable planets occur naturally only within the GHZ (which evolves in a manner roughly understood), but ATCs are not in any way limited to this region. We assume local influences both of and on ATCs.  Thus, we disregard overly speculative ideas about such concepts as cosmic wormholes or “basement universes”.  Interstellar travel is feasible, but it is bound to be slow and expensive (for anything larger than nanomachines) at all epochs. Astroengineering on the scales significantly larger than the scale of a typical planetary system (on the pc-scale and above) will remain difficult and expensive at all epochs and for all ATCs. ATCs will tend to maximize the efficiency of information-processing, no matter how heterogeneous their biological and cultural structures and evolutionary pathways are. These assumptions are naturally of varying validity and importance.  Items 1 through 3 are essential methodological guidelines of the entire scientific endeavor.  Although item 1 has recently become controversial with “rare Earth” theorists, there is still no compelling reasons for relinquishing it.  Assumption 4 is an empirical fact, and 5 is quite close to it.  Assumptions 6 and 7 are conservative extrapolations of our limited scientific and technological perspective, but in our view should be retained until the contrary positions can be verified.  In particular, absence of the Galaxy-size astroengineering effects in external galaxies … strongly supports the assumption 7. The most speculative assumption was #8, they acknowledged, but they reasoned this way: whether a civilization evolves toward hedonism (like the Romans) or toward accomplishment (like the Greeks), both would need to maximize their information processing.  “In either situation,” they rationalized, “they will seek the greatest computational capacity and efficiency possible to support these activities.”     So there you have it.  The drive toward the ultimate CPU governs the fate of life and intelligence.  Geeks will someday rule the universe. 1Milan M. Cirkovic and Robert J. Bradbury, “Galactic gradients, postbiological evolution and the apparent failure of SETI,” New Astronomy, Volume 11, Issue 8, July 2006, Pages 628-639, doi:10.1016/j.newast.2006.04.003. 2See also the film The Privileged Planet.  In this film Gonzales discusses the GHZ, and Brownlee gives reasons for his “rare earth” hypothesis.  The film also argues against the assumed Copernican Principle. Interesting paper.  Heavily sci-fi, profoundly speculative, politically incorrect, and somewhat amusing, perhaps, but thought-provoking.  Is it scientific?  Does its presence in a scientific journal indicate it is worthy of more serious consideration by rational truth-seekers than if it appeared in a theological journal or in Mad Magazine?  After all, they made predictions and provided a falsification criterion.  They talked about baryons and physical laws and thermodynamics.  And look – they even had equations!  Surely no one could accuse this kind of sober, rigorous analysis as being equivalent to religion.  What do you think?     Religion is a misleading word in this context.  It conjures up images of candles, robes, icons and prayer wheels.  World view is a more appropriate term: a way of looking at the world, of answering the big questions: who are we?  Where did we come from?  Why are we here?  Where are we going?  Science cannot answer these questions, yet world-view issues loom big in this article.  They have attempted to give their opinion about the origin and ultimate fate of the universe, dress it in a lab coat and pass it off as science.  Yet by any measure of scientific criteria, they always left a way out.     Their prediction is hollow, because it would require proving a universal negative.  Their falsification test is hollow, because we could all be dead before anyone finds a way to detect an unknown kind of technology at intergalactic distances, and even if someone did, another would find a natural explanation for it.  Predictions and falsifiability are not necessary components of science anyway, according to some philosophers of science.  And equations – well, nice, but the ones in the paper describe observable physical properties of temperature distribution in galaxies and have nothing to do with the social habits of intelligent beings.  Sentient beings are notoriously resistant to obeying equations about what they should do or will do.  In short, the scientific props of this article are distractions from the fact this is nothing more than a world view paper.     Their entire thesis breaks down on one of their assumptions.  It was nice of them to list their assumptions, but not so nice to glibly claim that the least plausible is one of “essential methodological guidelines of the entire scientific endeavor,” namely, “Naturalistic explanations for the origin of life, intelligence and ATCs are valid.”  Did you catch it?  They just attempted to baptize naturalism in the waters of science as if we wouldn’t notice.  (Only Cirkovic has a PhD, but they both attempted to doctor a philosophy.)     Why should this tactic be allowed for sci-fi speculation, but not for other kinds of scholarly investigation?  After all, theologians can make testable predictions.  A conservative Bible scholar, for instance, could predict that evidence for King David will be found, even point to the Tel Dan inscription as confirming evidence.  Some preachers argue that the equation “nothing times nobody equals everything.” has been falsified.  Should sufficiently scholarly sermons be allowed in scientific journals, then?  Not a few theologians are well trained in mathematical physics, and not a few scientists doubt the assumptions listed by these two speculators.  They should have no privilege in this game.  The quality of the reasoning and the support of evidence, not the scientific trappings and venue, need to carry weight in evaluating world view claims.  Cirkovic and Bradbury may wish to believe that life and intelligence are emergent properties of matter in motion, but they cannot support this world view with scientific evidence.  In fact, the tide of evidence is overwhelmingly against it (06/12/2006, 04/17/2006, online book).     These sci-fi speculators pulled off a shifty sidestep.  They merely assumed that “naturalistic explanations” for these things are “valid,” and then hid behind an arbitrary rule that naturalism is an essential methodological guideline for the entire scientific endeavor.  Oh yeah?  It wasn’t for many of the greatest scientists in history (see online book).  This claim is only made now by the Eugenie Scotts and Ken Millers of the world who want to shield their philosophical speculations from critical scrutiny.  It’s a tactic not unlike the childhood ploy “King’s X” that allows them to evade rules of the game to which the others are bound.     Cirkovic and Bradbury are as free as anyone to speculate, but need to take their speculations out of New Astronomy and argue them before philosophers and theologians, not claim special privilege for things that cannot be observed or known – indeed, things that run contrary to what we do know about the propensities of matter in motion.  What they wrote, though, is bound to make the SETI Institute angry.  A lot of investment capital is bound up in traditional SETI strategies.  These two warring parties may make any further comments superfluous; they may end up falsifying each other.(Visited 53 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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8 Mobile Technologies to Watch in 2010

first_imgTags:#2009 Redux#web#Year in Review At the beginning of this year, analyst firm Gartner released a report that highlights eight up-and-coming mobile technologies which they predict will impact the mobile industry over the course of the next two years. According to Nick Jones, vice president and analyst at the firm, the technologies they’ve identified will evolve quickly and will likely pose issues that will have to be addressed by short term strategies. Editor’s note: This story is part of a series we call Redux, where we’ll re-publish some of our best posts of 2009. As we look back at the year – and ahead to what next year holds – we think these are the stories that deserve a second glance. It’s not just a best-of list, it’s also a collection of posts that examine the fundamental issues that continue to shape the Web. We hope you enjoy reading them again and we look forward to bringing you more Web products and trends analysis in 2010. Happy holidays from Team ReadWriteWeb!The eight technologies identified include the following:Bluetooth 3.0 This is one of the no-brainers on the list. The Bluetooth 3.0 specification will be released this year and devices will start to hit the shelves by 2010. At this point, it’s expected that the 3.0 spec will include faster speeds, reportedly transferring files at 480 megabits per second in close proximity and 100 megabits per second at 10 meters. It will also feature an ultra-low-power mode that Gartner predicts will enable new peripherals, sensors, and applications, such as health monitoring. The technology will be backwards compatible, allowing old devices to communicate with new ones, so there’s no reason for it not take off in the upcoming years. Mobile User Interfaces + Mobile Web/WidgetsMobile user interfaces and mobile web/widgets were listed separately, accounting for two items on the list, but we think they can be lumped together. They all point to how mobile computing is rapidly becoming a new platform for everything from consumer mobile apps to B2E (business-to-employee) and B2C (business-to-customer). (Gartner did not include B2B on their list.) Modern day smartphones like the iPhone, Android, Blackberry, the upcoming Pre, and others deliver better interfaces for browsing the web, thus making it accessible to more people. Widget-like applications, including those that replicate thin client technology, will become more common especially in B2C strategies. Yet the mobile web still has challenges ahead. For example, there are no standards for browser access to handset services like the camera or GPS, the report notes. Location AwarenessLocation sensing, powered by GPS as well as Wi-Fi and triangulation, opens up new possibilities for mobile social networking and presence applications. Technology’s earliest adopters are already familiar with social networks like Brightkite and Loopt which let you reveal your location to a network of friends. But we’re still on the tip of this iceberg. Take for example, the iPhone IM client Palringo, they’re just now adding location services to their application. This allows users to see how far away their contacts are, introducing a whole new dimension to mobile communication. Over the next year or two, this sort of technology is expected to become more commonplace, but it will also raise questions about privacy. Will you want your network of online friends and acquaintances to really know your exact location? Will turning off location awareness signal that you’re up to something sneaky (so asks the suspicious wife, husband, boss, etc.)? As a society, we will have to answer these questions and more in the near future. Near Field Communication (NFC) NFC is a technology that provides a way for consumers to use their mobile phones for making payments, among other things. It’s something that has taken off in many countries worldwide, but certainly not all, and definitely not in the United States just yet. Unfortunately, Gartner predicts that the move towards mobile payment systems will still not occur this year or the next in mature markets like the U.S. and Western Europe. Instead, NFC is more likely to take off in emerging markets. Other uses of the technology, such as the ability to transfer photos from phone to digital photo frames, will also remain elusive to more developed markets. 802.11n & Cellular Broadband802.11n, a specification for wireless local area networks (WLANs), initially gave us pause. Although not ratified as an official standard yet, the technology is already commonplace. However, until it “goes gold” so to speak, it won’t really infiltrate the mobile world. Even the ubiquitous iPhone only supports 802.11 b/g at the moment.  On the flip side, the other Internet connection technology, cellular broadband, has the potential to make Wi-Fi almost unnecessary, at least for achieving high speeds. In addition to mobile phones, laptop makers will likely continue to incorporate this technology into their netbooks and notebooks using modern chipsets that provide superior performance to our current crop of add-on cards and dongles.Display Technologies Display technologies will also see improvements in the upcoming years. New technologies like active pixel displays, passive displays and pico projectors will have an impact. Pico projectors – the tiny portable projectors we saw being introduced at this year’s CES – will enable new mobile use cases. Instant presentations in informal settings could become more common when there isn’t large, cumbersome equipment to set up. The different types of display technologies introduced in 2009 and 2010 will become important differentiators between devices and will impact user selection criterion, says Gartner. For more information on these above technologies, you can read through the full report available here on Gartner’s web site. Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments on how you think the mobile space will be impacted in the future. sarah perez Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Railways told to pay relief to woman who lost legs

first_imgThe Bombay High Court has asked the Railways to take a decision on granting compensation to a woman, who lost both her legs while trying to board a moving train at the Khandala station two years ago.A division bench of Justices Abhay Oka and Anil Memon, while hearing a petition filed by the victim, Sejal Ladola, recently directed the Railways to decide on the compensation in the light of the peculiar circumstances of this case and posted the matter for final disposal on Monday.The Railways raised a technical issue and argued that the woman had an alternative remedy to approach the Railways Claims Tribunal to seek compensation.Chased robbersThe victim claimed that thieves entered her compartment at 3 a.m. on February 9, 2015, and ran away with her purse when the Secunderabad-Rajkot Express train she was travelling in made a scheduled halt at the Khandala station. Ms. Ladola got down from the train and chased the robbers, but she aborted the attempt when the train started moving. However, she slipped while attempting to board the train, losing both her legs in the mishap.Following the accident, Ms. Ladola filed a petition, demanding compensation for her treatment on the grounds that the Railways had failed to provide security to train passengers during night hours. The court noted that the petition had raised a basic issue about the alleged failure of the Railways to provide security to the passengers travelling in night trains.last_img read more

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Seniors to blame for India debacle: Vettori

first_imgNew Zealand skipper Daniel Vettori on Monday said senior players, including himself, will have to take the blame for the ODI debacle in India.”It’s about players standing up and performing, Vettori told ‘ONE News’ on the team’s return to the country after a 0-5 drubbing in India.”If we look at the reasons for the losses being because of selection or management structure we are absolving the players and myself included – so the players need to stand up,” said the talismanic leg-spinner, who has been leading the side since 2007.Set to take a break to nurse a sore back, Vettori rejected suggestions that his multiple roles of being a captain, selector and key all-rounder were affecting the team’s power balance.Vettori said his teammates are “comfortable” with his multiple roles but conceded that the fans might be running out of patience considering that his side has now lost 11 one-day international matches on the trot.”Yeah, of course I don’t blame them. This team is hurting itself. It’s a miserable time for New Zealand cricket,” Vettori said.”We did so well in the first couple of Test matches and then to let it all slip in the last Test and the one-day series, it hurts. And the only reason you play the game is to win and the only reason a lot of New Zealanders watch us play is to see us win.”So we have to give that to them as soon as possible or otherwise it’s going to be really upsetting to a lot of people,” he added.advertisementKiwi coach Mark Greatbatch echoed Vettori’s views and said the team is “exceptionally disappointed and embarrassed.”- With PTI inputslast_img read more

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