Melinda Page Hamilton & More Will Join Kevin Bacon in Rear Window

first_imgWe’re keeping an extremely close eye on this show—it has Broadway-bound written all over it. Melinda Page Hamilton, McKinley Belcher III and more will join the previously reported Kevin Bacon in Rear Window. Directed by A Gentleman’s Guide’s Tony winner Darko Tresnjak, the production has been adapted for the stage by Keith Reddin, and will play a limited engagement October 22 through November 15. Opening night is set for October 30 at Hartford Stage.Hamilton will play Mrs. Thorwald and Gloria. Her screen credits include Sleeping Dogs Lie, Devious Maids, Desperate Housewives, Mad Men and Big Love. She appeared on stage in Bell, Book and Candle and Cornelia at The Old Globe. Belcher will take on the role of Sam. His credits include the HBO miniseries Show Me a Hero, the upcoming PBS series Mercy Street, Twelfth Night at Hartford Stage and Romeo and Juliet at Classic Stage Company.The play is based on the same short story—Rear Window by Cornell Woolrich—that inspired the Alfred Hitchcock film. It is the classic tale of a man confined to his apartment who thinks he may have witnessed a murder in a nearby building.Also boarding the cast will be John Bedford Lloyd as Boyne (Tartuffe) and Robert Stanton as Thorwald (A Free Man of Color). Rounding out the company will be Dan Bender, Erik Bloomquist, Ashley Croce, Roy Donnelly, Barbara Gallow, Caitlin Harrity, William Squier and Quinn Warren.Rear Window will feature scenic design by Alexander Dodge, costume design by Linda Cho, lighting design by York Kennedy, sound design by Jane Shaw, projection design by Sean Nieuwenhuis and fight choreography by Steve Rankin. View Commentslast_img read more

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USC Green Engagement Fund launched

first_imgThe Environmental Student Assembly announced the Green Engagement Fund on Thursday, a new initiative that aims to fund student-driven projects geared toward increasing sustainability at USC, while increasing awareness in environmental stewardship.Graduate Student Government, ESA and the USC Sustainability Office have been working to implement the project for a few years. Shawn Rhoads, executive director of ESA and chair of the Green Engagement Fund, said the initiative was a long-term goal for the organization.“About two years ago, the Graduate Student Government voted to put aside money within their budget to fund green projects,” Rhoads said. “This was a while back, and no further action was really taken. So, what we’ve been working on this year is putting into place the original idea to create the USC Green Engagement Fund.”ESA decided to team up with GSG because ESA has been limited in the past by the ability to solely distribute funding for event based projects. Students who previously had ideas for campus-based projects were turned away.Rhoads explained that the projects are expected to be student-driven, but should have at least one faculty adviser helping them through the process.“The mission of the engagement fund is to give students the opportunity to start projects on campus that are related to USC,” Rhoads said.He mentioned specific projects students are working on, including increasing the amount of native plants on campus and placing signage in dorms advocating resource consciousness.Other projects include an initiative to make the dining halls more sustainable and create community gardens around campus.A committee was organized to approve applications for funding that is made up of student leaders and administrators. The goal is to make sure the administrative figures that would needed to clear these projects on campus are represented on the funding board.The committee will include Rhoads, a faculty member at large, three graduate students, three undergraduate students, the chair of the Sustainability Steering Committee, a staff member from Facilities Management Services and the sustainability program manager. Roughly $60,000 will be at the disposal of the committee, but Rhoads said that this number might increase.“We are hoping to be able to review applications and give out funding in April,” Rhoads said. “We have a certain amount of money this year, and next year, that will be replenished, and these projects will carry over.”Applications for funding from the Green Engagement Fund are available Wednesday, and will be available until April 6, at 9:30 a.m. They should be turned into the GSG’s office in the Ronald Tutor Campus Center.Next year, ESA will hold an application cycle in the fall and an application cycle in the spring. In the future, the committee’s hope is that Undergraduate Student Government and the university at large will adopt similar funding programs to increase sustainable initiatives at USC.last_img read more

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Emotion takes over in 1st conference victory

first_imgJunior forward Chris Prince knocked in the Badgers’ first score Saturday night before heading in the assist on the eventual game-winner.[/media-credit]Whether it was the coaches, players, referees or fans, emotions ran high through the entirety of the men’s soccer match in a 2-1 victory over Michigan Saturday night.Entering the match, the Wisconsin men’s soccer team had won just two of their previous 11 games and was winless in the Big Ten. Following a mid-week loss to UW-Milwaukee, the team that scoffed at their preseason predicted finish of sixth place in the conference was falling into the mediocrity Big Ten coaches expected of them.The Badgers (4-6-3, 1-2-0) beat the Wolverines (4-6-1, 1-2-1) twice in 2011, eventually ending Michigan’s season, so both teams had plenty of motivation, and it became easy to see the heightened pressure.Coaches approached the field, collisions sent players to the sidelines and the Badgers committed more fouls than they have in any conference game this season. After a rainy day littered the field in moisture, Wisconsin eventually answered the call, victorious by a score of 2-1 in a game literally filled with action from start to finish.After Wisconsin took the lead in the 80th minute, the Wolverines’ attempts at an equalizing goal continued for the remaining ticks and tocks as goalkeeper Chase Rau saved one final corner kick try as the final horn sounded.Each team had its moments of extreme emotion. For Michigan, it was a few calls that halted a possible scoring possession and for Wisconsin, a reaction to Joey Tennyson being tripped in the scoring box while the game remained tied. Although many times the team was able to hold its emotions in check tends to prosper, the Badgers let their emotions fly and ended up victorious.For junior captain Chris Prince, the intensity of another conference game was the root of the Badgers’ passionate effort.“I think [the increased emotions] came from the atmosphere being a Big Ten game, usually things get turned up a whole different notch,” Prince said. “We wanted more out of each other, we expected a lot better so that’s why I think it got a little chippy, but I think it paid off because it turned everyone up and made them try harder.”The game had barely reached the seventh minute when Drew Conner poked a shot through the legs of Michigan goalie Adam Grinwis, which trickled toward the goal line before Prince finished the play with a sliding score.But the Badger lead didn’t last long, as Michigan quickly evened up the tally with a goal in the 15th minute.The next 60-plus minutes passed by without many fireworks, but the excitement came from within the lineups as each goalie continued to thwart offensive runs and shots on goal.Midway through the first half, Rau made an impressive save, leaping backward to punch the ball over the crossbar and swiftly regained his footing as he charged teammate Adam Lauko with some strong feelings regarding Lauko’s defensive play.Lauko shoved Rau back toward the goal and the two went their separate ways within the Badgers’ defense. Although this may have been a sign of dissent among teammates, head coach John Trask appreciated the fiery competitiveness his team showed.“I think it shows we care. Chase said something to Adam, and Adam bit back at him,” Trask said. “You can’t win in the game of soccer without some emotion. They kinda shoved each other … but that shows our guys care.”Prince noticed the scuffle, but relayed the thought that what Rau did is rather standard in soccer.“I think it was all about communication,” Prince said. “If you watch professional soccer, when the ball gets in the box, it’s the goalie’s responsibility to get on his teammates and demand better from them.” Rau did just that, and as the Badgers settled in, they found themselves in yet another 1-1 game approaching the end of regulation.At that point, the emotions of the game hit their peak.A long, low goal kick from Rau flew over mid-field before Prince headed it onward to forward Nick Janus who lobbed a quick flick over the goalie that had pulled out too far. Janus’ kick floated toward the goal, caught the bottom half of the crossbar, bounced on the goal line and finally found the top of the net for the game-winning goal in the 80th minute.Janus wasn’t even able to see the goal Trask said took a little help from the “soccer gods.”“I got rocked,” Janus said in describing the play. “I heard the cheering, but I actually thought that someone else kicked it in.“Tonight, the luck was on our side. You need a little bit of luck in soccer.”Having not been so lucky on other occasions, Wisconsin will certainly take its first conference victory of the year. Shortly after the win, the team gained a new sense of expectation for the remainder of the season.“We’ve got three more Big Ten games,” Trask noted. “We still have a chance to finish 4-2. I know our guys still have the belief, now we just have to go out and do it.”Follow Nick on Twitterlast_img read more

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After a season-ending injury his senior year of high school, Domenic Cozier has battled back to lead Holy Cross

first_imgAfter a breakout junior season in high school, Domenic Cozier’s chances of playing for a Division I FBS school were higher than ever before. Teams had interest and Cozier planned to visit schools, but just needed his senior year to cement his status. In the opening half of the first year in his final season at Milton (Massachusetts) Academy, Cozier fell to the ground. Torn ligaments in his elbow would put an end to his high school career and his recruitment by Syracuse, among other FBS schools.He transferred to Milton to focus on football his sophomore year of high school, and before his injury, Cozier rushed 90 times for 1,445 yards and 18 touchdowns as a junior. He was going to be a player for a Power 5 school, but none of that mattered anymore. The injury left Holy Cross as one of two remaining schools asking for him. “It was a big setback and obviously it changed recruiting for a lot of schools,” Cozier said. “Holy Cross was always there for me, throughout the process, especially when I was hurt.”Following surgery and rehabilitation on his elbow for the remainder of his time at Milton, Cozier headed to Holy Cross not as the running back he is today, but as a wide receiver. Standing at 5-foot-9, Holy Cross expected Cozier to be a more natural fit for the team as a wideout. He accepted that role.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThrough six games, Cozier had minimal impact in a predominantly special teams role. In Week 7, due to injuries in the backfield, Cozier finally got a chance to start at tailback for the first time since he tore his elbow. Against Harvard on Oct. 15, 2016, Cozier totaled 112 net yards on 16 carries.“It slows down so much…after you have success in that first game,” said Cozier. “Ever since that I have been fine.”Eva Suppa | Digital Design EditorFollowing the game versus Harvard, though, Cozier only earned three more starts in the backfield to end his freshman season. In his second year, Cozier improved his yards per carry but still failed to make a season-long impact. Stuck behind other running backs on the team, he was deployed sparingly as a speed back, totaling just 39 carries for the season.To establish himself as the feature back with the Crusaders, Cozier set out to change his body before his junior season. At just 164 pounds after the conclusion of his sophomore season, Cozier dedicated his summer to his physical development. He said he now sits around 180 pounds.“He was never a scrawny kid growing up, but he was never as big and as strong as he is now,” said Anthony Mazzini, a close friend and SU alum. “It has helped him grow as a football player over the years, the numbers speak for themselves.”Cozier had a breakout season after gaining weight in 2018 and was named second team All-Patriot League. He ranked 61st in the nation in rushing scores and 91st in yards, leading Holy Cross to wins in their last four Patriot League contests. Included in those games was a 56-0 rout of Lehigh in which Cozier ran for 208 yards and a touchdown, the eighth-highest single game rushing total in the college’s history.“It was definitely my best game I have ever played,” said Cozier.To start 2019, Cozier dealt with pneumonia and missed the season-opener at Navy, then barely played in the Crusaders’ subsequent win over New Hampshire. The offense has struggled to get going without him thus far, and with an uncertain situation at quarterback, Cozier will seek out a bigger role moving forward in his final season, now at full strength.“I want to be first team All-Patriot League,” Cozier said. “But I also want to be an All-American.” Comments Published on September 25, 2019 at 11:23 pm Contact Eli: efjarjou@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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