Confusion over erection of mysterious posters in West Donegal

first_imgA Donegal county councillor has reacted after dozens of posters thanking him and a well-known Donegal GAA star for working for the gay community appeared on lamp-posts.The posters, which depict both Cllr Micheal Mac Giolla Easbuig and footballer Eamonn McGee appeared in West Donegal today.Cllr Mac Giolla Easbuig said he does not know who is responsible for erecting the posters. But he added “I would like to thank the “anonymous” people who put up posters in Gaoth Dobhaire acknowledging my support for the gay community in Donegal.“I will continue to do whatever I can to support oppressed, marginalised communities throughout the county, but it’s nice to get some recognition for that support.”Cllr Mac Giolla Easbuig is seeking to retain his position as a county councillor in the local elections this weekend.Mr McGee is a well-known commentator and activist but is not standing for election. Confusion over erection of mysterious posters in West Donegal was last modified: May 20th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Cllr Micheal Mac Giolla EasbuigpostsWest Donegallast_img read more

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Resource Discovery: Veteran Short Stories

first_imgThis post was written by Kacy Mixon, M.S., LMFT, Social Media Specialist.  She is a member of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn. By Kacy Mixon, M.S., LMFTGallagher, M. (2013). Fire and forget: Short stories from the long war. Da Capo Press, Boston: MA.Today’s Resource Discovery features a book titled Fireand Forget: Short Stories from the Long War, edited by Roy Scranton and MattGallagher. This literary work houses a collection of short stories written byveterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The stories present authentic accounts of veteran experiences that news reports typically do not offer. The preface highlights the editors’ aim for the book:“On the one hand we want to remind you, dear reader, of what happened and insist you recollect those men and women who fought, bled and died in dangerous and faraway places. On the other hand there’s nothing most of us would rather do than leave these wars behind. No matter what we do next, the soft tension of the trigger pull is something we’ll carry with us forever.  We’ve assembled this book to tell you because we had to remember.”The editors met after their deployments through the New York University Veterans Writing Workshop. For more information on this book and the editors’ motivations for writing this book, listen to the National Public Radio (NPR), Fresh Air interview (In ‘Fire and Forget,’ Vets Turned Writers Tell Their War Stories). For more information on issues pertaining to veterans and showcases of their writing, explore The Hero Project. These accounts can assist in service professionals working with military families to gain insight into what it is like to not only serve during wartime but also how some experience post-deployment transitions.last_img read more

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Letran, Arellano stay in F4 hunt

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH View comments Rey Nambatac. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netThere was no way Rey Nambatac was leaving Letran with a stunning defeat.Nambatac, who is set to turn pro late this month, bailed the Knights out with crucial baskets down the stretch for a thrilling 66-60 victory over the St. Benilde Blazers that forged a playoff for a Final Four berth in NCAA Season 93 basketball tournament on Tuesday.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next But a loss by the Stags will make the showdown between Arellano and Letran on Friday the decider for the last Final Four spot. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:11’Not just basketball’: Circumcisions, pageants at Philippine courts00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight The lefty guard finished with 18 points, including a three-point play with 20 seconds remaining that helped the Knights finish with a 9-9 record at the end of the elimination round.“I have some unfinished business with Letran,” said Nambatac.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I want to make the Final Four then the finals and hopefully get a championship again. I’m not thinking that this was my last game. I just went all out as soon as I entered the court.”With Arellano beating Mapua, 81-64, earlier to also finish with a 9-9 record, the Chiefs and Knights will face off in a stepladder playoff for the last Final Four spot in the event that San Sebastian prevails over Perpetual Help this Thursday.center_img MOST READ Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Surging Ateneo eyes repeat vs NUlast_img read more

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Gilas shakes off Japan to start World Cup qualifiers campaign

first_imgPhilippines guard Jayson Castro. Photo from Fiba.comWith Gilas Pilipinas still groping for form, coach Chot Reyes went to his old reliable Jayson Castro as the Philippines held off Japan, 77-71, to start its campaign in the Asian qualifiers of the 2019 Fiba World Cup Friday at Komazawa Olympic Park General Sports Gymnasium in Tokyo.Castro provided some semblance of stability for the Philippine side which struggled to get its bearing on the offensive end and lost grip of an early 14-point lead.ADVERTISEMENT Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice LATEST STORIES View comments Naturalized player Ira Brown chimed in 10 markers and 15 boards for Japan, while Daiki Tanaka also had 10 points on a 3-of-4 sniping from threes in the loss.The Scores:PHILIPPINES 77 – Castro William 20, Blatche 13, Wright 12, Norwood 10, Fajardo 6, Aguilar 5, Abueva 5, Pogoy 5, Ravena 1, Alas 0, Rosario 0.JAPAN 71 – Hiejima 20, Brown 10, Tanaka 10, Togashi 8, Baba 7, Harimoto 7, Shinoyama 4, J. Takeuchi 3, Ota 2, Furukawa 0, Uto 0.Quarters: 18-10, 37-28, 59-55, 77-71. Read Next Ravena vows ‘composed’ Ateneo come Finals against La Salle Castro also went 3-of-5 from three, halting the Philippines’ dry spell from downtown after missing its first eight attempts.Gabe Norwood added 10 points, seven rebounds, and four assists, while Matthew Wright had 12 markers on a perfect 7-of-7 shooting from the charity stripe.Reyes also drew huge contributions from substitutes June Mar Fajardo and Roger Pogoy. The four-time PBA MVP pumped six points and three rebounds but was a plus-eight on his time on the floor, while the reigning Rookie of the Year got two huge defensive stops in the final minute to diffuse Japan’s late rally to go with his five-point output.Gilas Pilipinas will now fly home to face Chinese Taipei on Monday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.Makoto Hiejima was sensational for the Akatsuki Five as he paced his side with 20 points, five rebounds, and five assists.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC The veteran guard fired 20 points, six assists, and seven rebounds, including five of the last seven points for Gilas, none bigger than a trey with 1:14 remaining that took the air out of the home team.With the defense clicking, Gilas jumpedto a 16-4 start which ballooned to a 24-10 advantage early in the second period.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut Philippines was hobbled by shooting woes and allowed its 37-28 halftime lead go down the drain with 12-0 blast from the the Japanese, who took a 40-37 edge midway in the third quarter.Gilas, though, just had enough in the gas tank as Andray Blatche eventually found his mark and paired with Castro in the end game. The naturalized center went for 13 markers, 12 boards, five dimes, three steals, and three blocks. Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READlast_img read more

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4 Essential Nonprofit Messaging Secrets

first_imgWant to know a secret? There’s a trick to crafting the perfect marketing message for your nonprofit. Put your audience first.We all know people who are all about “me, me, me.” We tolerate them when we need to, but we avoid them as much as we can. On the other hand, we gravitate towards people who show interest in our lives, while also sharing information about themselves. It’s a reciprocal relationship that feels good.Crafting a message for your nonprofit follows the same rule of thumb. “You” marketing centers around your organization. “Me” marketing focuses on the benefits of what you are offering to people. How do you speak to their needs? How can you be of service to them?Craft Your MessageThese simple touchstones will help you create campaigns that are Connected, Rewarding, Actionable, and Memorable (CRAM), so you can catch your donors’ attention.Connect to things your audience cares about; such as making a difference, being part of a community, feeling good about themselves, feeling heard, etc.Reward people for taking action, both emotionally and tangibly. The most effective rewards are immediate, personal, credible, and reflective of your audience’s values.Action that is specific, easy to do, and measurably advances your mission offers an immediate sense of gratification.Memorable campaigns are unique, catchy, personal, tangible, desirable, and closely tied to your cause.Once they’ve taken action, thank them for participating. Encourage them to tell their friends about their support of your campaign or organization by providing a link to share on Facebook, Twitter, and email.OK, that’s one secret. Want to know the other three? Check out Insights, our new line of fundraising resources. These short bursts of information offer quick tips on how to make your nonprofit marketing and fundraising a success.Download 4 Essential Nonprofit Messaging Secrets today!last_img read more

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6 Steps to Improve Your Year-End Strategy

first_imgIt may seem too early to think about your year-end campaign, but trust us…it’s not! The final two months of the year are a crucial time for nonprofits. The numbers speak for themselves — 30% of annual giving occurs in December, and 10% occurs on the last 3 days of the year. Now is the time to start planning how you’ll boost your fundraising efforts to attract the generosity of people who are focused on giving at this point in the year.The best way to create a strategic year-end plan is to base it on your donor data. Using this data will optimize your efforts, ensuring you don’t waste resources. In this post, we’ll share five steps for using data to inform your year-end strategy.1) Segment Your DonorsDonor segmentation is important for two reasons. First, it gives you a better idea of who your donors are, how involved they are in their chosen cause, and their giving habits. Second, it provides a way to deliver relevant, customized communications that will pique donors’ interest. The more personal you get with your communications, the more your supporters will feel like part of your team. Segmenting your donor list serves as the foundation of your year-end strategy. Use our Donor Segmentation Cheat Sheet to get your donor data in order today.2) Recruit Top Advocates, Participants, and Volunteers for a Peer-to-Peer CampaignPeer-to-peer fundraising (also known as social fundraising or simply P2P) leverages your network of supporters to fundraise for you. Social fundraising campaigns are most successful when the campaign has a firm deadline — which is why they’re perfect for year-end fundraising. You can tie your P2P campaign to the theme of giving thanks, the holidays, or plan one that celebrates the upcoming new year and ends on January 1.Once you’ve segmented your list according to the detailed data on your contacts, you’ll know who to recruit for your P2P campaign. Focus on those who are consistently involved with your work, whether they volunteer, contribute financially, or simply spread the word about your organization.3) Promote Your Monthly Giving Program Across All ChannelsThe end of the year is an ideal time to promote your monthly giving program. People are in a giving mood, and they’re setting resolutions for the new year. Make it easy for them by inviting them to join your team of active, monthly supporters. Make the most of your monthly giving program in your year-end campaigns. Feature it in your email and direct mail appeals, promote it on your social media accounts, make it the default donation frequency on your giving page.You can promote your program across all your channels in a variety of ways. The first step in gaining new supporters is to make them aware of the opportunity. Again, use your segmentation to send messages customized to each group of donors.4) Approach a Major Donor for a Matching GiftMatching gifts increase not only the revenue per solicitation, but also the response rate of campaigns. There are several reasons why matching gift campaigns work, not the least of which is the desire to be part of a meaningful movement.Year-end campaigns gives you a reason to approach a major donor for a matching gift. Again, this time of year is when people are already in a giving mood, and they’re looking for opportunities to get involved. If you present a major donor with an innovative campaign idea at this time of year, the chances are high that she or he will agree. Scan your data to see which major donors are likely to be open to this idea and focus on those donors first.5) Build Direct Mail and Email Templates Specifically for Year-EndSwitch things up by creating special branding for your year-end communications and donation page. Celebrating the end of the year will get people freshly excited as they see you making the most of this time of year. These banners and templates might include snippets of what you and your supporters have accomplished together throughout the year. Use your data to see which donors celebrate which holidays and customize your direct mail and email templates accordingly.6) Create a CalendarAs you’re brainstorming ideas and creating to-do lists, don’t forget to plan out your calendar in detail. Once you’ve decided what your year-end strategy will consist of, create a calendar that outlines the tasks associated with each campaign and tactic and specifies who within your organization will be responsible for each. From #GivingTuesday to holiday cards to major donor phone calls, assigning dates to the campaigns and tactics you intend to implement will ensure nothing gets lost in the hubbub. You’ll also be able to identify opportunities you missed by noting any holes in your calendar that could be filled. Schedule your social media posts, note which hashtags you’ll use, and include links to relevant materials.Be Sure to Send Your Thank YousStart the new year right! Follow up your year-end campaign by using the first week in January to send your thank yous, expressing gratitude for the role your supporters play in the work you’re doing together. These thank yous will reinforce the good vibes and motivate donors to continue their support.Close out the year with a bang by taking advantage of your donor data. Create a targeted, effective strategy by following the steps we’ve outlined and rest easy knowing that your strategy is based on a firm foundation.last_img read more

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Collaboration and Creative Communication: How the WOMAN Trial Findings Translated Into Maternal Health Policy Change

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on December 11, 2017December 12, 2017By: Haleema Shakur-Still, Associate Professor of Clinical Trials, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Project Director, WOMAN TrialClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)When our research team first started exploring whether an off-patent drug called tranexamic acid could reduce the number of people—mainly young men—who bled to death as a result of trauma, I never imagined that more than a decade later I would be surrounded by maternal health experts discussing how this treatment could help new mothers around the world. But that’s exactly where I found myself at a special event at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) titled, “How can we stop women bleeding to death in childbirth?”Six months after results from the WOMAN trial were published, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated its guidelines to include the use of tranexamic acid for prevention of PPH. Our hopes for the WOMAN trial came to fruition, demonstrating the protective effect of tranexamic acid on postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), a devastating complication that kills roughly 100,000 women every year—or one woman approximately every six minutes. We found that tranexamic acid, when administered within three hours of delivery, reduced a woman’s risk of death due to bleeding by one-third.All too often we scientists focus our energy on conducting high quality medical research and collecting more and more evidence to improve health outcomes—and this is important. However, research doesn’t have an impact on people’s health unless the information reaches clinicians and policymakers who can implement the findings. As Professor Joy Lawn, Director of the MARCH Centre at LSHTM and chair of the event highlighted, “Tonight is about time. Time that we take a stand to say that women shouldn’t be dying from something preventable, like bleeding.”As I reflect on the discussions, I have thought about two keys that have helped the WOMAN trial results lead to better maternal health outcomes and more effective policies: collaboration and creative communication.CollaborationThe WOMAN trial was a collaboration on an epic scale, involving 20,060 women from 193 hospitals in 21 countries and thousands of doctors, midwives and nurses. We were delighted to have representatives from some of these groups at the event, including Sir Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, former president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, and Her Excellency Toyin Saraki, Founder-President of the Wellbeing Foundation Africa and ambassador for the International Confederation of Midwives.In addition, recognizing the importance of including representation from professional bodies, maternal health advocacy groups and policymaking organizations, the WOMAN trial steering committee elicited feedback from WHO colleagues from the beginning.Involving numerous stakeholders from different sectors throughout the process helped ensure that the findings would translate into maternal health policy change.Creative communicationAs researchers, we need to be creative about how we share findings to reach a target audience. Some strategies for effective communication include letters, fact sheets and presentations at conferences. Harnessing the power of social and digital media by translating research findings and information into a story is another opportunity. In the past, the WOMAN trial collaborators and I have produced cartoons and animations to illustrate how tranexamic acid works. We have found videos to be another effective vehicle to tell the stories of women who experienced severe blood loss during childbirth and how it impacted their lives.At the event, we unveiled a new communication tool—the Blood Clock—which will remain on display at LSHTM until February 2018. The Blood Clock is a unique art installation whose aim is to raise awareness about PPH and the need for urgent treatment, illustrating that every six minutes, somewhere in the world, a woman dies from PPH. It was created by Consultant Obstetrician Dr. Graham Tydeman, who regularly deals with the problem of blood loss in childbirth.Now we need to keep the momentum going. I call on providers, policymakers and other members of the global maternal health community to act on these findings and educate others about tranexamic acid. No woman should die from preventable causes on the day she gives birth.—Watch a video of the Blood Clock.Read the findings from the WOMAN trial.Share this:last_img read more

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Measuring Person-Centered Maternal Health Care

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on February 14, 2018February 15, 2018By: Dominic Montagu, Associate Professor, University of California, San Francisco; Katie Giessler, Research Analyst, University of California, San FranciscoClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Access to high quality health care is not only an inherent human right but also a critical component underpinning positive maternal health outcomes. This was indicated clearly by the World Health Organization (WHO) Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health, which found that while a base of essential interventions is necessary to manage severe complications, above this minimum level of equipment and trained staff, more technological infrastructure is not associated with better maternal health outcomes.The BetterBirth study, a more recent large-scale randomized controlled trial, looked specifically at the technical processes that make up management of pregnancies, including handwashing and use of gloves, early referral for at-risk women and magnesium for hypertension. The trial was conducted over one year in 60 hospitals in Uttar Pradesh, India to support medical staff in adhering to the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist. The BetterBirth trial results showed that the coaching-based program was associated with significantly higher adherence to essential birth practices, but this led to no significant improvement in maternal mortality, the primary outcome indicator of the study.In 1966, Avedis Donabedian proposed a simple framework for understanding health care quality, dividing the observable components into structure, process and outcomes. The implication is that structure plus process must equal outcomes. The evidence from the WHO Multicountry Survey and the BetterBirth Study suggests that improvements in structure or technical process alone will not lead to improvements in outcomes. Two recent publications lay the groundwork for studying a third key component of maternal health: patients themselves. WHO and the Institute of Medicine explicitly address the importance of “patient centered care” in current guidance, and this concept is increasingly being changed to “person-centered care” (PCC) so as to include those who are not ill—women attending an antenatal care session, for example. PCC incorporates the human-rights dimensions of respectful maternity care and adds domains of knowledge exchange and experience of care (privacy, predictability of costs, cleanliness, etc.) that, when combined with patient-provider interaction, make up the key non-clinical aspects of care. PCC provides a framework for examining maternal health that starts from the perspective of the person receiving care.Based on existing analytic models of patient experience, quality of care, health seeking-behavior and other areas of health, researchers have developed a new model of the key domains of PCC for reproductive health.Domains of Person-Centered Care. Sudhinaraset et al. 2017After conducting qualitative data collection, expert reviews, cognitive interviews, iterative testing and revisions, surveys and psychometric analysis, researchers have translated this framework into a validated scale for measuring person-centered maternity care (PCMC). The PCMC scale is a standardized tool that researchers, program managers from government or health facilities and health providers themselves can use to measure the whole patient experience. The scale, which has been adapted for different contexts, consists of 30 questions in the Kenya-specific scale and 27 in the India-specific iteration. A shorter multi-setting version has been developed with only 12 questions.The PCMC scale has been applied in studies and interventions in Kenya, India and Ghana thus far. With it, researchers are now able to identify and better address the aspects of care that matter most to ensure positive patient experiences. The scale can also identify where these areas of care fall short and inform what practices must change to improve the quality of care as a whole. Both the framework and the scale are important as pragmatic, actionable steps to understanding patient care during childbirth. The improvements being made to infrastructure and medical processes need to be matched by improvements in the respect, empowerment, support and overall women-centered experiences that are at the center of every birth.Donabedian proposed that structure plus process drives outcomes. The experiences of BetterBirth and the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health may seem to have challenged this assumption, at least for hospital-based maternity care and in the geographies they examined. But perhaps it was because a key aspect of process was missing from this work. Donabedian identified process to include technical as well as human components, noting that “the interpersonal process is the vehicle by which technical care is implemented and on which its success depends.” PCMC brings these interpersonal processes to the forefront of maternal health care.Perfect information is not necessary for improvement, although searching for good information when there are unknowns will lead to a better understanding of the complexities of health care and through that to improvements. The recent advances in person-centered care for maternal health, and the development of models and tools to understand patient experiences more accurately, come at a time when WHO’s initiative on Quality, Equity and Dignity is bringing new attention to the same issues. The growing attention to this issue will help us understand both how to improve person-centered Care and how doing so might change both experiences and outcomes for women.—Read the full paper and access the validated scale for measuring person-centered maternity care: Development of a tool to measure person-centered maternity care in developing settings: Validation in a rural and urban Kenyan populationLearn more about measuring women’s childbirth experiences.Share this:last_img read more

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ID of missing woman found 1250 km from where she was last

first_imgHolly MooreAPTN InvestigatesA driver’s license belonging to missing woman Ashley Simpson has been found in the tank of a vacuum septic truck at a Northern British Columbia lodge more than two years after she disappeared.“It was pretty shocking,” said her father John Simpson. “It is such a weird piece of the puzzle.”Simpson’s case was one of four missing women in the Okanagan Valley featured in the APTN Investigates episode Dark ValleyCpl. Dan Moskaluk of the BC RCMP confirmed that Simpson’s license was found.“Police are aware that Ashley Simpson’s ID was located at the Sasquatch Crossing Lodge, an area in Pink Mountain that Ashley was linked to prior to her relocation to North Okanagan,” said Moskaluk.Pink Mountain is 1,252 kms north of Enderby, B.C. where Simpson was last seen.Police are supposed to be coming to pick up the driver’s license.“I have the license in an envelope in front of me right now waiting for it to be picked up,” John Simpson said from his home in Ontario.A photo of the license which expired in 2017 was sent to John Simpson’s wife Cindy Simpson on Facebook by the owner of the Sasquatch Crossing Lodge Oct. 9. The license arrived in the mail shortly after.“We aren’t sure what to think of it or what to do about it,” said John Simpson. “We do know she was working up there.”Father recalls she may have lost her ID.Her father recalled Simpson saying that her wallet and ID went missing for a while. He said his daughter worked at the lodge for three years before moving to Enderby, B.C. with her boyfriend Derek Favell.“We aren’t sure if she got it back or if someone just decided ‘Oh I still have this license’ and tossed it somewhere,” he said, “The biggest thing with that is if it was someone in Pink Mountain, why wouldn’t they put it in the garbage and burn it? All the garbage is burned there.”The license was found in the tank of a truck that was used by the lodge. The trucks vacuum sewage out of trailers on the property.“Why wasn’t it soiled if it was in there for any length of time?” said John Simpson, adding the license was relatively clean for being inside of sewage waste.John Simpson travels to the Okanagan Valley to search for his daughter every year.He said he was told that the RCMP near Fort St. John looked into the discovery though he hasn’t heard anything about their findings.“We haven’t heard anything back,” he said. “All I know is that they said to keep the license in the envelope.”John Simpson said it is hard to know what happened and how the ID ended up in the truck tank.“It is very agonizing,” he said. “We are still hoping that sooner or later, someone is going to have remorse and tell us what happened to her.”Women and girls have been going missing from the Splatsin Nation for decades. If you have any information about these or any historical cases, Email us at investigates@aptn.cahmoore@aptn.ca@hollymoorenewslast_img read more

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My dream came true NHL game in Plains Cree a hit

first_imgDennis WardAPTN NewsClarence Iron had called many hockey games on the radio – but what happened on Sunday, during the NHL game between Montreal Canadiens and Carolina Hurricanes, amazed him.Iron made history by being the first play by play announcer to call a game on national television in Plains Cree.“It happened – my dream came true but to call it in Cree. I thought I would call it in English because I’ve called a lot of English hockey games before but to do the Cree, even myself, sometimes I amaze myself,” he says with a laugh.APTN and Sportsnet, the official broadcaster of NHL hockey in North America, teamed up for the historic game – a milestone in Canadian television history.Iron has long been recognized as one of the Cree voices of hockey.He’s hoping this historic moment opens the doors for the next generation too.So does studio host Earl Wood who was beaming with excitement throughout the game.“I want to invite all those young people out there no matter where you are to take it upon yourself to gain an interest in our language and to utilize it,” Wood told APTN News. It has a place in this modern day society and can take you anywhere you want to go.“Anywhere you want to go, your language will take you there.”Shtatahaa Carey Price ngii ngaabinaan mwebigaanhsan! #APTN #aptnhockey @APTN @APTNNews @APTNInFocus https://t.co/xHXn2i1iKP— Dominic H K Beaudry (@DhkBeau) March 25, 2019The game was pure entertainment on and off the ice.The Hurricanes played the spoilers for Canadiens fans in a 2-1 overtime win.In a game with playoff implicationsEven if you didn’t understand a word, you could feel the excitement in the call.“That was exciting tonight,” says Joel Darling, executive producer of special events at Sportsnet. “It really was and to see some of the tweets that were being put out on social media was pretty exciting to and hear you guys call it the way you did, it was entertaining and really fun to listen to.”While some may have tuned in initially for the novelty, many stuck around because it was so exciting to watch.An important game for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples says Jason Chamakese, a Cree language guest on the broadcast.“The only thing that I can think of right now is wow. To be part of something that amazing, to have our languages broadcast to living rooms all across Canada and to have people who don’t understand the language hear how beautiful our Cree language sounds. It’s amazing to be a part of.”Chamakese hopes the airing of this game is about more than just hockey.“I think we want everybody to get along and to care about one another because I see a disconnect and through something like this our hope is that we build these bridges between people,” he says. “That’s what I’m hoping for that this will lead to something good, something positive (in cree) which is sharing the land in a good way.”Studio analyst and former NHL player John Chabot says this can’t just be a one off.“The NHL has done a job of reaching out to our new Canadians but they’ve really never reached out to our pre-Canadians and this was something that was a long time coming,” he says.And it may not be a one off.Talks are underway in the hopes of airing more games next season on APTN in different Indigenous languages.At the moment, hockey is broadcast in English, French and Punjabi.dward@aptn.ca@DennisWardNewslast_img read more

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