Much Studios Creator Bianca Harris helps women set their intentions and achieve

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Much Studios Creator Bianca Harris founded WIPP, (Women Inspiring Passion and Purpose) in 2015. Through a steady stream of digital content, including their weekly podcast Wipped C.R.E.A.M, and live events, they have grown to be one of Toronto’s biggest brands for women, helping them discover their authentic passions. Now, Bianca is ready to help set intentions and achieve goals with the latest WIPP event, ÄR-KE-TEKT, on Saturday, April 7 in Toronto. Taking place at the Bell Media Studios campus at 277 Queen St. W, the event features workshops in goalsetting and meditation aimed at inspiring passion and purpose in women’s lives. Building on the success of previous events, tickets have been selling fast for ÄR-KE-TEKT, with the evening session already sold out! Tickets for the afternoon sessions, which run from 1 – 5 p.m. are still available through Eventbrite.“ÄR-KE-TEKT is designed to help women start building the life they actually want, and you can only accomplish that by taking small steps” says Harris. “So the idea with ÄR-KE-TEKT is for attendees to pick one intention that they can meditate and work on throughout the day.”After hosting their biggest event in May 2017, where more than 500 attendees gathered to be inspired by a panel of celebrity speakers, ÄR-KE-TEKT is a more intimate event filled with engaging, hands-on workshops. Each session begins with a workshop led by Harris and Chantel Chapman from Mogo Money, focusing on developing intentions. Harris and Chapman guide attendees through journaling, goal setting, and deadline creation, and discusses how to overcome the things holding them back from achieving their goals. The second workshop of the day focuses on meditation. Led by certified reiki instructor and pranayama and meditation facilitator Miriana Perticarini, this session helps attendees visualize their goal and release the fears holding them back from achieving it. Participants at each session also have the opportunity to engage with art installations from Toronto-based multimedia artist Whyishnave Suthagar, a crystal energy room, as well as enjoy tarot card readings, music, and networking. Twitter Login/Register With:last_img read more

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Multiple shots fired on North Dakota march against DAPL pipeline by worker

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN National NewsA number of shots were fired during an anti-DAPL march in North Dakota Saturday.Violence during the demonstrations against the pipeline that will run from North Dakota to Illinois are increasing.Now police are investigating this latest confrontation.tfennario@aptn.calast_img

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Limited chances to reduce government spending and cut deficit: FAO

TORONTO — Ontario’s fiscal watchdog says opportunities for the Progressive Conservative government to cut spending in order to reduce the deficit may be limited.The Financial Accountability Officer says the province’s per capita spending in 2017 on government programs was already the lowest amongst all the provinces.The Tories have said Ontario has a $13.5 billion deficit and have promised to balance the budget without raising taxes.The FAO report says the province takes in the lowest revenue per person in Canada and that is combined with similarly low spending on government programs.It notes that Ontario spent the lowest amount per person on health care out of any province in 2017.The report also says Ontario receives the second lowest level of transfer payments from the federal government.The Canadian Press read more

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Government says no new commitments after Zeids report

“During the Government headed by former President Mahinda Rajapaksa, the Human Rights Council, on 27 March 2014, adopted Resolution 25/1 titled ‘Promoting reconciliation, accountability and human rights in Sri Lanka’, requesting the High Commissioner, inter alia, to undertake a comprehensive investigation into alleged serious violations and abuses of human rights and related crimes by both parties in Sri Lanka during the period covered by the LLRC, and to establish the facts and circumstances of such alleged violations and of the crimes perpetrated with a view to avoiding impunity and ensuring accountability, with assistance from relevant experts and special procedures mandate holders, ” he said. The Government says there will be no additional or new commitments for Sri Lanka arising from the report on Sri Lanka by the UN High Commissioner for human rights, Zeid al-Hussein which was submitted to the ongoing 34th Session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.The Foreign Ministry quoted Deputy Foreign Minister Harsha de Silva as saying Sri Lanka will undertake a two-year extension of the timeline for fulfilment of commitments made in Resolution 30/1. “Moreover, further international action was being envisaged on Sri Lanka as a result of the Government’s inaction on matters pertaining to rule of law, reconciliation, and governance, at the time the Presidential Election was held on 8 January 2015,” the Deputy Foreign Minister said.Following the Presidential election on 8 January 2015, the National Unity Government of Sri Lanka, under the leadership of President Maithripala Sirisena and Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, took steps to take ownership of reconciliation, rule of law, accountability, human rights and governance issues. (Colombo Gazette) Following this request of the Council, the High Commissioner launched the OHCHR Investigation on Sri Lanka (OISL), a first of this nature carried out by an external entity on matters pertaining to Sri Lanka. read more

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New Journal on life of former President Cheddi Jagan published

Last Evening, the Peoples Progressive Party published a new journal on the life of Guyana’s former President the late Dr Cheddi Jagan after contributions from over 20 editors and individuals.The journal which was published in observance of the former leader’s 21st death anniversary is called “The Thinker”. It examines how critical a thinker Jagan was during his time as President of Guyana.The new Journal that was published on Tuesday eveningThe journal is expected to give expression to progressive thinking, to defend human right to democracy and to hold up the proverbial mirror to happenings of our society. “The Thinker” explored Jagan as an internationalist and showed how his formative years were influenced by his years of living and studying in the United States, his linkages and alliances, his vision and his leadership. It also covers issues such as the ongoing tragedy unleashed on the sugar workers at Wales, Rose Hall, Enmore and Skeldon.Dr Frank Anthony, who gave an overview of the journal, noted that some might not agree with some of the articles, however, the journal looks to reveal truth.In addition, President of the Guyana Peace Council (GPC) – which was founded by Jagan – Clement Rohee, in his remarks, noted that the journal is intended to stimulate debate in our country which is currently lacking in Guyana. “Critical debate, intellectual debate and discussions, a group of us came together with the intent of reviving the spirit of debate and discussions and as such we created the journal to be a tribute for those kinds of discussions in our country,” Rohee said of the ‘journal with a difference’.Jagan was described as being influenced by many world leaders who made significant contributions such as Charles Baird, an American progressive writer. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedGoverning Party observes Cheddi Jagan’s 17th death anniversaryMarch 4, 2014In “Politics”Red House fiasco: Ramjattan supports Govt’s actionsJanuary 14, 2017In “latest news”Dr Cheddi Jagan’s life was exemplary – PPP General SecretaryJanuary 2, 2018In “latest news” read more

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Apple une amende de 625 millions de dollars pour violation de brevets

first_imgApple : une amende de 625 millions de dollars pour violation de brevetsÉtats-Unis – Le groupe californien Apple pourrait être condamné à verser 625 millions de dollars de dommage et intérêts à la société Mirror Worlds, qui l’accuse d’avoir violé trois de ses brevets informatiques.La société informatique Mirror Worlds, fondée par un professeur de l’université de Yale aux États-Unis, a déposé plainte en 2008 contre le groupe Apple pour violation de brevets informatiques. Trois brevets auraient été utilisés lors de la conception des iPod, iPhone et des ordinateurs du groupe. Les trois logiciels en question sont Cover Flow (une interface de navigation au sein d’une bibliothèque), Spotlight (un moteur de recherche par contenu, inédit) et Time Machine (un logiciel de sauvegarde et de restauration).À lire aussiiPhone 6 : un smartphone fragile qui se plierait en restant dans une poche ?Le verdict final n’a pas été rendu par le tribunal de Tyler, en charge de l’affaire au Texas. De son côté, Apple a déposé une motion d’urgence demandant le report de la décision en mettant en avant des “questions en suspens” concernant deux des trois brevets. Le groupe a également contesté que les montants des pénalités puissent s’additionner. En s’élevant à 625 millions de dollars, la condamnation équivaut à des indemnités de 208,5 millions de dollars par brevet.Apple avait acheté le logiciel Cover Flow en 2006 pour l’intégrer à iTunes 7 et en août, certains aspects de la poursuite de Mirror Worlds avaient ainsi été rejetés. Pourtant, le groupe à la pomme risque aujourd’hui d’être contraint de payer cette amende qui, selon le New York Times, serait la plus importante jamais versée dans une affaire de violation de propriété intellectuelle aux États-Unis.Le 6 octobre 2010 à 12:39 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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LIBERIAN CLUB PLANS TO PLAY CAF GAMES IN GAMBIA

first_imgBy Sulayman BahBarrack Young Controllers from Liberia are planning to play both their Caf Champions league matches against Real de Banjul in Gambia, Foroyaa Sport can reveal.The Liberian league champions –pitted against Gambia’s Real de Banjul – are in the hunt for a neutral ground to hold their matches after being banned by CAF from playing their home fixtures in Liberia in the wake of the ongoing ebola epidemic there.The Ebola epidemic that has claimed thousand of lives in the subregion, is said to have affected more people in Monrovia and amid fears of its spread, CAF urged the BYC, via a circular sent last week, to look for an alternative venue as a precautionary measure.Ghana and Ivory Coast were initially among countries been considered by the Liberian Football Association but they have now turned to Gambia, Foroyaa Sport understands, and have in fact written a request seeking approval from the Gambia Football Federation to play both legs in Banjul.Real de Banjul’s President Willy Abraham reacting to the issue when reached yesterday said: ‘That shouldn’t concern us. What we are more particular about is whether they are coming. If that occurs, it will be to our advantage.’When quizzed over the matter a GFF spokesperson confirmed the Liberian club’s request but said talks are ongoing to that effect.Real De Banjul faces Barrack Young Controllers who won the Liberian Cup a quadruple time on Saturday 14th February for the first-leg.In a separate development, the GFF has announced plans to offer Papa Bakery Gassama voted Africa’s best referee of 2014 a welcoming ceremony once the 37-year-old returns from the African Cup of Nations in Equatorial Guinea.A sub-committee led by federation second VP Ebou Faye has ben formed. ]]>last_img read more

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New York Philadelphia End Veteran Homelessness

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR With the Obama administration’s target for eliminating veteran homelessness fast approaching, several major cities — along with a number of counties and smaller cities — in recent weeks announced they had set up systems and had resources in place to ensure all veterans experiencing chronic homelessness are either housed or are on an immediate path to permanent housing.Last week, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the city had reached that goal after a two-year effort involving city agencies, the federal government and several nonprofit organizations serving veterans.“Today we have ensured that those in the veteran community who have struggled to find and remain in housing time and time again will have a stable place to call home,” de Blasio said according to a press release.Earlier in December, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter said his city had effectively ended veteran homelessness. In both cities, a handful of veterans remain on the streets after refusing housing assistance.“I have a message for each of you who are still out there,” Nutter said during his Dec. 17 announcement, reported the Philadelphia Inquirer. “We honor your service and your sacrifices. You deserve a home. We won’t give up on you.”Over the past year, a number of cities have met President Obama’s challenge to end veteran homelessness by the end of 2015. As of late December, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) had officially recognized 15 jurisdictions that have succeeded, including Houston, Las Vegas and New Orleans. In November, Virginia declared that it had become the first state to meet the federal definition of ending homelessness among veterans.HUD recently acknowledged that the administration’s end-of-the-year deadline for eliminating veteran homelessness nationwide would not be met, but officials highlighted the 36 percent drop in the number of homeless veterans over the past five years.“The thing is that we can’t stop our work until every single veteran has a place to call home in the United States. That means that you have a role to play in teaching other communities how you did it,” HUD Secretary Julián Castro said prior to Philadelphia’s announcement in December.For some veterans advocates, ending veteran homelessness as defined by the federal government still leaves more to be accomplished.“This is a great example of spiking the ball before you cross the goal line,” Paul Rieckhoff, president of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, told the Observer following last week’s announcement in New York. “There’s been tremendous progress, but there’s still a long way to go — and there’s a big difference between ending chronic homelessness and ending functional homelessness and ending real homelessness,” Rieckhoff said.last_img read more

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New House minority Republicans vent claim theyre sidelined in budget process

first_imgRep. Lance Pruitt, R-Anchorage, during a discussion about HB 115 in the House Finance Committee on Feb. 13. He opposes a change that would reduce the House minority’s budget influence. (Photo by Skip Gray/360 North)For years, the minority caucus in the Alaska House has had a say in the state’s budget. But that may not happen this year, as the majority caucus looks to tap Permanent Fund earnings to close the budget gap.Listen nowHouse minority members say they’re being cut out of the budget process. House Minority Leader Charisse Millett, a Republican from Anchorage, said this:“They’re not interested in what we have to say, and our contribution to the budget process,” Millett said.To understand why the minority feels left out, it pays to understand what the state government’s two large piggy banks are – and what it takes to spend from them.One account is the Constitutional Budget Reserve. The state Constitution requires three quarters of each house of the Legislature to vote to spend money from the reserve. That’s given the House minority leverage in past years, since it became impossible to balance the budget without this money.The other piggy bank is the Permanent Fund earnings. For the past 35 years, the state has only spent money from fund earnings for Permanent Fund dividends. But if the Legislature wanted to, it could spend these earnings by a simple majority vote.That’s what Rep. Paul Seaton wants to do.The majority-caucus Republican from Homer has proposed drawing $4.2 billion from the earnings reserve to pay to close the budget gap. Of that money, $1.7 billion would go to the state’s education fund.“We really want to work on the major thing that Alaskans want us to work on, which is the comprehensive, sustainable fiscal plan,” Seaton said. “And as long as we have an unfunded budget, we will be working on that for a long time. So we fully fund the budget by having that education fund.”Anchorage minority-caucus Republican Rep. Lance Pruitt said the Senate will have the House minority’s back.“I’m going to go back a ways, and go back to high school. I had friends and sometimes if you forget if people have friends and you mess with someone, then it comes back later and it really hurts,” Pruitt said. “And we got friends in the Senate. There’s a whole other body that this has got to go through.”Pruitt said Seaton is manipulating the entire House majority by suggesting the budget change. Seaton is the House Finance Committee co-chairman, and proposed the change as the chairman of the committee’s budget language subcommittee.“To try to hide something like that – that’s deceptive, that’s just flat-out deceptive,” Pruitt said. “But that being said, the whole caucus is resting on that one person.”Seaton said past finance committee chairmen included changes to the budget language without any committee votes. On Tuesday, the committee did vote on Seaton’s proposal to draw from Permanent Fund earnings. It passed seven to four, along caucus lines.“Every single amendment was offered and voted on by full Finance,” Seaton said. “So there were no balls hidden.”Two years ago, the two caucuses were in opposite positions. The Republicans were then in the majority and wanted to shift Permanent Fund earnings in a way that would have allowed them to bypass minority support for the CBR. And most Democrats opposed the move, but they’re now in the majority that could bypass the minority.Both sides distinguish their position two years ago from where they are now. Republicans say they only raised the idea of bypassing the minority two years ago because they wanted to avoid pink slips for state workers after months of budget negotiations. And those who were in the minority two years ago note the proposal then would have drained state savings by a larger amount than the current majority is considering.For the earnings draw to be adopted, it would require another vote by the House Finance Committee, then votes by the full House and the Senate.last_img read more

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Ban on hovercraft use within Alaska preserve stands another appeal may come

first_imgThe man at the center of a lawsuit over National Park Service authority to regulate rivers in Alaska parks is reacting to the most recent legal decision in the case.Listen nowA three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a decision Monday in the long-running case filed by Anchorage hunter John Sturgeon. Sturgeon contested a National Park Service ban on hovercraft use within Yukon Charley Rivers National Preserve, in the eastern interior. The case reached the U.S. Supreme Court, which remanded it back to the 9th Circuit in March. The appeals court again backed Park service authority. Sturgeon points to a disconnect between the two courts.“Supreme Court said over and over again, Alaska’s different by law. That our laws are different,” Sturgeon said. “That our parks, reserves and refuges are supposed to managed differently than the Lower 48.”The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) that established Yukon Charley Preserve, and many other federal parks in Alaska, allows NPS system wide regulations, like the hovercraft ban, to be applied inside Alaska parks, but Sturgeon maintains non-federal in-holdings, like state owned rivers, are not included.“The federal government should not have control over state-owned navigable waters. That’s the bottom line,” Sturgeon said.The environmental law firm Trustees for Alaska is sided with the park service in the Sturgeon case. Attorney Katie Strong said this week’s ruling clarifies a difference between river waters and other park in-holdings, like state and Alaska Native lands, which are immune from NPS regulations.“Waterways flowing through the parks are public lands and they are to be regulated by the Park Service,” Strong said. “To protect the parks as Congress intended when establishing them.”The Sturgeon case, and the broader fight over control of Alaska Rivers, may not be over. Sturgeon said he’s considering another appeal, noting that his case is backed by the state, numerous groups and many Alaskans.last_img read more

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Trying to solve a moosesized mystery in the tundra near Nome

first_imgWarren Hansen stands beside a white radio collar used to track moose. (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/Alaska’s Energy Desk)Moose weren’t always a staple in Western Alaska. The animals migrated to the region sometime after the turn of the century. But outside of Nome, the population has been continuing to decrease, following years of heavy snow.Listen nowWarren Hansen is counting down the days until he can fly over the tundra to look for moose. Although he’ll be searching the landscape with his eyes, his ears will be doing most of the work.“Listening to static and beeps all day and trying not to get motion sick,” Hansen said.Hansen is a wildlife biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish & Game.In the aircraft, that beeping sound will be transmitted from Hansen’s moose to a radio receiver. Or rather, the 16 calves he collared last fall.Right now, those calves are somewhere outside of Nome, wearing the chunky white collars Hansen gave them. Hopefully, they’re emitting a sound that indicates they’re alive. But a mortality signal could be closer to the truth.In an area north of Nome, the moose population is decreasing by about 12 percent annually. Hansen says moose are an important subsistence food, so a shrinking population is concerning.About a year ago, the department of fish and game received federal and state money to look into the issue.But if this were a detective story, Hansen says it’s only the first chapter in figuring out what’s going on with moose.Moose turned up near Nome around the 1930s, and scientists aren’t totally sure why. It’s possible they could have just naturally migrated into the area, much to the delight of local hunters.“Well, [moose] may not have been barreling through,” Tony Gorn, a management biologist for the state Department of Fish and Game, said. “But it was probably an impressive sight to see this long-legged animal standing on a hillside.”Gorn has lived in Nome for 20 years, and he’s spent most of that time working with the Department of Fish and Game.Back in the 1980s the moose population was booming. So much so that biologists wondered if the landscape could even sustain it. And by the late 2000s, Gorn was on the job — capturing calves to weigh them and see how the animals were getting on.At first, the young moose were a normal weight. But for the next two years, heavy snow fell in Nome, and their weight dropped. Management biologists wondered if there were too many moose, so they increased the hunting quota to ensure a sustainable population.But since then the population started to decline more rapidly.Gorn says it’s too early to tell exactly what’s going on. It’s complicated. But nutrition could be a factor.“There’s definitely not one thing we could call the silver bullet,” Gorn said.Still, one thing’s for certain: winters in Nome are not as cold as they used to be. At around 30 degrees, you get warm, wet conditions, which can lead to more snow and ice.Measuring snowpack is challenging because it can blow across the tundra. But the National Weather Service has recorded more seasonal snowfall than what was typical just a few decades ago.As for moose, Gorn says the animals are hardy. They’re built to handle heavy snow, but their environment, at least around Nome, appears to be changing.Moose eat shrubby plants like willow.“You know, we see our willows completely encased in ice,” Gorn said. “Those are things that we need to begin to understand. Particularly, if they’re going to be become long term events.”But for now, Gorn says the emphasis is on what is happening to moose. Not necessarily why. Are they malnourished? Migrating farther north? Are the calves being eaten? Those are the big questions.When this study is done in about three years, the Department of Fish & Game hopes to have a better understanding. This research could influence management decisions down the line to help stabilize the population.Gorn says the goal is to achieve the best science possible within the confines of public support.In the meantime Gorn plans to go back out into the tundra this spring with his colleague to check on the young moose.“If the weather was beautiful tomorrow, we’re not flying,” Gorn said.Gorn says right now the plane is solid block of ice. The mystery is when the weather will be clear enough to fly.last_img read more

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Fast ferrys future sailings uncertain

first_imgThe fast ferry Fairweather docks at Juneau’s Auke Bay Ferry Terminal in 2013. It’s been sailing since 2004, but could be retired later this year. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)The Alaska Marine Highway System appears to be phasing out its fast ferries. One is in long-term storage and the other will join it this fall.Listen nowSitka resident Mim McConnell’s family car has an ignition problem. The dealer is in Juneau and only way to get it there — the ferry system – doesn’t sail very often anymore.“I cannot affordably get that car over to Juneau to get it repaired and then get it back here,” McConnell said. “There’s no quick turnaround, for one thing. So I haven’t even bothered getting it fixed.”The realtor and former Sitka mayor is one of many coastal Alaskans dependent on the marine highway system. She’s among those who’ve come to appreciate the fast ferries, which shorten sailings, allowing such a trip to happen in a day or two.McConnell said that’s helped sports teams, school clubs and others needing a quick turnaround, which saves lodging and meal costs.“Having affordable access on and off an island, that’s huge,” she said. “That can have a tremendous economic impact on a community.”Fast ferry service has become less frequent in recent years.Soon, it will be gone altogether.A pair of slower, short-run Alaska Class Ferries will begin sailing next year.“Once we have two new ships, it’s very difficult budget-wise to maintain the existing fleet,” Capt. John Falvey, general manager of the Alaska Marine Highway System, said.The ferry system reduced sailings because of funding cuts.The fast ferry Fairweather will sail its usual Southeast routes this summer, connecting Juneau to Sitka, Haines and Skagway, he said. It will switch to Prince William Sound in the fall, linking Whittier, Valdez and Cordova.A draft fall-winter-spring ferry schedule released Thursday shows it leaving service mid-November. It will be tied up for the winter with no plans for its return.Falvey said nothing is final.“We’ll have to see, budgetary-wise, where we are once we get at least one (Alaska Class Ferry) running on May 1, 2019. That’s our goal,” Falvey said.The two new ferries are being built at the Ketchikan Shipyard.The Hubbard and the Tazlina will connect Juneau, Haines and Skagway, one of the routes the Fairweather sails.While it will be laid up, the fast ferry will be kept ready for use. Its sister ship, the Chenega, was also tied up about two and a half years ago. The state paid about $160,000 for the first year the Chenega was in storage.The state sold another tied-up ship, the Taku, for scrap earlier this year for $170,000.But Falvey said it has no immediate plans to sell either fast ferry.“We let all the certificates and everything lapse on the Taku, whereas we’ve got all the high-speed code certificates and things like that in a frozen-type mode on the Chenega,” Falvey said. “We could pretty quickly activate that ship and do the same thing with the Fairweather.”The first fast ferry began operations in 2004, followed by the Chenega in 2005.They sail faster because they are compact, lightweight and have more powerful engines than other ships their size.But they burn more fuel, so they also are more expensive to run than the system’s other small ships.last_img read more

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Historic 7 March being observed

first_imgBangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman. File photoThe Historic 7 March, a memorable day in the history of Bangalees’ long arduous freedom struggle, is being observed on Wednesday with elaborate programmes, reports UNB.This year, the day bears a great significance as Unesco recogonised the historic 7 March speech as a world documentary heritage.On this day in 1971, Bangalees’ undisputed leader Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman delivered his epoch-making speech of independence before a mammoth rally at the historic Racecourse Maidan, now Suhrawardy Udyan, in the city.In his 19-minute extempore speech before a million freedom-loving people, Bangabandhu had made a clarion call for a non-cooperation movement asking the nation to prepare for the war of independence to liberate the country from the exploitative Pakistan regime.“The struggle this time is for freedom, the struggle this time is for independence, Joy Bangla,” Bangabandhu declared from the massive rally.In his speech, compared with US President Abraham Lincoln’s historic Gettysburg speech, Sheikh Mujib said, “Since we’ve learnt to give blood, we’ll give more blood. Inshallah, the people of this country must be liberated…Turn every house into a fort. Face (the enemy) with whatever you have.”Bangabandhu’s speech worked like a magic spell inspiring the entire Bangalee nation to join in the struggle for independence from the autocratic and repressive rule of the then Pakistani military junta.On 30 October last, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (Unesco) recognised the Bangabandhu’s historic 7 March speech as a world documentary heritage.Awami League and different socio-political and cultural organisations have chalked out elaborate programmes to observe the day in a befitting manner.The ruling party is set to hold a public rally at the Suhrawardy Udyan on the occasion.Bangladesh Betar and Bangladesh Television as well as private television channels and radio stations are airing special programmes while national dailies published supplements marking the day.Meanwhile, president Abdul Hamid and prime minister Sheikh Hasina have issued separate messages recalling with gratitude courageous and farsighted leadership of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in materialising the nation’s journey to freedom through his March 7 Speech.In a message, the president said, “Bangabandhu’s dream was to turn Bangladesh into ‘Sonar Bangla’. We should take steps to fulfill the dream of the Father of the Nation.”In her message, prime minister Sheikh Hasina said, “The historic speech of the Father of the Nation was the source of the immeasurable strength during the Liberation War. The everlasting speech will inspire the deprived, engrossed and freedom seeking people of the world.”The prime minister on behalf of her government and the Bangalee nation thanked the Unesco authorities for recognising the speech as part of the world’s documentary heritage.last_img read more

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Kenya bus crash death toll rises to 36

first_imgEmergency workers stand near the wreckage of a bus and a lorry that crashed in a head-on collision, killing thirty people, at the accident scene near Nakuru, Kenya, on 31 December, 2017. Photo: AFPThirty-six people were killed and 11 injured early Sunday morning in a head-on collision between a bus and a lorry on a road in central Kenya, police said.”The death toll is now 36,” said Rift Valley traffic police chief Zero Arome, explaining the initial toll of 30 had risen, “after six passengers succumbed to injuries in hospital.”The accident occurred at 3:00 am (0000 GMT)close to a notorious stretch on the Nakuru-Eldoret highway.A bus travelling from Busia, in western Kenya, collided with a truck coming from Nakuru town.Police said the death toll for that stretch of road has now topped 100 this month alone.Arome said the drivers of both vehicles were among the dead, as well as a three-year-old child, while the injured had been taken to a Nakuru hospital.One survivor, speaking from his hospital bed, said he had been asleep at the back of the bus when the collision happened.”All I heard was a loud bang and screams from all over,” he said. “I was seated at the back and was helped out after some time because my legs were stuck. It is by the grace of God that I am alive. I saw many people dead and their bodies mutilated.”Official statistics show that around 3,000 people die annually in road accidents in Kenya, but the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates the figure could be as high as 12,000.In December last year more than 40 people died when an out of control fuel tanker ploughed into vehicles and then exploded on another busy stretch of highway. Deaths from road accidents commonly spike during the holiday period when people criss-cross the country visiting relatives.In recent weeks road accidents have claimed the lives of hundreds of people, among them three Pentecostal bishops and a newly elected governor.last_img read more

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Largest DC Government Union Endorses Muriel Bowser

first_imgAmerican Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME)On Aug. 12, District Council 20 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) hosted a press conference to endorse Democrat Muriel Bowser for D.C. mayor. Bowser secured Council 20’s support after meeting with the leadership for nearly an hour, answering questions and committing to follow-up tasks. The announcement was made at Council 20’s headquarters on Kalorama Road in Northwest.This is the second major union endorsement for Bowser. A day earlier, she received the support of the Metro Washington Labor Council, AFL-CIO union coalition, who endorsed Bowser based on her support for labor issues such as wage-theft enforcement and government workers’ right to unionize, according to the AFL-CIO’s president, Joslyn Williams.Before giving the floor to Bowser, Council 20’s executive director Andrew D. Washington shared his view of the District, as “a city that is changing at an incredible pace; a city where the income of the top 20 percent is $285,000 a year, while the income of the bottom 20 percent is less than $10,000 a year!”These staggering figures, he said, are not a matter of economics, but a challenge for the city’s next leader. In considering other candidates for Council 20, Washington said all others fell short. “Unlike her opponents, Muriel does not need to re-introduce herself to voters nor does she need a fake political makeover to recast herself as an ally of working people,” he said.While he does not expect to see eye-to-eye with Bowser at all times, Washington said he is confident a Bowser administration will be inclusive and respectful to District workers. “In Muriel Bowser, we believe unions will have a seat at the table when important issues are discussed,” he said.Democratic Mayoral candidate Muriel Bowser.In response to the support of the more than 6,000 District government employees that form District 20, Bowser said, “I’m honored to be endorsed by the hardworking men and women of District Council 20, a group that helps represent the backbone of our economy. Together, we will build an even stronger and more vibrant city, one that that supports working families, grows middle-class jobs, and brings trusted leadership to the District of Columbia.”Bowser, 42, won the democratic nomination on April 1, 2014, outing incumbent Vincent Gray. Bowser’s primary contender in the Nov. 4 election is independent D.C. council member, David Catania.Her campaign touts the fifth-generation Washingtonian as a pragmatic, hands-on approach leader with experience in legislation, oversight, and policy‐making in the District. As Ward 4 Councilmember, her agenda has included pushing an open and ethical government, rebuilding quality neighborhoods, and transforming schools and commercial corridors.last_img read more

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Firefox will block DLL Injections

first_imgFirefox will block DLL Injections by Martin Brinkmann on January 21, 2019 in Firefox – 21 commentsMozilla Firefox will soon block the injection of DLLs by antivirus applications and other third-party programs in an effort to improve stability, security, and privacy.Antivirus applications on Windows and other third-party applications, e.g. other security software or PDF tools, may inject DLLs in the browser. These injections are known to cause stability issues for users.Mozilla follows Google which started to block third-party code injections in Google Chrome in 2018. Google discovered that Chrome installations with third-party DLL injection crashed 15% more than Chrome installations without.Mozilla started to investigate options to disable DLL injections in Firefox in the fourth quarter of 2016 but things picked up speed only recently.Firefox Nightly, the cutting edge version of the Firefox browser, blocks DLL injections already. The feature will be integrated in Beta and Release versions of the Firefox browser when they hit version 66.Firefox Beta will hit version 66 on January 29, 2019, and Firefox Stable version 66 on March 19, 2019 according to the release schedule.How do you know whether the protective feature is enabled already? That’s easy. Just open about:support in the browser’s address bar and check the Launcher Process listing near the top.If it states enabled it is active; if it states disabled or is not present, it is inactive.Firefox users can disable the feature currently and it is likely that the turn-off option remains a feature in Beta and Stable as well.Go to about:config?filter=browser.launcherProcess.enabled to display the preference in Firefox. Note that the link returns the preference only if it exists.Double-click on it to set it to True or False. True means that the launcher process is enabled, False that it is disabled. Firefox blocks DLL Injections by third-party applications if the preference is set to true.Firefox users (and Chrome users) may experience issues with their browsers or applications that attempt to inject DLLs into the browsers. Third-party developers may need to update their applications to remove the DLL injecting components from the applications or exclude browsers that block these attempt anyway.Closing WordsDLL injections have always caused stability issues on Windows; Google discovered a 15% more crashes in Chrome browsers with DLL injections than without. Mozilla did not reveal any statistics but it is likely that the figure is in the same region. (via Techdows)SummaryArticle NameFirefox will block DLL InjectionsDescriptionMozilla Firefox will soon block the injection of DLLs by antivirus applications and other third-party programs in an effort to improve stability, security, and privacy.Author Martin BrinkmannPublisher Ghacks Technology NewsLogo Advertisementlast_img read more

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Elections Dont Work at All You Can Blame the Math

first_imgYes, I asked how they chose. “They actually used approval voting,” Ullman says.So do a lot of professional societies, including mathematicians. You might think that this would yield only the most anodyne, least objectionable choice, but you actually get winners—Condorcet winners!—with broad support. (Engineers don’t like it as much; the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers abandoned the practice.) You can even go harder and hybridize various options, or add ranking to simple yes/no approvals. One downside might be that voters have to have an opinion about everyone on the ballot. “If someone said, ‘you have to submit a preference ballot and you have to rank all 20,’ there’d be a lot of people who would know their first and second choice, and maybe their third, but then say, ‘I’ve never heard of the rest of these people.’” The mystery of who the next mayor of San Francisco will be wasn’t even primary day’s only drama. Instead of splitting up other races by party, in California everyone goes onto the same ballot, and the top two vote-getters advance to the general election in November. If they’re from the same party? So be it. Except this year Democratic enthusiasm was so high because of, like, everything, that the slates in those races filled with rarin’-to-go Dems representing every wavelength of blue from desaturated purple to deep indigo. That freaked out the national party, which worried that everyone would peel votes from everyone else, locking Democrats out of both slots in four districts when the party is hoping to take control of the House of Representatives. They didn’t get locked out, but the attempt at electoral innovation came from the same spirit. San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee died in December of 2017; the election to replace him was Tuesday. No one knows who won. Partially that’s because the votes are still trickling in. Mail-in ballots merely had to be postmarked by election day, and as I write the city is reporting 87,000 votes yet to be processed. But that’s not the only roadblock. The other problem is math.See, the San Francisco mayoral election isn’t just another whoever-gets-the-most-votes-wins sort of deal. No, this race was another example of the kind of cultural innovation that California occasionally looses upon an unsuspecting America, like smartphones and fancy toast. Surprise, you guys! We don’t even vote like y’all out here.The way it worked is called ranked choice voting, also known as an instant runoff. Voters rank three choices in order of preference. The counting process drops the person with the fewest first-choice votes, reallocates that candidate’s votes to all his or her voters’ second choices, and then repeats. Does this sound insane? Actually, it’s genius. It is also insane.The mayoral ballot had eight candidates, including unlikely winners like a lawyer who’d run three times before, a holistic health practitioner, and a Republican. San Franciscans coalesced around three: London Breed, Jane Kim, and Mark Leno, all local elected officials with the kinds of intertwined histories that you could only get from two-fisted municipal politics in a region with astronomical amounts of tech money (mostly out of government reach thanks to sweetheart corporate tax deals and a history of failing to tax homeowners on the real value of their property). Breed has the most first-place votes so far—10 percentage points up on Leno, in second—but Kim’s reallocated third-place vote count has given Leno a margin so narrow it’d disappear if you looked at it on-end.What’s the point of complexifying a straightforward election? The thing is, elections aren’t straightforward. Social choice theory lays out a bunch of different ways a group might make a decision, and “plurality”—whatever gets the most vote wins—is just one. It works great if you have a ballot with only two choices on it. But add more choices, and you have problems. When Reform Party candidate Jesse Ventura defeated the Republican Norm Coleman and the Democrat Skip Humphrey for governor of Minnesota in 1998, political pundits saw voter disgust with The System at work. Ventura got 37 percent of the vote; Coleman, 35; and Humphrey, 28. But as Emory mathematician Victoria Powers wrote in a 2015 paper, exit polls said that almost everyone who voted for Coleman had Humphrey as a second choice, and Coleman was the second choice of almost everyone who voted for Humphrey. “The voters preferred Coleman to both of the other candidates, and yet he lost the election,” Powers wrote.That’s plurality. The same problems come up with “antiplurality,” in which everyone says who they hate, and the person with the least votes wins. Both potentially violate Condorcet’s Theorem—as in the philosopher-mathematician the Marquis de Condorcet, who in 1785 said in part that an election should be won by a candidate who’d beat all the other candidates head-to-head. (Sequential pairwise voting, in which you eliminate the losers March Madness style, gives you a clear Condorcet winner … but that winner is different for every order you run the matchups.)So, yeah, plurality: bad. “It’s very restrictive on voters,” says Daniel Ullman, a mathematician at George Washington University and the co-author of The Mathematics of Politics. “If you allow voters to say who their top two candidates are, or rank all 10 in order, or give approval to those they like or don’t like, or all sorts of other ballots, then things get interesting.”They do indeed. The other systems let voters express more choice, but they also introduce what mathematicians call paradoxes. Here’s an example: ranked choice voting lacks “monotonicity.” That is to say, people sometimes have to vote against the candidate they’re actually supporting to make a win more likely. “That’s disturbing, because when you go into the ballot box you’re not sure if you should reveal what your true wish is,” Ullman says.center_img And indeed, some of the campaigning leading up to election day involved telling people which two candidates to vote for, regardless of order—basically, please vote against the other corner of the triangle. Flip side, imagine how different American history might be if the 2000 presidential election (Al Gore virtually tied with George W. Bush, Ralph Nader and Pat Buchanan as spoilers) had been ranked choice.Ranked-choice and sequential pairwise aren’t even the weirdest possibilities out there. You could assign everyone a score, with some points for top choice, fewer for second, fewer for third, etc. Whoever has the most points at the end wins. That’s a “Borda Count.” Fun problem: In the same election with the same vote counts, plurality, antiplurality, and Borda count could all yield different winners. And Borda violates Condorcet, too. Yiiiiikes.“There was a meeting of voting system experts a number of years ago, and they voted on which method they liked best. Apparently the plurality method got zero votes,” Ullman says. “One of the favorites was approval, where your ballot is a yes-no choice for each candidate, and whoever gets the most yeses wins.” California has long been willing to perform surgery on democracy to correct flaws both cosmetic and life-threatening. Gilded Age California politics was so corrupt that progressive reformers instituted the initiative process, for example, letting anyone with enough signatures put legislation on a ballot. The top-two primary, also used in Washington and Nebraska, comes in part as a tool in the fight against gerrymandering. Like a lot of Californian ideals, the voting system is a little crazy-making and a little noble all at once.It’s also doomed. In the 1950s the economist Kenneth Arrow set out to find the one best voting method, one election to rule them all. He ended up proving that there wasn’t one. Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem, for which he one the Nobel Prize in 1971, says that outside a two-choice plurality, no good method exists to make a rock-solid social choice.But that’s democracy for you. We’re not here to make the union perfect—just more perfect.More Great WIRED StoriesHow San Quentin inmates built a search engine for prisonMeet the Apple programmer who got apps talking to each otherAirbus’ H160 helicopter helps save pilots from their own mistakes187 things the blockchain is supposed to fixPHOTO ESSAY: These glamour shots show a whole new side of spidersGet even more of our inside scoops with our weekly Backchannel newsletterlast_img read more

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​ITN Celebrates World Cancer Day 2018

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 World Cancer Day takes place annually on Feb. 4 to raise awareness and education in the media, governments and people around the world, with an aim to save millions of preventable deaths each year, according to its website. Every year, almost 9 million people die of cancer. Here we have gathered ITN’s coverage of cancer treatments, studies and technological advances. More information can be found on ITN’s Radiation Oncology channel page:The Future of Radiation OncologyVIDEO: Inside the ASTRO Scientific CommitteeMEDraysintell Downgrades Proton Therapy Market Projection for 2030ASTRO: CMS Report on Radiation Therapy Payment Model Charts Path to Value-Based Cancer CareBreast Cancer Radiation PlanningTransforming the Outlook on CancerWEBINAR: Pancreatic Cancer Outcome Highlights via On-table Adaptive MR-guided RadiationVIDEO: The Future of Radiation OncologyProton Therapy Continues Rapid GrowthOncology Information Systems Need to IntegrateVIDEO: Clinical Considerations for Proton TherapyMRI-guided Radiation TherapyGenerating Precise Treatment PlansRadiation Therapy Treatment AdvancesWEBINAR: Advances in CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Colonoscopy Systems | August 06, 2019 Rise in Early Onset Colorectal Cancer Not Aligned With Screening Trends A new study finds that trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | Radiation Oncology | February 01, 2018 ​ITN Celebrates World Cancer Day 2018 World Cancer Day is Feb. 4 and aims to raise the profile of cancer News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. News | Proton Therapy | August 06, 2019 IBA Signs Contract to Install Proton Therapy Center in Kansas IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.) recently signed a contract and received the first payment for a Proteus One solution… read more Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications Radiation Oncology Comparison ChartsAccess to these charts requires a login, but it is free and only takes a minute to fill out the form.Arc-Based Radiotherapy SystemsImage Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT)Oncology Information Systems (OIS)Proton Therapy SystemsRadiation Therapy SystemsTreatment Planning Systems Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more Related Content Image courtesy of Imago Systemslast_img read more

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Costa Rica leads Central America in Cup of Excellence coffee auction

first_imgRelated posts:And the best coffee in Costa Rica is … Costa Rica’s best coffee hails once again from Naranjo New smartphone app lets farmers crowdsource coffee fungus alerts Costa Rica’s best coffee comes from this hillside in Alajuela The breakaway favorite of Costa Rica’s 2014 Cup of Excellence competition took home the highest bid in the Alliance for Coffee Excellence international auction Tuesday.Luis Enrique Navarro of Monte Copey in Dota, Tarrazú, winner of the Cup of Excellence in May, received $41.20/lb. for his lot. Maruyama Coffee, Sugi Coffee Roasting, Ponpon Coffee, and Orsir Coffee of Taiwan purchased 1,518 lbs. of Navarro’s coffee for $62,541.60.The $41.20/lb. bid is so far the highest in Central America this year, followed by Honduras with $35.10/lb., El Salvador with $29.50, and Nicaragua with $21.20. The average price per pound of the 25 Costa Rican lots up for auction was $10.25, the highest in seven years, according to Specialty Coffee Association of Costa Rica, which organizes the auction locally. Cup of Excellence auctions for Guatemala and Mexico will take place on July 2 and 9, respectively.Coffee futures traded at roughly $1.76/lb. Tuesday.“It’s a great prize that we’ve worked toward for 35 years,” Navarro told The Tico Times, “[Winning the Cup of Excellence] is a radical change in our lives, in our family. Now we can live better. I thank God for all he has given us.”The Navarro family also placed second, fourth and fifth in the Cup of Excellence competition this year.Noelia Villalobos, executive director of SCACR, told The Tico Times that while not everyone takes home $60,000 for their coffee, qualifying for one of the 25 slots in the auction offers small producers international exposure that’s hard to put a price on.Roasters around the world are not the only ones interested in Navarro’s beans. Hidennori Izaki, 2014 World Barista Champion from Japan, traveled to Navarro’s farm and worked with the family to select the coffee he used in the competition in Rimini, Italy in June.The winning bid for Navarro’s coffee was close to Costa Rica’s record bid, $45/lb. in 2012. Judges culled 25 lots out of 117 submitted by famers this year that made it to auction Tuesday. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

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Carlos Alvarados victory speech This election held up a mirror to Costa

first_img Facebook Comments Fabricio Alvarado gives concession speech in Costa Rica To deafening applause, the president-elect thanked Rodolfo Piza, the former candidate for the Social Christian Unity Party (PUSC) whose declaration of support for Carlos Alvarado early in the second round was undoubtedly a decisive factor in his victory.“The flag we must raise tonight with great pride to show to the world is the flag of Costa Rica… a unique country that we love, and for which we work… What unites us is much greater than what divides us,” he said.Stay tuned for more on this developing story. Related posts:Candidates face off at Grupo Extra debate in Costa Rica New poll in Costa Rica: another small Fabricio lead, another statistical dead heat 5 keys to understanding Costa Rica as it faces new elections BREAKING: Carlos Alvarado wins 60.6 percent of vote with 90.6 of votes recorded in Costa Ricacenter_img “Today the world is looking at Costa Rica, and Costa Rica, once again, sends forth a beautiful democratic message. Well done, Costa Rica,” said Carlos Alvarado, the victor in today’s presidential runoff with a surprisingly decisive 60.8 percent of the vote at press time, with 39.2 percent for his rival, conservative pastor Fabricio Alvarado.The president-elect delivered his speech to a euphoric crowd at the Plaza Roosevelt in San Pedro, the university district just east of downtown San José.“Costa Rica is a marvelous country, and it is one country. Let’s celebrate that,” he said. “This election, in particular, has held up a mirror to our country. We have to understand this in a profound way, and as the country’s first servant… I must unite this country and make it a leading republic in the 21st century.”He thanked his opponent for his hard-fought campaign, which divided Costa Ricans in unprecedented ways over issues including marriage equality. He also thanked Fabricio Alvarado for his pledge of support for the new government.“I have received a call from Fabricio Alvarado and his congratulations. I congratulated him, as well, for the work his movement has done. I ask for applause for them, for the work they carried out,” he said, to dutiful cheers. “We have seen a country with inequality, a country that needs to work to bring bigger opportunities to its various regions… to reduce the inequality between men and women. A country that must provide opportunities for people with disabilities, for the elderly, for our children.” Experience Election Day in Costa Rica with The Tico Times’ first-ever 360 videolast_img read more

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