Herbie Hancock and Robert Glasper Experiment Dazzle Prospect Park With A Unique Evening Of Jazz

first_imgLast night, legendary Jazz pianist/keyboardist/godfather Herbie Hancock brought a unique band and some incredible opening acts with him to the Celebrate Brooklyn! concert series at the Prospect Park Bandshell. The show, which was organized by This Is Our Music and LPR Presents, featured a heavy-hitting opening lineup of soul musician Jamie Lidell and the electro-r&b of the Robert Glasper Experiment, and found Hancock performing a headlining set in Brooklyn for the first time in 50 years.After a short but intense downpour delayed the opening of doors for a few minutes, the crowd was allowed inside the venue for a mini set by Jamie Lidell. The British crooner, who was playing his only U.S. tour date for the forseeable future, is supporting a new forthcoming album called Building a Beginning, which will be released on October 14th.The real fireworks started when the Robert Glasper Experiment took the stage. The band, made up of Glasper on piano and keys, Derrick Hodge on bass, Casey Benjamin on saxophone, keytar, and vocoder, and Mark Colenburg on drums, took the audience on a quick trip to space via their unique blend of jazz fusion, hip-hop, and r&b. This band is one of the best improv outfits on the planet, and their set weaves between original tracks, unique and unexpected covers, and a healthy dose of full-band improvisation. The band unfortunately had to cut a few minutes from their set due to the rain delay, but made up for it in kind with an epic set-closing tribute to J. Dilla, during which Glasper surprised the audience by bringing out Bilal and Common to sing and spit a few bars, respectively. The collaboration felt very “Brooklyn”, and was a perfect fit for the larger-than-usual audience the Experiment were afforded.Finally, Herbie Hancock, the master, took the stage with his impressive band. The players in his band were a who’s who of modern jazz greats: James Genus from the Saturday Night Live house band on bass, West African legend Lionel Loueke on guitar, famed session drummer Trevor Lawrence Jr., and To Pimp A Butterfly mastermind and multi-instrumentalist Terrace Martin on keyboards, vocoder, and saxophone.The band was hot right out of the gates, opening with the uptempo 1974 jazz fusion track “Actual Proof”. The crowd was entranced by the virtuosity of the band, as they whipped from one idea to the other as the band worked themselves through the tune. After Hancock took a few minutes to introduce the band members to the audience, they launched into a winding version of “Overture” that featured impressive playing from Lawrence, as he picked up the rhythm of the jam and built it up until the song’s epic climax.Hancock followed that up with his classic “Watermelon Man”, and the funky track was met with huge applause from the enraptured audience. Loueke then led the band through a Afrobeat-tinged version of “Come Running To Me”, which featured some impressive soloing on the keytar from Hancock. Finally, things came to a close with a danceable version of “Cantaloupe Island” that saw Hancock and his band trading licks with ease.After a short break, the band returned to the stage for a synthed-out performance of Hancock’s best known song, “Chameleon”. The crowd went absolutely crazy for the track, and Hancock picked up the keytar again for a wild solo that was the perfect exclamation mark to cap off an excellent evening in Prospect Park.In the end, it was a truly amazing night in Brooklyn. Usually relegated to small clubs and festival appearances, it was amazing to see a show of jazz legends with thousands of other people in one of New York City’s most reliable cultural centers. The Robert Glasper Experiment and Herbie Hancock both put on incredible shows filled with improv and experimentation, and the crowd absolutely ate it up. We hope it doesn’t take another 50 years for Herbie to return to Brooklyn!Herbie Hancock | Celebrate Brooklyn! | Prospect Park Band Shell | 8/11/2016Set One: Actual Proof, Overture, Watermelon Man, Come Running To Me, Cantaloupe IslandEncore: Chameleon[photo via @briccelebratebk]last_img read more

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In the spirit of an intrepid reporter

first_imgStephen Engelberg, the managing editor of ProPublica, an independent nonprofit newsroom, envisions a new media world in which people pay for online content. Ultimately, investigative journalism will flourish, he told the audience, because “original unique content is what people want. There is a commercial argument for finding things out, things that nobody else knows.”Alex Jones, the Laurence M. Lombard Lecturer in the Press and Public Policy, and the director of the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, moderated the session.Earlier in the day, the city of Cambridge named the corner of Linden, Bow, and Mount Auburn streets as Halberstam Square in honor of the journalist. David L. Halberstam died doing what he loved, hunting down a story.The intrepid author, reporter, and Harvard graduate who won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the Vietnam War, which called into question the American military strategy in the conflict, died in a 2007 car crash.He was 73, and was on his way to an interview.The author of more than 20 books, including “The Best and the Brightest” and “The Powers That Be,” Halberstam began his love affair with reporting while at Harvard, becoming sports editor and managing editor for the student-run Harvard Crimson. During his lengthy career, he covered a vast range of subjects, including history, politics, the Civil Rights movement, and sports. He was known for an incredible work ethic and a passionate drive to find and report the truth.“When the government doesn’t tell the truth, the power of journalism goes up,” said Halberstam in a video clip that began a panel discussion about his life and legacy, held at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum on Wednesday (Oct. 6).Three seasoned reporters offered their perspectives on the changing nature of journalism in the age of new media and instant access, their thoughts on the future of investigative journalism, and their own accounts of reporting from the front lines and breaking big stories.Charles M. Sennott fell in love with the craft while helping his brother, who was a photographer for the Boston Herald. Transporting his brother’s film from the Boston Garden to the paper during Celtics’ games, Sennott knew then he “always wanted to be courtside.”Later, when Sennott was an investigative reporter for the Boston Globe, he covered the Big Dig and helped to break the financial and management scandal behind Boston’s massive highway project. Sennott, who also was a foreign correspondent and is now executive editor and vice president of the news website GlobalPost, said he knew he had a break in the Big Dig story when, over drinks with some of the project’s engineers, “One of them let slip, ‘There is no way this is going to work.’ ”Using Halberstam’s words, Sennott said it was the kind of instant “when history catapults you to a moment when journalism matters.”Aggressive, intelligent journalism is still important, but the path there looks vastly different from the one taken by Halberstam, who graduated from a local paper to The New York Times, said Sennott. He argued that GlobalPost’s model, which relies on a cadre of more than 100 freelance journalists working around the world to provide “international news for a digital age,” is the wave of the future for up-and-coming foreign correspondents.“It’s going to be a different path for you,” Sennott told the aspiring writers in the crowd, adding, “You are going to have to be your own brand.”A veteran foreign correspondent who has reported from war-ravaged countries such as Iraq and Afghanistan, panelist Martha Raddatz, now the chief foreign affairs correspondent for ABC News, said the nightly network news still plays a critical role in informing the country. By delivering a daily, comprehensive account of what is happening internationally, minus the endless distractions and “noise” that can be part of the online sphere, network news offers people “what’s important.”Discussing her own career, Raddatz recalled a seminal moment when, as ABC’s chief White House correspondent, she interviewed Vice President Dick Cheney. Telling Cheney in the spring of 2008 that two-thirds of Americans thought the war in Iraq was not worth fighting, Cheney, she recalled, stared back and said, “So?”“I could see his staff in the room just go ‘oh no,’ ” said Raddatz, adding, “A lot of moments passed where he could have said, ‘Let’s go back to that, or let me explain further,’ and he didn’t.”last_img read more

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The Great Xscape at Dell EMC World

first_imgIt’s been one week since we debuted The Great Xscape (Steve McQueen would be proud, I’m sure) at Dell EMC World. Now, perhaps you’re asking yourself “just what is an escape room?” It’s a real-life adventure game where teams of players work together to solve a series of puzzles and accomplish a specific objective. But, if you’ll indulge me, I can make it a bit more real for you. Here’s the Las Vegas story…You’ve just left the CPSD booth, and entered a room humming with LEDs. There is a series of buttons to your right. To your left, a half assembled network patch panel. And was that a server cabinet behind you? You begin to think about quickly leaving Las Vegas when the door closes behind you and your team. You’re trapped. A display springs to life.A woman in a white lab coat briefs you. The app your company just launched is a success beyond anyone’s expectations. Hooray right? Well, sort of. She goes on to inform you that the user demand is so great that your infrastructure is about to crash (which will mean very bad things for you and the company). Fortunately, you have in your possession one prototype VxRail node—all you have to do is deploy it in time.A digital display above the screen begins to tick away… 10:00… 9:59… 9:58… The gauntlet has been thrown down. Will you get out in time???Now as cool as this experience was, the cooler part was the experiential learning that took place inside the room. Successfully completing a puzzle triggered the next video setting off another challenge. Woven throughout the videos was all manner of VxRail goodness. Participants learned how to update the software running on a VxRail Appliance with the click of a button, saw VxRail Manager auto detect a new node when it was cabled up to the network, and experienced how easy it is to scale out additional nodes. A little work, a little play–what can I say? That’s just what happens in Vegas.Over 500 attendees put their wits to the test, puzzling their way through The Great Xscape. We designed the escape room to be challenging, and our partners and customers rose to the occasion. Each day’s fastest team won Dell laptops. And even those teams that ran out of time still left with smiles on their faces (and swag in their pockets). What’s that? You’re feeling a bit of fear and loathing because you didn’t have a go at The Great Xscape? Not to worry–just plan to meet me in Las Vegas in August. We’ll be at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino for VMworld with a slew of exciting product announcements and our escape room in tow. In the meantime, we’re going to huddle up with our team of mad scientists–we have 21 ideas for how to make The Great Xscape even better. Viva Las Vegas.last_img read more

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Melinda Page Hamilton & More Will Join Kevin Bacon in Rear Window

first_imgWe’re keeping an extremely close eye on this show—it has Broadway-bound written all over it. Melinda Page Hamilton, McKinley Belcher III and more will join the previously reported Kevin Bacon in Rear Window. Directed by A Gentleman’s Guide’s Tony winner Darko Tresnjak, the production has been adapted for the stage by Keith Reddin, and will play a limited engagement October 22 through November 15. Opening night is set for October 30 at Hartford Stage.Hamilton will play Mrs. Thorwald and Gloria. Her screen credits include Sleeping Dogs Lie, Devious Maids, Desperate Housewives, Mad Men and Big Love. She appeared on stage in Bell, Book and Candle and Cornelia at The Old Globe. Belcher will take on the role of Sam. His credits include the HBO miniseries Show Me a Hero, the upcoming PBS series Mercy Street, Twelfth Night at Hartford Stage and Romeo and Juliet at Classic Stage Company.The play is based on the same short story—Rear Window by Cornell Woolrich—that inspired the Alfred Hitchcock film. It is the classic tale of a man confined to his apartment who thinks he may have witnessed a murder in a nearby building.Also boarding the cast will be John Bedford Lloyd as Boyne (Tartuffe) and Robert Stanton as Thorwald (A Free Man of Color). Rounding out the company will be Dan Bender, Erik Bloomquist, Ashley Croce, Roy Donnelly, Barbara Gallow, Caitlin Harrity, William Squier and Quinn Warren.Rear Window will feature scenic design by Alexander Dodge, costume design by Linda Cho, lighting design by York Kennedy, sound design by Jane Shaw, projection design by Sean Nieuwenhuis and fight choreography by Steve Rankin. View Commentslast_img read more

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New development director

first_imgRobert K. Cooper will return to the University of Georgia March 14 as senior development officer and assistant to the dean for external affairs in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Office of College Advancement, J. Scott Angle, CAES dean and director, and Brooks McCommons, senior director of the UGA Office of Development, announced today. “Rob is a proven, successful fundraiser in our industry,” Angle said. “In these tight budget times he’s the perfect person to help our college fund new opportunities for our students, our researchers and our extension programs.” Cooper was previously executive director of the National FFA Foundation headquartered in Indianapolis, Ind., where he served as the chief executive of the foundation. He was responsible for overall fundraising strategies, achievement of the foundation’s mission and vision and overall strategic development.Before joining the National FFA Foundation, Cooper was director of development for the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He was responsible for overall management of fundraising ventures and alumni relations.“It’s nice to come back to a place I consider home with fresh ideas and new experiences to apply to an institution I firmly believe in,” Cooper said. “The world-class work of this college is the future of agriculture, and I’m thrilled to have an important role to play in helping them secure that future.” Previously, Cooper was director of development at the University of Maryland College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. He has held titles of executive director of the Maryland 4-H Foundation in College Park, Md., and director of development for the National 4-H Council in Chevy Chase, Md.He earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Delaware in Newark, Del.His wife Linda is a teacher with Oconee County Schools in Watkinsville, Ga.last_img read more

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Central America and Cooperating Countries Review Security Aid to the Region

first_imgBy Dialogo February 02, 2012 Central American technical experts concluded a meeting in Honduras with representatives from other countries and international organizations to define aid programs in the security area for the region. The meeting was organized by Honduras, which is serving as president pro tempore of the Central American Integration System (SICA), and was a follow-up to the meeting held in El Salvador in November. At that meeting, SICA evoked the need for a “regional security strategy” and called on the international community to support Central America with financial and technological resources and training to fight drug trafficking and organized crime. On behalf of the Group of Friends, Spaniard national Ignacio Nicolau declared that they were in Honduras “precisely to define the commitments of each of the contributors and friends of this strategy.” The regional security strategy “will promote the efforts that we Central Americans have been making in the fight against insecurity in a tangible way and in response to the growth of organized crime,” Honduran Foreign Minister Salomé Castellanos said. Drug trafficking is at the root of a large part of the high levels of violence and insecurity experienced by Central America. In 2010, Honduras recorded the world’s highest homicide rate, 82 murders per 100,000 inhabitants, according to the United Nations.last_img read more

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Gov. Bush makes appointments to the JNCs

first_img August 1, 2002 Regular News Gov. Jeb Bush has made most of his appointments to two seats on each state judicial nominating commission based on Florida Bar nominations for those seats. He has also made a direct appointment to each of the nine-member commissions.The Board of Governors in May nominated six people for each of the 26 JNCs, from which Bush was to select two. Under a law passed last year, the Bar nominates three people for four seats on each JNC for gubernatorial appointment. Bush directly appoints the other five members for staggered four-year terms.The governor has the authority to reject the Bar nominees and request a new slate, but for the second year in a row, with appointments made to 22 of the 26 JNCs, Bush accepted the Bar nominees for each commission.Here’s a list of the appointees. The appointments made based on Bar nominations are listed first, followed by the governor’s direct appointment. Where only two are listed, the governor has not yet made his direct appointment. Appointed were:• To the Supreme Court JNC, Arturo Alvarez of Miami Lakes, Joseph P. Milton of Jacksonville, and Manuel “Manny” Kadre of Coral Gables.• To the First DCA JNC, Mellissa F. Allaman and Lawrence E. Sellers, Jr., both of Tallahassee, and Jeanne M. Miller of Jacksonville.• To the Second DCA JNC, Jack P. Brandon of Lake Wales, Christine H. Greider of Naples, and George M. Jirotka of Belleair Shore.• To the Third DCA JNC, Kevin P. O’Connor of Miami Shores, Nancy J. VanSant of Miami, and Hector J. Lombana of Miami.• To the Fourth DCA JNC, Marjorie Gadarian Graham of Hobe Sound, James D.Robinson of Pembroke Pines, and Thomas E. Sliney of Boca Raton.• To the Fifth DCA JNC, Theodore D. Estes of Winter Park, James H. Fallace of Satellite Beach, and C. Richard Newsome of Orlando.• To the First Circuit JNC, Anne M. Patterson and Linda H. Wade, both of Pensacola, and Jacky L. Bytell of Mossy Head.• To the Second Circuit JNC, Warren H. Husband of Tallahassee, Stephanie W. Redfearn of Monticello, and Lynette G. Brown of Tallahassee.• To the Third Circuit JNC, Christina Nieto Johnson of Lake City, David Phelps of Perry, and Joe C. Peavy of Madison.• To the Fourth Circuit JNC, Mary Bland Love and Joel Barry Toomey of Jacksonville, and Michael H. Stokes of Bryceville.• To the Fifth Circuit JNC, Merrie Meredith Kirste of Leesburg, Gary L. Sanders of Ocala, and Thomas S. Hogan, Jr., of Brooksville.• To the Sixth Circuit JNC, Sallie D. Skipper of New Port Richey and George E. Tragos of Clearwater, and Cassandra D. Jackson of St. Petersburg.• To the Seventh Circuit JNC, Lonnie N. Groot of Deltona, William E. Loucks of Ormond Beach, and William J. Voges of Ormond Beach.• To the Eighth Circuit JNC, Kevin David Jurecko, Brian S. Kramer, and Richard A. Parker, all of Gainesville.• To the Ninth Circuit JNC, David L. Holbrook, Dennis R. O’Connor, and Valerie W. Evans, all of Orlando.• To the 10th Circuit JNC, Deborah L. Oates of Bartow, Donald H. Wilson, Jr., of Homeland, and Judy Lee Brown of Sebring.• To the 11th Circuit JNC, Gregory M. Cesarano of Coral Gables, Gerald I. Kornreich of Miami Beach, and Manuel “Manny” Kadre of Coral Gables.• To the 12th Circuit JNC, Gary H. Larsen, Mark R. Zimmerman, and Marsha Nippert, all of Sarasota.• To the 13th Circuit JNC, C. Howard Hunter III, William J. Schifino, Jr., and Barbara N. Wilcox, all of Tampa.• To the 14th Circuit JNC, John L. Fishel II, Jerry W. Gerde, both of Panama City, and Julie A. Sombathy of Lynn Haven.• To the 15th Circuit JNC, Edward Downey of Jupiter, Rafael J. Roca of Palm Beach, and Frank DeMario of Wellington.• To the 16th Circuit JNC, where Bush made five of his direct appointments in addition to the two Bar appointments, David Manz of Marathon, David J. Nozick of Key West, Gerald Abreu, Jr., of Key West, William E. Anderson of Key West, Louis Caputo of Key Largo, Robert B. Shillinger of Key West and Piper Lee Smith of Key West.• To the 17th Circuit JNC, Timothy L. Bailey of Pompano Beach, Walter R. Blake of Coral Springs, and Davis W. “Bill” Duke, Jr., of Ft. Lauderdale.• To the 18th Circuit JNC, Scott L. Knox of Melbourne, Philip F. Nohrr of Indiatlantic, and Dixie N. Sansom of Rockledge.• To the 19th Circuit JNC, David B. Earle of Palm City, Diamond R. Litty of Port St. Lucie, and Nita G. Denton of Stuart.• To the 20th JNC, Darol H.M. Carr of Punta Gorda, George H. Knott of Ft. Myers, and Brett E. Harding of Cape Coral. Gov. Bush makes appointments to the JNCscenter_img Gov. Bush makes appointments to the JNCslast_img read more

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Oil supplied

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General mask use OK where hand-washing, distancing hard: WHO

first_imgRacism row Tedros also lashed out at “racist” suggestions from some scientists that Africa could be used as a testing ground for a vaccine, which is thought to be 12 to 18 months away.Two leading French doctors sparked a storm of criticism last week by discussing on television the idea of testing a coronavirus vaccine in Africa, citing its relative lack of resilience to the pandemic in its infrastructure.They insisted Friday they had been misunderstood and apologized for any offence caused.Africa has confirmed relatively few cases and deaths so far compared to other continents.But the WHO and others have long warned that it could be badly exposed should the virus, both in terms of preparedness and health care.”Africa cannot and will not be a testing ground for any vaccine,” Tedros said.”It was a disgrace, appalling, to hear during the 21st century to hear from scientists…  this kind of racist remarks.”The hang-over from the colonial mentality has to stop. WHO will not allow this to happen.”We will follow all the rules to test any vaccine or therapeutics all over the world using exactly the same rules,” said Tedros, who previously served as minister of health and foreign affairs in Ethiopia. The WHO said Monday that asking the general public to wear facemasks could be justified in areas where hand-washing and physical distancing were difficult, but warned masks alone could not stop the coronavirus pandemic.World Health Organization chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus also slammed suggestions that Africa should be used as a testing ground for a vaccine as racist.The global COVID-19 pandemic has killed more than 70,000 people, while more than 1.2 million people have tested positive for the new coronavirus. A vaccine is thought to be at least a year away. “Countries could consider using masks in communities where other measures such as cleaning hands and physical distancing are harder to achieve because of lack of water or cramped living conditions,” Tedros told a virtual briefing in Geneva.Tedros said he understood that some countries had recommended or were considering the use of both medical and non-medical masks in the general population to prevent the spread of the virus.However, he stressed that the mass use of medical masks could exacerbate the shortage of protective equipment for healthcare workers, saying some were now facing “real danger”.And he said that outside of health facilities, medical masks were recommended for those who were sick, and their carers.center_img Free online concert Meanwhile the WHO teamed up with US superstar Lady Gaga to launch a giant coronavirus awareness concert on April 18 entitled “One World: Together at Home”.The free oTopics :last_img read more

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Triple M’s Lauren Fitch is parting with her childhood home surrounded by wildlife

first_img41 Oppermann Drive, Ormeau.Triple M’s super sales agent Lauren Fitch is sadly waving goodbye to her family home at Ormeau.The glamorous account manager has been commuting from 41 Oppermann Drive to the radio station’s headquarters at North Quay on and off for the past six years. Lauren Fitch“It’s an easy commute and it is worth it, as I love that house,” Ms Fitch said.Her parents, Robyn and Julian, purchased the elevated five-bedroom property at auction around 17 years ago.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North8 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day ago41 Oppermann Drive, Ormeau.“I have moved rooms three times because there’s so many,” Ms Fitch joked.“The view from the deck is amazing, so is the space for all my clothes.”Ms Fitch has relocated a number of times but has always enjoyed returning to her family’s hilltop retreat.“I’ve moved back home three times now,” she laughed. 41 Oppermann Drive, Ormeau.“It’s a bit sad knowing I won’t have that option in the future.”The two-storey sprawling home offers a spectacular 180-degree view over cane fields to North Stradbroke Island.It’s listed for sale with NGU Real Estate’s Drs Paul and Amy Howe.“The construction is of an extraordinarily high standard that you just don’t see these days,” Dr Paul Howe said.“Its location is also a wonderful plus as it’s surrounded by acreage properties, yet access to the M1 and Brisbane’s CBD or Gold Coast beaches is extremely convenient.”The home is described by Dr Howe as a grand Federation home.The property oozes character with its vaulted ceilings in the entrance, gold taps, picture rails, ornate cornices, ceiling rosettes and intrically laid Italian tiles.last_img read more

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