Nobel Prize winner speaks at ND Forum event

first_img“We need all students, whatever their future careers are going to be, to be able to think about science more like scientists do,” Nobel Prize winner Carl Wieman said as he urged Notre Dame to take a second look at education during Monday’s Notre Dame Forum event.Wieman’s presentation, “Taking a Scientific Approach to Science Education,” is the first in a series of discussions that asks, “What do Notre Dame Graduates Need to Know?” In his lecture, Wieman offered an answer that stressed the learning experience as opposed to the learned material itself.By the time a person becomes an authority in their field, they have developed a certain way of thinking about their discipline that gives them expertise, Wieman said. Students can begin to gain this expertise in a subject if they are exposed to a classroom environment that promotes discussion and interaction, rather than the standard lecture format most classes currently use, he said.“It’s not that the knowledge [of a subject] is absolutely important, but what really matters is to have knowledge integrated with these broader underlying aspects of expert thinking,” Wieman said. “Because that’s really when the knowledge is useful, rather than a bunch of memorized facts that you can’t do anything with.”While field experts are preferred to teach undergraduate courses, they may not initially understand the importance of this approach because of their own expertise, Wieman said.“One of the challenges of actually being a good teacher if you’re an expert, particularly of introductory students, is that the way you think your brain worked when it was at their level is fundamentally wrong, because there’s no way for the brain to know it’s changing … your brain is just plain different than [it] was when you were a beginning student,” he said.Wieman said the focus on research in many universities could also impact education.“We developed a system at research universities where really the only thing that’s measured — and it’s measured very carefully — is research productivity,” Wieman said. “And that’s what gets measured and rewarded. And so, as a person who’s done lots of science research I appreciate that. … It’s created the wonderfully productive research university system we have.”Wieman said universities’ obsession with efficiency may decrease the quality of research.“The problem is that because it’s the only thing that’s measured – it’s so effective at what it does – the collateral damage is that diverting even a small amount of time to pay attention to teaching and doing it more effectively penalizes a person and penalizes a department,” Wieman said. “So we have to fix that basic system.”Notre Dame physics professor Michael Hildreth said Wieman’s contribution to the Notre Dame Forum addressed an important topic that the University itself hopes to address.“The forum is supposed to address what Notre Dame students should know when they graduate, or I would rather phrase it, what Notre Dame students should learn while they’re here,” he said. “Too often we get bogged down in what students should know, which is really focused on topics. … I would rather turn that around to look at process. I would like to think that we would teach the students how to think.”Tags: Carl Wieman, Notre Dame Forum, Science Education, Scientific approachlast_img read more

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New development director

first_imgRobert K. Cooper will return to the University of Georgia March 14 as senior development officer and assistant to the dean for external affairs in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Office of College Advancement, J. Scott Angle, CAES dean and director, and Brooks McCommons, senior director of the UGA Office of Development, announced today. “Rob is a proven, successful fundraiser in our industry,” Angle said. “In these tight budget times he’s the perfect person to help our college fund new opportunities for our students, our researchers and our extension programs.” Cooper was previously executive director of the National FFA Foundation headquartered in Indianapolis, Ind., where he served as the chief executive of the foundation. He was responsible for overall fundraising strategies, achievement of the foundation’s mission and vision and overall strategic development.Before joining the National FFA Foundation, Cooper was director of development for the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He was responsible for overall management of fundraising ventures and alumni relations.“It’s nice to come back to a place I consider home with fresh ideas and new experiences to apply to an institution I firmly believe in,” Cooper said. “The world-class work of this college is the future of agriculture, and I’m thrilled to have an important role to play in helping them secure that future.” Previously, Cooper was director of development at the University of Maryland College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. He has held titles of executive director of the Maryland 4-H Foundation in College Park, Md., and director of development for the National 4-H Council in Chevy Chase, Md.He earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Delaware in Newark, Del.His wife Linda is a teacher with Oconee County Schools in Watkinsville, Ga.last_img read more

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