Peabody receives $150,000 grant

first_imgThe Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology has been awarded a $150,000 Museums for America Grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services. Over the next two years, staffers will catalog, document, inventory, and photograph the Peabody’s most important archaeological collections with the grant.“Our collection will be more accessible to researchers, especially educators,” said Senior Collections Manager David DeBono Schafer, who will manage the project. “These are among our most requested materials. Now researchers will be able to quickly determine exactly which archaeological objects are in the collection.”The collection of approximately 20,000 objects includes stone tools from the Leakey excavations in Africa, organic archaeological materials (such as textiles, wood, leather, and basketry), ceramics from the American Southwest, and many historic artifacts from three decades’ excavations in Harvard Yard.last_img read more

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Three cheers for Harvard Heroes

first_img Related Faculty diversity continues to grow Harvard Heroes, including Faust, honored at Sanders Theatre University recognizes 61 extraordinary staff memberscenter_img Friends, family, and colleagues packed into Sanders Theatre on a rainy Thursday afternoon to celebrate 2019’s Harvard Heroes. The 61 honorees represented Schools and departments from across the University, from custodial services and catering to faculty affairs and fire safety.University President Larry Bacow led the ceremony, praising each honoree for their achievements. He also had groan-worthy puns to spare.“Your admirers say you deserve more than a little plaque for your good deeds,” Bacow said to Harvard School of Dental Medicine’s senior human resources coordinator Mary Anderson. “I guess a crown will do!”In short videos presented during the ceremony, this year’s heroes shared their best — and weirdest — Harvard moments, including a first-year student asking whether he could microwave his laundry to dry it and being invited to a meeting at “U-Hall” (a.k.a. University Hall) and subsequently wandering the Yard looking for a moving truck.A reception was held in Annenberg Hall, with drinks, charcuterie, and cake pops for all.Director of Fellowship and Leadership Development Programs in the Center for Public Leadership Myrish Cadapan Antonio said she was “deeply humbled” by the award. “I am receiving this award for the collective, for the team,” she said. “So many people could have [earned] it. I feel blessed.”Antonio was lauded for teaching and mentoring Mason Fellows, as well as helping to develop University training for cultural competency as a Harvard Administrative Fellow. She said she learned about her award when she was called into a team meeting with her manager.“I thought I had done something wrong,” she recalled. “I was shocked!”Campus Services fire safety supervisor Peter Underhill was also surprised by his colleagues.,“My director pulled all the managers in the room for a training, but there were cupcakes,” he said. “There’s never cupcakes at trainings.”He began as a technician for Fire Safety Services six years ago, and has been a supervisor for a year. During his first year as supervisor, he has worked to streamline the testing and inspection process for fire alarms, suppression systems, and emergency generators across campus.Underhill is also studying business management with a minor in organizational behavior at Harvard Extension School, hoping to finish his bachelor’s degree next year.“I’m going to class and then into the office and it applies immediately,” he said.Surrounded by his family and friends, Brandon Tilghman, the academic appointments manager in the Office for Faculty Affairs at SEAS, said becoming a Harvard Hero was “overwhelming.” His team surprised him with balloons, treats, and even a video to catch his reaction.During the 15 months he has worked at Harvard Tilghman said he’s gotten to know a lot of people across campus. He was commended for creating “innovative, inclusive ways for underrepresented members of the community to meet and network.”“It surprised me that there’s a mission to diversify Harvard from the outside in,” he said. “I wasn’t expecting that to be embraced. Through the support of affinity groups and employee resource groups, [there is] encouragement of underrepresented minorities to unite.”Bacow was beaming as he presented the awards.“I think it was wonderful,” he said. “The best thing about Harvard is the people, and we were honoring all our people. What could be better?” Percentages of women and minorities who are tenured and tenure-track reach record highs last_img read more

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High performance computing drives innovation for manufacturers

first_imgNote: This is the second blog in the recent HPC vertical blog series. Visit this blog to read more about HPC in healthcare, and visit Dell4Enterprise again in the coming weeks for more on HPC in oil and gas.Automotive plant using industrial robotics technology. Photo from Wikipedia.Since the Industrial Revolution, manufacturers have worked tirelessly to develop innovative, functional, high-quality products, while eliminating any sliver of inefficiency or unnecessary cost in their processes. Although it’s critical for developing competitive products with exceptional fitness-for-use, the product development process has been scrutinized in recent years for speed, cost and efficiency. As increased competition in most industries has driven the need for more sophisticated products and accelerated development cycles, high-performance computing (HPC) has proven to be critical for virtual product development and testing. With virtual product development and testing powered by HPC, manufacturers are able to develop the best-in-class products without wasted time and resources.With any mass-produced product, design optimization and testing is a critical and time-consuming factor to eliminating defects and ensuring optimal performance. Virtual product development and testing is playing a major role in speeding time-to-market. More powerful computer resources are necessary to facilitate these sophisticated virtual simulations, which are not only faster, but also more accurate and ultimately less expensive than manual alternatives.HPC is clearly a crucial technology for manufacturers wanting to stay competitive, but there are significant barriers to adoption for many companies. According to the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), out of more than 300,000 manufacturers in the US, 95 percent are categorized as small or medium sized (less than 500 employees) and 94 percent have not fully adopted HPC. Traditionally, these smaller companies have often used multi-core workstations, which are powerful tools for simulation and analysis. However, they are limited by total CPU core count and memory capacity limiting the size and complexity of their simulations. To increase the resolution and complexity of their simulations, while the workstations would be used for model design, pre- and post-processing and visualization, the computationally intensive simulation would be a shared HPC cluster. However, many small manufacturers and engineering shops have not pursued an HPC solution, considering them to be too complex, not having staff familiar with HPC technology, or simply thinking that it’s too expensive.The Dell HPC team has worked hard to provide a market solution that addresses these issues and I’m excited by what we’ve accomplished. The Dell HPC System for Manufacturing is designed to optimize digital manufacturing workloads, and is pre-tested with ISV software applications including SIMULIA®, Abaqus®, ANSYS® Mechanical™ & Fluent®, CD-adapco® STAR-CCM+® and LSTC LS-DYNA®.  It offers a single, simple system that includes compute, storage and networking that doesn’t need a formal, raised floor, data center. This easy to configure system – which includes full installation services and support – handles simulations while the workstation can continue to be used for any processing or visualization in a manner that is comfortable and familiar to engineers. With this system, organizations can run larger problems that are beyond the scope of a single workstation, and interact with jobs on multiple workstations.The goal of our HPC System for Manufacturing is to make HPC accessible and seamless for manufacturers of all sizes, allowing them to develop more competitive products with faster time to market, higher quality, and lower cost. Dell also provides domain-specific, pre-sales and architectural expertise to help organizations determine the right configuration based on their specific manufacturing requirements. Dell’s single source of support for consistent, predictable and reliable IT services helps eliminate deployment and production bottlenecks.Just like manufacturing processes in the Industrial Age, volume and repeatability for HPC is critical to efficiency and mass adoption. We’re continuing our work to make HPC systems easier to manage and exploit, while providing more thorough and accurate ROI calculations that justify expenditures for cost conscious manufacturers. By opening up HPC resources to more and more manufacturers, Dell is helping to enable an unprecedented surge in innovation. We’re proud to play a part in this movement, and I can’t wait to see what amazing products our customers develop over the next few years!For additional information on Dell HPC offerings, visit the following:@DellHPC on TwitterDell HPC Customer Case StudiesDell HPC CommunityDell HPC System for Digital Manufacturing White Paperlast_img read more

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Fitness test undergoes changes, improvements

first_imgThe Class of 2016 will experience a new wave of fitness testing during the next academic year. The Physical Education and Wellness Department recently implemented an additional fitness test, called a post-test, to occur in April of students’ freshman years, in addition to the swim test and pre-test in August. Steve Bender, a visiting faculty instructor to the department, said the staff conducted a successful trial run of the post-test at the Loftus Center on members of the current freshman class last week. “The feedback that we’ve gotten has been incredible and the test exceeded our expectations,” Bender said. “We had probably 90 to 95 percent of the students actually ‘go for it’ by pushing themselves and not blowing it off.” The new test will consist of pushups, sit-ups, a 1.5-mile run, and sit-and-reach flexibility, Bender said. He said instructors used to administer the fitness test during the Contemporary Topics course, and the test’s components were at the discretion of the instructor. “We decided to make it consistent and thought we’d get better results in a larger group,” Bender said. “Sometimes if you had 30 people in your Contemporary Topics class and walked during the test, it was obvious and you stood out.” “We thought that if there were 200 people on the track at the same time, nobody cared and nobody would notice at all,” he added. Bender said the primary benefit of the new system would be the instant feedback on levels of muscular fitness and cardiovascular endurance. “The student will be able to log in online and know right off the bat where their results fit in nationally,” he said. “They’ll also be able to see where they are in comparison to males and females at Notre Dame.” A goal of the department is to show that physical education is a part of a student’s academic experience, Bender said. “The more fit you are, the better student you’ll be as fiscal and physical go hand-in-hand,” Bender said. “We’re trying to show that fitness is a lifestyle, so if we can extend it throughout your freshman year, then you’ll have a better chance the next three years of keeping with it … Instead of a one-shot deal, we’re trying to set the tone and hopefully the it stays with you throughout your whole life.” Overall, Bender said he was pleased with the results from the trial run and is ready for the fall. “We always knew Notre Dame students were ultra-competitive in the classroom. That carried over to the test, too,” he said. The fitness training learned during freshman year physical education should apply to finals week and the days leading up to it, Bender said. “I recommend 30 minutes of some kind of cardiovascular exercise each day to get you away from the monotony of sitting in front of that computer or reading that book,” Bender said. “Sometimes you don’t think you have that 30 minutes, but when you come back, it’s just like taking a 5-Hour Energy, as you’ve got that energy and it stays with you longer.”last_img read more

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Nobel Prize winner speaks at ND Forum event

first_img“We need all students, whatever their future careers are going to be, to be able to think about science more like scientists do,” Nobel Prize winner Carl Wieman said as he urged Notre Dame to take a second look at education during Monday’s Notre Dame Forum event.Wieman’s presentation, “Taking a Scientific Approach to Science Education,” is the first in a series of discussions that asks, “What do Notre Dame Graduates Need to Know?” In his lecture, Wieman offered an answer that stressed the learning experience as opposed to the learned material itself.By the time a person becomes an authority in their field, they have developed a certain way of thinking about their discipline that gives them expertise, Wieman said. Students can begin to gain this expertise in a subject if they are exposed to a classroom environment that promotes discussion and interaction, rather than the standard lecture format most classes currently use, he said.“It’s not that the knowledge [of a subject] is absolutely important, but what really matters is to have knowledge integrated with these broader underlying aspects of expert thinking,” Wieman said. “Because that’s really when the knowledge is useful, rather than a bunch of memorized facts that you can’t do anything with.”While field experts are preferred to teach undergraduate courses, they may not initially understand the importance of this approach because of their own expertise, Wieman said.“One of the challenges of actually being a good teacher if you’re an expert, particularly of introductory students, is that the way you think your brain worked when it was at their level is fundamentally wrong, because there’s no way for the brain to know it’s changing … your brain is just plain different than [it] was when you were a beginning student,” he said.Wieman said the focus on research in many universities could also impact education.“We developed a system at research universities where really the only thing that’s measured — and it’s measured very carefully — is research productivity,” Wieman said. “And that’s what gets measured and rewarded. And so, as a person who’s done lots of science research I appreciate that. … It’s created the wonderfully productive research university system we have.”Wieman said universities’ obsession with efficiency may decrease the quality of research.“The problem is that because it’s the only thing that’s measured – it’s so effective at what it does – the collateral damage is that diverting even a small amount of time to pay attention to teaching and doing it more effectively penalizes a person and penalizes a department,” Wieman said. “So we have to fix that basic system.”Notre Dame physics professor Michael Hildreth said Wieman’s contribution to the Notre Dame Forum addressed an important topic that the University itself hopes to address.“The forum is supposed to address what Notre Dame students should know when they graduate, or I would rather phrase it, what Notre Dame students should learn while they’re here,” he said. “Too often we get bogged down in what students should know, which is really focused on topics. … I would rather turn that around to look at process. I would like to think that we would teach the students how to think.”Tags: Carl Wieman, Notre Dame Forum, Science Education, Scientific approachlast_img read more

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Weekend Poll Top Three: Fans Crown Newsies’ ‘King of New York’ as Ultimate NYC Showtune

first_imgThe sailors of On the Town are back on the Great White Way, and they’ve got us in a New York state of mind. The Broadway.com office is frequently abuzz with showtunes (are we predictable?), so we wanted to know: which Great White Way tune celebrating the Big Apple is your favorite? The votes are in, and here’s what you had to say! 2. “New York, New York,” On the Town—17% It’s a helluva showstopper! A catchy Bernstein, Comden and Green tune is one thing. But throw in three men in uniform? Yes, please. We’re thrilled to have Gabey, Chip and Ozzie back on Broadway, and we’d be more than happy to point them to the Bronx, the Battery or anywhere in between. View Comments 1. “King of New York,” Newsies—24% The Act II opener from Alan Menken and Jack Feldman has it all: leaping over chairs, tap-dancing leading ladies and a bunch of lovable wet noodles. Who wouldn’t want to nob with all the muckety-mucks? Now, if only we could still feel like Big Apple royalty with a barbershop haircut that costs a quarter. 3. “NYC,” Annie—14% Sure, Depression era New York wasn’t entirely glitz and glam (thank you, Herbert Hoover). Still, as the Charles Strouse and Martin Charnin number says, no other town in the whole 48 (OK, 50) can half compare. Also, who doesn’t love a beltress storming center stage and marking her territory with an E flat?last_img read more

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Abracadabra! Penn & Teller Get the Sardi’s Treatment

first_img View Comments Related Shows Magicians Penn Jillette and Teller are also Broadway legends—the duo got their start on the Great White Way in 1987 and are now back for a brand new magic extravaganza at the Marquis Theatre beginning July 7. But first, the stars made an appearance at Sardi’s on July 1, when they were honored with their very own portraits on the wall of the famed theater restaurant. Check out the magicians with pianist and musical director Mike Jones, showgirl Georgie Bernasek and magic consultant Johnny Thompson, then see Penn & Teller on Broadway through August 16! Penn & Teller Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 16, 2015last_img

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If/Then Singing Contest Finalists Announced! Vote For Your Favorite to Win!

first_imgANALISE RIOSBronx, New York <a data-cke-saved-href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/mxmrpiy03ds8fm/" href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/mxmrpiy03ds8fm/">Fill out my Wufoo form!</a> After hours upon hours of big belting and big deliberation, the Broadway.com editorial team is ready to reveal the five finalists for our If/Then singing contest. Now it’s up to YOU to pick the winner! Watch the five finalist renditions of “Always Starting Over,” the big eleven o’clock number of the hit Broadway musical that is hitting the road next week, and then vote for the best (voting ends Tuesday, October 13 at 5PM EST). The winner will receive a trip to the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa, CA to see the show live and a special If/Then prize pack. Thanks to everyone who entered!JENNIFER LAFRENIEREProspect, Connecticut View Comments MEGAN ROZAKBuffalo, New York NICK MULLINSManchester, Tennessee LISA-MARIE LEGGHaines City, Floridalast_img read more

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Neoen, Tesla begin construction of 300MW battery, to be biggest in Australia

first_imgNeoen, Tesla begin construction of 300MW battery, to be biggest in Australia FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:French renewable energy developer Neoen and battery storage giant Tesla have wasted little time getting to work on what will be the biggest battery in Australia, holding a groundbreaking ceremony at the site near Geelong with Victoria energy and climate minister Lily D’Ambrosio on Tuesday.The so-called Victorian Big Battery will be 300MW and 450MWh, and is due to come into service within 12 months, when it will overtake the recently expanded “Tesla big battery” at the Hornsdale Power Reserve in South Australia which was also built by Tesla and owned and operated by Neoen.The Victorian Big Battery will have a specific role to play, satisfying a contract with the Australian Energy Market Operator that will enable it to increase imports from NSW via the main transmission link at peak times in the summer season from November 1 to March 31.“Grid-scale batteries can provide dynamic warp-speed responses so existing transmission lines can operate at full capacity,” Neoen says. “Like adding another lane to a freeway, the battery can unlock additional capacity on existing transmission networks – saving customers millions of dollars in expensive transmission line upgrades.”It will also become a major new player in the state’s energy market for the rest of the time, buying power at low prices and selling during peak periods, “firming” renewables, as well as providing frequency control and inertia.“We’ve almost doubled the energy density of the site compared to our previous Powerpack product (used at Hornsdale and other big batteries in Australia). “Importantly, the footprint of the project is significantly smaller than a comparable 300MW Open Cycle Gas Turbine (OCGT),” a Tesla engineer working on the project said in a recent LinkedIn post.[Giles Parkinson]More: Neoen and Tesla get to work on Australia’s biggest battery near Geelonglast_img read more

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UHPA: The government must adopt the criteria as soon as possible and work out all the measures to know exactly what we can count on

first_imgBefore adopting the measures, UHPA sent its proposal of measures to the Ministry of Tourism, which concerns travel agencies, and today it sent a review of the proposal of measures to help the economy due to the coronavirus epidemic by the Government of the Republic of Croatia. As they point out in their statement, UHPA welcomes the Government’s proposal of measures to help the economy and certainly believes that the most important thing is to keep the jobs of hard-working employees of travel agencies. Employees are key in every business, especially in travel agencies where the greatest value is i know-how assets and highly motivated employees. / / / UHPA PROPOSES SPECIFIC MEASURES REGARDING LOSSES OF TRAVEL AGENCIES “For this reason, we are satisfied with the Government’s measure to ensure minimum wages for employees. One of the proposed measures of UHPA towards the Government of the Republic of Croatia was the exemption from paying contributions, taxes and surcharges on salaries to employees, which we believe is necessary for the survival of small and medium enterprises as the most vulnerable group in this disaster that befell us all. Of course, there are a large number of measures that our members will be able to use and certainly each of them will help us to overcome this unfavorable period. What is extremely important at this moment is that the Government adopts the criteria as soon as possible, and develops all measures so that our members know exactly what they can count on. ” points out Tomislav Fain, president of UHPA. The Association of Croatian Travel Agencies (UHPA) has sent a review of proposed measures to help the economy due to the coronavirus epidemic. The Government of the Republic of Croatia has adopted a Proposal of Measures to Assist the Economy Due to the Coronavirus Epidemic, which includes 63 measures, and their main goal is to preserve the liquidity and jobs of entrepreneurs, including measures related to the tourism sector.  The UHPA concludes that it will continue to monitor the situation regarding the adoption of measures and criteria in order to help its members overcome this situation in a timely manner.last_img read more

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