Nobel Prize winner speaks at ND Forum event

first_img“We need all students, whatever their future careers are going to be, to be able to think about science more like scientists do,” Nobel Prize winner Carl Wieman said as he urged Notre Dame to take a second look at education during Monday’s Notre Dame Forum event.Wieman’s presentation, “Taking a Scientific Approach to Science Education,” is the first in a series of discussions that asks, “What do Notre Dame Graduates Need to Know?” In his lecture, Wieman offered an answer that stressed the learning experience as opposed to the learned material itself.By the time a person becomes an authority in their field, they have developed a certain way of thinking about their discipline that gives them expertise, Wieman said. Students can begin to gain this expertise in a subject if they are exposed to a classroom environment that promotes discussion and interaction, rather than the standard lecture format most classes currently use, he said.“It’s not that the knowledge [of a subject] is absolutely important, but what really matters is to have knowledge integrated with these broader underlying aspects of expert thinking,” Wieman said. “Because that’s really when the knowledge is useful, rather than a bunch of memorized facts that you can’t do anything with.”While field experts are preferred to teach undergraduate courses, they may not initially understand the importance of this approach because of their own expertise, Wieman said.“One of the challenges of actually being a good teacher if you’re an expert, particularly of introductory students, is that the way you think your brain worked when it was at their level is fundamentally wrong, because there’s no way for the brain to know it’s changing … your brain is just plain different than [it] was when you were a beginning student,” he said.Wieman said the focus on research in many universities could also impact education.“We developed a system at research universities where really the only thing that’s measured — and it’s measured very carefully — is research productivity,” Wieman said. “And that’s what gets measured and rewarded. And so, as a person who’s done lots of science research I appreciate that. … It’s created the wonderfully productive research university system we have.”Wieman said universities’ obsession with efficiency may decrease the quality of research.“The problem is that because it’s the only thing that’s measured – it’s so effective at what it does – the collateral damage is that diverting even a small amount of time to pay attention to teaching and doing it more effectively penalizes a person and penalizes a department,” Wieman said. “So we have to fix that basic system.”Notre Dame physics professor Michael Hildreth said Wieman’s contribution to the Notre Dame Forum addressed an important topic that the University itself hopes to address.“The forum is supposed to address what Notre Dame students should know when they graduate, or I would rather phrase it, what Notre Dame students should learn while they’re here,” he said. “Too often we get bogged down in what students should know, which is really focused on topics. … I would rather turn that around to look at process. I would like to think that we would teach the students how to think.”Tags: Carl Wieman, Notre Dame Forum, Science Education, Scientific approachlast_img read more

Read More →

Jovic apologises for breaking self-isolation rules in Serbia

first_imgRead Also: Turkish football season suspended after Mikel’s exit“When I arrived in Serbia, they gave me the test and it came out negative. I am very sorry that some people have not done their job professionally and have not given me specific instructions on how I should behave during my isolation.“In Spain it is allowed to go to buy food or buy products in pharmacies, which does not happen here (in Serbia). I apologise to everyone if in any way I have hurt or put someone in danger. I hope that together we can overcome all this.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Promoted Content7 Worst Things To Do To Your PhoneWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Will 7 Largest Wet Markets In The World Survive After Pandemic?From Enemies To Friends: 10 TV Characters Who Became Close12 Marvel Superheroes When They Were Kids8 Amazing Facts About Ancient EgyptMind-Bending Technology That Was Predicted Before It Appeared7 Reasons It’s Better To Be A VeganThe Best Cars Of All TimeEverything You Need To Know About Asteroid ArmageddonBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime Real Madrid striker Luka Jovic apologised on Thursday after travelling to Serbia and breaking self-isolation rules put in place to limit the spread of coronavirus.Advertisement Jovic claims he was given permission to fly to his home country of Serbia by Real Madrid, who went into quarantine last week after one of the club’s basketball players tested positive for the virus.But after arriving in Belgrade, according to Spanish newspaper AS, the 22-year-old was “seen on the streets of the capital, celebrating the birthday of his girlfriend”.The local press in Belgrade have reported that Jovic was visited by police, although it is not clear whether charges will be brought against him.Real Madrid’s Luka Jovic (right) says he was given permission to go to Serbia by Real Madrid.“First of all, I am very sorry that I am the main topic (of debate) these days, and I am sorry that people are constantly writing about me and not about the main protagonists in the fight against this crisis, who are the doctors and all those who work in healthcare,” Jovic wrote on social media.“In Madrid, my Covid-19 test was negative. So I decided to travel to Serbia, to help and support our people, in addition to being close to my family, with the permission of my club.last_img read more

Read More →

‘The Color of Sundays,’ by Andrew Conte, tells Nunn’s ‘story’

first_imgLike us at https://www.facebook.com/pages/New-Pittsburgh-Courier/143866755628836?ref=hlFollow @NewPghCourier on Twitter  https://twitter.com/NewPghCourier ANDREW CONTEBill Nunn Jr. never wanted me to tell his story.Sure, he had changed the history of the National Football League, and he had played a key role in the Steelers winning more Super Bowls than any other team.But Nunn insisted on deflecting praise to others. The story, he insisted, started before him—and would continue after. He challenged me to write, instead, about the first African Americans who played football.I ended up doing both.Nunn’s story started with the Pittsburgh Courier, where his father worked as managing editor. When he came of age, Nunn joined the newspaper too, traveling thousands of miles each fall to compile the Courier’s Black college All-America football teams.In the process, by focusing on the athletes rather than their skin color, Nunn came to find talent that others overlooked.That proved strategic for the Steelers. They hired Nunn as a team scout, and he discovered players such as John Stallworth, L.C. Greenwood, Donnie Shell, Glen Edwards, Sam Davis and many others. They played at small Black colleges, beyond the NFL’s line of sight.Ultimately, with Nunn’s help, I came to see a broader story too.The changes he brought about did not stop at the edge of the gridiron. Football helped the United States become a better nation by showing Americans how to cheer for the best players—without blind spots to race or ethnicity.(Andrew Conte is an author, reporter, and director of Point Park University’s Center for Media Innovation. “The Color of Sundays” is available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.)last_img read more

Read More →