How The Rock added the word ‘SmackDown’ into the English dictionary!

first_imgLast Updated: 10th October, 2019 15:58 IST How The Rock Added The Word ‘SmackDown’ Into The English Dictionary! The Rock is well known for many talents and recently posted a video on IGTV that shows when he coined the word ‘SmackDown’ which went into the dictionary! LIVE TV FOLLOW US COMMENT Gladwin Menezes Also Read | Cain Velasquez’s Knee Surgery To Affect His Future In WWE?The English dictionary too recognises ‘SmackDown’ as a word and has a justified definition for the same. Recently, The Rock posted a video on Instagram IGTW, in which he is seen expressing awe and admiration on finding out about this. The video also has a clip which shows him using the term for the first time.This video has been released just a few days after The Rock made his comeback in the WWE SmackDown.Also Read | Vince McMahon Reportedly Thinks Some WWE Stars Are ‘Too Pro Wrestling’ Dwayne Johnson is a man of many talents. Famously known as The Rock, Johnson started his career in the WWE as a professional wrestler and had a remarkably successful run since the mid-90s. Come the late 2000s and he decided to venture into films and business and has been doing significantly well ever since. The Rock often makes surprise comebacks in the WWE just to surprise his fans every now and then.Also Read | WWE: Does Hulk Hogan Want One Last Brawl?How ‘The Rock’ added a word into the English dictionary!Recently, The Rock made a return to SmackDown where he was welcomed with loud applause and cheers from wrestling fans. He delivered his signature style of ambush to the ‘King of the Ring’ winner for trash-talking with him. The Rock has always been an integral part of the WWE’s history. Recently, he posted a video on Instagram’s IGTV which surprised not only the WWE universe, but also his entire fanbase in general.Also Read | John Cena Reveals The Real Reason Behind His Disappearance From WWEWhen The Rock was a frequent wrestler in the WWE, he wrestled UFC champion Ken Shamrock in the ring. On one instance during a pre-match interview, The Rock trash talked about his opponent. One of his many trash talks in the past made history as he immortalised and coined the word ‘SmackDown’.In the interview, The Rock tells his opponent that he would smack him down. From that day onwards, the word ‘Smackdown’ was something that has stuck with the WWE. First Published: 10th October, 2019 15:58 IST WATCH US LIVE SUBSCRIBE TO US Written Bylast_img read more

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TOUCHLINE:”I was meant to be a footballer but….. “- Kwaisey Pee

first_imgKwaisey Pee is a pioneer in terms of making Highlife music attractive to young people. With relativessuch as Rex Omar, it is no surprise that Akwasi Opoku (real name) is such a talented artiste.Hit songs such “Me hia odo” made sure Kwaisey Pee is the household name that he is today.Music may be Kwaisey’s first love; however on this week’s edition of Touchline, we discover and uncover his love for sports as well.The Touchline panel this week also look at the seemingly unending conundrum about two of the world’s most prolific strikers; Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi.The panel also assess Baba Rahman’s impressive performance for Chelsea against PSG in the Champions League earlier in the week.Has he proven himself well enough to merit consistent selection at a highly competitive club like Chelsea? Touchline airs on Joy News channel at 6:30 to 7:00 PM and is also available online. Click the link below to find out more in this week’s edition of Touchline. –Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoySportsGH. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

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Emmanuel Sanders injury update: Broncos top WR out for season with torn Achilles

first_img Broncos to work out QB Nathan Peterman early next week, report says The Broncos suffered a huge loss Wednesday as top wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders went down with a torn Achilles at the team’s practice. He will miss the rest of the season.Sanders was helped off the field and didn’t put any weight on his left leg as he was taken into the locker room for further evaluation, per The Gazette of Colorado Springs. According to NFL Media, Denver claimed former Bills receiver Andre Holmes later Wednesday. Related News The injury happened early in practice as he went down during passing drills. Sanders slipped when he was making a cut on a short route and there wasn’t anyone around him, 9News reported. Sanders has made a significant impact this season for the Broncos’ offense as he has 71 receptions, almost twice as many as his nearest teammate, for a team-high 868 yards and four touchdowns through 12 games.The Broncos (6-6) have climbed back into the AFC playoff discussion with a three-game winning streak that they put on the line Sunday against the 49ers in San Francisco.last_img read more

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Teletović Set a New Personal Record in the NBA League

first_imgHe played 6 games of NBA league on Friday night. Winners, among others, were Oklahoma, Brooklyn and Minnesota.Brooklyn Nets at the Barcklays Center won against Milwauke Buckse with 104:93.  Finally, players of Jason Kidd won and Mirza Teletović set a new personal record in NBA.Specifically, Teletović in 31 minutes spent on the court, scored 19 points, 2 assists, 1 block and 4 mistakes. He shot 5 of 9 three points, a total 7/13. He also had 6 rebounds, all 6 defensive.Video: http://youtu.be/87a1cVc2fxA(Source: Sportsport.ba)last_img

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Ffion birdies her way to U14 triumph

first_img Gloucestershire’s Ffion Tynan beat par today to make up a four shot deficit and win the English U14 girls’ open championship on the Signature course at The Nottinghamshire.The 13-year-old birdied the last two holes for one-under par 71. She finished six over par for the 54 hole championship and four shots clear of joint runners up, Elena Moosmann of Switzerland and overnight co-leader Kirttu Hiltunen of Finland. Zainab Jeppe (Mill Green) was fourth on 11-over.Tynan, from Minchinhampton, said: “It means a lot to me to win this, it just shows I can do it.”Her attitude today was straightforward: “I was four shots off the lead and just thinking ‘go out and have fun and do what you can do.’ I knew I could shoot a low score.”She set out to play par golf, but did better than that, reaching the turn with eight pars and one birdie. She dropped her first shot on the 11th with a three-putt and had another bogey on the 16th before finishing in style, holing a 25ft putt on the 17th and 10-footer on 18.“I was really excited,” she said. “On the 18th I just gave it a go, I had nothing to lose.”Tynan started golf five years ago, having tried the game while on holiday in America. “I went to a golf camp and they said I had talent and to keep practising when I got home.”Moosmann scored one-over 73 today while Kirtunen dropped back with seven-over 79. Annabell Fuller (Roehampton), who also shared the lead after 36 holes, had her challenge derailed when she hit three balls out of bounds on the par five 11th, notching up a 14. Despite that, she returned a score of 80, playing the other 17 holes in one-under par.Click here for full scoresImage copyright Leaderboard Photography 28 Jul 2016 Ffion birdies her way to U14 triumph last_img read more

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Thrills – and Chills – at Monmouth Park

first_imgOCEANPORT – Appren­tice jockey Jonathan Zayas captured his first career win by taking Monmouth Park’s fourth race on Saturday, Aug. 24, atop Saint Goldie Locs.“It’s thrilling,” said Zayas following his first winner’s circle photo. “My father was a jockey and I’ve been around this my whole life.”In keeping with racetrack tradition, apprentice jockey Jonathan Zayas gets doused with water after winning his first race.While up on the early pace, Saint Goldie Locs and Zayas asserted their authority, turning for home and opening up to a convincing 5 ¾-length victory, going six furlongs in 1:12 flat. They returned $15.40 in the field of seven fillies.A 20-year-old native of Puerto Rico, Zayas moved to New Jersey when he was 8 years old.  He is a graduate of Monmouth Regional High School in Tinton Falls.Saint Goldie Locs, trained by Juan Serey, was Zayas’s third career mount. Hall of Fame jockey Jorge Velasquez is Zayas’s agent.last_img read more

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Is SETI Morphing Its Mission?

first_imgLook at the mission statement at the website of the SETI Institute: “The mission of the SETI Institute is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature, and prevalence of life in the universe.”  What happened to the aliens?  The word “intelligence” is not found in their mission statement.  It sounds indistinguishable from the mission of Astrobiology (which does not care whether the life is intelligent).  A look at the dozen activity boxes on the home page only reveals two or three that seem clearly relevant to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence.    Further indications that the SETI Institute is morphing its mission into a bigger tent can be seen in the News links: a report on the Leonid meteor shower (this is about planetary science, not SETI); an interview about the ethics of space exploration (that’s human space exploration, not Star Wars); an interview with a young scientist studying extremophiles in salt ponds on earth (that’s regular biology); and an airship-based investigation of climate change (that’s political science – 11/26/2009).  Only at the bottom of the column is there one clear article about SETI.    For some reason, Space.com dropped its link to weekly news articles from the SETI Institute.  These used to be clearly noted on the top title bar.  “SETI Thursday” is gone.  The last two articles did not deal with SETI: Sept. 2009 dealt with the institute’s “Adopt a Scientist” program, and Oct. 2009 was a review of the movie 2012..  The link Space.com/SETI only lists previous articles.    The SETI project has long been lampooned in some quarters (notably the Senate; 04/17/2006 and 11/18/2005 commentaries) but supported with almost religious fervor in others (09/24/2005, 06/03/2006).  Carl Sagan used to promote the search as the noblest ambition of the human species.  It’s not clear why Space.com and the SETI Institute appear to be downplaying SETI at this time.Who knows; perhaps the economy has affected funding and, like a private company, they feel the need to diversify.  Perhaps Paul Allen is re-evaluating his charitable contributions (10/12/2007).  Perhaps the public is losing interest in SETI after 50 years of failure to find anybody out there.  Or perhaps SETI advocates are smarting from accusations that they are using intelligent-design methods inconsistent with their Darwinian world view (see 12/03/2005 and this Brett Miller cartoon).  Astrobiology is a bigger, warmer tent.  The life can be microbes on planet Xircon Z589 and an astrobiologist will be happy.    That was not, however, the mission of SETI.  Jimmy Carter wrote on the Voyager record that “We hope, someday, having solved the problems we face, to join a community of galactic civilizations.”  SETI scientists don’t want to join a community of slime (do they?); they want to talk with sentient beings like ourselves.  Has SETI become impolitic again?  For the time being, discretion seems to be calling the SETI Institute to de-emphasize its raison d’etre and pretend to be regular scientists – studying earth life, meteors, climate, extrasolar planets, and normal astronomy.    If their mission has changed, so should their acronym: SETL, the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Life.  Or SET: the Search for Extra-Terrestrial whatever.  Or SE: the Search for Extra whatever.  Or just S: Search.  You don’t need radio telescopes for that.  Google is free – and you’ll find lots of aliens.(Visited 81 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Evolution Is a Magic Word

first_img(Visited 392 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享10 Media use the word “evolution” in articles that have nothing to do with it. It’s as if the word has magical powers to conjure up awe.Evolution, evolution, evolution. The e-word is ubiquitous in science articles and papers, even when the data have nothing to do with evolution as Darwin conceived it. (See the important preface in the 10/02/19 entry to understand what natural selection is and is not.)In the following examples, look how writers wave the e-word like a magic wand, assuming it has supernatural powers to create any highly-complex and well-designed entity, given enough time. In some cases, the word is used metaphorically. In none of these cases is it used to describe functional innovation by genetic mutations that were preserved by some mysterious “natural selector” somehow.Evolution tells us we might be the only intelligent life in the universe (The Conversation). “Evolution tells us?” Pray tell, where is evolution’s voice? Is it a he, she, or non-binary sentient force? Where is the podium from which Evolution teaches facts about reality? This weird article by long-time Darwin-lover Nick Longrich (now at University of Bath) comes to a possible conclusion that humans might be the only “intelligent” life in the universe, but of course he doubts it. And Longrich is pretty sure that life is evolving everywhere it can, even if non-intelligent. His fairy story is filled with assumptions that Sir/Madam Evolution has no trouble inventing biological marvels all over the universe (examples below) – except that maybe, though, the god Evolution has a little trouble creating thinking beings. Live Science reposted this article with the modified title, “Humans May Be the Only Intelligent Life in the Universe, If Evolution Has Anything to Say.” That’s a big If.The universe is large, and old, with time and room for intelligence to evolve…Could intelligence simply be unlikely to evolve? Unfortunately, we can’t study extraterrestrial life to answer this question. But we can study some 4.5 billion years of Earth’s history, looking at where evolution repeats itself, or doesn’t.Evolution sometimes repeats, with different species independently converging on similar outcomes. If evolution frequently repeats itself, then our evolution might be probable, even inevitable.Other striking cases of convergence include dolphins and extinct ichthyosaurs, which evolved similar shapes to glide through the water, and birds, bats and pterosaurs, which convergently evolved flight.Eyes evolved not just in vertebrates, but in arthropods, octopi, worms and jellyfish. Vertebrates, arthropods, octopi and worms independently invented jaws. Legs evolved convergently in the arthropods, octopi and four kinds of fish (tetrapods, frogfish, skates, mudskippers).The complex, eukaryotic cells that all animals and plants are built from, containing nuclei and mitochondria, evolved only once. Sex evolved just once. Photosynthesis, which increased the energy available to life and produced oxygen, is a one-off. For that matter, so is human-level intelligence.There are places where evolution repeats, and places where it doesn’t.  [See Stuff Happens Law]Humans couldn’t evolve until fish evolved bones that let them crawl onto land [etc].Earth’s history must have allowed intelligent life to evolve, or we wouldn’t be here to ponder it.Intelligence seems to depend on a chain of improbable events. But given the vast number of planets, then like an infinite number of monkeys pounding on an infinite number of typewriters to write Hamlet, it’s bound to evolve somewhere.Image credit: Illustra Media, The Case for a Creator.Regarding the monkey-typewriter myth, Longrich should have listened to the late Dr A.E. Wilder-Smith, who pointed out that the myth depends on the characters being preserved as the monkeys type. If the letters fall off the page soon after they are typed (like chemical reactions in the real world, which are reversible), the apes will never type anything worthwhile, even given infinite time.Repertoire-wide phylogenetic models of B cell molecular evolution reveal evolutionary signatures of aging and vaccination (PNAS). Evolution is so pervasive and pernicious, it is going on inside of you!High-affinity antibodies that protect us from infection are produced by B cells through an evolutionary process of mutation and selection during adaptive immune responses. B cell repertoire sequencing combined with phylogenetic methods has provided unprecedented potential to study B cells as an evolving population. However, phylogenetic models operate on individual lineages rather than the thousands of lineages often found in B cell repertoires. Here, we develop an evolutionary framework that incorporates B cell-specific features and combines information across lineages to characterize mutation and selection dynamics of entire repertoires.Now hold on just a cotton-pickin’ minute. Your body is not evolving, your family is not evolving, and your species is not evolving. We are all Homo sapiens, and what goes on inside of us has no bearing on your offspring (note that they are watching for changes during aging, which means your kids are already grown up). These six Darwinos are using natural selection in a metaphorical sense, but it doesn’t have anything to do with evolution. The fact is, B cells are extremely well designed to hone in on antigens so as to fight them. The last thing they need is Darwinism! If the human body were not designed to intelligently select the shape of potential antigen shapes from a pool of trials, you would die. This has nothing to do with evolution, and the authors should know it. They are confusing the public with such faulty analogies and equivocations, just like Darwin did when he compared artificial selection (intelligent design) to natural selection.How the earliest mammals thrived alongside dinosaurs (John Pickrell, Nature). Watch how Pickrell, like Longrich, merely assumes that Evolution has magical creative powers. When complex organs appear abruptly, that’s no problem for Evolution. It just means that the wonder-worker was on a roll. He/she/it worked super-fast, producing an explosion of inventions displaying creative genius.An explosion of fossil finds reveals that ancient mammals evolved a wide variety of adaptations allowing them to exploit the skies, rivers and underground lairs.[A mother of fossil young] is a cynodont, a member of the group from which mammals evolved.The discoveries are also starting to reveal the evolutionary origins of many of the key traits of mammals — such as lactation, large brains and superbly keen senses.A raft of extraordinary fossil finds is revealing details of how mammals evolved from reptilian forebears 178 million years ago.“We used to say that during the time of dinosaurs, mammals were totally unspectacular. That they were just these little mousey things scampering around in the shadows,” says Brusatte. But these animals “were undergoing their own evolutionary explosion”, he says.To make that possible, mammals evolved a wide variety of complex teeth for biting and grinding food.Much of the constellation of features we think of as defining mammals — complex teeth, excellent senses, lactation, small litter size — might actually have evolved before true mammals, and quite quickly. “More and more it looks like it all came out in a very short burst of evolutionary experimentation,” Luo says. By the time mammal-like creatures were roaming around in the Mesozoic, he says, “the lineage has already acquired its modern look and modern biological adaptations”.Notice the sophoxymoronic phrase “evolutionary experimentation.” If it’s experimentation, it’s not evolutionary, and vice versa. Experimentation presupposes a person with a mind and a goal, intent on learning something or accomplishing a purpose. By definition, Darwinian evolution is aimless and purposeless. Scientists who speak of “experimental evolution” in the lab are using their minds as selectors. They may use random variations, but they determine the criteria for success and pick the winners, just like breeders do.Mosaic evolution, preadaptation, and the evolution of evolvability in apes (bioRxiv). The author of this preprint, Caroline Parins-Fukuchi, is so drunk on Darwine she sees evolution itself evolving! Hers is not the only paper on “evolvability,” but she applies it to human beings. With this magic trick, evolutionists can speed up or slow down the magic act, allowing them to explain not only why traits evolved quickly in some cases, but also why they did not evolve in other cases. With this magic trick an evolutionist can explain everything – even opposite outcomes. Written in Jargonwocky, the trick sounds almost plausible, with dramatic effect.Shifts in modularity drove dramatic evolutionary changes across the ape body plan in two distinct ways: 1) an episode of relaxed integration early in hominoid evolution coincided with bursts in evolutionary rate across multiple character suites; 2) the formation of two new trait modules along the branch leading to chimps and humans preceded rapid and dramatic evolutionary shifts in the carpus and pelvis. Changes to the structure of evolutionary mosaicism may correspond to enhanced evolvability that has a ‘preadaptive’ effect by catalyzing later episodes of dramatic morphological remodeling.Notice that “evolvability” acts like movable axes on a graph. When traits in fossils appear abruptly, the evolutionist can move the axes close together to call it a “burst.” When traits are static, the evolutionist can move the axes apart and call it “relaxed integration.” Evolution is the constant; the rate is the variable, yielding a warped image of nature, not unlike a fun-house mirror.The use of passive voice is another trick that obscures the sleight-of-mind magic going on. “The formation of two new trait modules” is supposed to mean, “Evolution invented two traits by chance that it knew would be useful later.” The phrase “later episodes of dramatic morphological remodeling” is supposed to mean, “Evolution dramatically remodeled the bodies of apes on their march to humanity.” Evolution is so clever, it can “preadapt” traits to speed up evolution. Is that “dramatic,” or what?There are so many examples of this form of cheating by evolutionists in the media (i.e., treating “evolution” as an all-purpose magic wand), we’ll have to continue this topic with more examples. For now, understand the point: none of these papers even attempt to show what actual genetic mutations occurred, how many of them were required, and how a blind process (not a “selector” by any meaning of the word) could even care what happened. After you laugh, get mad. This nonsense is the only tolerable narrative allowed in public education in most societies around the world today. And why? Well, D.M.S. said it best in 1929 after the Scopes Trial, “Evolution [is] a theory universally accepted not because it can be proven by logically coherent evidence to be true, but because the only alternative, special creation, is clearly incredible.” Evolution is their god, and Darwin is the high priest who brought the knowledge of their god to the peasants. Anyone coming into the tribe with a different Creator must be Expelled!last_img read more

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Brand South Africa commends Springboks

first_imgJohannesburg, Saturday 24 October 2015 – Brand South Africa commends the Springboks for their well-played game against the All Blacks from New Zealand in 2015 Rugby World Cup.Speaking from Johannesburg, Brand South Africa’s CEO Mr Kingsley Makhubela said, “We commend the Springboks for fighting for South African success in the World Cup. You were brave and fearless and despite the outcome of the game, we thank you for playing your part to put South Africa on the global sporting map.”“We remain proud of your endurance, tenacity and courage,” concluded Mr Makhubela.last_img

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A strong safety net is critical for all farmers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Imagine that you’re a young tobacco and grain farmer in Kentucky. Despite low commodity prices and a tough agriculture market, you’ve been doing alright. As a beginning farmer, you’ve relied on trusted advisors, access to reliable credit and strong farm policies for support. You’ve mitigated risk with smart decision-making and a solid crop insurance policy that provides protection and peace of mind at a time when there’s no room for loss.Now, imagine you are planning to put in a new crop, but you’ve had to drop your coverage level because the premium is no longer affordable. You manage to buy the seed and other inputs you need to plant and care for the crop, despite limited access to credit, but it’s a catastrophic year. Severe weather destroys your entire crop and you have a limited safety net in place to mitigate risk. The success you’ve realized in past years is gone with one turbulent season, and you have no choice but to walk away from farming.With a strong, affordable safety net in place, this scenario is merely a cautionary tale. But with recent proposals to slash budgets for federal crop insurance programs, this could become a reality for young farmers, who won’t have access to the resources that protect them from market and weather volatility.Crop insurance through the years Putting a crop in the ground is risky business. Without crop insurance to protect investments, it would be nearly impossible for farmers to succeed. Federal crop insurance was first authorized by Congress in the 1930s to help agricultural communities recover from the effects of the Great Depression and Dust Bowl years. The program expanded and evolved over time to protect farmers from losses due to adverse events such as inclement weather and market downturns. Today, farmers must purchase crop insurance to be eligible for certain farm loans and government disaster benefits. National Crop Insurance Services reports that in 2016, 1.2 million crop insurance policies were sold, protecting more than 130 crops on more than 290 million U.S. acres. Those crops had an insured value of $100 billion.The crop insurance program hasn’t come without pushback from those outside agriculture. Budget cuts to the federal program have been proposed by several administrations over the years, but have been soundly rejected by Congress. Recently, we’ve seen a proposal to cut federal crop insurance programs by $29 billion over the next decade. These destructive cuts would be catastrophic for farmers, rural economies and the agricultural industry. And those who stand to be most affected are young and beginning farmers with limited cash reserves who rely on crop insurance to access credit.Budget cuts could change the risk pool Crop insurance is actuarially sound, meaning that including more participants (and more acres) in the program spreads risk, which keeps premiums and costs down for all participants. One of the current proposed budget cuts would cap crop insurance premium subsidies at $40,000 (there is currently no limit) for growers with an adjusted gross income (AGI) of $500,000 or less. Producers above that income level would lose premium subsidies completely.Without subsidies to help pay premiums, lower-risk established farmers with large operations may be inclined to opt out of purchasing crop insurance. Depending on where the AGI limit is set, more than half of U.S. acres could be left unprotected by proposed cuts. This puts more pressure on the program and on younger, higher-risk farmers who’ll be left funding it. In short, cuts to crop insurance would be detrimental to farms of all sizes, not just the large ones.Crop insurance helps rural economies At Farm Credit, our mission is to secure the future of rural communities and agriculture, so policy decisions that support a stable future align with our core purpose. Crop insurance is a cornerstone of U.S. farm policy. It keeps the pool of farmers large and provides a safety net to ensure their investments are protected. In a time when rural economies are struggling and the average age of farmers is rising, we must have strong policies and support to continue producing affordable food, fuel and fiber for a growing population.The success of young farmers depends on affordable, reliable crop insurance and access to credit. Today, the average age of a farmer is 58, and 78 percent of principal farm operators have been on their farms for more than 10 years. In the coming years, many of these farms will need to be passed on to a younger generation who’ll likely face more risk with tighter margins and lower cash reserves to cushion them through tough years. Affordable crop insurance will make it possible for the next generation to maintain financial stability during difficult times.Crop insurance doesn’t help only farmers. A trickle-down effect supports all of agriculture and even those outside of rural communities. Since 2000, farmers have paid $50 billion out of their own pockets for crop insurance. In turn, they were able to secure capital that ultimately was reinvested in their communities through the acquisition of labor, products and services.In the absence of affordable crop insurance, the cost of crop losses would fall directly on taxpayers. Agriculture accounts for 5 percent of the U.S. economy and 10 percent of U.S. employment, so it’s easy to see why a stable agriculture sector is good for everyone.What can you do? We’ve seen four consecutive years of declining farm income. The U.S. Department of Agriculture predicts that in 2017, farmers will take home half the pay they did in 2013. Current budget and farm bill discussions are more important than ever to ensure that reliable, affordable crop insurance and financing options remain in place to protect farmers, especially those now stepping up to take on the risk-intensive business of farming. Remember to stay informed when it comes to ag policy decisions and stay connected to what’s going on in Congress.last_img read more

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