Barclays Bank of Kenya Limited (ABSA.ke) 2018 Abridged Report

first_imgAbsa Bank Kenya Plc (ABSA.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2018 abridged results.For more information about Absa Bank Kenya Plc (ABSA.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Absa Bank Kenya Plc (ABSA.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Absa Bank Kenya Plc (ABSA.ke)  2018 abridged results.Company ProfileAbsa Bank Kenya Plc formerly known as Barclays Bank of Kenya Limited is a leading financial service provider in Kenya offering banking products and services to the consumer and corporate sectors under the categories Personal Banking, Prestige Banking, Premier Banking, Corporate, Treasury and Lie Assurance. The company specialises in offering solutions for specialist investment banking, financing, risk management and advisory services for corporates, financial institutions and government clients. Its personal banking division offers full-service banking; ranging from personal transactional accounts to credit application and wealth and investment management, with electronic and mobile banking support. The financial institution has approximately 120 outlets and 230 ATMs, with its head office in Nairobi, Kenya. Barclays Bank of Kenya is a subsidiary of Barclays Africa Group Limited. Absa Bank Kenya Plc is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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President Dilma Rousseff retains the support of Brazilian Anglicans

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY April 30, 2016 at 1:16 am Although I have not been able to find the text of da Paixão’s comments in Portuguese, I feel certain they were mistranslated here. “Ministro” (or Minister) is used for heads of cabinet offices in Brasil, instead of “Secretary” — and nothing would please the American-inspired right wing evangelicals in Brasil if there were never another woman in government, ever. Recently they described Temer’s wife as the “right kind” of woman to be involved in politics: a beautiful, well-behaved home maker. Thus: Temer is not talking about priests. The word “minister,” referring to cabinet department heads, was surely mistranslated. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (2) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Geoffrey McLarney says: Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 29, 2016 at 2:22 pm “Temer also plans to please evangelicals by disallowing women priests … ”How on earth does the government have any say in the doctrine or discipline of religious bodies? Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments are closed. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC South America Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff has the support of the country’s Anglicans as she faces impeachment proceedingsPhoto: Roberto Stuckert Filho[Anglican Communion News Service] Anglicans in Brazil are continuing to stand-by the country’s embattled president, Dilma Rousseff, claiming that attempts to impeach her are a right-wing attempt to scupper her party’s endeavors to support Brazil’s poor and marginalized.Since coming to power in 2003, Rousseff’s Workers’ Party has overseen huge improvements in the lives of low income and vulnerable communities. But right wing opponents – in alliance with Christian fundamentalists – are seeking to have her impeached.The lower house of Brazil’s Parliament voted to start impeachment proceedings against Rousseff earlier this month over charges that she manipulated government accounts. The upper House will consider the move next month and are expected to suspend  Rousseff while they carry out a trial of the charges, which she denies.There have been large-scale protests throughout the country by supporters and opponents of Rousseff. The Primate of Brazil, the Most Rev. Francisco de Assis da Silva, and the province’s House of Bishops have both issued statements in support of the president.“Essentially, we are witnessing an attempted coup by right wing politicians who represent the interests of Brazil’s wealthy minority and want to put a stop to social welfare for the poor,” the Rev. Joabe Cavalcanti, a former a trade union leader in Brazil who now serves as a trustee for the Anglican Mission agency United Society. “Since the dark days of the continent’s military dictatorships, South America has come a long way. Democracy has been embraced.“Now many people fear that those achievements could be put in peril by the current undemocratic, non-electoral and non-judicial attempts to overthrow Brazil’s elected president.”In an interview with the United Society, da Silva, said that he is continuing to support Rousseff and her party in their efforts to improve the lives of the poor.“What we are seeing is the emergence of a political alliance between Brazil’s wealthy elite and Christian conservatives in an attempt to stop social advances for the poor. These people are opposing legislation that supports women and education for all.“I find it shocking that MPs are using the name of God to justify their attempts to impeach President Rousseff. They are trying to give a religious justification for their attempts to block social welfare initiatives being put forward by the president.”In a statement providing background to the current crisis, the United Society say: “There are accusations of corruption and scandal on both sides of the political divide in Brazil. In essence, the disagreements boil down to a contest between left- and right-wing agendas.“Since her re-election in 2014, President Rousseff’s popularity has plummeted due to an ongoing economic crisis, national corruption scandals, and the fall of many middle-class Brazilians into poverty.“In response, opposition parties are attempting to remove her from power, claiming she should be impeached for using money from state-owned banks to safeguard an anti-poverty program. However, it has been noted that this budget strategy has been used by previous presidents without complaint. Indeed, the same budgetary maneuver was used by Senator Antonio Anastasia, rapporteur of the Upper House Impeachment Committee, when he was governor of Minas Gerais.“Many of the politicians who want to see the president impeached are themselves under investigation for corruption, even for torture and practicing modern slavery. As one example, Federal Deputy André Moura, of the Social Christian Party Sergipe, which voted for the impeachment, is charged with attempted murder.”Commenting on Rousseff’s opponents, the Brasilia-based Anglican blogger Rodrigo Gomes da Paixao, wrote: “They are self-centered members of an elite that doesn’t want the government to pay social welfare. That is the very reason for which they plan to impeach Rousseff – because of her budgetary maneuvers to guarantee the payment of a social benefit to poor families.”Speaking to the United Society, da Paixao added: “It is worth highlighting that the undemocratic ventures we are seeing are only possible because Brazil – unlike Argentina, Chile and Uruguay – has never punished the coup-plotters of the past. While Argentina’s dictator Videla died in jail, João Batista Figueiredo, the last dictator in Brazil, enjoyed a quiet retirement in Rio.”He said that if the impeachment went ahead, and the country adopted the economic agenda of the president’s rival Vice President Michel Temer, ordinary Brazilian workers would lose a huge amount.“The Bolsa Família program, which helped reduce poverty, would be limited to families earning less than a dollar per day,” he said. “Funds for building popular housing would be limited. Workers would have to work until they’re 65 in order to retire (in order to accumulate the required 35 years of social security contributions). Retired people wouldn’t have their pensions automatically adjusted to the annual minimum wage raise. And the minimum wage itself wouldn’t be adjusted by inflation.“Temer also plans to please evangelicals by disallowing women priests and doing away with aspects of racial equality law and human rights, which will certainly affect current programs to tackle institutional sexism, racism and homophobia. By contrast, President Rousseff’s Workers’ Party is seen as the political patron of LGBTs, Indians, blacks and feminists.”Cavalcanti described the achievements of the Workers’ Party since coming to power as “truly monumental,” adding: “It is the largest and most rapid redistribution of wealth and reduction in poverty ever carried out by a democratic country in the history of the world.”Highlighting some of them, he said that the percentage of people below the poverty line has been reduced from 15 per cent in 2003 to 2.8 per cent in 2014; and that the percentage of students from poorest 20 per cent of the population studying at state universities has increased from 1.2 per cent in 2004 to 7.6 per cent by 2014; and that the number of non-white students had increased from 16.7 per cent to 45.5 per cent over the same period.And in what he describes as “one of the largest house-building programs the world had ever seen,” the government have built 3.4 million houses between 2009 and 2014 for poor families who had been living in shanty towns and other substandard accommodation.The United Society has published a prayer for Brazil:Loving God of all,we pray for our sisters and brothers in Brazil at this time of political turmoil.We thank you for those who work for the good of all peoples in that diverse land:those who have brought justice to oppressed lives,those who have brought dignity to the marginalised,those who have brought education, healthcare and hope to many,those who work for a fairer distribution of the country’s resources.Root out self-interest, corruption and oppression, and breathe through your Spirityour kingdom values of justice and worth for all.Through Jesus Christ our Lord,Amen Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Apr 29, 2016 President Dilma Rousseff retains the support of Brazilian Anglicans Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AJ Shelton says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

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Church ‘cannot, will not walk away’ from reconciling role in…

first_img Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 29, 2018 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Church ‘cannot, will not walk away’ from reconciling role in global conflict, Archbishop of Canterbury tells UN Justin Welby calls on Security Council to match its mediation goals with emphasis on reconciliation In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (1) Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Anglican Communion, [Episcopal News Service] Churches are the on the front line of mediation efforts across the world, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby told the United Nations Security Council on Aug. 29, in part because churches often are “the only functioning institutions in a fragile or pre-conflict situation.”He said that churches and other faith communities are “intimately present where there are conflicts; we cannot and will not walk away from them.” He cited the role of Sudanese Anglican Primate and Archbishop Justin Badi Arama in peace efforts in South Sudan.Welby repeatedly stressed that mediation must take place within the context of reconciliation.“Where mediation is about resolving conflict, reconciliation is the process of transforming violent conflict into nonviolent co-existence where communities have come to terms with history and are learning to disagree well,” he said during a briefing that made him the first archbishop of Canterbury to address the Security Council. “Mediation by itself, however skilled, is like using a garden hose to put out a forest fire, when what you need is rain over the whole area to let new life grow and sustain itself.”Reconciliation doesn’t come at the end of conflict, the archbishop said. “It must come out of framework that enables us to sustain peace and avoid conflict cycles from repeating in ever-increasing destructive force.”Welby was the first briefer for the council’s “open debate” on “mediation and its role in conflict prevention.” United Kingdom Ambassador to the U.N. Karen Pierce invited Welby to participate. The debate is one of two big “discretionary events” being organized by the U.K. during its “rolling presidency” of the organization.The archbishop has experience in international mediation and is a member of U.N. Secretary General António Guterres’ High-Level Advisory Board on Mediation. Guterres established the board in September 2017 as part of his call for a “surge in diplomacy for peace.”The United Nations Security Council begins its Aug. 29 debate on mediation and its role in conflict prevention. Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby is the first person seated at the right end of the table. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceAccording to a U.N. background document, the questions for the council to consider during the Aug. 29 session included how it can more effectively support mediation as a means for settling disputes; how it, member states and the U.N. organization can adapt their approach to mediation to take account of the changing nature of conflict and the increase in the number and diversity of mediation actors on the ground; how it can find the most effective approach to building mediation capacity at all levels; and how all three entities more effectively can support and strengthen the meaningful participation of women in mediation and conflict resolution.Welby told the Security Council that he represents a global church “in which the average member is a poor woman living in a conflict or post-conflict setting who has the aspirations of all vulnerable people – above all, a longing for peace.”Guterres wants to strengthen the U.N.’s work in conflict prevention and mediation, and the mediation advisory board is expected to allow the U.N. “to work more effectively with regional organizations, nongovernmental groups and others involved in mediation around the world,” the U.N. said.The secretary general asked in January 2017 (page 4 here) that the Security Council to make greater use of the options laid out in Chapter VI of the Charter of the United Nations on the “pacific settlement of disputes,” including mediation.“War is becoming increasingly complex – and so is mediating peace,” Guterres said Aug. 29 as he opened the debate. “Conflicts around the world drag on for years and decades, holding back development and stunting opportunities. Comprehensive peace agreements are becoming more elusive and short-lived. Political will wanes; international attention drifts.”The secretary general said that the U.N. must invest more in preventing conflicts and that must include “investment in mediation, peacebuilding and sustainable development.” That investment, he said, must be more inclusive of women and of entities beyond “political and military elites.”“That means working at the subnational and local levels to help build peace from the ground up. Local authorities, civil society, traditional and religious leaders all have critical roles to play,” Guterres said.The secretary general issued a report on U.N. activities in support of mediation in June 2017.Mossarat Qadeem, co-founder of PAIMAN Alumni Trust, addresses the United Nations Security Council Aug. 29 on the role of women in the international peace and security. Photo: Evan Schneider/UN PhotoPakistani peace advocate Mossarat Qadeem, who spoke after Welby, echoed the call for including women mediators in the U.N.’s work. “We as women remain largely outside the door,” she said, perhaps because they have skills that others perceive as “soft.” She said women mediators often strategically choose to begin with “soft issues” as a way to move the parties into the harder ones.She rejected the argument that women cannot be mediators in certain places because of cultural expectations about gender roles. It’s not about culture, she said, it’s about power. How much longer, she asked, can the world afford to reject the skills of “those of us who are working for peace on the front lines?”The Security Council last considered mediation and the peaceful resolution of conflicts in an open debate on April 21, 2009. More background about the intent of the Aug. 29 open debate is here.Jack Palmer-White, the Anglican Communion’s representative to the United Nations in Geneva, left, speaks with the Rev. C. K. Robertson, canon to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry for ministry beyond the Episcopal Church, before the Aug. 29 meeting of the United Nations Security Council. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe Anglican Communion has official observer status with the United Nations. Jack Palmer-White is the communion’s representative to the U.N. The Episcopal Church is a U.N. Economic and Social Council accredited nongovernmental organization, or a member of the so-called “civil society” organizations that are engaged in advocacy and activist work.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Stewart David Wigdor says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab August 30, 2018 at 1:14 pm People had many ideas of God’s Love before Jesus came. Then He healed the blind, the lame the physical suffering of individual to many to multitudes…beginning in the very temples people worshipped God. Do we limit Love now that our Lord sacrificed Himself so we can love in Him all the way to Heaven? I believe Love now the mediation between each life and God; can empower us; because of the Church; to overcome all other forces of mankind. Archbishop of Canterbury last_img read more

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Wildernesses Mews / Morris+Company

first_imgManufacturers: Cambridge Architectural Precast, The Rooflight Company, Gem Group, SIGA Slate ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/911599/wildernesses-mews-morris-plus-company Clipboard 2019 “COPY” Wildernesses Mews / Morris+Company Photographs “COPY” Morris+Company ArchDaily United Kingdom Area:  1060 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Environmental Engineer:Max FordhamCost Consultants:GleedsCdm Coordinator:Gleeds, Morris+CompanyApproved Building Control Inspector:NHBCAcoustic Consultant:Max FordhamCad Software Used:MicrostationClient:PegasusLifeArchitect:Morris+CompanyCountry:United KingdomMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Jack HobhouseRecommended ProductsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedMetallicsSculptformClick-on Battens in Ivanhoe ApartmentsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsText description provided by the architects. Morris+Company has recently completed eight contemporary houses for retirement developer PegasusLife on the Wildernesse Estate in Sevenoaks, Kent. The extra-care housing scheme is designed as part of a holistic retirement community alongside the original Grade II listed country estate, which is currently being renovated by Purcell Architects. The project will support a wide range of accommodation and facilities, with eight new mews houses, together with a restaurant pavilion and a later phase of five free-standing villas, all designed by Morris+Company.Save this picture!© Jack HobhouseSave this picture!Ground Floor PlanSave this picture!© Jack HobhouseThe eight mews houses are designed as an ensemble, subservient to the existing Grade II listed mansion. The houses are two- bedroom ranging from 957sq ft to 1687sq ft. Each home also provides a courtyard at the front of the mews to encourage social and communal engagement for the residents.Save this picture!© Jack HobhouseThe mews have been built in accordance with the UK Government’s ‘Housing our Ageing Population Panel for Innovation’ (HAPPI)* principles, offering good light, storage, ventilation, the flexibility of space, private ‘home zones’ and communal spaces. For example, existing pantry rooms and generously proportioned stairwells provide future flexibility to install a domestic lift, helping to future-proof the homes by anticipating how the needs of older residents may change over time.Save this picture!© Jack HobhouseThe façade‘s massing is cleverly broken down through a recurring pattern of brick lattice, Juliet balconies that alternate between the front and rear elevations, and a stepped plan that allows for private outdoor patios that create a strong streetscape, as well as the opportunity for neighbourly engagement. Carefully crafted iroko carpentry, including custom-made benches and storage cupboards to each home’s entrance, complement the material palette and add warmth. Large windows characterise the design and work with the open-plan layout.Save this picture!© Jack HobhouseThe vaulted roofs again reflect the hipped roofs of the original house and inside create dramatic, soaring ceilings on the upper floor, creating an expanded feeling of space on a relatively compact footprint. The houses reference the language of the Estate’s former stable yard, with the brickwork reflecting the Kentish Ragstone of the listed house, and its horizontal banding mirrored in the stone lintels of the contemporary design, cleverly hiding the recessed rainwater pipes. Project gallerySee allShow lessSantos Augusta Building / Isay WeinfeldSelected ProjectsGwang-ju View Folly / Moon HoonSelected Projects Share Year:  Save this picture!© Jack Hobhouse+ 23Curated by Paula Pintos Share Wildernesses Mews / Morris+CompanySave this projectSaveWildernesses Mews / Morris+Company Camlins ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/911599/wildernesses-mews-morris-plus-company Clipboard Lead Architects: Peter Brett Associates CopyHouses•United Kingdom Planning Consultant: Architects: Morris+Company Area Area of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeMorris+CompanyOfficeFollowProductsWoodGlassBrick#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesUnited KingdomPublished on February 18, 2019Cite: “Wildernesses Mews / Morris+Company” 18 Feb 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MSun Control Window Film in MarkthalBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsCabinetsFlorenseCabinet – FloAirWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagStair Railing – CELLON®LightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt GardenBathroom AccessoriesBradley Corporation USAHigh Speed Hand Dryers – Aerix+BoardsForestOneLaminate – EGGER laminatesAcousticSchöckStaircase Insulation – Tronsole®Metal PanelsRHEINZINKPanel Systems – Horizontal PanelWall / Ceiling LightsA-LightAccolade Wall Light at River Dental OfficeBricksStröherClinker Brick Slips – StiltreuMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Contractor: Project Manager: Landscape Consultant: Photographs:  Jack Hobhouse Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Gleeds Shaylor Group Projects Structural Engineer: Tibbalds Planning and Urban Design Houseslast_img read more

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Webb Ivory to launch charity e-commerce portal

Fine Art Developments, which runs the catalogue fundraising division Webb Ivory, is to launch a charity e-commerce portal later this year. Read UK Fundraising’s report. Fine Art Developments, which runs the catalogue fundraising division Webb Ivory, is to launch a charity e-commerce portal later this year. Read UK Fundraising’s report. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Advertisement Webb Ivory to launch charity e-commerce portal Howard Lake | 24 May 1999 | News  22 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

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Oxfam Unwrapped joins TradeDoubler affiliate network

first_img Oxfam is promoting its Oxfam Unwrapped catalogue of ‘alternative gifts’ through the TradeDouble online affiliate network.Oxfam is offering up to 15% commission on sales generated by website owners operating in the TradeDoubler network.Oxfam is also offering a 45-day cookie, enabling merchants to benefit from purchases that they inspired but which did not take place immediately. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Oxfam Unwrapped joins TradeDoubler affiliate network Tagged with: Digitalcenter_img It is running a Christmas and a generic campaign. Howard Lake | 19 December 2005 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Frances Dostal: A revolutionary communist fighter

first_imgFrances Dostal and Ted Dostal in 2000.Frances S. Dostal, a founding member of Workers World Party and who, with her spouse Ted, founded the Cleveland branch of WWP, died in her sleep on Dec. 26 at the age of 85. She leaves behind scores of loving comrades, friends, coworkers and activists in the Cleveland movement.Frances Sherman was born in 1928 in Brooklyn, N.Y., the daughter of Polish Jewish immigrants. Harry Sherman and Tessie Sherman later lost most of their immediate family in Hitler’s concentration camps. Frances and her sister Adele grew up in Brighton Beach, then a Jewish neighborhood.Her parents were both active members of the Communist Party USA. Thus, while Frances attended public school during the day, she attended the CP-run Jewish school following regular school. In the summer, she went to WoChiCa—Workers Children’s Camp. Decades later, she remembered lyrics from a song she sang there: “We’re fighting for the working class against the bourgeoisie.”Frances was struck by the discrepancy between what she was told in public school and the way things were presented in Jewish School. Her mother explained that in public school the capitalist version of reality was foisted upon young minds and you had to “vomit it back up at them.” Frances graduated from high school as class valedictorian.Following high school, Frances attended Brooklyn College, during which time she organized a campus protest against the U.S. war on Korea. This was one of the few anti-war protests during the height of the period of anti-communist offensive known as McCarthyism, named for the reactionary Sen. Joseph McCarthy (R-Wisc.).Frances went on to attend the Yale School of Nursing, after which she worked as a nurse in and around New York City. She made friends with another young Marxist, Artie Rosen, who introduced her to the Socialist Workers Party. The two of them soon realized, however, that they agreed with the minority faction within the SWP and in 1959 they, along with Sam Marcy, Dorothy Ballan, Vince Copeland, Ted Dostal and others, left the SWP to found Workers World Party.In the meantime, she and Ted had fallen in love and in 1959 they were married. Now she was living in Youngstown, Ohio, where Ted worked in the U.S. Steel mill.  To announce their marriage they sent out notices to their friends and family around the country, printed with a union bug and proclaiming that “the union makes us strong.” This proved to be an understatement. The two of them together engaged in innumerable struggles, from building an organization of the unemployed to following and harassing the racist Ku Klux Klan all around Ohio to protesting the U.S. war against Vietnam.One important campaign was in defense of Mae Mallory and Rob Williams, two leaders of the Black liberation movement, who were framed up on bogus kidnapping charges in North Carolina. Williams was organizing self-defense in Monroe’s Black community against KKK attacks; Mallory was a New York supporter of Williams.Under racist police attack, Williams fled to Cuba and Mallory to Cleveland. From nearby Youngstown, Frances and Ted organized support for Mallory. The Monroe Defense Committee fought to prevent her extradition to North Carolina, delaying it long enough for Mae Mallory to survive and eventually beat the charge.In 1967, Ted retired from the steel mill and he and Frances moved to Cleveland. They established the Cleveland WWP branch. Within a year, Ted was arrested at a demonstration against segregationist Alabama Gov. George Wallace. A working-class jury acquitted him of “assault on a police officer.”In 1969, Ted, Mae Mallory and others were arrested and charged with “contempt of court” for demonstrating outside Cuyahoga County Courthouse while Black Nationalist leader Ahmed Evans was on trial. In fact, honoring Mae Mallory’s position that this should be a Black community protest, Ted and Frances were only there as observers. The prosecutor claimed Ted Dostal was leading the demonstration and he spent almost six months in jail. The Cleveland anti-subversive squad testified that they nicknamed Ted “Iron Man” because he never missed a demonstration.Meanwhile, Frances Dostal had organized the nurses at Kaiser Community Health Foundation, where she worked, into a local unit of the Ohio Nurses Association. She was elected president. Her union responsibilities did not, however, keep her away from the revolutionary movement. Frances, along with younger activists, helped form a chapter of WWP’s youth arm, Youth Against War and Fascism. After the Attica Rebellion, Cleveland YAWF brought eyewitness Tom Soto, who had intervened at the invitation of the rebelling prisoners, to Cleveland and formed a Prisoners Solidarity Committee chapter.Whenever there was a national mobilization, Ted and Frances worked to bring people to it. Buses from Cleveland took people to national anti-racist marches in Boston in 1974 and Buffalo in 1981. Later in 1981, they brought Clevelanders to the March on the Pentagon to oppose military intervention in El Salvador, as well as to the All Peoples Congress in Detroit, which was called to oppose Reagan’s cutbacks.In the decades to follow, Frances and Ted maintained their reputation for rarely missing a “demo.” They protested apartheid and the first Gulf War. They demonstrated for Mumia Abu-Jamal and helped free Abdul Haqq, a New York activist falsely charged with murder in 1997. They fought for reproductive rights. From the early days of “Gay Liberation,” the Dostals were among the first straight allies to stand with the LGBTQ movement.Frances Dostal also led a strike of Kaiser nurses, pushing back management’s demands for workers’ concessions.Whenever Workers World Party ran candidates, Ted and Frances were out getting signatures to get them on the ballot. Only after Ted became ill and Frances needed to devote herself to his care was there any letup in the pair’s activism.Ted passed away in 2003 at the age of 96. Frances remained active until this past year, when her health began to decline. She was a fixture at the peace vigils that have taken place every week in Cleveland since before the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. Even after moving into a nursing home, she enjoyed having Workers World read to her and hearing about the current struggles.From her days as a WoChiCa camper up to her last breath, Frances Dostal was a revolutionary communist fighter. Her spirit and smile will be greatly missed.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Macron and cronies repress Yellow Vests, unionists and youth

first_imgHerrera, a Marxist economist, a researcher at the Centre national de la Recherche scientifique (CNRS), who works at the Centre d’Économie de la Sorbonne, Paris and who often contributes guest articles to Workers World, wrote this article for Unsere Zeit, the newspaper of the German Communist Party. WW staff translated it.Week 19: Yellow Vest protesters continue demonstrations in France, March 23March 29 — It was a good day for everyone, both the Yellow Vests and the President of the Republic. March 16 was sunny. Yellow Vests could demonstrate without rain; Macron could decompress and tan. So in the afternoon, while clashes between rioters and police were raging in many cities of the country for the 18th consecutive Saturday over four months during the latest mobilization of Yellow Vests, Mr. Emmanuel Macron, competitive skis on his feet and trendy sunglasses on his nose, was hurtling down the slopes of La Mongie, a chic winter sports resort in the High Pyrénées.A week earlier, on March 9, just after the “Act 17” of Yellow Vests, the Minister of the Interior, Christophe Castaner, was surreptitiously photographed chugging shots of vodka and kissing a young woman (only faintly resembling his wife) in a trendy nightclub in Paris. On Sunday, March 17, in the evening, the bizarre Alexandre Benalla, ex-presidential bodyguard in trouble with the law, who has been placed under judicial control since his release from prison, was seen and filmed, hookah in one hand and glass of champagne in the other, at the side of the sumptuous swimming pool in Nikki Beach, a luxury hotel in Marrakesh, Morocco.Is all this an uncensored scene from an ongoing Hollywood soap opera? No, just the sorry spectacle of the occupants of the state’s highest levels in today’s France.What else? The Alexis Kohler affair. Kohler is a secretary general of the Elysée (Presidential office). An anti-corruption association (Anticorp) has filed several complaints against him for “unlawfully taking sides, trading in influence, passive bribery” and “major conflict of interest” in a case which is still in the courts. It involves the MSC company (the world’s second largest cargo shipper, whose owner is none other than Kohler’s cousin), the shipyards STX and the government, and even the city of Le Havre (where current Prime Minister Édouard Philippe was mayor).Then there is the case of Bernard Mourard, a former special adviser to Emmanuel Macron in charge of fundraising during his election campaign. Mourard is a former banker at Morgan Stanley, president of Altice (the media group of business magnate Patrick Drahi, which owns, in addition of the telecommunications company SFR, a good part of the most influential newspapers and television channels in France). Mourard, today director of Bank of America Merrill Lynch in Paris, was just appointed to oversee the Agency of State Participation in its privatization process of Paris airports.There is the new Police Prefect for Paris (the capital’s top cop), Didier Lallement — reputed to be “muscular” and “ruthless” — who was appointed on March 21. He will replace his predecessor who was fired for “dysfunctions” in the “management” of the excesses during Yellow Vest mobilizations. He will soon be questioned in the framework of an investigation by the National Financial Prosecutor’s Office and the Economic Crimes Brigade on suspicion of favoritism in awarding contracts. This stems from when Lallement chaired the Bid Review Committee for the construction of the Greater Paris Metro — the largest (and most expensive at 37 billion euros or $41.4 billion) construction site in Europe.What more can you say? Except that the Senate, with a rightwing majority, has decided to take on a number of high-profile cases to court (for “false testimony” before a parliamentary committee): Alexandre Benalla’s cases as well as those of his sidekick Vincent Crase, former reserve officer of the Gendarmes accused, like Benalla, of brutality; the cases of three other close associates of President Macron at the Élysée: Alexis Kohler, already mentioned; Patrick Stzoda, cabinet director of the Presidency; and Lionel Lavergne, head of the Presidency’s Security Group. This is only the second time that such a procedure has been initiated under the Fifth Republic.The Secretary of State to the Prime Minister and government spokesman Benjamin Griveaux resigned on March 27.All are, of course, presumed innocent — assuming that one fine day justice should be done.And the protests continueOn March 16, tens of thousands of Yellow Vests were still demonstrating throughout France. Sometimes alongside them, sometimes at the same time, there were additional tens of thousands protesting other issues: trade unionists (CGT in the lead), ecologists from the Mobilization for the Climate (the “Walk of the Century”), college and high school students, members of neighborhood associations, undocumented workers and wheelchair users. Together they represented a “yellow-red-green convergence.”At the Place de l’Etoile in Paris, from 10 a.m. on, clashes occurred with the police. Le Fouquet, an emblematic restaurant on the Champs-Elysée, a symbol of luxury and the headquarters of the Parisian jet set (where Nicolas Sarkozy celebrated his 2007 presidential election victory), was ransacked and burned. The exact origin of the “considerable damage” reported by the management of the establishment is still not determined.And a few dozen meters away, on Franklin Roosevelt Street, a bank branch was burned. Vans of the gendarmerie were attacked; policemen were beaten up. Nearly a hundred stores were vandalized.Some paving stones in the neighborhood were ripped up. A slogan, tagged on a wall, read: “Paving stones are our ballots!” “32,000 protesters” were recorded in France by the police at the end of the day (against 28,000 the previous Saturday), including “10,000 in Paris.” That’s the same as the number announced by the Ministry of Interior a few days earlier at the Paris demonstration supporting Algerians who are demanding the departure of Abdelaziz Bouteflika. Ridiculous! It was enough to be on the street on March 16 to measure the great number of people mobilized.On March 23, for “Act 19,” everything was calmer. And for good reason: The army was in place; the perimeter of the Champs-Elysée and the official buildings (Elysée, Matignon, the government ministries, etc.) was off limits to Yellow Vests. Their march ended this time at the top of Butte-Montmartre.The answer of the Macron government? Always the same: repression. “The immediate dispersal of all gatherings” in places previously prohibited [reflected] “strong decisions”; police brigades were created to repress violent acts, “to go for contact.” From Nov. 17, 2018, to Feb. 12, 2019, there were more than 8,400 arrests and 7,500 people placed in police custody, with 1,796 convictions, including 316 sent to prison. Some residents of the provinces were “banned from appearing in Paris.” Nearly half of the arrested cases were thrown out for lack of charges. That’s a lot. Here and there voices were raised. Certain instructions given to the security forces would have been patently illegal: The public prosecutor (appointed by the President) would push them to carry out provisional detention in order to deter a greater number of Yellow Vests from going to demonstrations. And the order to use flash bang grenades — which cause so many injuries — also came from the top.In the media, the bourgeoisie’s hate-filled rage against rebellious wretches is intensifying. A president of the Republic turning the French army against the French people is not enough. On the right, Éric Ciotti, a member of parliament (MP) from the French Republican Party, demanded greater firmness of the government, including an outright prohibition of the right to demonstrate, plus the restoration of the state of emergency.There you have it: An MP from The Republic on the Move (LARM) — the party of Macron — Claire O’Petit compares “Yellow Vests” to “terrorists.” The background information speaks of “ultra-yellow.” Another MP, Mohamed Laqhila (Modem), demands the dissolution of the departmental union CGT — too much agitating for his taste.Parliamentarians from LARM proposed a bill to remove allowances paid by the state to people who have been arrested. And all those who, like the leaders of the Yellow Vests, call for illegal demonstrations will now fall under Article 40 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and will be accountable to the courts.The “Grand Debate” initiated by President Macron finally ended with 160,000 “citizen contributions” officially listed on the site made available to the public by the government. This represents about a 0.003 contribution for each member of the French population over 18. The important thing, for Macron, was to make believe that we live in a democracy. A democracy in which, on March 23, a 73-year-old peace activist, charged by a policeman and badly wounded on the head, heard, from her hospital bed, Emmanuel Macron say that she should have had “the wisdom to stay home.” The wisdom, sir, would be to change this world of bling-bling and money for your supporters and misery and clubbing for others.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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From the Immigration Movement, for the Left: Election 2020 lessons

first_imgSan Antonio, TexasThese slightly edited remarks were given on a Workers World Party Nov. 12 webinar, “What Now?”The huge voter turnout from the Latinx and the im/migrant rights movement for the 2020 presidential election must be put into the context of developments on immigration since 2006.Teresa Gutierrez. WW PHOTO: Brenda RyanUnder a Democratic administration, a horrific war against immigrants began, one that was intensified by Trump. I am talking about the Latinx and im/migrant movement, but want to make it clear that I do not want to imply that all im/migrants are Latinx.In fact, they are Central and South Asian, African, Haitian, etc. But the bulk of migrants are Latinx because they come from south of the U.S. border, so I’m putting it within that context.Also, the Latinx vote is not a monolithic vote. There’s a Latinx vote, but not a Latinx voter. It is very, very complex. Many Cuban Americans are beholden to anti-communism, and they will vote in a certain way. Puerto Ricans tend to be more progressive and revolutionary and will vote or not vote a certain way and so forth.  So it’s not one vote.But I want to specifically talk about the im/migrant rights movement and what happened with the vote.The reports I’ve heard are that some millions of im/migrant rights advocates and Latinx voted in this election. There was massive organizing, there was a mobilization of three million workers. There were 800,000 calls made by VotoLatino. My phone, my email were really burning up before the election. Every im/migrant rights organization that I’ve ever worked with in New York or Wisconsin or Arizona – everybody was reaching out.Defeat of Trump – ‘buoyed, not duped’We’ve got to understand that the defeat of Trump for the im/migrant rights movement is a step forward. That movement is buoyed by this defeat of Trumpism. They’re buoyed, but they’re not duped. I want to make that clear. This is a sophisticated, experienced movement. As many activists have said, they mobilized not to pick a savior, but to pick a target. We talk of a class war, do we not? And in a war, you’ve got to assess the strength of your soldiers, of your class. We’re in a class war – and in a war, you need a reprieve, you need a respite, you need a break, you need to breathe. The im/migrant rights movement, in particular — because of Trump and because a Democrat like Obama deported more than any other U.S. president ever in history – they needed a reprieve. They needed to get the boot of Trump off their neck, and they were able to do this. This is a very complex and wonderful development that we can be hopeful about, because even though it is within the context of a bourgeois election, this sector of the working class was not passive, but active. And because they’re not duped by the Democratic Party, we can be hopeful. Fight for concessions nowThis is a moment to fight for concessions.  This is a moment when the oppressed and the working class can make gains and win concessions.  For example, here in San Antonio there is a housing project with a long history of struggle and a symbol for the community. At the end of December, it stands to face many evictions when the moratorium ends. Many of the supporters are connected to organizations that mobilized for Biden. They should count on his administration to give some concessions because it will be an embarrassment for Biden to be inaugurated with all the evictions, with all the deaths from COVID.So we’ve got to push hard to get some concessions from this government. I’m very excited  by the struggle that’s going on within the Democratic Party because for once it’s out in the open. And we have to credit women of color for bringing that struggle out into the open. AOC –- Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez –- said that she may not run again because the Democrats are blaming the “Defund the Police” slogan as a reason why some of them did not win. The women of color are calling [the Democrats] out on this publicly. I’ve been getting on some calls with the National Nurses United, the nurses’ union, a fighting organization. A Black Lives Matter activist from Missouri, Cori Bush, was on one of these calls – she had been on the ground during the Mike Brown struggle and rebellion. She’s a nurse – and this sister just got elected to Congress! And she is now part of the “Squad.” But we are not naive about the role of the Democratic Party. We know that they will try to put a brake on the struggle. We know that with the next police murder, they’re going to say “Chill.” We know that they can go to war at any time. We know that they’re going to go against the Venezuelan revolutionary government. We know they’re not going to find housing for the victims of the hurricanes, and so forth and so on. We have an opportunity to push like hell right now and win some concessions from the ruling class, because capitalism is at a dead end. And it can go either fascist, or it could go to where they have to give us some more concessions. We’ve got to organize that!  Abolish ICEAs for freeing the thousands of people who are still in ICE detention, I think that’s why this im/migrant rights movement was so active in this period. They felt like Trump, who wants to be a fascist and openly represents a fascist movement, was like a dog whistle to the right wing, an armed right wing. Now I think that the im/migrant rights movement is very much going to challenge the Biden administration and the Democratic Party about ICE detention. They’re going to mobilize, they’re going to expect some victories. Many DACA children (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) are adults now, fighting to keep their families together in the U.S. One such Dreamer, so-called after a Congressional act meant to protect them from deportation, demonstrates in Washington, D.C., in 2018.Already Biden has supposedly agreed publicly that he will stop building “the wall.” I don’t think that’s a major victory myself – Trump wasn’t even able to build the wall that he talked about. But Biden has said that the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) youth will get full relief. He has said that he will look for a path for citizenship and amnesty for the undocumented. We’ll see where that goes. Deep organizingThe main point I want to make about the im/migrant rights movement is how we have to really deepen our organizing, as Marcello was saying earlier, among the working class. This is what has saved the im/migrant rights movement. This is what has resulted in fewer deaths and deportations. We have so much to learn, not just from the Black Lives Matter movement, but from the im/migrant rights movement as well. The day-to-day work of organizing means building a base, winning the trust and understanding of the masses, and for the movement of immigrants rights it has meant moving as a bloc.This is the kind of deep organizing that we have to do if we’re going to influence any of those 70 million that voted for Trump. And if we’re going to win back people from the Democratic Party, we’ve got to get on the ground. And we’ve got to sustain. The elections determine who governs, not who rules. It’s still the Wall Streeters and the Bill Gates types, they’re the ones who are really ruling, right? So how are we going to get to rule? How are we going to defund the police or abolish ICE? How are we going to get there? We’re only going to get there if we do the deep organizing that especially the young comrades are talking about. I really feel like that’s the task of revolutionaries. The lessons from the im/migrant rights movement are to deepen ourselves among the working class, to elevate consciousness, to win the victories of defunding the police, but also get to the point where we abolish ICE and abolish the police altogether. We have to do that. And that means abolishing capitalism, because as long as capitalism exists, the threat of fascism is real. That’s why the victory of defeating Trump was so important. Because it was a pushing back of white supremacy, and an element in this country that would very much welcome fascism. To push it back at this moment, that’s no small thing.This is the moment for the workers and the oppressed to win things. And do deep organizing. This is the lesson of the im/migrant rights movement for us right now. 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Impunity triumphs in Iranian justice

first_img News News June 9, 2021 Find out more March 18, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Iran IranMiddle East – North Africa News Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists to go further November 23, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Impunity triumphs in Iranian justice February 25, 2021 Find out more Six years after a wave of murders of intellectuals and journalists in Iran, the Kazemi, Forouhar, Charif, Mokhtari, Pouyandeh and Davani families, and other families like them, still wait to know the truth about what happened to their loved ones, while the instigators and perpetrators of these killings celebrate six long years of almost total impunity that shows no sign of stopping given the frequent displays of judicial complicity and hypocrisy in these cases, Reporters Without Borders said today. Six years after a wave of murders of intellectuals and journalists in Iran, the Kazemi, Forouhar, Charif, Mokhtari, Pouyandeh and Davani families, and other families like them, still wait to know the truth about what happened to their loved ones, while the instigators and perpetrators of these killings celebrate six long years of almost total impunity that shows no sign of stopping given the frequent displays of judicial complicity and hypocrisy in these cases, Reporters Without Borders said today.”The ban on any demonstration by the families of the victims to mark the sixth anniversary of these killings is a reflection of the obstructiveness and bad faith of the Iranian justice system, which is controlled by the conservatives in power,” the organisation said.Referring to the July 2003 murder of Zahra Kazemi, a Canadian photojournalist of Iranian origin, Reporters Without Borders said: “In this case, the Iranian justice system gave yet another demonstration of denials of justice, manipulation and lies that guarantee lasting impunity for the instigators, especially when they hold high government positions.”One of the most outrageous examples of this impunity was undoubtedly the decision of Ayatollah Shahroudi, the judiciary’s supreme chief, to appoint former intelligence minister Ghorbanali Dorri-Najafabadi as state prosecutor in June of this year. Dorri-Najafabadi was alleged to have been directly involved in the serial killings but was never prosecuted.Akbar Ganji, one of the few journalists to investigate these killings, has been imprisoned in Evin prison north of Tehran since 22 April 2000. He wrote several articles about these cases in the newspaper Sobh-é-Emrouz implicating religious affairs court prosecutor Mohseni Egeie and several political leaders including Ali Fallahian and Hashemi Rafsandjani, a possible successor to Mohammad Khatami as president.As for the lawyer of the victims’ families, Nasser Zarafshan, he was arrested on 7 August 2002 and is still detained. A military court found him guilty in March 2004 of “divulging case information” and sentenced him to five years in prison.The wave of killings of intellectuals and government opponents took place in November and December 1998. The victims included liberal opposition figureheads Darioush and Parvaneh Forouhar, Iran-é-Farda editorialist Majid Charif and writer-journalists Mohamad Makhtari and Mohamad Jafar Pouyandeh.These deaths had been preceded by a few months by the disappearance of Pirouz Davani, the editor of the magazine Pirouz (“Victory” in Farsi). His body was never found. All these cases were extensively covered by many pro-democracy news media.The intelligence ministry officially recognized in January 1999 that some of its agents were involved and announced dozens of arrests. Fifteen intelligence ministry agents were convicted in January 2001 for the murder of the Forouhars. Three were sentenced to death. The other 12 received prison sentences. Three other suspects were acquitted. The supreme court upheld the verdict but only two persons were sentenced to 15 years in prison. The authorities never tried to establish the circumstances Davani’s disappearance and there was never any investigation into Charif’s death.None of the instigators of the 1998 murders have ever been questioned or detained. The victims’ families, who are supported by Reporters Without Borders, have filed complaints before international judicial bodies.There have been no limits to the judiciary’s duplicity and hypocrisy in the Kazemi case. Arrested on 23 June 2003 while photographing the families of detainees outside Evin prison, Kazemi died in custody, probably on 10 July 2003. After trying to conceal the causes of her death for nearly a week, the Iranian authorities finally recognised that she was beaten to death.Following an Iranian parliamentary enquiry and under heavy pressure from Canada and the international community in general, the judicial authorities named an intelligence agent who had been one of Kazemi’s interrogators as the person responsible for her death. He was charged and then acquitted in a sham trial on 24 July 2004.Lawyers acting for the victim’s family requested that Mohammad Bakshi, an Evin prison agent working for Tehran prosecutor Said Mortazavi, and five other senior judicial officials present during Kazemi’s interrogation, should appear at the trial. But the Tehran court refused and concluded the trial in two days. Yet various Iranian commissions of enquiry had implicated these officials.A few days after this parody of justice, the Iranian judicial authorities revised the findings of the investigation and announced that Kazemi’s death was “accidental.” Organisation RSF_en Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists IranMiddle East – North Africa Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020last_img read more

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