Voices of frustration

first_imgIn some instances the details are so graphic, her editor chooses not to publish them.For years, investigative journalist Fatima Tlisova has documented the torture of prisoners and the corruption of government officials in Russia’s Northern Caucuses. And for years, Russian officials, and the mainstream media, have largely ignored her stories.But the work is vital and needs to reach a wider audience, said Tlisova during a discussion at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society. The July 11 talk explored the challenges of reporting international stories to U.S. and global audiences.Because many members of the Russian media are also corrupt or controlled by the government, the real stories are never told, Tlisova said. “That is why attention from the Western audience is needed,” she said, so that the world knows what is happening.She recalled reporting on a corrupt Chechnyan official who, though he earned a mere $5,000 salary, had a fleet of exotic sports cars and lived in a mansion. She showed the audience a Web video shot by citizens who snapped pictures of the home and the vehicles using their mobile phones.“The media doesn’t give you the real picture,” she said. “You have to listen to the local people.”But a commitment to reporting the truth can come with a high price, as is the case with Nigerian Dele Olojede.A joint winner of a Pulitzer Prize in 2005 for his work reporting on the aftermath of the Rwandan Genocide, Olojede began his career in Lagos, Nigeria. He later worked for Newsday in the United States, eventually becoming the paper’s foreign editor.One day Olojede said he “looked up on the wall and saw that the clock was winding down.” So he returned to Nigeria, where he created NEXT, NextOnSunday, and 234NEXT.com, news outlets that he calls “an honest space” for credible news.But today his business is on the brink of collapse after advertisers and shareholders balked at his practices of exposing widespread government corruption. Despite his efforts, the public continues to elect the same corrupt officials, said Olojede, and the mainstream media ignores the story. His options, he said, are to find another type of business model, or “just say the hell with it, we have already made our statement.”He challenged the audience with “a very important question.”“What if you provide the information, what if you take the risk, what if you did all the reporting, what if you are broken in the process? … What if we did all this and armed the public with the information that they need to enable them to make rational decisions as citizens, and they don’t?”The event was a tribute to Persephone Miel, a onetime Berkman Fellow who died last year. Miel was a longtime employee of Internews Network, a media development organization that supports independent media around the world.She devoted much of her life to figuring out how to help make international stories more accessible to American and global audiences.One of the best ways to honor Miel’s memory is to seek out and engage with stories that are largely ignored by the mainstream media, said Ivan Sigal, executive director of Global Voices, a nonprofit media initiative.In places like Afghanistan and Pakistan, “tremendously dangerous places to work,” where U.S. reporters focus on drone strikes and terrorism, local journalists are also risking their lives to report on those and other important stories with a different point of view, he said.Today Dele Olojede’s business is on the brink of collapse after advertisers and shareholders balked at his practices of exposing widespread government corruption.“The potential for us to listen to and read and hear stories that are coming from Pakistanis that are not about primarily the framework that the American media places on those stories or those kinds of narrow channels … is a tremendous one, and I urge you all to take the time to engage those different stories.”Jon Sawyer, founding director of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, briefly discussed the Persephone Miel Fellowship. Before she died, Miel expressed her wish to be remembered by a fellowship that would help journalists outside the United States report on their home countries and bring their stories to a wide international audience. The fellowship, overseen by the Pulitzer Center in partnership with Internews, recently announced its first fellows.“Persephone was so involved in so many things,” said her husband, Tony Rudie, who spoke briefly at the event. “We miss her in so many different ways.”last_img read more

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Notes on music’s lessons

first_imgJazz legend Wynton Marsalis met his audience at a tuneful crossroads at Sanders Theatre Monday night, exploring America’s diverse musical heritage. On Tuesday, the energetic trumpeter and composer met with members of the Harvard community at the intersections of music, education, ethics, and innovation during two far-reaching panel discussions.“Entrepreneurs are always in search of ideas, and artists have a knack with creativity and original thinking, which entrepreneurs can learn from,” said Mihir Desai, Mizuho Financial Group Professor of Finance, who moderated an afternoon panel with Marsalis and professors from Harvard Business School (HBS) at the Harvard Innovation Lab, or i-lab, a new University initiative aimed at fostering innovation and collaboration. The conversation was the first in a series of planned events for the i-lab that will explore the connections of artists as entrepreneurs.Following his Monday night lecture, the third of six in a two-year presidential series, Marsalis pointed to Duke Ellington, the composer, musician, and big band leader as an example of a true innovator.Marsalis (center) spoke about the “Artist as Entrepreneur” at the i-lab. Also attending the event were Nancy Koehn (from left), Mukti Khaire, Rohit Deshpande, and Mihir Desai. Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerEllington stuck fast to his mission of creating a fusion of sound based on musical tradition. He surrounded himself with other expert musicians who could help him realize his musical vision, and he worked harder than anyone, making up for a lack of resources by constantly sacrificing for his dream, said Marsalis during the HBS panel.“He so believed in his music that he would sacrifice whatever he had to sacrifice for that music to be right. And the first thing he sacrificed was time. When everybody else was sleeping, he was up,” perfecting his music, said Marsalis.Like music, business requires a profound understanding of the subject matter at hand, said the artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, and confident professionals who know their material and are ready to lead. Marsalis said he examines a spreadsheet the same way he reviews a complicated musical score, by studying every number on the page.“There’s not a conductor in the world who gets the score of [Igor Stravinsky’s] “The Rite of Spring” and goes, ‘Wow, there are a lot of notes here.’ You don’t sit in front of an orchestra with a score and say, ‘Well, I don’t understand these 20 measures, but we’ll make it through that OK.’ ”In a story that resonated with the innovators and dreamers in the crowd, Marsalis recalled important advice he received from his father as he prepared to leave home as a teen. Friends and family told him to have something to fall back on if his plans for a musical career didn’t work out. Others cautioned that if he stuck with music he would struggle, like his father, a pianist, who worked hard just to make ends meet.“My daddy said, ‘Man, the only thing I can tell you is, don’t have nothing to fall back on.’ ”Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot (left) was among those who shared the stage with Marsalis during a discussion at the Graduate School of Education. His topic: “Education for Moral Agency and Engaged Citizenship.” Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerMusic and the arts can be a guiding force in helping students to develop solid, moral foundations, several Harvard professors agreed during a talk with Marsalis titled “Education for Moral Agency and Engaged Citizenship” at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.During the discussion, Marsalis touched on many of the themes in his 2008 book “Moving to Higher Ground: How Jazz Can Change Your Life.” The book discusses how concepts in jazz can be applied to broad life lessons involving integrity, creativity, empathy, and humility.The trust, collaboration, experience, and communication that unfold on a stage filled with jazz musicians are applicable to the classroom as well, said Marsalis.“Music forces you to hold two opposite thoughts in your mind, and it forces you to act on both of those things … all the time.” As part of a band, he said, you have to always be aware of what you are playing and what somebody else is playing. That art of listening, he argued, is essential to education.As a young man, Marsalis played with an ensemble that included many members of Ellington’s band. The experience taught him a lesson in communication and understanding.“The old men were always cussing us out and saying, ‘you all are playing too loud, too loud, too loud, too loud’ … Being around them forced you to play softer. Then, when you played softer, you could hear what somebody else was playing.”Holding students to high standards and expecting them to bring ideas, energy, and commitment to their music is another Marsalis hallmark. He challenges young musicians, he said, as a means of getting them to take their craft seriously and bringing out their best.His message was an important one for educators to remember, said panelist Diane L. Moore, a senior lecturer in religious studies and education at Harvard Divinity School.“You take them seriously. You expect that they can rise to a standard,” said Moore. “Too often, we don’t involve and invite our students in any context of any classroom to collaborate, to assume they come into the classroom with valuable information that they can share.”last_img read more

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How to Keep Your PC Running at Its Best

first_imgIn addition to these weekly posts highlighting helpful information in our Dell Knowledge Base, my team also holds monthly technical support webinar sessions.In this month’s session — Monday, October 16, 10:00 a.m. (CST) — we’ll discuss how we recommend you keep your system running at its best with a few tips and tricks we’d suggest for both the technical experts out there, and anyone new to Dell laptop or desktop PCs.Direct2Dell is designed to bring you news and stories about Dell people, products, services, partners and customers. Often those customers need support for their Dell products. For that, our Dell Support team continuously updates a library of articles called the Knowledge Base.In an effort to make that information even easier to find when you need it, each Friday I will bring you a list of the most highly reviewed articles with appropriate responses to the latest trends we are seeing in our customer inquiries.With these publications you can stay informed about the latest troubleshooting guides and resolutions across various client system lines.Questions about these issues should be left in our Support Forums where trained staff are available to assist, rather than commenting here on Direct2Dell.You can also contact Dell Customer Service or Dell Technical Support for assistance. And, as always, our @DellCares and @DellCaresPro teams are just a tweet away for help.This week we’ve seen a lot of interest in these topics:Understanding Beep Codes on a Dell Desktop PCTroubleshooting Hard Disk Drive (HDD) and Solid State Drive (SSD)IssuesHow to Upgrade Memory in Your ComputerChange sleep settings or create/modify a power plan in Windows 10How to Troubleshoot Remote Desktop/Terminal Server Connectivity IssuesHow to Configure U2415 Monitor Daisy Chaining on Intel HD GraphicsNo POST, No Power, No Video on a Dell Desktop ComputerDrivers HelpHow to Use and Troubleshoot the Dell Thunderbolt Dock (TB16)Bulletin: Precision 5510 and XPS 9550 swelling system batterylast_img read more

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Iva Bencun: The first thing I would do if I were the head of the Zadar Tourist Board invited all stakeholders in tourism for an interview, because without the synergy of the group, one person can hardly achieve any significant results

first_imgAfter the current director of the Zadar Tourist Board, Ante Rados, resigned, in the middle of the season, which is certainly frivolous and unprofessional, the Zadar Tourist Board announced a competition for a new director of the Zadar Tourist Board, which ended yesterday.The competition states that the candidate must have at least three years of work experience in the field of tourism, have completed at least a specialist graduate professional or graduate university study, make a proposal for its work program of the tourist board for the next calendar year and speak at least one foreign language.But in the whole story all this is less important, as well as diplomas and various recognitions, etc.… the only thing that matters is concrete market experience, knowledge and vision of development. What someone has done so far, what projects he has worked on and led, and practical market experience. Of course, in the whole story we should talk about market development and market processes, not political functions, but it’s all up to us. Do we want market and strategic development or status quo and inertia. We are either growing or stagnant, ie we are losing pace with the competition.Iva Bencun: Guests want to feel the Mediterranean way of life, they want to be relaxed, they want to feel welcome. You’re going to have a hard time giving it to them if we personally don’t live it.Iva Bencun from Zadar, the owner of the company Feral Tours and the organizer of the Zadar Outdoor Festival and the president of the Association of Adventure Tourism at the Croatian Chamber of Commerce, also applied for the competition. In a conversation with Iva Bencun, we talked about the current development of tourism in Zadar and what is her vision of development if she comes to the helm of the Zadar Tourist Board.Do you think that you are the right person for the position of director of the Zadar Tourist Board and why?I certainly don’t think that I am the only person, but that I certainly have the knowledge, experience and, above all, the will to deal with the problems that this job brings with it. Throughout my working life, I have worked in a variety of jobs in tourism; I was an escort, I worked in a boat rental company, and in my agency I work with hoteliers, private renters, caterers, other agencies, and various tourism service providers. In addition, I am fluent in 4 foreign languages, which means that I get first-hand information from tourists about what they like and what they resent about us. The recent launch of the Zadar Outdoor Festival project is also a great school for me, where I realized how much good can be achieved by proper communication with people; Finances are not always crucial – if you have people you can run, willpower and perseverance is the key to success. I think that all of the above is a prerequisite for a good job as a director of the Tourist Board.What would you change in the tourist offer of the city of Zadar? Would you return the concerts? Everyone is complaining about the offer this year, that there are no real concerts and entertainment, ie enough content that is crucial?The City of Zadar has a very good Tourism Development Strategy for the period 2016-2026. year on which a large part of the tourist program can be based. Namely, we must be aware that we are not a concert destination. Even if you organize the best band in the world (if you can pay for it of course) the question is whether guests would come to your city just for that. And if they did, how long would they stay? We are a tourist destination; all future tourists come primarily for vacation, and then to have the opportunity to have fun and learn something during that vacation. So, if it is primarily a vacation and an escape from everyday stress, then you must first and foremost make sure that the whole city and the whole region functions in a way that does not add to that stress.How are you going to do that?To keep the city beautiful and clean, to solve the parking situation with quality (we know that the stress is the strongest), to kindly welcome your guest and patiently explain everything to him, to provide easy access to information via websites, on site, via info-places; even through students who will walk around the city and provide the information needed by the guest. If you have provided easy arrival and access, not only to the guest, but first of all to the local population, then the kind approach of the local population will make the guest feel welcome, and only after that the guest will enjoy listening to the concert, exhibition or play. Guests want to feel the Mediterranean way of life, they want to be relaxed, they want to feel welcome… You will find it difficult to give it to us if we personally do not live it..And how will we live it if the arrival of tourists makes our lives worse because we can no longer find a parking space ; if most of the city stinks of rancid oil; if you can’t walk down the street from the barns that inevitably widen, motivated by demand and the fact that the “rush hour” lasts 2 months?Zadar, like most tourist destinations in the last couple of years, has recorded a large increase in arrivals and overnight stays, is Zadar for mass tourism or should we control this mass and load on all the city’s disputes and raise the quality? Zadar, as well as Croatia, should develop quality, not mass tourism. It has already been shown that better quality facilities have fewer holes, guests are more satisfied, the service is charged more, and it is provided with less stress. Yes, the city of Zadar can have many more quality programs, concerts, exhibitions, festivals, gastronomic events, but they do not have to be megalomaniacal; they just have to be smaller, more intimate, more “homey” and widespread throughout the year. Zadar has a lot of people with quality ideas, but they do not come to the fore, or do not even respond, believing that it is all already intended for someone else. Unfortunately, this is the attitude in most things and situations where some new solutions could be offered. It seems to me personally that this was the first thing that started to change in tourism. Increasingly, I see capable individuals who have come to positions from which they can change things, and I have to admit that I like the direction in which they are moving.Photo: Pixabay.comSo what would you do first as the director of the Zadar Tourist Board? You certainly would not be in a position to determine parking spaces.Of course not; fortunately the strategy clearly foresees who is in charge of what. However, what I could do is communicate about these issues along with colleagues who are in charge of those things. The first thing I would do was invite all stakeholders in tourism in the city of Zadar for an interview. So, both hoteliers, and representatives of private renters, caterers, agencies, tourist guides… I think it would be fair to first invite them, introduce themselves, and invite them to cooperate. Make a “brainstorming” where everyone could say what problems they face and present their suggestions so that we can all solve the same problems together. You know the old “Two heads are smarter than one”. It seems to me that communication is something we always have problems with; without the synergy of the group one person can hardly achieve any significant results..Tourism is very complex and complementary; if we intend to do it properly we need to live it..And the clerk at the post office or bank or in the city administration must be aware that he is indirectly benefiting from tourism. If we manage to achieve this only then will we have success in tourism.How do you see Zadar in terms of tourism in 5 years, what is your vision of development if you will be the director of the Zadar Tourist Board? Zadar is a city that is extremely pleasant to live in. It is not too big or too small. It is spatially nicely distributed and every part of the city is easily and in a short time accessible. The traffic is also very well connected, the roads are excellent, we have the port of Gaženica and the airport. All this gives the possibility of development in several directions. My opinion is that Zadar should continuously work on quality; everything done so far is going in that direction. We definitely need a tidier city, we need more accommodation, but I’m not for big resorts; small boutique hotels with a couple of larger hotels of world-famous chains would significantly increase the city’s offer. In addition, I still believe that Zadar and the whole region is ideal for an active vacation and should work in that direction. In a very small area, in an environment of only half an hour drive we have an incredible wealth of nature..sea, islands, rivers, mountains .. All this allows frequent outdoor stays which guests are increasingly looking for, and this type of guests comes out of the main months of the season. Zadar is developing more and more in terms of gastronomy, which means that we have a nicely rounded package of offers. Together with the whole region, it has the potential to attract guests for much longer than 3 days, which is currently the average stay of tourists in the city. We need to work on connecting all activities and better informing the guest. At the same time, we need to work on additional programs throughout the year and continuous airlines; promotion should be done in the markets from which people travel throughout the year. In winter we have an ideal climate for guests from the Scandinavian market, and now in the representative office in Stockholm we have a person from Zadar who knows the region best. If we work smartly and manage the development of the city, I think that in 5 years Zadar will be one of the most desirable cities to live in Croatia, and tourists will feel and appreciate it.Whatever the Tourist Board decides, I sincerely hope that this time the profession and experience will prevail, ie common sense, the main question is: Do we want market and strategic development or the status quo and inertia?We are either growing or stagnant, ie we are losing pace with the competition. We need professional people who have practical experience, and we need to deal more with market development than politics. Politics is one thing, and the market and market development are quite another. Ultimately, if we do not deal with tourism strategically and sustainably, then we are where we are – we have a short season, low tourist consumption and we chronically lack quality content and offer. We are not for mass tourism, but we must offer quality and diversity of offer and content. Greece and Turkey are not and should not be our competition, and the biggest competition is ourselves.So it’s all up to us, we have it all, even too much of it, and it’s just a question of whether we’re going to take advantage of it and be who we are. Let’s be who we are, it has to be our main tourism product, not strive for standardization and be bad copies.last_img read more

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RDA row heads for Euro court

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Adventures in Africa

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Seven tips for buying off-the-plan

first_imgOff-the-plan investors should apply these top tips to mitigate the risks and boost the upside potential. Photo: Glenn HuntForearmed is the way to go if you’re considering an off-the-plan investment in these trying times for attached housing.The signs have been bad for this sector of late, with the concept of oversupply looming large, but off-the-plan properties are still finding eager buyers, and not all are bad investments.Off-the-plan can apply to low-rise suburban units, townhouses, detached dwellings and prestige owner-occupier apartments too, and the rules around each are similar.To help, Patrick Nolan, head of Home Loans at ME Bank, has compiled some top tips to ensure your off-the-plan dream doesn’t become a nightmare. 1. Timing is everything “In a rising market, buying off-the-plan can be a masterstroke,” Mr Nolan said.“You’re committing to a property at today’s prices and, if all goes well, by the time the development is completed the place will have risen in value providing a rapid capital gain.”Of course, if your timing is like that of a lousy conductor, your real estate symphony can collapse into the financial pit.“If values weaken, off-the-plan buyers can be left paying more for the property than necessary,” Mr Nolan said.“The only way to avoid this downside is by thoroughly researching the market to make an assessment of how it is likely to behave. Bear in mind, the longer the time to completion, the harder it is to estimate how property values will move.” 2. Use your time wisely Buying off the plan effectively means a very long settlement. Use this time to build up your war chest, said Mr Nolan.“A 10 per cent deposit will usually secure an off-the-plan property. “Once this is paid, off-the-plan buyers have a window of opportunity to ramp up personal savings and this can mean taking out a smaller home loan with less to repay each month.”Just remember — the keys are discipline and planning. 3. Check the specs While at the end of the transaction you will own a tangible piece of real estate, in the beginning you are making big decisions based on the specifications.“Buying off-the-plan means committing to a property you cannot physically inspect, and the display suite could differ in layout, size and finishes from the apartment you’re signing up for,” Mr Nolan said.He said carefully check the specs outlined in the sale contract because there are no guarantees they’ll match those in the marketing material.“Ask lots of questions about finishes and fittings like blinds, curtains, tiles and carpets to get a clear idea of what you’re buying,” he adds.Remember you’re also purchasing aspect and view, so pay careful attention to the physical location of your property and the surrounding land uses that may affect it. 4. Have the contract independently reviewed. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home5 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor5 hours agoIt’s the bedrock agreement parties refer to — particularly when there’s a dispute. Make sure yours is watertight and you are well across all the clauses — particularly those that could put you at a disadvantage.“Resist the urge to sign on the dotted line until you’ve had the contract of sale thoroughly checked by a solicitor or conveyancer,” Mr Nolan said.“Off-the-plan contracts are usually more complex than for established homes — often with clauses that favour the developer. Your legal adviser can explain any clauses of concern.” 5. Look to the future “On a property that hasn’t even seen the excavators arrive, you could be looking at an extended time to completion,” Mr Nolan said.Life can change dramatically over these time frames. Try as much as possible to factor future life changes into your purchasing decision.“Even if you no longer want the property, you’re still committed to buying it, and bailing out can be costly,” he said. 6. Go with a reputable developer One of the best ways to avoid heartache is to make sure your dealing with someone with a history of delivering on their word, Mr Nolan said.“Opting for properties backed by an established developer with a blue chip reputation doesn’t just make it more likely the end product will be high quality. If the developer becomes insolvent at any stage during construction, you’ll be in a long line of other creditors trying to get your money back,” he said.“Sticking to reputable developers also provides the opportunity to check out completed developments by the same company to see how well they have stood the test of time.” 7. Size matters Until such time as we Aussies become akin to living in tiny spaces like New Yorkers, you must remember there are logistic hurdles with too-small units.“Many lenders shy away from, or ask for a bigger deposit on, very small apartments — typically studio units with less than 50 square metres of floor space,” My Nolan said.This includes purpose-built housing such as student apartments which can be both tiny and subject to special lease terms or management agreements.“The key is to speak with your lender before you start looking at off-the-plan properties to know whether the type of apartment you’re considering falls outside normal lending conditions,” he said.last_img read more

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Police: Dollar General Store Clerk Schemed Out Of $2,000

first_imgSurveillance images released by police depict the suspect.BATESVILLE – A robbery scheme that has been reported in the Cincinnati area has appeared in Batesville.Authorities say an employee at Dollar General in Batesville received a call from someone posing as a representative from the corporate office Thursday, July 24.The caller said that he would send a woman to the store to pick up the daily deposit, police said.An unidentified woman entered the store later in the day and received a deposit totaling around $2,000 from the same employee that spoke over the phone earlier in the day.The suspect is described as having long black hair past her shoulders and wearing a gray sweatshirt, pink hat and sunglasses.Batesville Police are reaching out to the public in hopes of identifying the woman.Investigators are also working with surrounding agencies that have reported similar schemes that have occurred in the Tri-State area.Greendale Police reported a similar incident Monday.Anyone who can help identify the suspect is encouraged to contact Batesville Police at (812) 934-3131.last_img read more

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Marjorie T. Meier, 95, Cedar Grove

first_imgMarjorie T. Meier, age 95, of Cedar Grove, Indiana died Friday morning September 21, 2018 at the Brookville Healthcare Center in Brookville.Born June 1, 1923 in Cleves, Ohio she was one of seven children born to the late William & Mary (Minges) Hoerst. On April 12, 1947 she became the wife of Alvis “Bud” Meier, and he preceded her in death on May 10, 2003. She was a member of St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church.Survivors include four daughters & sons-in-law, Ann (John) Selm and Irene (Mike) Selm all of Brookville, Indiana. Susan (Steve) Moeller of Hamburg, Indiana and Donna (Gary) Meyer of St. Peters, Indiana; a son & daughter-in-law, Robert (Dawn) Meier of Blooming Grove, Indiana; 15 grandchildren; 32 great-grandchildren; two sisters, Marcella Kocher of West Harrison, Indiana, Delores “Babe” Garver of Lawrenceburg, Indiana.In addition to her parents and husband, Bud, she was preceded in death by two sisters, Florence Steinfort and Marie Getz, and two brothers William Hoerst & Joe Hoerst.Family & friends may visit from 4 until 8:00 P.M. on Wednesday, September 26, 2018 at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Avenue, Brookville, where the Holy Rosary will be recited at 8:00 P.M..Rev. Vincent P. Lampert will officiate the Mass of Christian Burial on Thursday, September 27, 2018, 10:30 A.M., at Holy Guardian Angels Chapel, 405 U.S. 52, Cedar Grove, Indiana. Burial will then follow in Holy Guardian Angels Cemetery.Memorial contributions may be directed to Holy Guardian Angels Cemetery or the Cedar Grove Volunteer Fire Department. The staff of Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home is honored to once again serve the Meier family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.com .last_img read more

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McGinley not swayed by Clarke rift

first_img And w hen Tom Watson was named US captain in December 2012, Clarke suggested 2010 captain Colin Montgomerie should also be considered as “whoever it is standing on that stage opposite Tom Watson needs a huge presence”. With the public backing of players such as Rory McIlroy, Luke Donald and Ian Poulter, McGinley subsequently won the day but admitted recently that his conversations with Clarke were now “short and sweet” and amounted to little more than passing pleasantries. However, the 47-year-old vowed to be professional when the new selection process gets under way. Since 1999, the captain was selected by the European Tour’s 15-strong tournament committee, but changes announced in August last year mean the responsibility now falls to the previous three captains (McGinley, Jose Maria Olazabal and Montgomerie), the Tour’s chief executive and a tournament committee representative. Asked by Press Association Sport if his relationship with Clarke would be a problem, McGinley said: “Abs olutely no problem whatsoever. I’m going to be very professional in my input. “I’m going to get opinions from a lot of players and a lot of people before I put my opinion forward as to what it will be. Just like I was very much pushed over the line by the players, I want to get the opinion of the players. “I think we’re very fortunate in Europe, a little bit like the Liverpool soccer team and the boot room, I think a lot of us have benefited hugely from being vice-captains. Darren has been a vice-captain along with many other guys. We will see where that all evolves and I’ll make a professional decision based on the views of people that I respect.” As to whether he would be a vice-captain under Clarke, McGinley added: “I don’t think I’d be vice-captain to anybody going forward to be honest. I’m very happy to help in an unofficial capacity but I don’t think I have the personality to go back in as vice-captain. Press Association Paul McGinley insists his strained relationship with Darren Clarke will not influence his opinion on who should be Europe’s next Ryder Cup captain. Clarke is odds-on favourite to lead the side at Hazeltine in 2016, when Europe will be looking to claim their fourth straight victory and ninth in the last 11 contests. The former Open champion sent McGinley a letter in 2011 offering his support for the latter’s bid to become captain in 2014, but later changed his mind and also put himself forward for the role. “I would like to be able to support the new captain in whatever direction he went, and if I had a belief about a different area, I’m afraid there would be a conflict.” That means McGinley’s Ryder Cup career is officially over, a career which has seen three wins as a player (2002, 2004 and 2006), two as a vice-captain (2010 and 2012) and one as captain. “That’s six I have been involved in and six wins,” he said. “L ike a heavyweight fighter, I will retire undefeated.” Undefeated but perhaps not uninvolved, McGinley raising the possibility of using his expertise in the same way he got former Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson to speak to the team on Tuesday. “I would certainly like to play a role, if required, a little bit like Alex Ferguson did this week for me,” he added. “I bounced ideas off him. He didn’t preach to me. He didn’t tell me what to do, but what he did was he solidified my ideas and he gave me confidence that, yeah, my hunches were right. “I certainly won’t be pushing myself forward (but) whoever the next captain may be, if he has any questions, I’ll help in any single way I can.” McGinley admitted his one regret at Gleneagles was not having enough time to coach Ian Poulter in the role of senior player for his partnership with Stephen Gallacher, the untried duo losing 5&4 on the opening morning. But he praised Poulter for accepting his somewhat limited role during the week, the top European points scorer in each of the previous three contests playing just twice before the singles. “I had to make some tough calls, really tough calls,” added McGinley, who said his decision not to pick Luke Donald as a wild card was still eating away at him; Donald sending McGinley a long text of congratulations on Sunday evening. “All along I had thought that Ian Poulter was going to play in the second afternoon, and he thought he was going to play, and at the 11th hour I decided on Martin Kaymer instead and to break up that dynamic of Poulter and (Justin) Rose which has been so successful. That was a big call. “But the way Ian accepted that decision, I mean, he came out to me on the golf course in the afternoon and he was consoling me. That means more to me than the Ian Poulter banging on his heart and what he did in Medinah.” last_img read more

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