Vermont Health Centers get $1.5 million in stimulus funds

first_imgIn another round of economic stimulus funds for Vermont, eight community health centers in the state will receive more than $1.5 million to expand services and create jobs. The Vermont grants include $229,967 for Community Health Centers of The Rutland Region in Bomoseen; $157,958 for Little Rivers Health Care of Bradford; $294,562 for Community Health Center of Burlington; $192,281 for Community Health Services of the Lamoille Valley in Morrisville; $146,390 for The Health Center of Plainfield;  $164,980 for the Richford Health Center in Richford; $254,463 for Northern Counties Health Care in St. Johnsbury, and $100,000 for Springfield Medical Care Systems in Springfield. This is one of the most significant steps forward that we have seen in decades in addressing the primary health care crisis in our country, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) said of the funds, part of $2 billion for Federally Qualified Health Centers included at his urging in the economic recovery bill that Congress passed on February 13. Health centers provide affordable primary care, dental care, mental health services and low-cost prescription drugs.Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) said community health centers are part of Vermont s health care infrastructure. Rural areas like much of Vermont depend on these vital community-based resources to ensure the availability of local dependable health care services.  Even so, some Vermonters are still without a regular source of care.  With this timely addition of funds from the economic recovery plan, Vermont s eight Community Health Centers can reach more Vermonters during these difficult economic times. Vermont s community health care centers have played an extraordinary role in ensuring that Vermonters can see a doctor when they need medical attention, said Congressman Peter Welch (D-Vt.). This additional funding will help health centers reach more patients with quality services, which is all the more important as Vermonters continue to struggle in this difficult economy.The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released the Vermont grants as part of $338 million distributed nationwide to expand services offered at the nation s community health centers. In an earlier round of funds released under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Springfield Hospital was awarded $1.3 million to become Vermont s eighth Federally Qualified Health Center. With that addition, health centers will provide primary health care to more than 100,000 Vermonters regardless of their ability to pay.A cost-effective alternative to hospital emergency rooms, community health centers offer basic services like prenatal care, childhood immunizations and cancer screenings. Open to everyone, the centers care for patients covered by Medicaid, Medicare and private insurance as well as those who have no insurance.The National Association of Community Health Centers last night gave Sanders its 2009 Distinguished Community Health Champion Award, citing his dedication and leadership ¦to preserve, strengthen and expand access to quality health care.WASHINGTON, March 27last_img read more

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Nurses Assc President Zooms in on Nurse Attrition

first_imgNew president of the Dominica Nurses Association, Mignon Rolle-Shillingford, is acknowledging that there is an ongoing reduction in the nurse workforce and has an idea of how to begin to address the problem.“I want to know why. Why are they leaving?” she says.“This is not new to Dominica. I was trained in 1996-1999 and in that period, 30 of us trained and about five years later, eight or nine of my colleagues migrated. Nurse migration is not something new but recently, it has accelerated. The number of nurses leaving has increased and it’s not just a Dominica thing but a regional thing. Many of our sister islands are having that same experience.”Shillingford says her approach to the matter will be fact-based.“I believe in numbers and statistics. I don’t like to assume” she says because research presents factors previously unconsidered. “Within our own association, I want to conduct a survey and identify why nurses are leaving.”Shillingford says money is not the only issue. She listed that some nurses feel unappreciated or are treated badly by their colleagues or want better benefits.“I’m not going to assume and go by what people say because some people speak loudly and some don’t speak at all but could speak in a survey.”She says she also plans to get an update on the status of a Nurses Bill which is currently under review.Shillingford says she will ensure that the details and terms important to nurses are enshrined in the Bill. LifestyleLocalNews Nurses Assc President Zooms in on Nurse Attrition by: – January 2, 2020 85 Views   no discussions Share Tweetcenter_img Sharing is caring! Share Sharelast_img read more

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