QPR misfit finds new club

first_imgPetter Vaagan Moen has signed for Norwegian club Lillestrøm.The Norway midfielder was a free agent after recently leaving QPR by mutual consent.He joined Rangers on a Bosman free transfer in 2010 but was unable to make an impact at Loftus Road.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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R400m for digital TV subsidies

first_imgOnce the details had been finalised and the scheme was ready to be rolled out, Nyanda said consumers would be informed of the criteria for qualification and the application process. “[The] government has already made a decision to support poor TV-owning households, and we are in the process of finalising the details regarding the implementation of the support scheme,” he said. Source: BuaNews “These features enable the disconnection of stolen boxes and will reduce the possibility of an influx of boxes not manufactured or approved in South Africa flooding the market,” Pule said. Speaking in Johannesburg this week, Communications Minister Siphiwe Nyanda said the Cabinet had approved R400-million to subsidise around five-million households, with subsidised set-top boxes expected to cost around R300. 23 October 2009 The set-top boxes that many South Africans will need to watch television when broadcasting goes digital-only will be available at stores throughout the country in the first half of 2010. The government is expected to subsidise 70% of the R700 cost of the units for poorer households.center_img Deputy Communications Minister Dina Pule said that the set top boxes for free-to-air services would have standardised operating systems prioritising security features, interoperability, addressability and inter-connectability. South Africa is currently in a “dual-illumination” period, with both digital and analogue TV signals available. The digital signal was switched on in November 2008, and the analogue signal is due to be switched off on 1 November 2011. In order to receive the digital signal after that date, households with analogue TV sets will need to purchase set-top boxes that convert digital into analogue signals. Nyanda and Pule were speaking at a two-day summit aimed at discussing a set-top box manufacturing strategy that will pave the way for local companies to manufacture the devices. Standards, security featureslast_img read more

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HIV in SA improving slowly

first_imgThe 2009 HIV gauge reveals that progress is being made, especially among South Africa’s youth, but more needs to be done. (Image: MediaClubsouthafrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Fareed MohammedloveLife public relations+27 11 523 1102 or +27 79 597 9374RELATED ARTICLES • Loving life, fighting Aids • HIV in South Africa stabilising • Powerful HIV antibodies found• Hunger strike against HIV • HIV/Aids in South AfricaJanine ErasmusNational youth HIV prevention programme loveLife, which celebrated its 10-year anniversary in October 2009, has released its second annual publication on the status of HIV in South Africa.The publication shows that in some areas there has been marked improvement, but a lot more needs to be done to control the spread of the epidemic and save lives.The 2009 Gauge of HIV Prevention in South Africa is written by Dr David Harrison, former loveLife CEO, and freelance researcher Ruth Scott. Harrison now heads the national youth empowerment programme Connected! – a loveLife initiative.“The publication will give us a sense of where progress is, and is not being made,” said Harrison, speaking at the launch on 2 November 2009.“We’re finding that data such as that from national antenatal surveys are becoming less and less useful – we would prefer that the money be used to better understand the dynamics of the epidemic.”LoveLife CEO Grace Mathlape concurred, saying that the gauge would inform people about what has been and can still be achieved in preventing the spread of HIV and Aids.The publication was funded by the UK Department for International Development, which manages UK aid to poor countries, working to eradicate destitution. It may also be accessed online.Comprehensive informationDrawing on a wide range of published sources, the publication collates all current data about HIV and Aids from both national and regional studies, and presents it in one comprehensive document.The gauge has a threefold aim. Firstly, it reports on the status of the HIV epidemic in South Africa and identifies trends that will assist in halting the spread of the disease. Secondly, it aims to identify areas where knowledge is lacking, and thirdly it makes recommendations that could influence the direction of future policies and programmes.The report noted a number of positive developments. The HIV epidemic has peaked, according to the publication, but the prevalence will not drop for at least five years even if the incidence, or rate of new infections, is slashed in half. This is because antiretroviral drugs help to prolong life, and therefore there are more people living with HIV and Aids.More precise measurements must be implemented to overcome this situation and deliver accurate results, said Harrison. In fact, he added, if the prevalence goes down too soon it could mean that treatment is failing and that too many people are dying.Another significant statistic reveals that in the past five years the prevalence of HIV among 15- to 24-year-olds has dropped, indicating that the rate of new infection has also decreased sharply.Research did show, however, that there is a sharp jump in new infections among people in their mid-20s and early 30s. This means that children in school are relatively protected, but once out of school their lifestyle changes, the future is no longer so certain, and they are more willing to take risks.The report recommends more support structures for new school leavers, and immediate opportunities for personal growth and development.The number of people who have been tested and now know their status has also increased over the past few years, from less than 33% of the population, to about 50%.Preventing infectionThere are a number of areas where firm action could save thousands of lives.Mother-to-child transmission is a key area that could result in fewer new infections. According to the report, every year about 30 000 babies are needlessly infected with HIV in this way, when prevention is possible. Although this number has decreased in the past few years it is still unacceptably high – there should be no more than 4 000 of this type of infection per year.The strategy for preventing mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) does not reach all babies. When successful, the programme reduces transmission to less than 5%, but the report revealed that for various reasons, at most only about 66% of infants who need PMTCT actually benefit from it. The main reason is that testing doesn’t extend to all pregnant women, and many of those who are tested, and found to be HIV-positive, are later neglected by the health system.Testing also falls short with regard to tuberculosis, as incidence of the two diseases are closely related and more than 50% of tuberculosis patients also have HIV. The successful detection of tuberculosis in HIV-positive people must increase.For every two pregnancies in South Africa, there is one HIV infection. This is largely as a result of higher risk in the social environment, since young girls often drop out of school during this time and become insecure about their financial situation. There is also a greater physiological vulnerability to infection.The report recommends a focus on the prevention of teen pregnancy, but failing this, there must be a greater use of condoms during pregnancy as well as the return of new, young mothers to the school system as soon as possible.While condom use has increased among young men between the ages of 15 and 24, the same cannot be said of women in the same age group. Furthermore, not enough condoms are distributed, as seen in the high incidence of HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, Mpumalanga and the Free State – the provinces where condom distribution is lowest. Female condoms are expensive and not readily available.Some of the most vulnerable groups, such as prisoners, are not protected by easy access to condoms. This is especially dangerous because each year 25% of all prisoners are released back into society. “We must flood prisons with condoms,” said Harrison.Disabled people, Aids orphans, and commercial sex workers are also at particular risk of contracting HIV. The group most at risk of infection are those living in informal settlements, whether urban or rural. Most-at-risk groups are neglected in general, and this is an area that needs urgent attention.Taking actionAnother strategy that could drastically reduce the infection rate is the introduction of a national male circumcision programme, as this medical procedure has been proven to reduce HIV incidence – when performed properly.Behaviour change and the reduction of risk tolerance must also be addressed. Such programmes do not address all age groups and there is too little focus on high-risk groups.The report recommends that healthcare be improved generally, as well in specific areas relating to most-at-risk groups, men and those with sexually transmitted infections.More funding is needed. Although currently about R1-billion (US$130.6-million) is spent on HIV prevention, the gauge reported that the investment of another billion into a comprehensive national programme will result in three times that amount in annual savings within a decade.Finally, government needs to be firm and clear on how it is tackling the spread of HIV and tuberculosis, and it must form joint partnerships with the civil and corporate sectors to strengthen its work.last_img read more

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The 7 Worst Marketing Emails You’ve Ever Seen

first_imgMarketing shouldn’t make people cry. Do you get marketing email that makes you want to punch your fist through your computer in hopes of actually connecting with the person that sent it. Marketing shouldn’t suck this bad. Marketing should solve problems, not induce fits of rage.Raise your hand, and repeat after me. “I will stop sending marketing emails that makes people want to punch me.” Marketing automation shouldn’t be about doing more crappy marketing with less effort. Instead, it should be about giving people valuable information in a personalized and contextual manner. Let’s take a look at some TERRIBLE marketing emails and learn from them so that we can delight our prospects, leads, and customers.7 Unbelievably Bad Marketing Automation Emails1. Bragging About Clients: Really? You work with all of these companies? Wait…I don’t care! These companies are not related to my business, and it doesn’t matter what you did for them. It’s also great to see that you needed to send a super LONG email to brag about yourself; thanks for wasting even more of my time.Marketing Takeaway: Your prospects and leads don’t care who you work with. They care about what you can do for them. Send them marketing email that is customized to their business needs with specific recommendations for them. 2. Terrible Event Follow-Up: Could the email below be more obvious that it’s a mass email? This sender was so lazy, that he/she put everyone who attended two events on the same list and sent them all the same email. They also include three separate calls-to-action, and the first one for a free trial doesn’t even include a link. This couldn’t be less personal.Marketing Takeaway: Understand how each person gets added to your email list. Use this information combined with their interaction with your website and content to provide them with personalized content and calls-to-action (CTAs). And stick with one CTA per email, please!3. Failure to Test: Nothing (and I mean nothing) demonstrates a lack of personalization better than an error message that displays instead of the recipient’s name. By not sending a test email to check for technical issues, you can instantly lose credibility as a marketer.Marketing Takeaway: Great marketing automation is about more than just compelling content. It’s about making sure all the details are perfect. Your marketing is the first experience that a potential customer faces. Make this process perfect by testing your email marketing sends to ensure that the formatting and personalization features work correctly.4. Forgetting to Nurture: Really? We just met, and you already want to get married? That is often what bad marketing automation email can feel like. Too many emails like the one below go straight into the sales pitch without any prior nurturing.Marketing Takeaway: Plan your communication with prospects and leads to ensure that you have included several steps of sending educational information before transitioning into product-focused information.5. The Scariest Unsubscribe Link Ever: One way to make sure people never unsubscribe from your emails is to scare the heck out of them. Check out the email below: it has a three line long unsubscribe link. When I saw it, I thought about the terror that could be inflicted on me and my email address if I clicked on it. To top it off, this email is completely self-serving.Marketing Takeaway: Make it easy for people to opt in and out of your email marketing efforts. And again, don’t talk about why you are awesome. Instead, help make the person you’re emailing more awesome.6. Horrible Subject Line: An interesting subject line can make or break the success of an email. Nothing says compelling subject line like “Marketing List.” Seriously? That is just bad. To make it worse, this email goes on to prove itself irrelevant and REALLY long. It keeps going well past the screen shot below.Marketing Takeaway: Invest time in great subject line writing. Test different variations with A/B tests to determine which subject line copy works best for your business. 7. Complete Disregard for Targeting: What you see below is a seemingly well-designed and -written email. The problem lies in targeting. I am not a customer of this company. Their targeting is completely off. To make horrible targeting even worse, the email is about nothing. It has no clear action for me to take. It really has no purpose but to take up space in my inbox.Marketing Takeaway: Understand what your subscribers want from your email. Send them clear and actionable messages. Don’t waste paragraphs of text that basically say nothing. Keep your email copy brief with a prominent desired action.Email shouldn’t be evil. Email should be helpful! What other email marketing mistakes have you noticed in your inbox?Image Credit: Generation Bass Originally published Nov 15, 2011 9:00:00 AM, updated August 29 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Email Marketing Mistakeslast_img read more

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8 Ways to Instantly Improve the Social Shareability of Your Visual Blog Content

first_img Visual Content Tip: Include your logo in infographics and visualizations like the one above. This way if it gets shared far and wide but people don’t attribute you properly, the logo will always be there.)3) Create a blog content pinboard.Speaking of Pinterest, if you want to give your visual blog content a jumpstart, why not create a pinboard specifically dedicated to featuring your blog content? The great thing about this is, you don’t even have to feature content that is particularly visual. Just make sure you include a compelling and interesting image within the post, and use that as the image you pin. Here’s how we do it on HubSpot’s pinboard for this very blog:This leads me to number four … 4) Put extra care into choosing high-quality images for your blog content.The images you choose for your blog content matter, especially since most social networks automatically pull in images with the links people share. As a result, incorporating compelling, high-quality images into your blog content shouldn’t be an oversight. A great image can catch people’s attention and increase clickthroughs to your content, so spend some time on image selection and choose an image that’s both relevant to your content and appealing. We’re fond of Creative Commons. Just be careful about image attribution, and when in doubt, you can always purchase a stock photo here and there. In fact, we have 75 stock photos that are free to download — no attribution required — right here.5) Use Facebook’s photo sharing feature, not its status update option, to share links to your content.Here’s why …See how much more space the version on the right takes up? The version on the left was shared using the general status update option in the composer, whereas the version on the right was shared using the photo share option. Because Facebook features visual content much more prominently in Timelines and in the News Feed, upload an image and include a link to the content in the image’s description for more bang for your buck.6) Create custom images specifically to promote blog content in social.Another thing you can do to optimize blog content that isn’t particularly visual for better shareability is to create custom images that you can use specifically for social media promotion. The example below was created by our social media manager in PowerPoint to promote this post on HubSpot’s Facebook Page, proving you don’t need a ton of fancy, expensive software to leverage the power of visual content.7) Turn text-based content into SlideShares.SlideShare presentations can make for great visual blog content, and the SlideShare website also gets a lot of traffic. Try turning some of your successful text-based content into a visual SlideShare, and embed it as a post on your blog. At HubSpot, we’ve found that posts with embedded SlideShares generate an average of 34% more views and 29% more inbound links than the average non-SlideShare post on this very blog. For tips about how to create a SlideShare, check out this post. You can also see an example of one of our most successful SlideShare-focused posts here. (Tip: Accompany your SlideShare post with copy for SEO and for visitors who prefer text-based content over visual content.)8) Create embed codes for your infographics. Social networks aren’t the only vehicles for extending the reach of your visual blog content. Getting other bloggers and publishers to share your visual content on their websites is a great way to reach new audiences and drive traffic back to your blog. Because they’re easy for others to embed, SlideShares are one great type of visual content for this. Infographics are another great option. So to make it easy for others to publish your infographics on their own websites, you need to … make it easy. But unlike SlideShares, infographics don’t have embed codes built in. Luckily, with Siege Media’s Embed Code Generator, they’re painless to create. We’ve even whipped up a tutorial for you the next time you’re trying to figure out how to create an embed code.In what other ways can you increase the social shareability of your visual blog content? If you’re looking to get started, feel free to grab those free stock photos we mentioned earlier right here.Image Credit: Scinern As you may have picked up by now, visual content is a fantastic marketing weapon. People are naturally attracted to images more than text, it’s highly shareable, and social networks are increasingly jumping on the visual content bandwagon.In fact, social networks are cropping up solely to take advantage of this visual craze. (Pinterest, Instagram, and Vine, anyone?) Even social networks that didn’t start out very visual are featuring visual content more prominently. Facebook is a great example of this — we’ve already seen them make updates to make images much larger and more visible in the News Feed.So what’s a marketer to do? The first step is to invest in visual content creation (this crash course in do-it-yourself visual content design should help big time). But we’re going to take it one step further and assume you’re already doing that — specifically focusing on visual content for your blog. Once you start incorporating more visuals into your blog, how can you increase that visual content’s shareability? We’re going to break out eight ways to do this so you can start increasing the reach of your visual blog content ASAP.8 Ways to Make Your Visual Blog Content More Shareable1) Make content easy to share with social sharing buttons.The best way to increase the shareability of your visual blog content (or any text-based content, for that matter), is to make it easy for your blog visitors to share it. Social sharing buttons are like little calls-to-action that subtly say, “Hey, you liked this? Why not pass it along?” Add some social proof to these sharing buttons in the form of share counts, and you can add a little “See? Everybody’s doing it …” oomph. For instructions about how to create social sharing buttons for the top social networks, check out our ultimate cheat sheet for creating social media buttons.2) Add Pin It buttons next to visual content within blog posts.One of the buttons covered in that social media buttons cheat sheet is Pinterest’s Pin It button, but it’s also worth calling out separately. Pin It buttons make it easy for Pinterest users to share visual content to Pinterest. They’re particularly beneficial for giving visual content such as infographics and other visualizations extra reach, since you can place these buttons within your blog content right next to the visual content you want people to share. For example, if we had created a visual to explain a difficult-to-understand concept (like closed-loop marketing), it’d be smart to add a Pin It button to it, like you see below: Topics:center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Aug 12, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

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20 Must-Read Takeaways From the Dublin Web Summit

first_img Originally published Nov 7, 2014 2:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Imagine a party where Bono, Drew Houston, Eva Longoria, and 20,000 of your lovably nerdy tech friends show up. Add colorful sheep, some intermittent Wi-Fi issues, and a whole lot of drinking, and you’ve got the Dublin Web Summit, one of the hottest tech and marketing events of its kind.The event is remarkable unto itself, but it’s even more remarkable when you consider that the event grew from 400 attendees just four years ago to 20,000 attendees this year. The conference is growing as fast as the Dublin tech scene — as Barry O’Dowd, Head of Emerging Business for IDA Ireland told us, “there is little doubt that the Web Summit has helped put Ireland’s tech scene on the international stage.”Not all the action happens on stage at the Summit, of course. Local legend states that Uber’s 2011 funding round was finalized in a pub at the Summit, and last year’s top 25 startup winners from the Summit raised over $400M over the past twelve months. We tried interviewing the sheep for comment (they politely declined), so instead we found the most tweetable, shareable insights we could find from many of the speakers and assembled them all into one doc for easy inspiration and motivation.Whether you attended the Summit for the first time this year, watched the live stream, or just heard about it from friends, here’s a SlideShare and a few tweetable takeaways of our favorite insights from our friends in the Emerald Isle, thanks to HubSpot’s Melissa Obleada: Topics: Conferencescenter_img 1) “Amazing people need a purpose beyond profits.” -@dharmesh (Click to tweet!)2) “Deal with disruption by being the disruptor.” -@andymarkowitz (Click to tweet!)3) “Life is too short for bad software.” -@sweetlew (Click to tweet!) 4) “Great marketing is marketing for people, not at them.” -@robnewlan (Click to tweet!)5) “One of the key triggers, statistically, for shareability is emotional intensity.” -@sarahfwood (Click to tweet!) Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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What Social Selling Isn’t

first_img Originally published Feb 11, 2015 12:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Social Selling This post originally appeared on the Sales section of Inbound Hub. To read more content like this, subscribe to Sales.Just like anything shiny and new, social selling suffers from a fair amount of hype. And with hype comes misunderstanding.Sales reps and leaders eager to embrace the next generation of selling tactics often jump in with both feet. While this enthusiasm is great, sometimes they dive in before they understand what social selling really is, or what they’re trying to achieve. This is a recipe for disaster.So instead of another piece listing the benefits of social selling and the results that can be reaped through social selling tactics, I thought I’d combat some of the hype by writing on what social selling isn’t. Then business leaders can go in with a clear understanding of what they’re getting into — and what they’re not.Social selling isn’t outsourcing to Marketing.Social selling is about curating and sharing content. Since content is generally Marketing’s job, some companies think social selling falls under their jurisdiction. Wrong. How can salespeople connect with their buyers through social and become known as thought leaders when they’re not actually doing the work themselves?Social selling isn’t about automation.Setting up salespeople’s social accounts so the same piece of content is shared at the exact same time looks inauthentic and fake. Don’t do it.Social selling isn’t a one-time event.You can’t just share one article or favorite one buyer’s tweet and then be done with it. Social selling is a continuous journey. Salespeople must commit to infusing social media into their daily routines for social activity to have an impact on revenue.Social selling isn’t immediate.Don’t expect to see major results after one week. Social selling is a marathon, not a sprint.Social selling isn’t about selling.If you’re using the same hard sales tactics on social that you’ve always used, you’re doing it wrong. LinkedIn messages aren’t just another avenue to send your cold pitch to buyers. Social selling is about nurturing relationships over time. Connect with and socially surround your buyers.Social selling isn’t modern trickery.If done right, it’s about creating genuine relationships with people. Nothing tricky or underhanded about that.Social selling isn’t the new channel for spam.If you’re mass sending your cold email pitch through LinkedIn messages or Twitter DMs, you’re doing it wrong. Spam — regardless if it’s sent through email or social channels — is still spam. That’s just #SocialStupid.Social selling isn’t cold calling.It’s way more fun than that.Social selling isn’t about sharing as much content as you can.Nobody likes someone who won’t shut up, and it’s the same on social media. Social selling is just as much (if not more) about listening to buyers to discover their interests as it is about becoming an effective content curator and thought leader.Social selling isn’t replacing face-to-face interaction.In person meetings will never die in sales. But modern salespeople should strive to be in all the places their buyers are. And that includes social media as well as trade shows.Social selling isn’t magic.If your company has a lackluster product or service, social selling isn’t going to change that. Don’t expect it to.Social selling isn’t stalking.Don’t favorite, retweet, share, or comment on every single post someone puts out. That’s just creepy. Show a sustained interest without crossing the line into stalker territory.Social selling doesn’t replace phone and email outreach.It’s strictly additive.Social selling isn’t about media.Getting involved on a social platform for the sake of being seen on the platform doesn’t make sense. Don’t forget the “social” in social selling — networking and connecting with people should be the crux of your strategy.Social selling isn’t right for everyone.If your buyers aren’t on social, I’m not sure why you would need to be there. Be where your buyers are — whether that’s on social media platforms or groups, or somewhere else entirely. Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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Don’t Use a CRM? Here Are 4 Reasons Why It Might Be The Solution You Need

first_img Using a CRM Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack This post originally appeared on HubSpot’s Sales Blog. To read more content like this, subscribe to Sales.In the early days of starting a business, you’ll encounter a dizzying array of acronyms — ROI, ARPU, CAC, LTV, MoM, NPV, just to name a few. One acronym is particularly important: CRM.Simply put, CRM — or customer relationship management — refers to software that tracks interactions with prospects and customers.All CRMs store prospects’ contact information — their name, email, and phone number, as well as any other identifying information a company chooses to track. CRMs can also group multiple contacts at a company under one account, which is helpful for sellers.Beyond contact info, CRMs log reps’ touchpoints with their prospects, including emails, phone calls, voicemails, and in-person meetings. Some CRMs offer the ability to track deal stages and reasons for closed-lost and closed-won deals.As anyone who’s ever struggled with contact management knows, a CRM system is an invaluable tool for businesses that want to grow and scale (read: virtually every business). But on the other hand, it’s yet another solution that business owners must implement and train users on. Is it really worth it?Absolutely. Here are the top four reasons why your business — regardless of size, maturity, or industry — needs a CRM.4 Crucial Benefits of Using a CRM System1) It’s a centralized place for storing data.In sales, speed and ease are critical. Spending precious time searching through their inbox or call history to get a prospect’s number or recall when they last spoke is a huge waste of a salesperson’s time. It’s also unreliable — if they forget a touchpoint, they risk sending the same email multiple times and annoying a prospect.A CRM provides a full, accurate record of a rep’s entire interaction history with a prospect that’s accessible with one click. Reps will never have to manually reconstruct a timeline of touchpoints again.Reps can also use a CRM to view their sales pipeline and opportunity queue, which ensures they always know where they stand relative to quota. In addition, CRMs allow salespeople to filter opportunities by the ones they own so they only have to refer to one page to get a high-level summary of all their deals in progress. Some even provide a snapshot of a rep’s sales pipeline by sorting opportunities by deal stage, making forecasting painless.2) It improves communication across an organization.In addition to making life easier for individual reps, CRM systems also improve communication at the organizational level. What if a rep is working a lead that their colleague spoke to two years ago? What if they’re taking over someone’s territory and have only been given an indecipherable Excel spreadsheet of prospects?With a CRM, reps can immediately assess what’s already been done with a given prospect and what’s next. Your reps don’t need to reach out to their colleagues to get interaction history, because the information they need is already in the system.3) CRMs make managers’ lives easier.Another organization-wide boon: CRMs standardize how reps track their activities and prospect interactions, which streamlines reporting.Without a CRM, different salespeople can track activities in different ways, which makes it difficult for managers and leaders to piece data together to form a coherent picture. CRMs make data entry uniform, meaning managers can easily combine and analyze data to understand the overall health of the sales organization.Keeping activity recording consistent also reduces friction when passing a lead from one rep to another, switching territories, or reassigning a departed colleague’s opportunity queue. Not only will all relevant information be accounted for, it will also have been recorded in a manner that makes sense across the sales force.4) It’s a sustainable, scalable tool for growth.You might be asking yourself, “Can’t I just do this all in an Excel spreadsheet and call it a day?”With one or two or five customers, manually tracking every interaction is doable. But think ahead to one, two, or even five years from now. Presumably, you want to triple or quadruple revenue in the years ahead, and the time your salespeople will have to spend recording prospect and customer information is eventually going to take over their days.Furthermore, what if you want to analyze your salespeople’s activities to discover what outreach strategies or series of touchpoints work the best (or, frankly, anything else about your sales force’s effectiveness)? Pulling inconsistently tracked data from multiple sources can drag out or compromise your ability to get an accurate picture.Ultimately, there’s a very simple question you should ask yourself if you’re considering a CRM: Do you want to grow your business? Your ability to do so is dependent on contacting your prospects at the right intervals and providing them relevant information at the right time, and you simply can’t do this effectively without a CRM.Ready to flip the switch? Check out HubSpot’s free CRM. Originally published Sep 13, 2015 8:00:00 AM, updated August 28 2017last_img read more

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Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: What’s the Difference?

first_img Originally published Oct 10, 2017 6:00:00 AM, updated October 10 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! Topics: We all have different reasons for getting up every morning and doing what we do every day.So why is it that, on some days, it can feel harder than others to get up when your alarm goes off, do your workout, crush a work or school assignment, or make dinner for your family?Motivation (or a lack thereof) is usually behind why we do the things that we do.There are different types of motivation, and as it turns out, understanding why you are motivated to do the things that you do can help you keep yourself motivated — and can help you motivate others.Download our complete productivity guide here for more tips on improving your productivity at work.In this post, we’ll dive into the two types of motivation — intrinsic and extrinsic — to learn the differences between the types, the benefits of each, and how to use both types to inspire productivity.Definitions of Intrinsic and Extrinsic MotivationIntrinsic motivation involves doing something because it’s personally rewarding to you. Extrinsic motivation involves doing something because you want to earn a reward or avoid punishment.What Is Intrinsic Motivation?When you’re intrinsically motivated, your behavior is motivated by your internal desire to do something for its own sake — for example, your personal enjoyment of an activity, or your desire to learn a skill because you’re eager to learn.Examples of intrinsic motivation could include:Reading a book because you enjoy the storytellingExercising because you want to relieve stressCleaning your home because it helps you feel organizedWhat Is Extrinsic Motivation?When you’re extrinsically motivated, your behavior is motivated by an external factor pushing you to do something in hopes of earning a reward — or avoiding a less-than-positive outcome.Examples of extrinsic motivation could include:Reading a book to prepare for a testExercising to lose weightCleaning your home to prepare for visitors coming overIntrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: What’s the Difference?At first glance, it might seem like it’s better to be intrinsically motivated than extrinsically motivated. After all, doesn’t it sound like it would be ideal if you didn’t need anyone — or anything — motivating you to accomplish tasks?But, alas, we don’t live in such a motivation-Utopia, and being extrinsically motivated doesn’t mean anything bad — extrinsic motivation is just the nature of being a human being sometimes.If you have a job, and you have to complete a project, you’re probably extrinsically motivated — by your manager’s praise or a potential raise or commission — even if you enjoy the project while you’re doing it. If you’re in school, you’re extrinsically motivated to learn a foreign language because you’re being graded on it — even if you enjoy practicing and studying it.So, intrinsic motivation is good, and extrinsic motivation is good. The key is to figure out why you — and your team — are motivated to do things, and encouraging both types of motivation.When Intrinsic Motivation Is BestResearch has shown that praise can help increase intrinsic motivation. Positive feedback that is “sincere,” “promotes autonomy,” and “conveys attainable standards” was found to promote intrinsic motivation in children.But on the other side of that coin, external rewards can decrease intrinsic motivation if they’re given too willy-nilly. When children received too much praise for completing minimal work or single tasks, their intrinsic motivation decreased.The odds are, if you’re reading this blog post, you’re not a child — although children are welcome subscribers here on the HubSpot Marketing Blog. But the principles of this study are still sound for adults.If you’re a people manager, be intentional with your praise and positive feedback. Make sure that it’s specific, empowering, and helps your direct reports understand your expectations and standards. But make sure you aren’t giving too much praise for work that’s less meaningful for your team, or they might lose intrinsic motivation.If you’re an individual contributor, tell your manager when their feedback is motivating — give them positive feedback, too. By providing positive feedback to your manager when they give you praise that keeps you motivated, you, in turn, will extrinsically motivate them to keep managing you successfully. (Meta, huh?)When Extrinsic Motivation Is BestExtrinsic rewards don’t just involve bribery (although bribery can work). In some cases, people may never be internally motivated to complete a task, and extrinsic motivation can be used to get the job done.In fact, extrinsic rewards can promote interest in a task or skill a person didn’t previously have any interest in. Rewards like praise, commissions, bonuses, or prizes and awards can also motivate people to learn new skills or provide tangible feedback beyond just verbal praise or admonishment.But tread carefully with extrinsic rewards: Studies have shown that offering too many rewards for behaviors and activities that people are already intrinsically motivated to do can actually decrease that person’s intrinsic motivation — by way of the overjustification effect.In these cases, offering rewards for activities the person already finds rewarding can make a personally enjoyable activity seem like work — which could kill their motivation to keep doing it.If you’re a people manager, use extrinsic rewards sparingly to motivate your team to take on new responsibilities or achieve lofty goals. Bonuses, commissions, recognition prizes, and promotions can be an effective way to motivate or reward your team for learning new skills, taking on new challenges, or hitting a quarterly goal. But make sure you’re giving your team members the time and resources to explore skills and projects they’re already excited about independently — without making them a part of their regular responsibilities, which could demotivate them.If you’re an individual contributor, work for the rewards you want, but don’t over-exhaust yourself in the pursuit of extrinsic prizes. Make sure you’re taking time, in your job or in your personal life, to explore activities that you enjoy just for the sake of doing them, to keep yourself balanced. Productivitylast_img read more

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This Simple Diagram Will Help You Tell Better Brand Stories

first_imgTell someone to write a poem, and chances are, they’ll freeze up. Tell someone to write a haiku, however, and we bet they’ll bang one out in less than 10 minutes.The reason: constraints unleash our creativity. But how can you translate that to the complex world of content marketing?Click here to download our ultimate toolkit for social and PR branding.The below diagram will help you do just that.The Story Funnel-MatrixThe funnel-matrix has two dimensions. The first maps loosely to the stages of a typical marketing funnel: awareness, consideration, and acquisition.What stories you tell will depend on your current relationship with your audience –where you are as a couple, to use the obligatory marketing-dating analogy.When you first meet someone, your conversations tend to be around things that you have in common — your shared interests and values. This is why so many people make small talk about the weather. It affects everyone, so it’s something we all have in common.You probably won’t dive into your health problems the first time you meet someone. You probably won’t share intimate details about the people in your life.But after you meet, you might start sharing some of those things, especially if the first date goes well. You might start to paint a picture of your dream life: where you want to live, your ideal career, where you want to travel. Though you shouldn’t hit them with a marriage proposal at this point, you’ll start to share more about yourself — what you care about and what you want.By the third or fourth date, you’ll naturally be sharing more personal stories than before. This is the way a relationship progresses. (Notice how storytelling is such a big part of what we do when we’re dating. It’s good for more than just marketing and publishing!)This brings us back to our storytelling funnel-matrix. In the beginning of a relationship, you should tell stories about shared interests and values. As things progress, you can tell stories about the people in your life (like your customers or employees). Finally, as things start getting more serious, you tell stories about your products and services themselves.The second dimension of the funnel-matrix adds an extra bit of planning help to your content creation strategy. This comes straight from the playbook of newsrooms.The idea is to divide the stories you tell into three more categories based on time: timely stories that are pertinent based on news or current events; seasonal stories that are relevant because of the time of year; and evergreen stories that will be valuable no matter when the audience sees or hears them.Take our client American Express, for example. Amex’s OPEN line of credit cards wants small business owners to know that they care about them. Building that trust is a key element of their B2B branding, so they tell stories in various places, most notably on OPEN Forum, a content hub and newsletter that attracts millions of small business owners each month. They’re mostly interested in staying top of mind, not driving conversions or talking about Amex’s products.Instead, they tell stories about how small business owners handle challenges like hiring and growth. These are examples of evergreen stories.Sometimes Amex OPEN Forum spots something relevant that happens in the news and writes stories about how it affects small business owners, like new overtime laws and tax policies. These are timely + top-funnel stories.And one day a year, American Express sponsors a holiday called Small Business Saturday, where it encourages consumers to shop at local businesses instead of big ones. To promote the upcoming holiday, Amex creates videos about small businesses around the country that are making a difference in their communities. These are seasonal stories.Shinola’s stories of its factory workers and their mission to transform Detroit are about both values (saving American jobs) and its company/people. So they are evergreen + top/mid- funnel.GE Reports, which tells stories of how GE invents really cool products (but doesn’t try to get you to buy those products), are mid-funnel and often timely—as the company reports on new innovations—but also evergreen because many of the stories are still interesting after the news is over.The Groupon stories we talked about fit into the category of timely + bottom-funnel. They’re stories about product deals Groupon wants you to buy on one specific day.Zady’s stories about the Indigo Skinny Jeans are evergreen + bottom-funnel. They’ll be around whenever you are ready for them.The smartest brand storytellers are constantly on the lookout for data to tell them what their audiences are interested in during each stage of the funnel and each segment of the Bullseye. They obsess over it. And that’s because they know it’s their secret advantage.This is an excerpt from the Amazon #1 New Release, The Storytelling Edge: How to Transform Your Business, Stop Screaming Into the Void, and Make People Love You” by Joe Lazauskas and Shane Snow, available today. Originally published Feb 20, 2018 6:00:00 AM, updated February 20 2018 Topics: Storytelling Don’t forget to share this post!last_img read more

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