NY Phil. concertmaster expects familiar faces at Thornton

first_imgWhen Glenn Dicterow, concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic, takes his place at the Thornton School of Music in 2014, his colleagues will not be strangers, but old friends.“I go back a long way historically with a lot of the faculty,” Dicterow said. “I’ve known [Midori Goto] since she was a little girl. I’ve known Ralph Kirschbaum since we were teenagers. I’ve known Alice Schoenfeld since I was a child because her sister Eleanor was one of my chamber coaches.”After a two-year search, USC announced Thursday that Dicterow would be the first person to hold the Robert Mann Endowed Chair in Violin and Chamber Music, honoring the founder and first violinist of the Juilliard String Quartet. The move back to Los Angeles will mark the end of what will be a 32-year tenure with the New York Philharmonic.Maestro · Glenn Dicterow, who will join the Thornton faculty in 2014, has taught at Julliard and the Manhattan School of Music. – Photo courtesy of Glenn Dicterow“I will have had almost 40 years of orchestral playing and I’m ready for the next part of my life,” he said. “When I step down from the [New York Philharmonic], I’m not going into any other orchestra.”Dicterow is no stranger to teaching, though. Despite a busy schedule of rehearsing and performing with the orchestra, he has regularly taught violin students at Juilliard and master classes at the Manhattan School of Music.“I just have to fit it in between rehearsals when I have time,” he said.Though the basics of his teaching will not change, he said he expects his students at USC to be different from his current students because Thornton, unlike Juilliard and MSM, is not a traditional conservatory.“The conservatories here are different in the way that they function because the academics are not stressed as much,” he said. “I think what Thornton is trying to do is to make more an intellectual product. They encourage study in history, in philosophy and I think that’s great.”What Dicterow will bring to students’ education is his expertise in performance, which began long before his time with the New York Philharmonic. He and his brother began playing violin when he was 8 years old. But his father, a violinist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, was not always supportive of his sons’ potential.“My father was actually not encouraging to us because, in those days, he realized how hard it was for a musician to make a living and he wanted something a little bit more secure,” Dicterow said. “I think because both my brother and I showed a pretty significant talent in that area, my mother encouraged us and practiced with us.”Dicterow made his orchestral debut as a soloist with the L.A. Philharmonic at 11 years old, playing Tchaikovsky’s “Violin Concerto in D Major.” He continued learning violin and sometimes attended master classes taught by famed violinist Jascha Heifetz at USC. He also continued performing and decided to attend Juilliard with several more years of solo performance experience in many major orchestras under his belt.“Performance is a part of what you teach and how you come across in front of an audience and how you play — it’s a package,” he said. “It’s interpreting the music and delivering the message that you teach and how you come across in front of an audience and how you play — it’s a package,” he said. “It’s interpreting the music and delivering the message that you want from within and really finding your own voice.”Dicterow’s career also includes time as both associate concertmaster and concertmaster of the L.A. Philharmonic, a guest soloist in many orchestras and international tours and several recordings for films including The Untouchables, Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast and Interview with the Vampire.He will spend the next two years balancing his time between the New York Philharmonic and teaching master classes at USC before returning to Los Angeles to begin teaching full-time in fall 2014.He will make the move with his wife, Karen Dreyfus, a violinist and teacher at MSM, Juilliard and Mannes College, who will also join the Thornton faculty in 2014.last_img read more

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After a season-ending injury his senior year of high school, Domenic Cozier has battled back to lead Holy Cross

first_imgAfter a breakout junior season in high school, Domenic Cozier’s chances of playing for a Division I FBS school were higher than ever before. Teams had interest and Cozier planned to visit schools, but just needed his senior year to cement his status. In the opening half of the first year in his final season at Milton (Massachusetts) Academy, Cozier fell to the ground. Torn ligaments in his elbow would put an end to his high school career and his recruitment by Syracuse, among other FBS schools.He transferred to Milton to focus on football his sophomore year of high school, and before his injury, Cozier rushed 90 times for 1,445 yards and 18 touchdowns as a junior. He was going to be a player for a Power 5 school, but none of that mattered anymore. The injury left Holy Cross as one of two remaining schools asking for him. “It was a big setback and obviously it changed recruiting for a lot of schools,” Cozier said. “Holy Cross was always there for me, throughout the process, especially when I was hurt.”Following surgery and rehabilitation on his elbow for the remainder of his time at Milton, Cozier headed to Holy Cross not as the running back he is today, but as a wide receiver. Standing at 5-foot-9, Holy Cross expected Cozier to be a more natural fit for the team as a wideout. He accepted that role.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThrough six games, Cozier had minimal impact in a predominantly special teams role. In Week 7, due to injuries in the backfield, Cozier finally got a chance to start at tailback for the first time since he tore his elbow. Against Harvard on Oct. 15, 2016, Cozier totaled 112 net yards on 16 carries.“It slows down so much…after you have success in that first game,” said Cozier. “Ever since that I have been fine.”Eva Suppa | Digital Design EditorFollowing the game versus Harvard, though, Cozier only earned three more starts in the backfield to end his freshman season. In his second year, Cozier improved his yards per carry but still failed to make a season-long impact. Stuck behind other running backs on the team, he was deployed sparingly as a speed back, totaling just 39 carries for the season.To establish himself as the feature back with the Crusaders, Cozier set out to change his body before his junior season. At just 164 pounds after the conclusion of his sophomore season, Cozier dedicated his summer to his physical development. He said he now sits around 180 pounds.“He was never a scrawny kid growing up, but he was never as big and as strong as he is now,” said Anthony Mazzini, a close friend and SU alum. “It has helped him grow as a football player over the years, the numbers speak for themselves.”Cozier had a breakout season after gaining weight in 2018 and was named second team All-Patriot League. He ranked 61st in the nation in rushing scores and 91st in yards, leading Holy Cross to wins in their last four Patriot League contests. Included in those games was a 56-0 rout of Lehigh in which Cozier ran for 208 yards and a touchdown, the eighth-highest single game rushing total in the college’s history.“It was definitely my best game I have ever played,” said Cozier.To start 2019, Cozier dealt with pneumonia and missed the season-opener at Navy, then barely played in the Crusaders’ subsequent win over New Hampshire. The offense has struggled to get going without him thus far, and with an uncertain situation at quarterback, Cozier will seek out a bigger role moving forward in his final season, now at full strength.“I want to be first team All-Patriot League,” Cozier said. “But I also want to be an All-American.” Comments Published on September 25, 2019 at 11:23 pm Contact Eli: efjarjou@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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How to Throw a Summer Party on a Budget

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