ON THIS WEEKEND

first_imgDIGICEL SPORTSMAX2:12 A.M.: STOKE CITY VS CRYSTAL PALACE5 A.M.: WEST BROM VS BOURNEMOUTH8:30 A.M.: WATFORD VS LIVERPOOL11 A.M.: SWANSEA VS WEST HAM DIGICEL SPORTSMAX2:10 A.M: EVERTON VS LEICESTER CITY12:30 A.M.: NEWCASTLE VS ASTON VILLA10 P.M.: MAN UNITED VS NORWICHDIGICEL SPORTSMAX:5 P.M.: CHELSEA VS SOUTHAMPTONSUNDAY, DECEMBER 20 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19last_img

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RESIDENTS ANGER AS PLANNING PERMISSION SOUGHT FOR THIRD WIND TURBINE AT HISTORIC BEAUTY SPOT

first_imgNeil Mc Cormack, Liam Cunningham Toni Devine and David Simpson walk along the long Glen Road near Kinnagoe Bay where the the purposed wind turbines are planed for in Co Donegal. Photo Brian McDaid/CristephDONEGAL County Council is expected to object to a planning application for a THIRD  massive wind turbines overlooking one of the county’s most beautiful and historic bays.An Bord Pleannala has already given the GO-AHEAD for two turbines which will stand on top of a hillside above Kinnagoe Bay in Inishowen and stretch an astonishing 132 METRES HIGH. The Bord overturned a decision of the council to ban the development.The council had objected to the move by Derry man Declan Clarke – who has a holiday home on the land at Crockbrack Hill. Now residents are angry to learn that planning permission for a third turbine on the Wild Atlantic Way was submitted just before Christmas.The turbines will sit on top of the hill and will be clearly visible from Kinnego Bay’s famous beach, scene of a Spanish Armada landing and a huge tourist attraction.Mr Clarke has leased another piece of land and continues with his plan to enlarge his wind farm on Crockbrack Hill. He has put in a new planning application 15/51683 to build the third wind turbine there.The local residents are encouraging people who want to protect Kinnagoe Bay and the surrounding area from wind farm development to object to this new application (15/51683).“He already has permission to build two turbines. That permission was granted even though Donegal County Council refused it and An Bord Pleanala’s own Inspector said it should not be granted,” said David Simpson from Inishowen Wind Energy Awareness Group.“If you look up the letters of consent in the new application, you can read for yourself, the landowner is giving her consent to Declan Clarke for construction of a “Wind Farm” on her lands.“Will Declan Clarke stop at three turbines?”The new site of the third turbine will be 412 metres to the East of the first two. The wind farm will be within a distance of 500 meters to a Designated European Special Area of Conservation, the North Inishowen Coast SAC and obviously nearer to Kinnagoe Bay, said Mr Simpson.He went on: “What is difficult to understand is the fact, that in the Donegal County Development Plan 2012-2018 the whole southern Hillside, opposite the building sites of the 3 turbines, is designated as EHSA: Area of Especially High Scenic Amenity and is designated as an area „Not Favoured“ for wind farms.”The local group Inishowen Wind Energy Awareness Group hoped last year that the launch of the Wild Atlantic Way, which passes the hill where the turbines will be built, would protect the area from inappropriate and intrusive development.But An Bord Pleanala rejected this argument of protecting the route and granted an amendment for the first two turbines in 2015. Now with the third turbine going up at Crockbrack Hill, no one knows how this wind farm will develop. “We all know that Declan Clarke doesn’t live here,” said Mr Simpson.“The landowners who lease their land for the development of a wind farm do not live in the area. It makes local people very angry that investors can come here, exploit the natural resources of our area without having any regard to the fact that they destroy the landscape, the heritage, the community and people’s peace of mind and our area just for their own profit.”Inishowen Wind Energy Awareness Group is encouraging people to object to this new application for a third turbine. Submissions of objection must be submitted by letter, including a fee of 20 Euro, to Donegal County Council by 29 January. More information about the application and how to submit an objection is available on the group’s Facebook page Inishowen Wind Energy Awareness Group. There is an online submission letter on www.change.orgRESIDENTS ANGER AS PLANNING PERMISSION SOUGHT FOR THIRD WIND TURBINE AT HISTORIC BEAUTY SPOT was last modified: December 30th, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:A SONG FOR INISHOWENArmadadonegalhistoricInishowenKinnagoeTurbineWild Atlantic Waywind farmlast_img read more

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A strong safety net is critical for all farmers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Imagine that you’re a young tobacco and grain farmer in Kentucky. Despite low commodity prices and a tough agriculture market, you’ve been doing alright. As a beginning farmer, you’ve relied on trusted advisors, access to reliable credit and strong farm policies for support. You’ve mitigated risk with smart decision-making and a solid crop insurance policy that provides protection and peace of mind at a time when there’s no room for loss.Now, imagine you are planning to put in a new crop, but you’ve had to drop your coverage level because the premium is no longer affordable. You manage to buy the seed and other inputs you need to plant and care for the crop, despite limited access to credit, but it’s a catastrophic year. Severe weather destroys your entire crop and you have a limited safety net in place to mitigate risk. The success you’ve realized in past years is gone with one turbulent season, and you have no choice but to walk away from farming.With a strong, affordable safety net in place, this scenario is merely a cautionary tale. But with recent proposals to slash budgets for federal crop insurance programs, this could become a reality for young farmers, who won’t have access to the resources that protect them from market and weather volatility.Crop insurance through the years Putting a crop in the ground is risky business. Without crop insurance to protect investments, it would be nearly impossible for farmers to succeed. Federal crop insurance was first authorized by Congress in the 1930s to help agricultural communities recover from the effects of the Great Depression and Dust Bowl years. The program expanded and evolved over time to protect farmers from losses due to adverse events such as inclement weather and market downturns. Today, farmers must purchase crop insurance to be eligible for certain farm loans and government disaster benefits. National Crop Insurance Services reports that in 2016, 1.2 million crop insurance policies were sold, protecting more than 130 crops on more than 290 million U.S. acres. Those crops had an insured value of $100 billion.The crop insurance program hasn’t come without pushback from those outside agriculture. Budget cuts to the federal program have been proposed by several administrations over the years, but have been soundly rejected by Congress. Recently, we’ve seen a proposal to cut federal crop insurance programs by $29 billion over the next decade. These destructive cuts would be catastrophic for farmers, rural economies and the agricultural industry. And those who stand to be most affected are young and beginning farmers with limited cash reserves who rely on crop insurance to access credit.Budget cuts could change the risk pool Crop insurance is actuarially sound, meaning that including more participants (and more acres) in the program spreads risk, which keeps premiums and costs down for all participants. One of the current proposed budget cuts would cap crop insurance premium subsidies at $40,000 (there is currently no limit) for growers with an adjusted gross income (AGI) of $500,000 or less. Producers above that income level would lose premium subsidies completely.Without subsidies to help pay premiums, lower-risk established farmers with large operations may be inclined to opt out of purchasing crop insurance. Depending on where the AGI limit is set, more than half of U.S. acres could be left unprotected by proposed cuts. This puts more pressure on the program and on younger, higher-risk farmers who’ll be left funding it. In short, cuts to crop insurance would be detrimental to farms of all sizes, not just the large ones.Crop insurance helps rural economies At Farm Credit, our mission is to secure the future of rural communities and agriculture, so policy decisions that support a stable future align with our core purpose. Crop insurance is a cornerstone of U.S. farm policy. It keeps the pool of farmers large and provides a safety net to ensure their investments are protected. In a time when rural economies are struggling and the average age of farmers is rising, we must have strong policies and support to continue producing affordable food, fuel and fiber for a growing population.The success of young farmers depends on affordable, reliable crop insurance and access to credit. Today, the average age of a farmer is 58, and 78 percent of principal farm operators have been on their farms for more than 10 years. In the coming years, many of these farms will need to be passed on to a younger generation who’ll likely face more risk with tighter margins and lower cash reserves to cushion them through tough years. Affordable crop insurance will make it possible for the next generation to maintain financial stability during difficult times.Crop insurance doesn’t help only farmers. A trickle-down effect supports all of agriculture and even those outside of rural communities. Since 2000, farmers have paid $50 billion out of their own pockets for crop insurance. In turn, they were able to secure capital that ultimately was reinvested in their communities through the acquisition of labor, products and services.In the absence of affordable crop insurance, the cost of crop losses would fall directly on taxpayers. Agriculture accounts for 5 percent of the U.S. economy and 10 percent of U.S. employment, so it’s easy to see why a stable agriculture sector is good for everyone.What can you do? We’ve seen four consecutive years of declining farm income. The U.S. Department of Agriculture predicts that in 2017, farmers will take home half the pay they did in 2013. Current budget and farm bill discussions are more important than ever to ensure that reliable, affordable crop insurance and financing options remain in place to protect farmers, especially those now stepping up to take on the risk-intensive business of farming. Remember to stay informed when it comes to ag policy decisions and stay connected to what’s going on in Congress.last_img read more

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