E.U. May Bar American Travelers as It Reopens Borders, Citing Failures on Virus

first_imgThe draft lists were shared with the Times by an official involved in the talks and confirmed by another official involved in the talks. Two additional European Union officials confirmed the content of the lists as well as the details of the negotiations to shape and finalize them. All of the officials gave the information on condition of anonymity because the issue is politically delicate.The forging of a common list of outsiders who can enter the bloc is part of an effort by the European Union to fully reopen internal borders among its 27 member states. Free travel and trade among members is a core principle of the bloc — one that has been badly disrupted during the pandemic.Since the outbreak, the bloc has succumbed to piecemeal national policies that have resulted in an incoherent patchwork of open and closed borders.Some internal borders have practically remained closed while others have opened. Some member states that desperately need tourists have rushed ahead to accept non-E.U. visitors and pledged to test them on arrival. Others have tried to create closed travel zones between certain countries, called “bubbles” or “corridors.” European Union countries rushing to revive their economies and reopen their borders after months of coronavirus restrictions are prepared to block Americans from entering because the United States has failed to control the scourge, according to draft lists of acceptable travelers reviewed by The New York Times.That prospect, which would lump American visitors in with Russians and Brazilians as unwelcome, is a stinging blow to American prestige in the world and a repudiation of President Trump’s handling of the virus in the United States, which has more than 2.3 million cases and upward of 120,000 deaths, more than any other country.European nations are currently haggling over two potential lists of acceptable visitors based on how countries are faring with the coronavirus pandemic. Both lists include China, as well as developing nations like Uganda, Cuba and Vietnam. Both also exclude the United States and other countries that were deemed too risky because of the spread of the virus.Travelers from the United States and the rest of the world already had been excluded from visiting the European Union — with few exceptions mostly for repatriations or “essential travel” — since mid-March. But a final decision on reopening the borders is expected early next week, before the bloc reopens on July 1. In late May and early June, Mr. Trump said Europe was “making progress” and hinted that some restrictions would be lifted soon, but nothing has happened since then. Today, Europe has largely curbed the outbreak, even as the United States, the worst-afflicted, has seen more infection surges just in the past week.Prohibiting American travelers from entering the European Union would have significant economic, cultural and geopolitical ramifications. Millions of American tourists visit Europe every summer. Business travel is common, given the huge economic ties between the United States and the E.U.Despite the disruptions caused by such a ban, European officials involved in the talks said it was highly unlikely an exception would be made for the United States. They said that the criteria for creating the list of acceptable countries had been deliberately kept as scientific and nonpolitical as possible. Share BusinessInternationalLifestyleNewsPolitics E.U. May Bar American Travelers as It Reopens Borders, Citing Failures on Virus by: – June 26, 2020 Including the United States now, the officials said, would represent a complete flouting of the bloc’s reasoning. But they said the United States could be added later to the list, which will be revised every two weeks based on updated infection rates. Share Sharing is caring! Share China, for example, has been accused of withholding information and manipulating the numbers of infections released to the public. In parts of the developing world, case numbers are very low, but it’s hard to determine whether they paint an accurate picture given limited testing.And in the United States, comments made by President Trump at a rally in Tulsa over the weekend highlighted how easy it is to manipulate a country’s case numbers, as he suggested that domestic testing was too broad.“When you do testing to that extent, you’re going to find more people, you’re going to find more cases,” Mr. Trump told supporters. “So I said to my people, ‘Slow the testing down, please.’ They test and they test.”European embassies around the world could be enlisted to help verify or opine on the data provided that would inform the final list, negotiators said, another indication that the list could end up being quite short if European diplomats at embassies said reported numbers were unreliable.Many European Union countries are desperate to reopen their borders to visitors from outside the region to salvage tourism and boost airlines’ revenue while keeping their own borders open to each other. Some have already started accepting visitors from outside the bloc.At the other extreme, a few European nations including Denmark are not prepared to allow any external visitors from non-E.U. countries, and are likely to continue with this policy after July 1. Scientists around the country have tried to identify everyday materials that do a good job of filtering microscopic particles. In recent tests, HEPA furnace filters scored high, as did vacuum cleaner bags, fabric similar to flannel pajamas and those of 600-count pillowcases. Other materials tested included layered coffee filters and scarves and bandannas. These scored lower, but still captured a small percentage of particles. The process of agreeing on it has been challenging, with diplomats from all European member states hunkering down for multiple hourslong meetings for the past few weeks. A prohibition of Americans by Brussels partly reflects the shifting pattern of the pandemic. In March, when Europe was the epicenter, Mr. Trump infuriated European leaders when he banned citizens from most European Union countries from traveling to America. Mr. Trump justified the move as necessary to protect the United States, which at the time had roughly 1,100 coronavirus cases and 38 deaths. One list contains 47 countries and includes only those nations with an infection rate lower than the E.U. average. The other longer list has 54 countries and also includes those nations with slightly worse case rates than the E.U. average, going up to 20 new cases per 100,000 people.The existing restrictions on nonessential travel to all 27 member states plus Switzerland, Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein were introduced on March 16 and extended twice until July 1, in a bid to contain the virus as the continent entered a three-month long confinement.“Discussions are happening very intensively,” to reach consensus in time for July 1, said Adalbert Jahnz, a spokesman for the European Commission, the bloc’s executive branch. He called the process “frankly, a full-time job.”The E.U. agency for infectious diseases, the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control, warned negotiators that the case numbers were so dependent on the level of truthfulness and testing in each country, that it was hard to vouch for them, officials taking part in the talks said. President Trump, as well as his Russian and Brazilian counterparts, Vladimir V. Putin and Jair Bolsonaro, has followed what critics call a comparable path in their pandemic response that leaves all three countries in a similarly bad spot: they were dismissive at the outset of the crisis, slow to respond to scientific advice and saw a boom of domestic cases as other parts of the world, notably in Europe and Asia, were slowly managing to get their outbreaks under control.Countries on the E.U. draft lists have been selected as safe based on a combination of epidemiological criteria. The benchmark is the E.U. average number of new infections — over the past 14 days — per 100,000 people, which is currently 16 for the bloc. The comparable number for the United States is 107, while Brazil’s is 190 and Russia’s is 80, according to a Times database.Once diplomats agree on a final list, it will be presented as a recommendation early next week before July 1. The E.U. can’t force members to adopt it, but European officials warn that failure of any of the 27 members to stick to it could lead to the reintroduction of borders within the bloc.The reason this exercise is additionally complex for Europe is that, if internal borders are open but member states don’t honor the same rules, visitors from nonapproved nations could land in one European country, and then jump onward to other E.U. nations undetected. uropean officials said the list would be revised every two weeks to reflect new realities around the world as nations see the virus ebb and flow. It was unclear if American officials were aware in advance of the exclusion of the United States from the draft lists, which have not been made public. Tweet Germany, France and many other E.U. nations want non-European travelers to be allowed, but are also worried about individual countries tweaking the safe list or admitting travelers from excluded countries, officials said. (New York Times) As of Tuesday, the officials and diplomats were poring over the two versions of the safe list under debate, and were scheduled to meet again on Wednesday to continue sparring over the details. Coronavirus testing at the Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport in Athens, Greece, this month. The E.U.’s final safe list of acceptable visitors will be revised every two weeks.Credit…Milos Bicanski/Getty Images 59 Views   no discussions Putting these safe lists together highlights the fraught, messy task of removing pandemic-related measures and unifying the bloc’s approach. But the imperatives of restoring the internal harmony of the E.U. and slowly opening up to the world are paramount, even if it threatens rifts with close allies including the United States, which appears bound to be excluded, at least initially.last_img read more

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Dorothy L. Cameron

first_imgDorothy L. Cameron, age 87 peacefully passed away Monday, March 2, 2020 at her home in Columbus Ohio. The daughter of Dorothy Beck Loew and Paul W. Loew, she was born in Cleveland, Ohio June 9, 1932, though Batesville was her true hometown where she was raised among family that reached back to the founding of Batesville. She was a member of St. Marks Lutheran Church in Batesville, and Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbus. Dorothy is survived by her two children Andrew O. Cameron, Sarah D. Cameron and her beloved Cousin Mrs. Patricia Hare, and her children, Jerry, Tim, and Paul.Her loves were the Batesville pool, her Devon Avenue pool in Columbus where she dove off the high-board every birthday through her 86th year, and she once swam across the Nile River in Aswan, Egypt. She loved being part of the Ohio State University Women’s Club, the OSU Faculty Club, Evening Drama, Opera Group, Symphony Group, Book Club, especially her family of friends at Germania in Columbus Ohio, and of course loved all her students around the world. She was loved for her fierce independence and speaking her mind, her love of literature, music, culture, the arts, and joy of good conversation with good people. She also dearly loved each Batesville High School Reunion and all her fellow classmates.Dorothy served her nation during the height of the Cold War with the US State Department Foreign Service Office, in Washington DC, Hong Kong, and in Berlin. She was a beloved Professor of English, German, and Literature at Ohio State, Otterbein College, and several others including the Ohio Women’s prison in Marysville, Ohio. She was also a Teacher of English as a Second Language in China, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, and Romania. She loved her work and travels to all continents, sailing in both the Arctic and Antarctic Circles. Yet in all her world travels her hometown of Batesville, Indiana was where her gravity was the strongest, where she knew the best swimming holes, the best grapevines to swing on, and where to walk for the best sunsets.Visitation is at Meyers Funeral Home in Batesville Indiana, from 9:30-11:00 am Saturday, March 14, 2020 with 11:00am funeral service immediately following. Reverend Jill Campbell will be officiating. Burial will follow in St. Mark Cemetery, Batesville. A separate memorial service will be held in Columbus Ohio at a later date.In lieu of flowers, please find the time, the place, and proper sincerity, to read a favorite piece of literature, heartfelt piece of writing, or cherished poem to someone you love.last_img read more

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USC’s Post-Conviction Justice Project is giving juvenile offenders a second chance

first_imgLaw professor Heidi Rummel points to a piece of art she keeps on the wall in her office. It’s a painting by one of her clients, Ruben Ruiz, a former convict. Ruiz was released from prison five months ago — thanks to the help of USC’s Post-Conviction Justice Project that Rummel co-directs. Ruiz had been in prison for 26 years, 12 of which were spent in solitary confinement after he was charged with a “special circumstance” murder at 17.Photo courtesy of USC News“I had the idea that I was going to die in prison,” Ruiz said. “I was moved by the fact they were willing to help. I had never had anybody that I didn’t know come into my life and do something for me, let alone fight for my freedom.” Ruiz said he owes a lot to Rummel and calls her a great friend. “There [are] some people that you come across in life that you just want to get to know and she’s certainly that person for me,” Ruiz said. “Whenever we talk, I always walk away with a greater perspective.”Years before she met Ruiz, Rummel served as a criminal prosecutor from 1996 to 2005, working to seek justice for victims and put criminals behind bars. In 2006, the director of the Post-Conviction Project invited her to join the program. Initially, Rummel was unsure, but she was open to see how she felt. It didn’t take long before she realized she was right at home. Her passion would inevitably emerge for her clients, their cases and the reforms she brought to the system.“Even though I’m fighting on the other side of the table, I do feel like I’m fighting for fairness and justice in the process, for people who are left behind and for a process that was patently unfair,” Rummel said. Today, she is the co-director of a 30-year program at the Gould School of Law which gives juveniles and female convicts who are sentenced to life without parole a chance at    resentencing. It also serves as a learning experience for law students by providing them with opportunities to work on real cases.“When students come to me, they have a foundation in the law,” Rummel said. “They understand how to read a case, how to make a legal argument, how to analyze the law and they move from that foundation into being true advocates for their clients.” For Rummel, at every stage of her career, she is moved to fight for justice. She has fought for civil rights, hate crime and police misconduct cases, all while working as a federal prosecutor in the United States attorney’s office.Rummel said she recognized gaps in the criminal justice system and worked to improve the landscape through legislative reform. “I really feel passionate about fighting for people who don’t have anyone fighting for them and haven’t had their rights protected by the system,” she said. Design by Karan Nevatia | Daily TrojanJihyuk Song, a third-year law student, worked on Ruiz’s case with Rummel. Now, Song travels to prisons across California with Ruiz and  speaks to juvenile convicts about their experiences and goals of rehabilitation. “Just four months ago I was visiting [Ruiz] in prison,” Song said. “Now he’s visiting prisons with me and able to help, and seeing that is great.”Ruiz is the project’s most recent client to be released from prison early. He said that spending time in solitary confinement allowed him to reflect on his life. These reflections influenced him to adopt Eastern meditation techniques and become an avid reader. He was also able to earn two college degrees behind bars. “I was able to transform my life and become the person I am today because of that time that I spent in [solitary confinement],” Ruiz said. “It humbled me, and it changed my life.”After spending more than two decades in prison, Ruiz said he is still adjusting to life as a free man. He looks forward to spending time with his family, helping his mother manage her business and working with the project that helped set him free. “Just seeing how [Rummel] impacts so many lives, her dedication and commitment, I have definitely grown to really enjoy the experience that she’s introduced me to,” Ruiz said. “I want to keep paying it forward.”And Rummel, she said she isn’t going to stop helping people like Ruiz. Her goals are to continue improving the criminal justice system, and fighting for her clients. “I think we’re moving from a system where you are defined by your crime and nothing else,” Rummel said. “We’re starting to look at the human being, at what is right for you, what you deserve, what will punish you and heal you, and I really hope we continue to move in that direction.”last_img read more

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Jagdeo calls for probe into GuySuCo subsidies

first_imgSugar sectorExpressing suspicion as to how the Government has used the billions it allocated to the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo) since taking office in 2015, the People’s Progressive Party (PPP) is calling for a probe to be launched into how these monies were spent.Articulating the Party’s position on the matter during a Friday morning press conference was PPP General Secretary Bharrat Jagdeo. According to Jagdeo, there are discrepancies between the figures quoted by President David Granger in his January 10 speech and Agriculture Minister Noel Holder.Former President Bharrat JagdeoJagdeo quoted verbatim from Granger’s speech, in which the President pointed out that “a new factory at Skeldon in the East Berbice-Corentyne region was built at a cost of US$212 million and $48 billion was expended in financial support to the industry since 2011, while $32 billion was spent over the past 30 months, which when calculated sums up to a rate of about $1 billion a month. This Government cannot sustain the sugar industry in its current state. It has had to make difficult choices in order to ensure the industry’s viability.”The PPP General Secretary noted that the figure quoted in Granger’s speech was divided by the number of months. Jagdeo, an economist by training, observed that this was how the figure of a billion a month was arrived at. According to Jagdeo, however, this does not add up and there is a clear contradiction between the President and his Agriculture Minister.“Holder said over the past seven years, Government pumped $48 billion in GuySuCo. $600 million in 2011; $4 billion in 2012; $5.3 billion in 2013; $6 billion in 2014; $12 billion in 2015; $11 billion in 2016; and $9 billion in 2017,” Jagdeo stated, quoting the Minister. “So when you add this, you see $48 billion over seven years. (But Granger) added $32 billion on top of it in his speech. Then he divided by the number of months and that’s how he came up with $1 billion a month. He over inflated the figures by two times in his speech to the nation. And Holder gave the accurate figures.”Agriculture Minister Noel Holder“Even in those figures, you would see that the period 2011 to 2014, an average of $4 billion a year was given in subsidy to GuySuCo. Between 2015 to 2017, $10.6 billion average. And that is impossible. It’s more than double the subsidy in just three years. We need to have a full-fledged investigation into whether this money was given, how it was spent. And knowing the nature of this Government, I suspect a significant portion of this money may have disappeared. And if they were so good at management, the figure should have deteriorated.”Government had announced that it will pay 50 per cent of the severance benefits to dismissed sugar workers by the end of this month. This commitment represents over $2 billion in severance payments, with a paper seeking to appropriate supplementary funds being laid and debated in the House.It was during this announcement that President Granger in a speech read by the Prime Minister spoke of $48 billion being spent since 2011 on the industry. Jagdeo expressed the belief, however, that the incorrect figures were no mere mistake.“Now when Guyanese hear this figure (from the President), they will say yes it can’t be afforded because it is a large sum of money. So that is what I believe it was designed to do, to say that we can’t afford to keep the sugar industry alive,” he stated.Soon after coming to office, the coalition Government doubled the subsidy to GuySuco to $12 billion. Nine billion dollars was also budgeted for early in the year, with a further $2 billion after the Corporation approached the Government requesting approximately $3.5 billion.A further $9 billion was approved in 2017 for GuySuCo, with Finance Minister Winston Jordan announcing that If Government adhered to the requests for specific monies for GuySuCo, it would be money wasted.In May 2017, Government announced plans to close the Enmore and Rose Hall Sugar Estates, sell the Skeldon Sugar Factory, reduce the annual production of sugar, and take on the responsibility of managing the drainage and irrigation services offered by GuySuCo.last_img read more

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