England v Italy Preview – with teams and stat attack

first_imgBy Rugby World editor Paul MorganVenue: Twickenham Stadium Date: Saturday, 12 February Kick-off: 2.30pm GMTCoverage: Watch live on BBC One, HD channel, Red Button and BBC Sport website from 1400; listen on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra; live text online and on mobilesEngland take the unusual step of naming an unchanged side, a luxury that Martin Johnson has rarely been presented with since taking over in the summer of 2008.  His only option after the 26-19 win over Wales was to bring the squad’s “fetcher” Hendre Fourie back after he recovered from a calf injury, but he has decided to stick with the power play of James Haskell at openside flanker, instead preferring to introduce Fourie after the 50-minute mark when turnovers can be more precious, the opposition forwards will be getting more tired, and his interventions may create more gaps than in the first 20 minutes. Especially in the first half England’s attacking game plan is built around their power runners like Haskell and Mike Tindall.The Twickenham crowd will demand more than just a 6-3 win but for Johnson it is two points that are crucial. “A win is always number one. That is the healthiest mindset. If you start thinking of unrealistic expectations you will be in trouble,” Johnson told me at the team’s Bagshot headquarters on Thursday. “Our number one priority is to win. Number two is we don’t have any serious injuries and number three is that it is an exciting Test match. If you go in with that attitude to any game you are in the right place. If you start thinking what it looks like, then you are in trouble.“We are here to win Test matches, make no bones about it. We have exciting players all over the field who can score and create damage and we want to use them – but to do that you have to win the battle.”Italy will play a restricted game plan as they have at Twickenham over the last decade but at least the new law interpretations will restric their opportunities to fire the ball high in the air time and time again, whcih will be a relief to the 80,000 heading to south-west London on Saturday. Attack coach Brian Smith said England would try not to get involved in a game of “aerial ping pong” but Italy would like nothing more than to spoil England’s party, hang in their until the 60-minute mark and see if Micro Bergasmasco can kick them home.I make England 15-point favourites and expect them to turn the screw after half-time if they approach the game with the right mindset. But let us have your predictions. What do you think will happen at Twickers?Johnson added: “The biggest fundamental of all these matches are that we have to have more energy, more enthusiasm, more speed around the field than these guys. We have to create that buzz. We have to bring the juice whatever game we play and I think the players understand that.”Nick Mallett’s biggest decision was to change his outside-half, Kris Burton dropping to the bench with Luciano Orquera replacing him. “Orquera should also have started against Ireland but he was coming back from an injury in November and it was he himself who said he didn’t feel quite ready, so now the coach is giving him his chance,”  said Italy team manager Luigi Troiani.Ladbrokes are giving England a 21-point start. Match Details:Referee: Craig Joubert (South Africa)Assistant Referees: Peter Fitzgibbon ENGLAND (Ireland) & Peter Allen (Scotland)TMO: Tony Redmond (Ireland)England: Ben Foden (Northampton); Chris Ashton (Northampton), Mike Tindall (Gloucester, capt), Shontayne Hape (Bath), Mark Cueto (Sale); Toby Flood (Leicester), Ben Youngs (Leicester); Alex Corbieseiro (London Irish), Dylan Hartley (Northampton), Dan Cole (Leicester); Louis Deacon (Leicester), Tom Palmer (Stade Francais); Tom Wood (Northampton), James Haskell (Stade Francais), Nick Easter (Harlequins).Replacements: Matt Banahan (Bath), Jonny Wilkinson (Toulon); Danny Care (Harlequins); Dave Wilson (Bath); Steve Thompson (Leeds); Simon Shaw (Wasps); Hendre Fourie (Leeds)Italy: Luke McLean; Andrea Masi, Gonzalo Canale, Alberto Sgarbi, Mirco Bergamasco; Luciano Orquera, Pablo Canavosio; Salvatore Perugini, Leonardo Ghiraldini, Martin Castrogiovanni, Carlo Del Fava, Quintin Geldenhuys, Valerio Bernabo, Alessandro Zanni, Sergio Parisse (capt).Replacements: Fabio Ongaro, Andrea Lo Cicero, Santiago Dellape, Robert Barbieri, Fabio Semenzato, Kris Burton, Gonzalo Garcia.* England changes from last weekend: England make one change to their 22 from the squad that won in Cardiff in the 2011 RBS Six Nations opener. The starting XV remains the same, but back row substitute Hendre Fourie returns following a calf injury, to replace the experienced Joe Worsley. Mike Tindall continues as captain* England fascinating fact: Andrew Sheridan is in his eighth season as prop after switching from flanker, and before that second row* England injuries: Lewis Moody (knee ligaments), Courtney Lawes (knee ligaments), Tom Croft (shoulder)* Italy changes from last weekend: Italy make four changes from the side that narrowly lost to Ireland last weekend at Rome, for the visit to Twickenham to play England. Two of the changes are injury enforced, with scrum-half Edoardo Gori and flanker Josh Sole being replaced by Pablo Canavosio and Valerio Bernabo respectively. The other two changes are switches between the bench and starting XV’s from the Ireland game ‐ fly half Kris Burton drops to the bench, with Luciano Orquera promoted, and Carlo del Fava coming in for Santiago Dellape at lock. Captain Sergio Parisse has recovered from a finger injury. Scrum-half Fabio Semenzato could win his first cap from the bench. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img * Italy fascinating fact: Mirco Bergamasco has scored 110pts from kicks in his last 12 Tests.* Italy injuries: Mauro Bergamasco (shoulder injury since November), Craig Gower (knee), Paul Derbyshire, Edoardo Gori (dislocated shoulder in 9th minute v Ireland), Josh Sole (ankle injury v Ireland), Manoa Vosowailast_img read more

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Aviva Premiership One to Watch: James O’Connor

first_imgWhat’s O’Connor got to say about it?“I have never tried to hurt anyone or done anything illegal but there have been errors in judgement on my call. There’s been a lot of soul-searching and trying to find out what the next move is. There’s a lot of people hoping to see me succeed and a lot wanting me to fail.In the spotlight: O’Connor talks to the media with Brian Smith (left) at the London Irish training ground this week“Given that I’ve left my support network back in Australia, London Irish offered me an environment that I felt comfortable with.“The club is renowned as a welcoming, family club throughout the world, it has a highly regarded Australian director of rugby in Brian Smith and plays a style of rugby that appeals to me.“In England and Wales they play a very high-pressured, territory based game. I thoroughly believe I can improve elements of my game by playing in the Aviva Premiership. I want to develop into a world-class 15.“It’s an awesome opportunity. To have Northampton in my first game with the boys – they are doing pretty well and gave Saracens a walloping at the weekend so it’s a great first match to have and one I’m looking forward to.”Will he be whooping or weeping this weekend? Into Exile: Having lost his Wallaby contract, James O’Connor is trying to rebuild his career and reputation with IrishBy Katie FieldWho is the man of the moment?James O’Connor, the 23-year-old Australian utility back who joined London Irish this week and will make his debut for his new club against Northampton Saints at the Madejski Stadium on Sunday, 3 November (kick-off 2pm).Why is he in the spotlight?O’Connor has packed a whole career’s worth of headlines into five years – some good and some bad. He became the second youngest Wallaby of all time when he won his first Australia cap at the age of 18 in November 2008 and he has scored 223 points in 44 Tests, including 14 tries. He has power, speed, flair, vision – in short he is the ultimate rugby talent and a proven match-winner at Super Rugby and Test level.Golden boy: O’Connor, in Australian colours, takes on Justin Tipuric of the Lions in the third Test last summerHowever, this sensational player, who can turn out at full-back, wing or fly-half, has incurred the wrath of the Australian authorities. He was suspended for a match in 2011 for failing to attend the World Cup squad announcement, he was reprimanded for being seen in a burger bar in the early hours of the morning during the week of the second Test against the British and Irish Lions last summer and a few weeks later he was escorted out of Perth Airport for being drunk the morning after Australia’s win over Argentina in the Rugby Championship.After that, Wallabies coach Ewan McKenzie and the Australian rugby bosses cut him from the squad for failing to “uphold the behavioural and cultural standards expected within the team”, leaving O’Connor with some big decisions to make about how to rebuild his career. He considered joining clubs in Japan and France or returning to Western Force, but opted to sign for London Irish until the end of this season. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS SUNBURY, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 29: James O’Connor speaks during a press conference to announce his signing for London Irish rugby club on October 29, 2013 in Sunbury, England. (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images) If last weekend’s astounding 41-20 trouncing of Saracens is anything to go by, Northampton will be too hot for London Irish to handle. However, the Irish have home advantage and even though they are without England wing Marland Yarde, they will be buoyed by the appearance of O’Connor among their ranks. The hosts will play some good rugby, but Northampton will win.Watch O’Connor and London Irish take on Northampton at the Madejski Stadium on Sunday, 3 November, kick-off 2pm.last_img read more

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November Tests: SuperBru predictions

first_imgWales v South AfricaOur prediction: You want to say Wales will dazzle with their backs and match Bok firepower up front, but it is hard to image the raw physicality of South Africa not hurting Wales. It should be close, but South Africa are used to sustained brutality. South Africa by 8Ireland v SamoaOur prediction: Samoa could climb to the dizzying height of fifth in the IRB world rankings should they triumph in this Test, but Ireland have a new age coming – even if there is a well-worn centre pairing of D’Arcy and O’Driscoll still there – and they have some young men with careers to forge coming in. And let’s not forget about Joe Schmidt’s ability to script breathtaking attacking plays. Ireland by 12 Will Australia hurt again?: Adam Ashley-Cooper suffers against England. The Wallabies could be stung by ItalyWITH RUGBY kicking into a different gear this weekend, with the first proper, extensive round of international action kicking off, there are several Tests worth getting excited about.How will they pan out, though? We offer up our predictions below, but if you see yourself as a bit of a guru when it comes to guessing win margins then enter our exclusive November Tests SuperBru pool and have a bash. You could win a year’s subscription to the magazine…Italy v AustraliaOur prediction: We’ve gone for it straight from the off. Australia looked deserted of attacking ideas against England and only profited from lax tackling to score. Italy are due another big scalp and they are at home. Italy by 2England v ArgentinaOur prediction: The Pumas have a lot of injuries and absentees, they have a new head coach and England have that winning feeling, despite never truly impressing against the Wallabies. They could fall into more of a rhythm at Twickenham this weekend, even if they face up a Puma scrum with an entirely new front-row. England by 16Scotland v JapanOur prediction: Japan gave a good account of themselves against the All Blacks without ever really getting too close. However, a trip to Europe is a different prospect and some in Scotland expect this side to build real momentum. And with rumours that soon-to-be head coach Vern Cotter has been making his presence felt at Murrayfield, the players may have a point to prove. Scotland by 16 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img France v New ZealandOur prediction: New Zealand are the best team on the planet. The French have spooked them in the past, but they have become somewhat of a conservative husk of the old France over the last year or so. The All Blacks spanked them during a French tour of the island in the summer. New Zealand by 15last_img read more

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Top signings in the Guinness Pro12

first_img With the start of the Guinness Pro12 now less than a month away and all teams well into their pre-season preparations, we take a look at eight of the biggest off-season signings in the competition and how they can impact their respective teams over the coming season.The likes of Jonathan Davies, Robbie Henshaw, Bradley Davies and Kieron Fonotia all narrowly miss out and although the league hasn’t quite been able to attract the plethora of stars that the Aviva Premiership or Top 14 has, it certainly shows that plenty of very talented rugby players are still choosing to make their way to the competition.Charles Piutau, UlsterNot too much explanation needed here. The All Black full-back was in excellent form for Wasps last season and was one of the larger contributing factors in their march to the semi-finals of both the Premiership and Champions Cup. In addition to his obvious class, Piutau will also give Ulster greater flexibility in their back-line, capable of lining up across the back three or at outside centre. He should combine well with Jared Payne, the man he replaced in the Blues team following Payne’s move north in 2011, and will bring incision and the ability to keep plays alive to the province’s backfield.Marcell Coetzee, UlsterHaving already recruited Piutau, Ulster’s luring of Coetzee to Belfast should go down as one of the best one-two punch pieces of rugby business in recent years. Unfortunately, a serious knee injury will delay the South African’s Ulster debut but once he returns to full fitness, a date which looks likely to be early in the new year, he will add plenty of workrate, breakdown expertise and physical edge to the Ulster back row. He brings test-calibre attributes to the unit and that has been something the men from Northern Ireland have been missing of late.Close contact: Marcell Coetzee in Bok actionJohnny McNicholl, ScarletsMuch of the attention in West Wales may be on the return of prodigal son Jonathan Davies but in McNicholl the Scarlets have added a winger whose play over the last five months has been as good as any wing in the world. Although his consistency has been at times questioned during his stint with the Crusaders, his pace, power and support running have always been beyond reproach. Alongside dynamic full-back Liam Williams and playing in the Scarlets’ ambitious system, McNicholl is a more than solid bet to trouble the PRO12 top try scorers’ table this season, even with his arrival delayed by domestic duties in New Zealand.Willis Halaholo, Cardiff Blues By Alex Shaw Slippy customer: Charles Piutau escapes Bath last season LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The balance of power in Italy seems to see-saw on an almost yearly basis but luring Odiete over from Zebre has to be seen as a real coup for Treviso. The young full-back/wing impressed in his debut campaign for the Azzurri last season and looked like one of the most threatening Italian backs of the last ten years. His counter-attacking ability will be invaluable for a club that is likely to find itself on the back-foot for much of the season and his form will of no doubt be of considerable interest to new Italy boss Conor O’Shea.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out how to download the digital edition here. Another Kiwi to have had a stellar season, Halaholo has filled the Ma’a Nonu and Conrad Smith-shaped voids in the Hurricanes midfield with aplomb over the last few months. His lines and powerful carrying have split many a Super Rugby defence asunder this season and he will be hoping to replicate that form this weekend in the tournament final. As good a player as Halaholo is, he is not enough to singlehandedly put the Blues back into contention at the right end of the Pro12, but he is certainly a significant step in the right direction for the region.Free and easy: Willis Halaholo on the runJamison Gibson-Park, LeinsterHalaholo’s Hurricanes team-mate Gibson-Park is also moving north this summer, linking up with Leinster, where he will attempt to replace the retiring Eoin Reddan and the departing Isaac Boss. The scrum-half has been largely limited to bench appearances during the 2016 Super Rugby season but with TJ Perenara entrenched ahead of him, that is not an indicator of any lack of ability on Gibson-Park’s part. His void of International caps make him appealing to the Ireland Rugby Football Union, whilst his Super Rugby experience will endear him to Leinster, who only have one other senior scrum-half on their books, Luke McGrath.Leonardo Sarto, Glasgow WarriorsGlasgow have replaced the hammer of Taqele Naiyaravoro with the rapier of Sarto. Since making his Azzurri debut in 2013, Sarto has been one of the more consistent players in Italian rugby, despite playing in international and club (Zebre) teams that have struggled overall. A move to Glasgow should see him given more front-foot ball and the opportunity to play with players of a higher calibre and that could be the making of Sarto. Mark Bennett’s star continues to rise and defenders are becoming more and more drawn to him, potentially creating plenty of space for the Italian to operate in out wide.The playmaker: Marnitz Boshoff conducts play for the LionsMarnitz Boshoff, ConnachtAJ MacGinty, star of the USA’s Rugby World Cup campaign, had a profound impact in Connacht last season, helping them to a maiden Pro12 title with his control and playmaking in the ten jersey. He has since departed for Sale Sharks and that same responsibility will now fall on Boshoff’s shoulders. The South African soared to prominence with a stellar campaign in the 2014 Super Rugby season, shining for the Lions in their return to the competition, but he has since been usurped by Elton Jantjies in the pecking order. Pat Lam will be hopeful he can unearth the 2014 Boshoff and if the South African can replicate the kind of control he exhibited that season, Connacht’s fortunes in the Champions Cup could look relatively favourable this season.David Odiete, Benetton Trevisolast_img read more

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The 100 Best Players In The World: 100-91

first_img Expand The 100 Best Players In The World: 60-51 Just Made It: We start our list with those making the 100-91 slots in our list (Getty Images) Expand Expand Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Take a look at who has made it… The 100 Best Players In The World: 90-81 Beauden Barrett narrowly misses out on top spot… Our next section of the 100 best players… The 100 Best Players In The World: 70-61 The 100 Best Players In The World: 80-71 Expand The 100 Best Players In The World: 10-4 Our next section of the 100 best players… Expand Expand Expand The 100 Best Players In The World: 50-41 Our next section of the 100 best players… Expand The 100 Best Players In The World: 40-31 Our next section of the 100 best players… Our bronze medallist in the list of the… The 100 Best Players In The World: 40-31 The 100 Best Players In The World: 20-11 Welsh talisman Alun Wyn Jones takes the top… The 100 Best Players In The World: 30-21 Our next section of the 100 best players… The 100 Best Players In The World: 2 Beauden Barrett The 100 Best Players In The World: 30-21 The 100 Best Players In The World: 90-81 Expand The 100 Best Players In The World: 1 Alun Wyn Jones The 100 Best Players In The World: 20-11 Collapse 96 Cobus ReinachTop Scorer: Reinach was joint highest try-scorer in the Premiership this season (Getty Images)Age 29 (7.2.90) Position Scrum-halfKing of the interception, he finished the Premiership’s regular season joint-top of the try chart with 12. “The way we defend gives me a lot of time at the back of the lineout to go for it,” says the Saints No 9. Once he’s picked off a pass, don’t bother chasing – he is lightning. Three Test starts is scant reward for his talent.95 Félix LambeyModern Times: Lambey may not be huge, but he has skills on other departments (Getty Images)Age 25 (15.3.94) Position LockYou get the feeling Lambey could get the Dalai Lama to snap. The Lyon lock insinuates himself in physical confrontations, perhaps because so much attention in France falls on the fact he is not enormous. What he does also possess, though, are some sublime hands. A very modern lock.94 Claire MolloyJack of All Trades: Openside Molloy can do it all (Getty Images)Age 30 (22.6.88) Position Back-rowThe only player from the Ireland XV that beat NZ at the 2014 Women’s World Cup who was a regular Six Nations starter in 2019. Yet the Wasps openside’s longevity isn’t her greatest strength; she’s the best in the game at getting over the ball, a tough defender and brilliant link player. On top of her rugby commitments, she has a high-pressure job as a doctor.93 Alivereti RakaWatch Out: Still to make his France debut, he could make some noise at the Rugby World Cup (Getty Images)Age 24 (9.12.94) Position WingInjuries and politics have so far prevented the Fijian making his France debut, but he’s expected to make a big impact at Japan 2019 now he has both French citizenship and a passport. Clermont Auvergne’s Challenge Cup-winning campaign illustrates how dangerous he is out wide. He beat more defenders than anyone else – 34 in just five matches. That’s nearly seven opponents a match flummoxed by the winger. He also averaged two breaks and 100 metres a game.Don’t just rely on stats, though. Ben Ryan described Raka as “box office” in Rugby World earlier this year before analysing his skill-set in detail.“His MO is to clutch the ball in his left hand, ready to offload, which frees up his piston-like right arm for the ‘see you later’ fend,” says Ryan. “The third strand to his attacking game is his 1970s hip swerve. This, combined with his fend and balance, will get him past even the most able of defences. He’s more than a hard man to stop; he’s a pinballing force of nature.”92 Stuart McInallyColossal Captain: McInally is the beating heart of Scotland’s side (Getty Images)Age 28 (9 August 1990) Position HookerWhen Scotland were in the deepest, darkest hole of their lives half an hour into the Calcutta Cup at Twickenham in March, they needed some kind of miracle to arrest their pitiful descent into humiliation. Trailing 31-0, somebody needed to step up. McInally did precisely that. His try, from 65m out, gave Scotland belief that a comeback was possible. That chargedown encapsulated him. The awareness to read Owen Farrell’s intentions, the skill to pick up the ball, the pace and determination to outrun the retreating Farrell and Jonny May.McInally has a huge heart and a huge engine. He’s a hooker who probably doesn’t get talked about as much as he should outside Scotland, but ask anybody who has played with him or coached him and you hear about his leadership, his relentless setting of standards, his work-rate, his durability. His season petered out a little with Edinburgh. He deserved better. Forced to withdraw from Scotland’s World Cup squad on the eve of the tournament four years ago, he’s longing to get to Japan. He may yet go there as captain.91 Agustin CreevyCenturion: Creevy is set to become the first Puma with 100 caps (Getty Images)Age 34 (15.3.85) Position Hooker Our next section of the 100 best players… The 100 Best Players In The World: 80-71 The 100 Best Players In The World: 70-61 The 100 Best Players In The World: 2 Beauden Barrett Our next section of the 100 best players… Many expected Creevy to move to Europe to finish his distinguished career after RWC 2019, but he has re-signed for two more years with the UAR. A powerful set-piece colossus with a penchant for jackling, the former Pumas captain is still a huge asset to the Jaguares and Argentina. He’s set to become the first Puma to play 100 Tests. The 100 Best Players In The World: 3 Mako Vunipola The 100 Best Players In The World: 60-51 The 100 Best Players In The World: 3 Mako Vunipola We kick off our list of the 100 best players going from 100 to 91. Take a look at who makes the cut. The 100 Best Players In The World: 10-4 The 100 Best Players In The World: 50-41 The 100 Best Players In The World: 100-91Welcome to Rugby World’s definitive list of the 100 best players in the world right now.Eighteen months have passed since Rugby World last compiled the ultimate list of the 100 best players in the world right now. It’s no easy task to put together, so as well as seeking the opinions of our writers from across the globe, we brought together a panel to debate who should make the cut.Fiji’s gold medal-winning sevens coach Ben Ryan, Wasps Ladies director of rugby Giselle Mather, Welsh broadcaster Ross Harries and Kiwi writer Liam Napier joined us for the selection meeting after the European finals – and more than 200 names were thrown into the mix!Cutting those down to 100 meant making tough decisions. Players’ recent form has been given precedence over previous achievements – Johnny Sexton is lower down the pecking order as it hasn’t quite clicked for him in 2019 – and we haven’t included those who’ve struggled with injury over the past year, the likes of Taulupe Faletau and David Pocock, as there is no form to judge them on.Comparing players across competitions, positions and genders is difficult, so we looked at players’ influence in their teams as well as their skill-sets. You can see a breakdown of nationality, age and position of the top 100 here and turn over to see who makes the list.We know it will spark opinions and we don’t expect you to agree with all our choices, which is why we want to know YOUR views. Is the right person at No 1? Who is too high or too low? Who have we excluded that you think should be in? Let us know through our social media channels.100 Melani MatavaoLive Wire: Melani Matavao helped Samoa qualify for the World Cup (Getty Images)Age 23 (19.11.95) Position Scrum-halfThe word ‘livewire’ perfectly describes this rising star, who played a pivotal role in Samoa securing a spot at RWC 2019 with four tries in the two-legged play-off against Germany. He brings real tempo to Samoa’s attack and has progressed from local rugby in Samoa to earning a pro contract with Otago last year. Look out for this bright spark at the World Cup.99 Sevu ReeceIn the Frame: Reece could get a surprise call up for the All Blacks (Getty Images)Age 22 (13.2.97) Position WingThe Fijian has made the most of his rugby lifeline at the Crusaders after his Connacht deal was torn up due to a court appearance for domestic assault. His superb finishing has set Super Rugby alight this year, rapidly propelling him into the All Blacks frame. Loves a chip-and-chase.98 Marcell CoetzeeOn The Mend: After a poor run of injuries, Coetzee is back to his best (Getty Images)Age 28 (8.5.91) Position Back-rowSo rough had his injury history been that some may have forgotten that Coetzee was at Ulster. But last term he was at his confrontational best, thundering into collisions with trademark ferocity and getting Ulster’s Pro14 play-off hopes on the front foot. Such has been his form that many will be surprised if he doesn’t earn a Springboks recall for RWC 2019.97 Ma’a NonuStill Going: Nonu is 37 but can clearly still compete at the highest level (Getty Images)Age 37 (21.5.82) Position CentreIn the first half of the Blues versus Highlanders Super Rugby clash this year, Nonu caught a ball going right to left, flashed a dummy, turned on the burners for an outside break, drew a two-on-one and put away flanker Tom Robinson for a try. At the age of 36.Much has been made of how ineffectual the centre was during his time at Toulon. But since his return to New Zealand this year he has caught plenty of headlines. His jet-heeled Blues team-mate Rieko Ioane recently said: “If the All Blacks team was picked today, based on form, he’d be in. He just brings so much experience, and different skill-sets than what we’re used to. His game would only lift being in that black jersey.”When Nonu was winning his second World Cup in 2015, we came to realise that he has skills we never gave him credit for when he was younger: long passes, deft kicks, vision. In the winter of his career you have to marvel at how much these abilities still stand out amongst far younger athletes. Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter. The 100 Best Players In The World: 1 Alun Wyn Jones Our next section of the 100 best players… Expandlast_img read more

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2019 Rugby World Cup: New Zealand 63-0 Canada

first_img Rugby World Cup Groups New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Rugby World Cup Groups TAGS: Canada Canada Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide 2019 Rugby World Cup: New Zealand v CanadaOne of the last teams to qualify for the 2019 Rugby World Cup, Canada were run ragged by a rampaging New Zealand team.Head-to-headPlayed – 5New Zealand wins – 5Canada wins – 0Did You Know?New Zealand became the first team to score 16,000 Test points when they drew 16-16 with South Africa in July. Their try tally after that match stood at 2,091 – another record.Related: Rugby World Cup FixturesIn a nutshellIt was always going to be a tough task for the Canadians to hold back the All Black tide and despite the occasional moment of quality, they were heavily outmatched in just about every department.The All Blacks started strongly playing some brilliant off-loading rugby that gave Canada no time to set their defence. They got on the scoreboard early by scoring a penalty try under the posts in the 5th minute and doubled their advantage in the 9th minute thanks to a lovely cross-field kick from Richie Mo’unga to Jordie Barrett.The man who epitomised the free-flowing rugby the Kiwis played was Sonny Bill Williams who looked to off-load at every opportunity. Indeed in the 18th minute there was no need as he found the try line to put the Kiwis up 21-0 after a quarter of the match had gone by.The Canadians showed some promise on occasion. After some lovely interchanges, Peter Nelson almost scored a breakaway try which would’ve raised the roof in Oita. But the All Blacks and Beauden Barrett pulled off some excellent defending to deny them, and he did so again a few minutes later. The Canadians were knocking on the door but couldn’t quite get in.The second Barrett to score was Beauden as he collected a Sonny Bill grubber kick under the posts to ensure the bonus point just before half-time. The only Barrett who hadn’t scored up to that point was Scott who dropped a certain try as he was crossing the try-line a few minutes earlier. No doubt, the man they call ‘dog roll’ is going to receive some flak for that moment. Expand New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Winners of the past two World Cups, the… Collapse And yet he made up for it quickly in the second-half. The All Blacks scored immediately as Rieko Ioane dotted down and then just a couple of minutes later Barrett managed to hold onto the ball this time after receiving a pass from Kieran Read. Shannon Frizell and Brad Weber then scored rounding off an incredible 10 minutes to start the second-half for the All Blacks. It was now a question of how many…Weber crossed again 6 minutes later for his second of the evening and that was all she wrote as the All Blacks ran out winners by 63 points to zero.Star manPlenty of choices to choose from. Brad Weber scored a brace and Sonny Bill Williams was excellent whilst he was on but we have gone for Richie Mo’unga. Controlled the game beautifully and didn’t miss with the boot all night. An imperious performance.On Target: Mo’unga didn’t miss with the boot (Getty Images)The reactionAll Blacks captain acknowleged the heat in his post-match interview; “It was bloody tough in this humidity under this roof so it was a tough game, but awesome to be a part of. You could probably tell as, basically, we were dripping wet as soon as we ran out to start the game. But something to work on in the knowledge we’ll probably get these conditions later on.”Canada coach Kingsley Jones said; “I’m just really proud of the guys and the way they stuck in there. We had big chunks of the game where we were really in the game. Every one of them can look themselves in the mirror and be proud of their performance tonight. At other times, I’m admiring the All Blacks’ accuracy, skill, speed. The bottom line is collisions: the speed and power that the All Blacks can deliver at times, it really causes big problems. And then after that, it’s difficult to deal with, difficult to defend.”The TeamsNew Zealand Team- Beauden Barrett, Jordie Barrett, Jack Goodhue (Ryan Crotty 40), Sonny Bill Williams (Ben Smith), Rieko Ioane, Richie Mo’unga, TJ Perenara (Brad Weber 40), Atu Moli, Liam Coltman (Codie Taylor 70), Angus Ta’avao (Nepo Laulala 25, Ofa Tuungafasi 52), Scott Barrett, Patrick Tuipulotu (Samuel Whitelock 70), Shannon Frizell, Matt Todd (Ardie Savea 70), Kieran ReadTries: Penalty 5, J Barrett 9, SB Williams 18, B Barrett 36, Ioane 41, S Barrett 45, Frizell 48, Weber 50, 56   Con: Mo’unga 8Canada Team- Patrick Parfrey (Andrew Coe 52), Jeff Hassler, Conor Trainor, Ciaran Hearn, DTH van der Merwe (Taylor Paris 60 reversed on 72), Peter Nelson, Gordon McRorie (Phil Mack 64), Djustice Sears-Duru (Hubert Buydens 68), Eric Howard (Andrew Quattrin), Cole Keith (Jake Ilnicki 49), Evan Olmstead (Josh Larsen), Conor Keys (Mike Sheppard 60), Lucas Rumball, Matt Heaton, Tyler Ardron The last team to qualify for the tournament,… Canada were one of the last teams into the tournament and faced the toughest of tests in New Zealand. Expand Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. A rundown of the Rugby World Cup groups… Canada Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Who should Eddie Jones pick for England this summer?

first_imgCapon and Oghre are the other selections – and are only 21 and 23 years old respectively. Capon has been a model of consistency for Bristol – while Barbeary’s clubmate Oghre has managed to win minutes against the most stacked hooker depth chart in the league. Dynamic in the loose with rare athletic ability for the position, his throwing will need to keep improving.Locks – Charlie Ewels (Bath), Nick Isiekwe (Northampton/Saracens), Chunya Munga (London Irish), David Ribbans (Northampton) Eddie Jones considers Ewels to possess leadership potential – and he is a real candidate to captain the side this summer. It will be interesting to see how he copes with being the senior member of a second-row partnership for the first time at Test level.If you were to draw an international second-row you’d alight on the shape of Ribbans – exceptionally durable, a massive unit, and one of the best pick-and-drive forwards in the league. He’s already been selected in wider England squads, and at 25 has time before the next World Cup to become the carrying lock Jones is looking to pack down alongside Maro Itoje. Harlequins fly-half Marcus Smith has only played for England in a non-capped match against the Barbarians in 2019 (RFU/Getty Images) Who should Eddie Jones pick for England this summer? This summer is the perfect chance for Eddie Jones to bring a raft of new faces into the England set-up. With 11 players in the British & Irish Lions squad, Tests against Canada and the United States will give fringe players the chance to assert themselves ahead of the 2023 Rugby World Cup.The equivalent tour to Argentina in 2017 was an unmitigated success. England not only won two Tests against a full-strength Pumas side, but also unearthed players who are now integral to the team, such as Tom Curry and Sam Underhill. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. It’ll be fascinating to see if Vunipola is selected this summer. While the temptation to rest him and other senior players is there, the Saracens No 8 has spoken about how playing games improves his physical condition. There will be plenty of opportunities to get him running downhill. Who should Eddie Jones pick for England this summer?Here’s a proposed 32-man England squad for the Tests at Twickenham against USA on 4 July and Canada on 10 July…Props – Ellis Genge (Leicester), Beno Obano (Bath), Bevan Rodd (Sale), Kyle Sinckler (Bristol), Marcus Street (Exeter), Will Stuart (Bath)At loosehead, Genge and Obano (before his ban) have enjoyed an excellent few months in the Gallagher Premiership. Sale’s Rodd isn’t a household name yet – but forwards coach Matt Proudfoot has attended Sale training to meet the 20-year-old loosehead, who is also eligible for Scotland.Sale’s Bevan Rodd is eligible for both England and Scotland (Getty Images)Sinckler and Stuart are England’s first-choice tightheads, so it seems worth having a youngster to learn from them. This means Exeter’s Harry Williams misses out in favour of 22-year-old clubmate Street, who really does have superstar potential. Leicester’s Joe Heyes is also in contention.Hookers – Will Capon (Bristol), Tom Dunn (Bath), Gabriel Oghre (Wasps) Alfie Barbeary would be in this group, but after a torrid season with injuries there is no sense in rushing him into a summer series. His time will come.Instead, Dunn deserves a run in the starting jersey. The emotional centrepiece of the Bath pack, he’s been unlucky to play so few minutes in his three England appearances so far. Recently banned after receiving a red card against Bristol, he should return for England raring to go. The other two spots are wide open and could include Northampton’s Alex Moon or Leicester tyro George Martin. But it’s time that Moon’s (temporary) clubmate Isiekwe got another taste of international rugby.He toured Argentina just after his 19th birthday and the future seemed bright, before he was harshly substituted off in the first half against South Africa the next summer. He’s been Northampton’s best forward since joining on loan from Saracens, is still only 23 years old and has an exceptional work-rate for a lock/six hybrid.Another youngster, Munga, is starting in the Premiership at only 20 for an underrated London Irish pack. Picked out as a future star by Alex Corbisiero and a key performer in the England age groups, he too should come into camp early.Back-rows – Ben Curry (Sale), Alex Dombrandt (Harlequins), Ben Earl (Bristol/Saracens), Ted Hill (Worcester), Sam Underhill (Bath), Billy Vunipola (Saracens)An extremely competitive area. Earl and Underhill are slam-dunk picks, with Underhill’s recovery from a hip injury edging out clubmate Miles Reid. Will Evans could have been involved before his untimely leg break.Hill and Curry have both been involved previously with England – Hill even picked up a cap against Japan in 2018. They have captaincy experience, are only 22, and hit like freight trains. With Tests against the USA and Canada on the horizon, younger players will be looking to force their way into the reckoning LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight points on the day Man-of-the-match That was some performance from Marcus Smith. #HARvWAS pic.twitter.com/ROBk9PC5H1— Planet Rugby (@PlanetRugby) May 9, 2021It’s tough on Simmonds, but Umaga’s versatility and instinct gets him the nod for the second spot. He’s impressively bounced back in recent months from a bout of sophomore struggles to return to his creative best, while also developing a quietly effective tactical kicking game.Centres – Ollie Lawrence (Worcester), Joe Marchant (Harlequins), Piers O’Conor (Bristol), Henry Slade (Exeter)The most difficult position to select, with so many different styles competing for a single berth. Lawrence and Slade are the obvious selections, given another chance to develop a centre partnership that has promise on paper but failed to fire in the Six Nations.Pairing Marcus Smith with clubmate Marchant could bring the best out of both, but it does mean that Wasps’ Paolo Odogwu misses out.Piers O’Conor is one of the best line-running backs in the Premiership (CameraSport/Getty Images)The final slot comes down to Sam James of Sale versus Piers O’Conor of Bristol – incredibly versatile ball-players capable of being a second playmaker or making clean breaks themselves. There is something irresistible about O’Conor’s decision-making in broken field, so he gets the nod on this occasion. Could also be used at full-back.Back three – Ollie Hassell-Collins (London Irish), Max Malins (Bristol/Saracens), Jonny May (Gloucester), Freddie Steward (Leicester), Ollie Thorley (Gloucester)There might be a temptation to rest May, but you sense the wing will be desperate to retain match sharpness in case the Lions come calling. Thorley deserves a second cap, while the third winger spot goes to namesake Hassell-Collins, who has been the crown jewel in an adventurous and youthful London Irish back-line.Hassell-Collins has made 33 clean breaks so far this season, almost ten clear of his closest competitor, and has the chance to finish the season with more than 1,000 metres with ball in hand. Possesses prototypical size for an international winger and is still only 22 years old.A third Ollie, Northampton’s Sleightholme, should also be considered – a real sprinter with a poacher’s instinct to match. Joe Cokanasiga and Jack Nowell miss out due to questions over injury and form. Freddie Steward in the air Nemani Nadolo’s pass Harry Wells with the finish A fantastic try scored by @LeicesterTigers The hosts are tied with @BathRugby, but who will win? Live Blog https://t.co/ENiA4e3FUZ#GallagherPrem #LEIvBATpic.twitter.com/BcEzK9nLPP— Premiership Rugby (@premrugby) January 3, 2021Malins is a certainty to be selected at full-back, having displaced Elliot Daly during the Six Nations, but the second slot is extremely open. Jones may well persist with the George Furbank experiment, but a better option would be Leicester’s Steward, who competes with a physicality, maturity and fearlessness beyond his years. If you need an Englishman to take a high ball for your life, Steward is the man. Plays like David Havili.Possible England Summer Test Starting XV: Malins; May, Slade, Lawrence, Thorley; Smith, Robson; Genge, Dunn, Sinckler, Ewels, Ribbans, Earl, Underhill, Vunipola. Vunipola’s skill-set also complements Dombrandt, who deserves a cap as part of the best 8-9-10 axis in the Gallagher Premiership. An X-factor player in attack, his off-ball work-rate has been questioned in the past, but along with his conditioning is improving rapidly.Scrum-halves – Dan Robson (Wasps), Alex Mitchell (Northampton) There isn’t a player more deserving of international minutes than Robson, who is poised to make his first start this summer after 11 substitute appearances. Simply exceptional against Harlequins in May.Behind him is a straight shootout between Northampton’s Mitchell, Exeter’s Jack Maunder, and Bristol pair Harry Randall and Andy Uren. Randall looked to be the favourite after being named in England’s Six Nations squad, but an ankle injury has left him without any significant minutes since January.Northampton scrum-half Alex Mitchell is ready for international rugby (Getty Images)Mitchell has enjoyed his longest run of form for Northampton, and after spending so long in camp merits game-time. Probably the nine with the best combination of run-kick-pass skills.Ben Youngs ruled himself out of Lions contention to spend time with his family, so it’s unlikely he’ll play for England this summer.Fly-halves – Marcus Smith (Harlequins), Jacob Umaga (Wasps)Time to see what the young guns can do. If George Ford is rested, it’s a choice between Smith, Umaga, and Joe Simmonds.Smith has been exceptional for Quins, who are reaping the rewards of allowing the academy product to run their attack at such an early age. He needs minutes to prove he can do the same at international level – the USA and Canada will be a gentle introduction.last_img read more

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Bonnie Anderson’s opening remarks to Executive Council

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags The Rev. Anne Bonnyman says: Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Executive Council Meeting, January 27, 2012:  Opening RemarksBonnie Anderson, President, The House of DeputiesGood morning—I am glad to be here with all of you. We have three days of hard work ahead of us, and I believe that, with courage and vision, we can make real progress toward a draft budget that will allow us to realize the future to which God is calling the Episcopal Church.Yesterday was the feast of Lydia, Dorcas and Phoebe. The story of these women, three of the church’s earliest disciples, comes down to us only through brief references in Paul’s letters. We can’t hear their voices, but we do know their work. As the collect in Holy Women, Holy Men says, they served God with the gifts each had been given:  Lydia in business and stewardship, Dorcas in a life of charity, and Phoebe as what Paul called a “deacon who served many.”I think there are two important things for us to remember about Lydia, Dorcas, and Phoebe as we begin this meeting. The first is that, without ordination, recognition, or status in a religious hierarchy, they used their gifts and resources to support the church in their local communities:  Lydia in Philippi, Phoebe in Cenchreae, and Dorcas in Joppa. Dorcas, in fact, was so effective in providing clothes to the poor widows of her community that when she died they called for Peter, who prayed and brought her back to life.The second important thing to remember about Lydia, Dorcas and Phoebe is that we almost missed them. Few women’s voices were recorded during their time, and the scriptural record of them is slight. Their mission and ministry strengthened the early church at a time when its survival was uncertain and its form was unclear, but we didn’t even recognize their feast until 2009. Lydia, Dorcas and Phoebe built up the church in essential ways during a period of great change, but we almost missed them.Like Lydia, Dorcas and Phoebe, we too are in a time of great change. There are many ways to deal with the kind of rapid societal change we have seen in the last few years. A lot of people deal with change by avoiding it, hoping that it won’t affect them. But if we avoid it, eventually change will catch up with us whether we are participants or bystanders.As Christians, we don’t really have the option to ignore change. By our baptism we participate with God in the quest to reconcile the world. So instead of standing by and watching change happen, we are called upon to use the change, even create the change that we believe will bring about a reconciled world. And so here we are, with a golden opportunity—the draft budget for the next triennium—to create some badly needed change.Now, we all know that mainstream religion is on the decline and that membership in the Episcopal Church has dropped below two million for the first time. It’s true that too many of our congregations and dioceses are struggling financially, and it’s clear that the days of being able to support a huge headquarters in one of the world’s most expensive cities are about over. We can spend a lot of time mourning what’s past or trying to keep a patchwork of it sewn together, or we can try to discern God’s call for our future by looking for what’s right in front of us that—like Lydia, Dorcas, and Phoebe—we’re in danger of missing.Which ministries in your dioceses are working well and need more resources to grow and thrive? What needs could your congregations respond to if you had more to work with? How could we revitalize the church if we put more of our money where our mission is—at the local level?Just allocating more money for local mission and ministry isn’t enough, of course. We need to cultivate innovation, hone our skills at rapid prototyping, and look around for the people and places already supporting ministry that we’re in danger of missing. Who in your communities is doing the work of the church without credentials, without institutional authority and without recognition? Where is God at work in your midst in ways that we might have missed while we were mourning the world—and the church—that has passed away?I hope that we will be brave, innovative and bold during this meeting. I don’t believe we need a transitional budget, one that takes baby steps but still holds on tight to the old structures and old ways of operating. We don’t know exactly what the future of The Episcopal Church looks like. I was reminded of this by an article in The Economist that said a lot of what we called “the future” a short time ago is already here–it’s just not evenly distributed yet.I believe that the best way to find out what the future looks like is to invest where we know that mission and ministry is already most effective and closest to God’s people.Let’s reduce the amount that we ask dioceses to send to the Church Center. Let’s study the best use of the building at 815 Second Avenue with an eye to freeing up for mission the $7.7 million dollars that is earmarked for facilities cost and debt repayment during the next triennium. Let’s expect that dioceses and their networks know best how to build up God’s church and support ministry where it is most effective. And as we change the budget, let’s acknowledge that we also need to change our models of accountability and responsibility to be mutual and respectful of the entire people of God, not just those with ecclesial power.Now is the time for us to be courageous. We won’t emerge from this meeting with the perfect budget, and we don’t have to, because Program, Budget and Finance and General Convention will add their skill and wisdom. We won’t even have the perfect budget on July 12 when we leave Indianapolis. But we can have a budget that reflects our courage and commitment to follow in the footsteps of Lydia, Dorcas and Phoebe, who built up the church where they were with what they had. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Doug Sandburg says: Posted Jan 27, 2012 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET January 31, 2012 at 3:30 pm i’m always interested in listening and or reading what you have to say. It leaves much to ponder about my own life and my participation. As i am in my 3rd year in EfM it seems clear to me that TEC is on the cutting edge of what God is doing in the world in reconcilitation and supporting leadership leadership in various ways. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Executive Council, Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Submit an Event Listing January 27, 2012 at 4:49 pm Bonnie Anderson,You opening remarks with regard to the future of the Church is most very welcome. For one to state that we as a church can no longer place the great financial burden on it by retaining an outdated headquarters in New York City in rewarding. Let us look to having a headquarters in a city that would cost less in building, salaries and just a less costly place to meet makes a great deal of sense.I do hope that your vision can be followed through as we need “help” for each of our parishes so we can grow both in membership and financially.Thank you,Doug Sandburg, Parishioner in Western New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Vivian Varela says: Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT January 28, 2012 at 8:50 am Thank you for your insight and leadership in a time of great change. I hear your words as a fresh wind blowing through the Church. Thank you also for reminding us of forebears who guide us along the way, especially those whom we nearly miss. May God bless you and the Council in your ministry. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Bonnie Anderson’s opening remarks to Executive Council Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bob Partlow says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH President of the House of Deputies Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (4) Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 28, 2012 at 10:58 am Again, you speak the truth to us. Our Diocese faces a difficult decision regarding valuable resources tied up in an outdated facility. I believe that our decision to either hold on to the treasured past or move boldly into a new future will be predictive of our future. Executive Council January 2012, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

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Storm-caused fire destroys summer chapel in south Jersey

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Jul 2, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service [Episcopal News Service] Lightning, or a downed utility pole, sparked a fire June 29 that destroyed the Church of the Redeemer, a Diocese of New Jersey seasonal chapel at Longport on the southern Jersey Shore.The Rev. John Baker and his family, from the Diocese of Virginia, who are due to be in residence for the next few weeks were not harmed in the fire, Bishop George Councell said July 1 in a message to the dioceses. Redeemer’s rectory is intact, he added. During Eucharist on the lawn adjacent to the burned-out building July 1, Redeemer’s chalice, recovered from the ruins by firefighters, was on a makeshift altar, according to a report  in the Philadelphia Inquirer. Burned and tattered Episcopal and U.S. flags stood nearby.Baker told the two dozen worshippers that “Christianity is about what you do when something happens. The message of today is all about new life and hard times.”Councell asked the diocese to “pray for the people who regularly attend the Church of the Redeemer and all those who support its presence and its ministry in the community of Longport.” “May our Lord bless and uphold them with grace and wisdom as they discern God’s call and consider the future shape of their mission in obedience to Christ,” he said.Members and friends of the chapel have already vowed to rebuild.Redeemer was organized in 1886 and became mission church of the diocese in 1918. The church nearly closed in the 1980s and it then became a summer chapel. The current Spanish mission-style church building dates to 1908. Redeemer opens for residents and vacationers during the summer months and is served by visiting priests. “The old building went up like a candle,” Tom Subranni, chair of the chapel’s governing board, told the Press of Atlantic City newspaper. “With winds blowing 50 miles per hour, they were fanning the fire like billows in a blacksmith’s shop.”Subranni said the blaze was started by either a downed utility pole or lightning.“We all feel hollow,” Maggie Dearnley, 65, who lives in Little Rock, Ark., but spends summers in Longport, told the Atlantic City paper. “You forget and then you look up, see it again and you feel worse,” said Dearnley, who added that five generations of her family worshipped in the church.Mike Cohen, the township historian and former mayor, said many residents — including his family — had gathered early on June 30 to watch the blaze. After so many years working to preserve the building, he said it was heartbreaking to watch its destruction. Cohen, a Jew who served as an unofficial caretaker of the building, told the newspaper he used to come by in the winter to check on the pipes and make sure storms off the oceans hadn’t torn open any windows.“If you come here in the winter time, upset about something, the place lifts your spirits,” he said. “It’s something I can’t describe.”Cohen said the seaside colony was founded by Quakers who worshipped in various locations until they received a donated plot of land from wealthy landowner Joseph P. Remington to establish a permanent church. The donation had a string attached: “Instead of being Quaker, they became Episcopalian because Mr. Remington’s daughter played piano and she couldn’t play the piano in the church if it was a Quaker church,” he said. Construction began in late 1908, at a cost of about $6,200, and the first service was held on July 4, 1909.A series of nautical-themed stained-glass windows designed in the 1930s by Philadelphia-based Willet Stained Glass Co., which operates today as Willet Hauser, were later added and destroyed in the fire.Brian Dearnley, of Philadelphia, and his wife Meghan were married in the church. They attended the July 1 Eucharist and told a Philadelphia Inquirer reporter that it was painful to think of the stained-glass windows. “They had a beautiful nautical theme – squid, octopi. Now, it’s a melted coke bottle,” he said.The New Jersey Department of Community Affairs says the average residential home value in Longport is $953,465. Cohen said the church sits on five buildable lots located about a half block from both the Atlantic Ocean and Great Egg Inlet. He estimated the lots are worth millions of dollars.Subranni said the Church of the Redeemer, which celebrated Eucharist on the lawn July 1, would rebuild.“When things get cleaned up, we’ll hold services under a tent on the labyrinth” adjacent to the burned-out building, he said.The church was insured, Subranni said, and the congregation will try to rebuild it as close to the original as possible.“We have a lot of faith that everything’s going to work out in the end,” he said. “We will miss our beloved church, however.”A series of destructive storms wreaked havoc on the mid-Atlantic states during the night of June 29-30. Southern New Jersey was on the northern edge of those storms. Vince Maione, an Atlantic City Electric official said July 1 the violent storms that left 3 million people without power across the eastern U.S. produced a “level of pure destruction” in South Jersey that was “more severe” than the damage caused by Tropical Storm Irene last August.The storm that meteorologists are calling a “derecho” brought winds in excess of 70 miles per hour that uprooted trees and tore off limbs, the south Jersey utility company said in a statement. The winds uprooted trees and blew down limbs, which brought down numerous power lines and broke cross-arms and poles, the utility said. The utility predicts it will take until late July 6 to restore power to all of its customers. Three deaths were attributed to the storms in New Jersey.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Storm-caused fire destroys summer chapel in south Jersey Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

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Anglican women’s organizations not sufficiently valued, network says

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] The Steering Group of the International Anglican Women’s Network (IAWN) has said that in many parts of the Communion full value is not yet given to Anglican women’s organizations that contribute to God’s mission among marginalized women and girls.In a communiqué issued after their UK meeting, Steering Group members reflected on the place of women in the Anglican Communion and concluded that more needed to be done to ensure the work and voices of women be acknowledged and appreciated.“During our discussions it became clear that many of the challenges faced by women are held in common, whether in the developed or developing world,” the group wrote. “In particular, poverty in its many forms too frequently has a woman’s face.”“It also became clear that in many parts of the Communion, full value is not yet given to Anglican women’s organizations that contribute faithfully to God’s mission among marginalized women and girls in their areas.”The group reviewed how it might better support the women who serve the Women’s Network as Provincial Links around the Communion, particularly in taking forward the implementation of the Anglican Consultative Council resolutions concerning equal representation of men and women on decision-making bodies in Anglican Communion churches.One possible way of supporting Provinces to address many of the challenges they had identified during their meeting was by facilitating two regional gatherings in South Asia (in 2015) and Africa (in 2016) which would focus on women’s economic empowerment.The big challenge for IAWN’s Steering Group over the coming months is to find the resources and support to realize these meetings.Read the full statement below:IAWN Steering Group CommuniquéWe, the members of the International Anglican Women’s Network (IAWN) Steering Group, thank God for the opportunity we have had to meet and reflect together at the Anglican Communion Office in London from November 7 – 12, 2013. All members of the Steering Group were present, apart from our Co-ordinator Mrs Ann Skamp from the Anglican Church of Australia, whom we greatly missed.During our meeting, we heard news of the loss of life, homes and livelihoods caused by Typhoon Haiyan, and held the people of the Philippines in our prayers. We also heard about the fragile peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and pray that this will lead to renewed, urgent efforts to eliminate sexual violence which is a deeply traumatic and unacceptable weapon and legacy of conflict.We were delighted that a number of experts within the Communion gave us time. The Revd Rachel Carnegie, soon to be Co-Director for the Anglican Alliance, expressed her desire to explore fresh approaches to collaboration between the International Anglican Women’s Network and the Alliance. Mr Jan Butter, Director for Communications at the Anglican Communion Office, challenged us to expand our approaches to global networking and sharing news. Anthropologist the Revd Dr Elizabeth Koepping, a senior lecturer at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, gave an inspiring theological reflection and described her research into the contradiction between Scripture and practice with respect to domestic physical violence. This enhanced our own reflections on the implications of Anglican Consultative Council Resolution 15.07 on gender based and domestic violence.In order to learn about a particular area of mission and outreach in an urban context, we visited the Church Army’s Day Centre in the Marylebone area of London. Day Centre Team Leader, Ms Valentina Ines La Mela, explained the work and ethos of the Project which successfully empowers vulnerable homeless women to live independently.We reviewed how the Steering Group might better support the women who serve the Women’s Network as Provincial Links around the Communion, particularly in order to take forward the implementation of the ACC resolutions concerning equal representation of men and women on decision-making bodies in our churches, and Anglican responses to gender based and domestic violence.The Steering Group includes women from around the worldwide Communion. During our discussions it became clear that many of the challenges faced by women are held in common, whether in the developed or developing world. In particular, poverty in its many forms too frequently has a woman’s face. It also became clear that in many parts of the Communion, full value is not yet given to Anglican women’s organisations that contribute faithfully to God’s mission among marginalised women and girls in their areas.In order to deepen conversation and resolve concerning common challenges, we will explore the possibilities of two regional gatherings, one in South Asia in 2015, and one in Africa in 2016, with a focus on women’s economic empowerment and related issues.The Secretary General, Canon Kenneth Kearon, welcomed us warmly to the Anglican Communion Office. The Chair of the Anglican Consultative Council, Bishop James Tengatenga, encouraged the Steering Group. He reaffirmed the importance of the Networks as “where things are happening; they make Anglicans visible, representing the whole Body of Christ, everyone and in every place. They show the life of the churches throughout the Communion.”We wish to thank the Anglican Communion Office for their hospitality, and in particular the Revd Terrie Robinson, Networks Coordinator and Women’s Desk Officer, for her generous and loving support and encouragement.Elaine Cameron, Scottish Episcopal Church; Meenakshi Das, Church of North India; Margaret Dempster, Anglican Church of Canada; Claudette Kigeme, Anglican Church of Burundi; Elenor Lawrence, Anglican Church in the Province of the West Indies; Kim Robey, The Episcopal Church; Pumla Titus, Anglican Church of Southern Africa. 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