What to do – and avoid – when people ignore your message

first_imgImagine this. You’ve had a bad day at work. For months, you’ve been trying to persuade everyone to recycle. No one is complying. In frustration, you send out a mass email. “Only 5% of staff is putting paper in the recycling bins. We need to do better,” you say.Bad move.Why? When we are deciding whether to do something, we typically look to see what others are doing (“social proof”). As Robert Cialdini has thoroughly documented, we’re compliant creatures. If we see everyone else is ignoring the recycling bins, we’ll ignore them too.If you lament that no one is listening, no one will listen. By emphasizing inaction, you discourage the very behaviors you’re seeking.If you want action, make people feel they are are part of something positive: “We’re aiming for 100% of paper recycled by Friday – and we’re on our way there.”If you’re at a nonprofit that’s attracted hundreds of donations when you wanted thousands, don’t say, “Fewer people have supported our cause this year. So many kids are going without lunch. We really need your help.”Say: “Your donation will provide a school lunch to Jason every day this year. Join the hundreds of donors supporting kids like him.”Here are three tips for turning your frustration over what isn’t working into a message that compels action – instead of more inaction.1. The number one thing you can do to overcome resistance is to celebrate and publicize the people who are taking action. It will help inspire the ones who aren’t.2. If you don’t have enough people to highlight, try getting just one – preferably a person who people respect (or who has authority). Ask that person to explain why he or she is taking action. Maybe you’re not the best messenger and that person would be better.3. Last, if you can’t succeed on those fronts, try to convert just regular one person. Then ask that person to explain why they changed their mind. Converted skeptics are the most motivating of any messenger for the people who have failed to act. The people who aren’t on your side are more likely to relate to someone who once felt like them.Bottom line? Accentuate the positive if you want a positive reaction.last_img read more

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The number one villain in the way of good decisions

first_imgOne of the worst things we can do when making decisions is to frame them too narrowly. This can lead us to the wrong thought process – and false choices.As Dan Heath puts it in his new book, “The first villain of decision making, narrow framing, is the tendency to define our choices too narrowly, to see them in binary terms. We ask, ‘Should I break up with my partner or not?’ instead of ‘What are the ways I could make this relationship better?’ We ask ourselves, ‘Should I buy a new car or not?’ instead of ‘What’s the best way I could spend some money to make my family better off?’”Or – to put this in nonprofit terms – we ask, “Should we have an event or not? Should we blog or not? Should we get rid of that board member or not?”Dan’s new book Decisive is all about this kind of problem. Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work provides practical ways to beat narrow framing and other villains of decision making. Here are two of his tips (and I quote):1. Consider opportunity cost. If you are considering an investment of time or money, ask yourself, “What is the next best way I could spend this time/money?” If you can’t come up with any other combination that seems enticing, you should feel more confident that you’re making the right investment. 2. Multitrack your options. Always try to think AND not OR. Can you avoid choosing among your options and try several at once? For instance, if you’re deciding whether to invest time in Spanish lessons or ballroom dancing classes, do both for a while until one of them “wins.” Or, rather than hire one employee out of three candidates, could you give all three a 2-week consulting project so that you can compare their work on a real-world assignment?For more tips, join a free Network for Good webinar with Dan today at 1 pm Eastern. Register here.PS for fun, here is one of Dan’s great teaching videos on giving better presentations. It draws on his book, Made to Stick.last_img read more

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Rev Up Your Data with Dashboards

first_imgCurrent status dashboard: Answers the question, “What’s our current status?” If you’re working on a capital campaign or have a specific target for your fall appeal, your dashboard can show your progress by date and the trajectory of where you need to be so your team doesn’t get complacent. For example, they’ll quickly see that they’ve raised $10,000 and have just three weeks to raise another $10,000. With this knowledge, the conversation at the staff or board meeting might revolve around “What action will we take?”Image Source: Mashable Blog: Is Give2ogether a Google Analytics for Philanthropy.Accountability dashboard: This one might feel scary! Let’s say you want at least 80% of your board members attending board meetings. Your accountability dashboard shows names, dates, and who attended. It gives you some one-on-one discussion points without making everyone feel bad: “Hey, Lynn, how can we support you? What’s keeping you from attending, because your board seat is really important and we want to make sure you’re able to do your duties as a board member.”Now that you know the value of dashboards for presenting important data quickly and sparking people to take action, why not try creating one that’s relevant to your organization’s numbers? For more in-depth guidance, examples, and useful resources, download a recording of the webinar for free.If you don’t have the ability to collect data to make a dashboard worthwhile, we can help! Do your hear crickets when you ask for help with donor engagement tasks, cultivation, or thank you calls? Are eyes glazing over when your board and staff review spreadsheets and donor lists? Fear not, there is hope!In our Nonprofit 911 webinar Change Your Data Story, Lori Jacobwith, president and co-founder of Ignited Fundraising and co-author of the Essential Fundraising Handbook for Small Nonprofits, shared how you can transform otherwise dull data into attractive and easy-to-understand dashboards that inspire everyone to action.What’s a Data Dashboard?The dashboard in your car gives you an at-a-glance update on some really important factors, like if you should slow down or stop for gas. Similarly, a data dashboard shows the important information your organization needs to know to achieve its strategic goals. The data should be arranged on a single screen so the information can be monitored as easily as the dashboard in your car.Data dashboards often show financials or various kinds of giving information, presented by day or month, year over year, zip code, and so on. Less common are board dashboards, but you’re likely to see a big jump in board engagement when you share data visually with this group.Why Use Dashboards?Good visual displays cause people to take action. Data dashboards:Bring attention to your priorities and help you reach your goals.Monitor performance and create accountability.Simplify information, such as complex financials.Fact: Humans are visually wired. Half of our brain is involved with visual processing. We remember 80% of what we see, 20% of what we read, and 10% of what we hear. Color increases our willingness to read something. In social media, for example, you know images are everything. The same is true when we present lots of numbers.You have just two goals when presenting any kind of data:Convey your story.Establish credibility.Some stories you might convey with data: Are we tracking adequately toward our goal? Do we need to fill our fundraising event with more people? Can we improve attendance at our board meetings? Dashboards drive these messages home quicker and more effectively than columns of numbers.Tip: Visual data displays should show information over time, not just year to date.3 Types of Nonprofit DashboardsThe varieties are endless, but here are a few dashboards to get you started.Business intelligence dashboard: Presents facts about your organization. The Indianapolis Museum of Art’s website features a live dashboard showing current totals of Facebook fans, endowment size, and active memberships. “Today’s Attendance” brings up a live tally of how many people passed through the main entrance, gift shop, special exhibitions gallery every two hours.Source: http://www.imamuseum.orglast_img read more

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Goodbye Spreadsheets: A Donor Management Software Success Story

first_imgFounded in 2005, Ovarian Cancer Connection (OCC) is no stranger to fundraising success during its 11-year history. In fact, this Ohio-based nonprofit has raised $36,000 just for their program that provides financial assistance to women undergoing treatment for ovarian cancer.This fundraising success, however, came with its own challenges. Without the right tools in place, the OCC’s system for tracking donors and donations ended up being a lot of manual work.Gini Steinke, OCC’s founder and executive director, knew that there was a better way to track OCC’s donor data. Gini decided getting a new database, known as donor management software or a donor management system (DMS), would help the OCC get all their donor data in one location. After exploring different options, OCC migrated their donor data from spreadsheets into Network for Good’s donor management system.Gini recently shared how she manages OCC’s donor information and fundraising now that they have a system better equipped to get the job done.Tracking Individual FundraisingLike many small nonprofits, the OCC raises most of their funds through individual gifts. These donations either come in through events or donations from individuals who have a personal connection with organization. Currently, the OCC has more than 3,000 donors in their database.Before Network for Good’s DMS, the OCC’s donor database was a detailed spreadsheet with tabs representing each year’s gifts. Although it’s not ideal, this system for tracking gifts is pretty standard among many nonprofits. Network for Good’s donor management system brings it all together. The primary problem with this practice is that a spreadsheet isn’t ideal for accessing donor information. If Gini was looking for a specific donor, she’d have to search through multiple tabs to find the donor’s complete giving history over the course of his or her relationship with the organization. According to Gini, transitioning to a system built to manage donor information has made this process much easier:“We did track donations through spreadsheets, but I’d have to go through all the tabs to find a donation. But now, Network for Good’s donor management system brings it all together.“Transforming Online Giving Gini estimates that she saves about 2 hours of work a day by using Network for Good’s donor management software. The Ovarian Cancer Connection has an incredible mission and is fortunate to have a savvy executive director like Gini who has created fundraising strategies that work. Gini estimates that she saves about 2 hours of work a day by using Network for Good’s donor management software. And during events season, she estimates she’ll save 3 hours of manual work every day.Now that they have the tools to help save time, keep donor records organized, and raise more money, the Ovarian Cancer Connection can focus what matters most: their mission.Are you ready to make the switch from spreadsheets to a donor management system that will save you time and help you streamline your fundraising processes? Schedule a demo and see Network for Good’s donor management software for yourself! Our easy-to-use system that’s helping organizations like Ovarian Cancer Connection save time everyday can help your organization too. Schedule a demo today!center_img I went into the donor management system and the online donation was right there. Everything was already entered. It was like a miracle! It was wonderful! Before using Network for Good’s online donation page and donor management software, OCC was collecting online gifts through PayPal, which made tracking a very cumbersome process:“Donations would come in through PayPal. We’d get an email notification and transfer the money to our bank. Then, I’d input the donation in QuickBooks and enter it into a spreadsheet. It was time consuming to make sure everything was recorded accurately.” Now, online donations are automatically added to OCC’s DMS. Using Network for Good’s donation page and donor management system together means there’s no manual lift required:“I went into the donor management system and the online donation was right there. Everything was already entered. It was like a miracle! It was wonderful!”Gini is especially excited to use the donor management system and donation pages during the organization’s big events.“This is going to be great when it comes time for our major events! More and more people are getting comfortable with online giving. This is great because it makes it easier for [donors] and it saves us money.”Managing Offline GiftsDonor management software isn’t just for tracking online donors, it can track offline gifts too. If Gini gets a check handed to her at an event, she can easily log the donation in the DMS and track specifics like the gift’s designation or if the gift is made in someone’s honor or memory.  Notes on why the donor gave can be attached to a donation too.Making Segmentation EasierSmart fundraisers like Gini use segmentation to send more relevant (and more effective) messages to different groups of supporters.And, because of the nature of their work, they need to be especially diligent with keeping track of those supporters who are survivors of ovarian cancer.Using the group feature in Network for Good’s donor management system allows the OCC to track survivors easily. When Gini is inviting survivors to a luncheon, she can seamlessly send the email through the system by simply selecting the group labeled “Survivors.” There’s no need to sort through a list, run a filter again, or import/export a spreadsheet.Ovarian Cancer Connection’s executive director saves 2-3 hours of work a day after switching from Excel to Network for Good’s donor management software.Keeping Track of Donor NotesGini truly understands that fundraising is about relationships, not transactions. For this reason, Gini needs to keep notes on every donor she speaks with. But with thousands of donors, details about important donor conversations can’t be kept organized with post-it notes or in someone’s memory. This is why Network for Good’s donor management system’s notes feature is so important to the OCC and Gini in particular:“In the donor management software, I can pull up the [donor’s] records and see my notes so the next time I talk to them, I can ask them ‘how was your son’s move?’ Otherwise, it would be in a paper file. But now, everything is right there in the donor record.”Reporting Success to the Board Network for Good’s donor management system offers built-in dashboards that are easy to understand and can help people like Gini explain the organization’s financials to those who aren’t digging into the numbers on a regular basis:“At board meetings, I plan to give a snapshot of our fundraising efforts so far. The dashboard clearly explains to everyone, especially to those without a finance background, the most important information:  average donation and giving to date. I think our Board will be surprised with what our average donation really is!”Saving Time by Getting Out of Spreadsheetslast_img read more

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Global Maternal Health Conference 2013: Join the Global Team of Guest Bloggers!

first_imgPosted on December 3, 2012August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Are you presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013 in Arusha, Tanzania? Do you plan to tune in to the live stream to view sessions remotely?Join the team of guest bloggers for the conference! With GMHC2013 right around the corner, the MHTF is looking forward to a lively online scientific dialogue about issues presented at the conference sessions. In an effort to fuel this conversation, we hope to engage a variety of perspectives–from various geographic regions and sub-fields–by connecting with health and development bloggers around the world.You might be interested in writing a guest blog post if:You would like to connect with a broader audience about the work you are presenting at GMHC2013,You work in global health and development and would like to share your thoughts on how the issues discussed in the sessions relate to your work in your specific context,You are working on similar issues to those discussed in the sessions, and would like to share your insights,You have a passion for global health and writing, and would like to help synthesize lessons learned from the sessions.Guest posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.If you are participating in the conference (either in Tanzania or remotely via live webcast) and would like to guest blog about the work you are presenting or the sessions you attend, please submit a brief statement of interest or a sample blog post of less than 300 words to Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu).Please also get in touch if you plan to blog on your own blog or your organization’s blog or website. We would love to discuss linking to your posts and cross-posting content.Take a look at the posts from the first Global Maternal Health Conference.For more information, contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu).Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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PMNCH Launches New Resources on National Progress and Global Commitments to MDG Maternal and Child Health Targets

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 22, 2013February 2, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As world leaders gather at the UN General Assembly to review progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and considers the framework that will follow the 2015 MDG deadline, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) has released its annual review of commitments to the Global Strategy on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. This year’s edition of the report focuses on assessing whether and how the 213 partners that committed to the Global Strategy have followed up on their pledges. As PMNCH Executive Director Carole Presern wrote in the Huffington Post introducing the report, “The report shows that more organizations, governments and the private sector are making commitments to improve women’s and children’s health every year, and that those commitments are being followed up with real action.”Along with the review, PMNCH has also produced “Success Factors,” a series of 10 national case studies that present critical lessons learned for global efforts to advance maternal, newborn and child health. The case studies focus on a diverse group of countries that have achieved substantial progress in recent years, and highlight both common themes and country-specific examples of how effective approaches have been implemented to achieve dramatic effects on maternal and child health.From PMNCH:Success Factor Country Summaries highlight lessons learned from 10 countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Laos PDR, Nepal, Peru, Rwanda and Vietnam) that are well on the path to achieving the MDG targets for maternal and child health.These summaries present different types of policies and programmes that countries use in key areas known to influence the health of women and children.The lessons learned from the analysis of these 10 countries illustrate: The summaries are drawn from evidence collected as part of “Accelerating Progress for Women’s and Children’s Health,” an ongoing, multi-partner effort to answer the question “What can we learn about making progress on women’s and children’s health?” based on  large-scale vidence from 136 low- and middle-income countries over the past 50 years.Share this:center_img Political commitment overcomes challengesEvidence guides policy and investmentSustainable development accelerates progressStrong partnerships achieve goalslast_img read more

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Perspectives on Post-MDG Targets From on the Ground and Around the World

first_imgPosted on January 17, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Members of the White Ribbon Alliance contributed the following comments regarding post-MDG maternal mortality targetsAs we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, what does the future hold for international maternal mortality targets? The MHTF is pleased to be hosting a blog series on post-2015 maternal mortality goal setting. Over the next several weeks, we will be featuring responses and reactions to proposed targets from around the world. Please share your thoughts with us!By Rahmatullah Niazmal, Consultant for PDM 1 & 2 and Overall Supervisor for RHP2, JICA-Reproductive Health Project Phase 2, Ministry of Public Health, AfghanistanAfghanistan is one of the countries which has high maternal mortality ratio (MMR). The current MMR is about 327/100000 live births. Respectively under-five mortality is 97 /1000 live births and, and the infant mortality rate is 77/1000 live births, according to the Afghanistan Mortality Survey, and the contraceptive prevalence rate is about 20 percent. The Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) has committed to improving access to maternal and reproductive health care; and enhancing the quality reproductive health care services is one the MoPH’s top priorities. However, still, there are challenges that MoPH has been competing with. Despite huge efforts that have been put by MoPH for the last one decade, much work remains to be done to maintain the current progress and improve further.The following are the goals for reaching beyond 2015:Increase access and utilization of quality reproductive health servicesIncrease deployment and distribution of trained SBA at national levelDecrease the number of home deliveries – which currently account for a greater proportion of births than institutional deliveriesFill the gap between knowledge(>90%) and utilization (20%) of family planning servicesLower the adolescent birth rate and reduce child marriage in the country.Build capacity at the national level about breast and cervical cancer for early prevention and treatmentEnhance capacity for obstetric fistula treatment, prevention and re-integration at the national levelRaise awareness about STIs, HIV and AIDS among adolescents and vulnerable populations.By Ronald Wonder, Managing Partner, PLUS CONSULTS, UgandaMy thinking on this issue is that targets are useful in driving progress in countries including Uganda but absolute targets are much better. It should then go further to set quotas for respective districts, starting with those with high mortality rates and trickle down to household in the sub counties.This would give more meaning to policy makers, individual and civil society organization making an effort to curb this problem among expectant mothers in Uganda.Keep the fight on to protect our mothers.By Jonas Fadweck, Youth Director and patron of Thuchila Youth Empowerment Programme, Project Officer of WHCCA-Malawi, member to White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood, and Girl Rising Regional Ambassador, UgandaIn order to improve maternal health in countries such as Malawi, I believe the following should be made priorities under the next development agenda:To increase rural bicycle ambulances for easy transport, especially in the community, for pregnant women: many women die before reaching the hospital, and many others deliver on the road before reaching a health facility – which is a disaster.To train other community members and/or increase expertise in the field in order to reduce the work load for nurses and midwives.To establish community mobilization campaigns to help people realize the importance of women to deliver at the hospital, attending antenatal clinics, and the consequences of teenage pregnancies.To introduce and increase maternity wings to health centres that now have no maternity services.To promote and encourage transparency and accountability.These are some of the contributions we can make to enshre more women and reach target goals.By Kezaabu Edwidge, Project Coordinator, Health Community Empowerment Project, UgandaThere is a great concern on maternal health and the situation is alarming: mothers are still dying in labour and post delivery due to problems related to pregnancy, labor and pueperium. Involvement of all stakeholders is of paramount importance. In Uganda, young people, in particular adolescents and youths engaged in unprotected sex – who face unwanted pregnancy – require more attention. This is important to address the issue of teenage pregnancy, and related concerns such as abortion. The issue of male involvement at all levels starting with the families, then to managers and leaders of all categories. Family planning is also a concern as most people shun off services because of ignorance, the myths and misconception and the unmet need.By Jonathan LugemwaA percentage target is appropriate: taking into account previous methodologies used in communities before these formal interventions came into practice because our current surveys describe that formal interventions which are brought to the people in a provisional standards without their consent are less eligible to create permanent change so its very much vital to include especially the local populations.By Uhawenimana Thierry Claudien, Public Relations and Communications Officer, University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health SciencesThere are considerable efforts underway to reduce neonatal mortality and maternal mortality in Rwanda, which now has a maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 340 deaths per 100,000 live births. However, a lot needs to be done in order to ensure no mother or child should die as a result of child birth or pregnancy complications.In some rural areas in Rwanda – mainly in the mountainous areas that are hard to reach – I have noticed that the physical settings may be the leading factor in maternal and child deaths. Some villages are far from the health facilities (7-8 kms) and the roads leading there are not well furnished. This leads some pregnant mothers to not complete the four recommended antenatal care (ANC) visits, which are vital to the safe pregnancy and delivery. Some women deliver along the way to the health center due to circumstances leading to the delay at home, and the delay to reach the health facility.Thus I would like that in the next targets to reduce maternal and child mortality, governments should put much emphasis on making the population aware of the birth preparedness and complication readiness; and also removing the barriers that impede the population from accessing obstetric services in a timely way, such as reducing the distance to the health facilities in areas that are hard to reach, availing ambulances at health centers that are far from the district hospitals, increasing the community health workers’ skills and knowledge to deal with some pregnancy related complications.As the number of adolescent girls who become pregnant increases in Rwanda, there is a need to educate them on health policies, including on how they can receive adolescent friendly services near them; and mobilize the whole community to go beyond the limits of culture and religion and support the sexual and reproductive health information on behalf of the adolescent. By doing this, no adolescent girl will be stigmatized because she has used contraceptives, and those who will accidentally get pregnant will not hide it; something that put them under the risk of death or injury. In addition, the rate of abortion will be reduced among this age group.There is a need to involve men in maternal and child health initiatives by giving them the knowledge and necessary skills required for them to support mothers and babies, as well as helping them understand their interests in embracing that role. Thus, there will play a key role in empowering the girls to be confident of themselves and to say no to unwanted sexual intercourse pulses, or will not seek to exploit you girls sexually.As for family planning, there is a need to train more professionals in providing services of family planning and who are experts in contraception usage. There is a tendency nowadays that nurses or midwives only administer any method of FP to a woman and at the end of the day, she faces side effects some of which may be fatal. But, if we have experts in contraceptives’ administration and counseling, some of the issues and myths preventing people from accessing the services will be kept at arm’s length. In addition to this, there is a need to keep on increasing the number of skilled birth attendants so that they be proportional to the number of deliveries taking place in health centers and hospitals. This will improve the service delivery given to the mothers and will reduce some of the risks associated with overloading the health personnel.Lastly, laws related to maternal and child health should be incorporated in the country’s legal framework and on top of that, the existing laws should be revised and even hold accountable men who impregnate girls and abandon them or those who refuse to support their pregnant partners among many others.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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How to Avoid Predatory Journals: A Five Point Plan

first_imgPosted on January 28, 2015May 9, 2017By: Jocalyn Clark, Executive Editor, Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition at icddr,bClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Increasingly, I’m asked to advise and assist with the problem of predatory journals. While it’s probably only an annoying nuisance to many in the developed world, the increasing number of spam emails inviting articles and conference participation is beginning to feel like a potentially serious problem for developing world scientists and institutions. This demands action, as Richard Smith and I argue in a recent editorial in The BMJ.That’s because these countries’ relative lack of development also extends, unsurprisingly, to scholarly publishing. Whereas in rich country institutions we would have training, supervision, and support that generate a level of literacy to discern predatory versus legitimate journals, this is often missing or nascent in developing country institutions. As a recent paper shows, the majority of authors in predatory journals are inexperienced and based in developing countries.Predatory journals (a term first coined by librarian Jeffrey Beall) are fake or scam journals that send phishing emails offering “open access” publication in exchange for payment, without providing robust editorial or publishing services. They have been discredited by the scientific community, and because they are not indexed in standard databases any research published in them is effectively lost. Their motive is financial gain, and their modus operandi is a corruption of the business model of legitimate open access publishing.Many organisations and universities around the world are facing this problem, but it appears predatory publishers may be particularly targeting institutions in the global south.I’m struck by how many more spam emails from predatory publishers I get to my Bangladesh institutional email than I do to my Canadian academic account. In a recent seven day trial, I received 14 predatory journal spam emails to my icddr,b account and six to my University of Toronto account; a colleague at Harvard in the same period got just two.This can’t be explained by inadequate junk mail filters, as the system we use at my organisation in Bangladesh is an industry standard.I recommend a five point plan for researchers to avoid predatory journals, which involves “doing your homework” to check the credibility of a journal or publisher, and always being sceptical of unknown journals. To distinguish legitimate from predatory journals, here are some useful sources of information—none of which are adequate on their own:Is the journal or publisher listed in Beall’s List? If so, it should be avoided, as this “blacklist” is regularly updated and specifies criteria for identifying predatory journals and publishers.If claiming to be an open access journal, is the journal in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)? This is a sort of “whitelist,” and journals here must meet specific criteria.Is the publisher a member of recognised professional organisations that commit to best practices in publishing, such as the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE); the International Association of Scientific, Technical, & Medical Publishers (STM); or the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)?Is the journal indexed? Do not accept the journal’s claims about being indexed. Instead verify these claims by searching for the journal in databases such as PubMedCentral (free) or the Web of Science (requiring subscription).Is the journal transparent and following best practices when it comes to editorial and peer review processes, governance, and ownership? Are there contact details for the journal and its staff (email, postal address, working telephone number)? Reputable journals have a named editor and editorial board comprised of recognised experts. Are the costs associated with publishing clear? Credible journals do not ask for a submission fee. Many bona fide open access journals require a publication charge, but this is levied after acceptance and through a process separate from the editorial process.To help with “doing your homework” authors can consult new guidance from COPE, which—along with the DOAJ, OASPA, and the World Association of Medical Editors—has set out principles of transparency and best practice that set apart legitimate journals and publishers from “non-legitimate” ones.These sources of information can help any researcher struggling to avoid predatory journals, but should supplement rather than supplant extensive discussions among co-authors about the right and reputable target journals for their papers.In addition, those of us who collaborate with and advocate health research from developing countries should lend our support to colleagues, especially junior colleagues, to spread publication literacy and to fight against the predatory journals.This post originally appeared on BMJ Blogs.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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5 Tips to Make Events Donor Centric and Stewardship Focused

first_imgIt’s common for nonprofit board members and staff to express frustration with special events. Questions like “How does this event advance our mission?” or “Where are the major donors, new donors, and volunteers?” are typical.Many of these concerns are raised because your board and staff want to make sure donors (and potential donors) have the opportunity to connect with the organization at a deeper level and understand how they are supporting mission-focused programs.Instead of moving forward with the usual events plan this year, try focusing on these five things that will ensure your events are donor-centric and have a stewardship element.1. Give corporate sponsors opportunities for more involvement.Your event sponsors want to show they care passionately about the community.  They want brand visibility and recognition in ways they cannot secure through advertising. Sometimes they want to meet new people: ask them to sponsor tables at a gala or water tents at an outdoor event and place members of their team at those tables and tents. Invite the employees of the corporation to participate as event volunteers.2. Secure creative event partners.Think about co-promoting your event by featuring local artists or dancers as the entertainment. Ask seven chefs to be the feature of seven different food sites at the event. Ask individuals who have a wedding or reunion coming up to allow you to use the table decorations or flowers. Create centerpieces that reflect the mission or are made by clients.  Choose a venue that reflects the mission, perhaps a hospital main lobby after hours, a schoolroom, or a park where homeless sleep at night. Not only do creative partners help cut costs, these partners are given the opportunity to contribute to your event in a unique way. These contributions of a special skill or talent can be extremely rewarding or, it lets supporters make the event possible beyond a typical cash donation.3. Choose the right events for the right type of donor.Different events attract different personas. Think of the different donor personas that might be in your donor database as you are planning your special events for the year. The mission must be front and center to the “why” support the event. If the event is an auction, you need to ensure that the people invited to this event can afford the benefit items and expect high end items. If the event is a race, you need to attract people who can not only complete the distance and bring a competitive energy, but will also attract or influence others to support them, support your organization’s cause and follow their training and race progress. And for peer-to-peer fundraising events, these peer fundraisers must also feel comfortable sharing why they support and want others to support your mission.4. Leverage (and value) your board and volunteers.The board must be empowered to connect their network to the event to reach the goal. They need to be proud and excited to participate in the event and willing to speak to their personal “why” story. They need to make supporting your mission important to those within their circle of influence. Some friendly fundraising or guest count competition between board members can be motivating for some people. Facilitate, invite, welcome the board member ideas.Event volunteers must be a fun team, able to answer questions, and easily identifiable the day of. Making sure board and volunteers are happy and feel valued promotes leadership succession for your committees and continued involvement. To help make sure that event volunteering is a postive experience, think about why committee members and board members would expend effort in planning and executing the event. Instead of focusing on what you or the staff need people to do, stay focused on your volunteer and staff why to ensure the experience is a great one for those helping out.5. Plan for success.This means planning at the detailed level. Everything, from signing up for an event and buying a ticket online to paying for an auction item, reflects on your nonprofit’s brand. Instead of thinking about how this process can be made easier for staff, think about the process from the donor’s point of view. Use consistent wording on invitations, your gala program, and volunteer training notes. This is especially important when explaining the event’s mission impact. Receipts or reservation confirmations must be prompt and communicate what has been accomplished because of their vital support. If you’re doing an auction, items should be on display online as well as on the night of the gala to add to excitement and facilitate online bidding.Planning for success requires a communication plan that cultivates the guests and volunteers of the event. Many nonprofits are afraid of over-communicating the event. Don’t be! Part of this events communication strategy should include plans for cultivating volunteers, sponsors, event attendees and major donors after the event. Gather their feedback and thank them early and often. Have board members follow up with five new people they met at the event. And put their ideas to use: with these comments, prepare an even better event next year.Donor-centric events are stewardship events. You will find success with these events as long as you utilize them to bring new and existing donors closer to the mission and to thank major supporters of your cause. And remember to thank early and often: when buying a ticket, upon arrival at the event, upon departure and after the event is over. Remind them when the goal has been raised that the mission cannot be archived without their support.last_img read more

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How to Harness Emotion as You Get Ready for Giving Season

first_imgLast week, we introduced a series on four lessons learned from fundraising for real nonprofits in Baltimore. This week, we’re diving into the first lesson: the emotional nature of giving.We’ve said it before– giving is an emotional act. Donors give when they can feel a connection – when they know they are doing something to help something (or someone) that they care deeply about. They could care less about your goal to reach $10,000 by midnight – what they really care about is ending hunger, ending systemic poverty, destroying the school to prison pipeline, providing safe shelter for women in need, or making recess fun again.When the Network for Good team went out to help real nonprofits, we learned this first-hand. The team that raised the most did so by leveraging the already-emotionally driven assets of the nonprofit (Wide Angle Youth Media), and sent them out to all of their family and friends. This double shot of an emotional appeal combined with personal connections between the donors and fundraisers themselves resulted in over $2440 in a 12-hour period.What can other nonprofits take from this?Tell a Good StoryWhen the Network for Good team ambushed Wide Angle Youth Media (WAYM) at their office in Baltimore, their initial plan was to create a video in the spirit of what WAYM does. The team quickly discovered that a project like that would take much too long, so they decided to use WAYM’s existing assets.The team watched one of WAYM’s videos and used that as inspiration to create a giving page.A successful giving page is one that creates a compelling story as to why the donor should give. To do that, use the five C’s of storytelling:Core message: The core message is that one thing you want people to remember after hearing your story. When developing your story, ask yourself three questions:What do I want donors to think?What do I want them to feel?What do I want them to do?The answers will help you uncover your core message and how to structure your email campaign. They’ll also guide you through the logical and emotional sides of crafting your story and engaging donors with the copy.Connection: Powerful stories are about creating an emotional and authentic connection with readers. This often happens in the beginning of a story (“Call me Ishmael.”)  The same goes for an email. Think carefully about your message’s salutation and the first sentence. How will you hook a reader and get them to stick with you through the end? A great example is personalization. Using a donor’s first name in the salutation (e.g. “Dear Sarah”) is a powerful way to build a connection.Character: This is often the person writing the email, or it might be a monthly donor talking about why she was moved to offer ongoing support, or the story of a person served by your programs. It could even be the story of a shelter dog finding a forever home. The sky’s the limit.Conflict: Conflict is crucial in fundraising. It creates a sense of urgency, which encourages people to respond (and give) to help you resolve the conflict. “These villagers have to walk five miles a day for fresh water. Donate now to build a new well.” Conflict and call to action are intertwined.Call to action: A call to action is the thing you want people to do. A good call to action is very specific and active: Click here to give. Donate now. Use active and affirmative phrases that motivate people to follow through.Work your networkAfter creating a stellar donation page, the Network for Good team of fundraisers did everything they could to spread the work to their networks. This meant Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, as well as personal appeals to potential large donors. At the end of the day, over $2440 was raised.Why did this work? Donors are three times more likely to give when asked by someone they know. Imagine, if you asked 5 people to give, and each of them asked five more people, right away that’s 30 potential donors. And this is perhaps the strongest argument we can give for why you should consider making a peer-to-peer campaign as part of your giving season strategy. More importantly though, it’s why you need to spend time now building up your relationships with the donors in your database already. When you’ve spent more time fostering a meaningful connection with your donors, they’re much more likely to be ready to give come December.For more ways to build an emotional connection with donors, grab a copy of 7 Ideas to Engage Your Donors Before Year-End.Check back next week as we dive into the second learning from our day in Baltimore, and how local nonprofits can take steps to overcome the time and capacity challenges that threaten their success.last_img read more

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The Impact of #GivingTuesday Infographic

first_imgStill wondering if you should participate in #GvingTuesday tomorrow? From first-time donors to your longtime, faithful donor base, this global day of giving is one of the most popular events of the giving season.Network for Good’s data shows that charitable giving on our platform on #GivingTuesday continues to grow. Since #GivingTuesday began in 2012, participating nonprofits raise more money in their year-end campaigns than organizations that don’t. And more nonprofits are participating every year. Due to the popularity of #GivingTuesday, more and more donors are participating, too!Even if you’ve procrastinated, these next 24 hours still offer time to organize a successful day of giving. Pull together your best impact stories, testimonials from community partners, and powerful images. Prepare an email blast and your social media posts, and spend this #GivingTuesday engaging with your donors. For other quick ideas, check out our Ultimate #GivingTuesday Checklist.last_img read more

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Women in Philanthropy Profile: Janet Cobb

first_imgA native of California, Janet Cobb currently serves as one of Network for Good’s Personal Fundraising Coaches. She has lived and worked in Oregon, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, before finally calling Chicago home. Cobb has thoroughly enjoyed her professional experiences in the culinary arts, in the high school classroom, and in fundraising and development; not to mention the gift of being a wife and a mother to three children who have become phenomenal young adults.Coaching NonprofitsWhat’s involved with your coaching process?In my role, I work with small nonprofits across the country to help them strategize around their fundraising efforts, particularly through the effective use of online fundraising, donor management, and communication tools. Together, we coordinate an integrated communication and fundraising plan that is data-driven and right-sized to fit each individual organization’s capacity to implement. I offer strategic and practical advice along with encouraging and supportive accountability.How long have you been a fundraising consultant?I’ve engaged in various aspects of fundraising throughout my career in the nonprofit arena and transitioned into coaching and consulting in 2013.How did you get started in nonprofit work?I’ve been a “do-gooder” my entire life and have worked within the nonprofit industry—in programming, administration, and fundraising—in some capacity my entire career. Working primarily in smaller nonprofits and schools, the program staff was often responsible for fundraising efforts. I remember in the 1980’s, conducting a ‘monthly giving’ program via snail mail when our donors mailed in $1 bills each month, sorting bulk mailings by zip code on tables in the retreat house dining hall, and sponging stamps long before self-stick existed. In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, I was heavily involved with strategic planning and grant-writing focused on transforming outdated classrooms and libraries into 21st century learning environments. By 2004, I moved more directly into fundraising and development work. Since then, I’ve been responsible for donor communications, database management, special events, major gifts, strategic planning, and capital campaigns—sometimes all at once.What keeps you in the nonprofit sector?I believe in the power of empowering others. The nonprofit sector declares that “we” are all in this together instead of “every ‘man’ for himself.” I believe in the interdependence of the community that fosters the independence of individuals within that community.What do you enjoy most about coaching fundraisers?Through coaching, I get to work with so many fabulous nonprofits that do great work in their own corner of the universe—doing good to make the world a better place. Fundraising is about engaging in conversation with others who care about what you care about, so that the donor has the opportunity to make an impact in a way that is meaningful to them. I enjoy sharing the skills I’ve acquired with others to make a positive impact.What’s your proudest accomplishment with the organization?My proudest accomplishment as a coach is that I’ve been able to support the fundraising efforts of more than 150 small and early-stage nonprofits who have a passion for their mission but can benefit from encouraging and supportive accountability around fundraising. I get to help bring their vision to reality!Women in Philanthropy is an ongoing blog series in celebration of Women’s History Month, featuring some of the incredible women Network for Good has the pleasure to work with.Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

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Save the Children Publishes 16th State of the World’s Mothers Report

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 6, 2015December 3, 2015Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Yesterday, Save the Children released the State of the World’s Mothers 2015 report, which focuses on the disadvantages of being poor in an urban setting.This report presents the latest and most extensive analysis to date of health disparities between rich and poor in cities. It finds that in most developing countries, the poorest urban children are at least twice as likely to die as the richest urban children. In some countries, they are 3 to 5 – or even more – times as likely to die.Read the full report here >>Share this:last_img read more

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Processing of Court Cases to Be Improved Through CISS

first_imgThe justice sector should see significant improvement in its processing of court cases, having implemented a Court Information Statistical System (CISS) in parish courts islandwide.The system allows for the tracking of matters as they move through the court system from initiation to disposition, which will result in faster determination of when a case falls into backlog.Statistics and Data Capture Consultant, Dr. Denarto Dennis, said CISS provides a mechanism which captures data at each stage of a case.“So the system would, for example, capture date of initiation, next date of hearing, reasons for adjournment, number of times the matter is mentioned, if a matter goes to trial and the dates that are set for trial,” he explained.Dr. Dennis told JIS News that the system is particularly effective in strengthening case management, as it captures the age of all matters active in the courts.“This means that at any given point you go on the system, you should be able to see the age, that is, how old each matter before the court is,” he said.The system was piloted in some parish courts beginning in July 2016 and was fully implemented by October. It was formally launched in January of this year.Ahead of the implementation, there was no electronic means of managing cases, except for the Half-Way Tree court, which had an older version of the system for a few years before. Cases were, therefore, being managed manually, which resulted in an ad hoc approach to tracking cases.“This system allows for a more centralised way of managing case flow and case progression. It makes the courts more efficient, in that we can now easily do historical searches for records, rather than having to scroll through warehouses and file inventory areas. CISS allows us to efficiently search for old cases, which helps in the day-to-day operations of the court and it being able to serve the public,” Dr. Dennis said.Parish courts have Case Progression Officers (CPOs) who work in tandem with data-entry personnel to monitor the progression of cases. The CPOs interface with the system, monitor the age of matters, monitor what is happening with the different matters, and then carry out the intervention necessary to get cases ready for court.Plans are under way to expand the CISS to civil courts. On June 5, the system was implemented for a pilot in the Corporate Area Civil Division. Following a successful pilot, it is to be rolled out islandwide in civil courts.“This programme adds tremendous value to the court system in the sense that what we will see in the coming years is a significant reduction in the length of time that it takes for cases to be disposed of,” Dr. Dennis said.This will be facilitated by the system allowing the courts to be able to better manage case flow and to inform the interventions necessary to strengthen the ability and capacity of the courts to handle their caseloads and to manage the readiness of matters for courts,” he added.Implementation of CISS is supported through the Justice Undertakings for Social Transformation (JUST) programme, which is funded by the Canadian Government.The programme aims to enhance the efficiency of case management and judicial processes in the court system.last_img read more

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Canadas luxury retail market takes off as brands flock to cities

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Nearly 40% of the about 50 new international retailers that entered Canada last year are considered to be in the luxury segment. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press) Login/Register With: Advertisement The industry publication has been tracking national store openings for the last five years.“In my neighbourhood of Bloor Street and Yorkville, we’re seeing this absolute explosion right now of luxury brands,” said Craig Patterson, president of Retail Insider, referring to two high-end shopping areas in Toronto.A combination of increasing wealth, tourism and more affordable prime retail property have made Canada one of the top destinations for luxury retailers, according to analysts.center_img Advertisement Twitter Whether you’re in the market for a new $2 million Swiss watch or just window shopping, it’s pretty hard to miss a new global luxury retailer setting up shop in one of Canada’s high-end shopping streets these days.There’s has been an influx of luxury brands opening flagship stores in major urban centres like Toronto and Vancouver over the last couple of years, with some of notables being French fashion houses Chanel, Hermèsand Swiss watchmaker Richard Mille.In fact, nearly 40 per cent of the about 50 new international retailers that entered Canada last year are considered to be in the luxury segment of the market, according to Retail Insider. Facebooklast_img read more

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