Trey Anastasio Gives Update On New Music, Says He’s Open For More Grateful Dead Gigs

first_imgAfter a brief teaser the other day, Rolling Stone has shared a major interview with Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio covering a number of threads in his ongoing career. The main focal point of the interview was the band’s current level of cohesion and their new music, for which Anastasio gives a major update on the new album.When asked about the progress of the album, Anastasio cited an interview with Jon Fishman where the drummer said the album was mostly done and that none of the new songs recently debuted would be on it.It’s not as far along as Jon Fishman would like to think! We were laughing really hard. He actually got a little ripping about that. Because he came in and played drums on a few songs and then left to go on Bernie tour. And then we saw this interview: It said, “The Phish record is done!” We were all laughing at his, um, perspective. But it’s not done. It sounds really great to me. We’re really happy. The band’s firing on all cylinders right now, so this is the perfect time to go into the studio. We’ll see, but it’s been pretty joyous. We’re kind of all over the place, flying down to Nashville to work, and then I’ve been doing a lot of work on overdubs at Avatar, which is in Manhattan, and then we go to Burlington, and worked at the barn, and we’re even working at Page’s house and Mike’s house a little bit. As for the songs themselves, Anastasio is confident they’ll be ready for the road.I do think we’ll be playing them this summer! Actually, contrary to what Fish was saying, a couple of the songs we busted out last year have been tracked for the album. I’m not entirely sure what’ll be on there, but I think in the interview he said there weren’t any. That’s not true. Another reason why we were laughing.Anastasio also talks about the band feeling more like a collective unit than in years past.There’s a feeling of unity that is pervasive on tour. When I think about last summer and then in Mexico, and the amount of time that we spent together, and where everybody is in their lives right now, it’s pretty magical. And I think that’s why it was really important for us to go right into the studio. Everybody’s bringing songs to the table. Page brought some great songs, Mike brought some great songs, Fish brought some great songs. I’ve got a lot of new songs. And everybody’s just diving in, in a unified way. And we can’t wait to get back on the road. It’s going to be a good summer.He also spoke at length about the band’s drive to play mostly original music, and even touched on the absence of “Fluffhead” for those fans keeping score at home (aka everyone).Yeah, first of all because we love to. We’ve always had a lot of fun playing covers, and I’m sure we will continue to. But what was starting to happen was after 2013, 2014, 2015, I would get home and kind of think to myself, “Man, we played, like, ‘Guelah Papyrus’ once in the last two years.” And I like that song. I’m a big “Guelah Papyrus” fan. It’s one of my faves. Last year we got home, and and we didn’t play “Fluffhead” the whole summer. And that wasn’t a conscious thing. We have a lot of good songs, and we have more in the repertoire all the time. But I’m sure this summer we’re going to do at least six or seven more [new songs], because we’ve been making an album. So we’re probably going to want to play them. So the original songs have sort of moved to the front burner. The interview then touched upon Anastasio’s role in the Fare Thee Well celebration for 50 years of the Grateful Dead. The band had mentioned there was “unfinished business,” and RS asked if Anastasio would be willing to do more shows with them.I’m open all the time. It was definitely a little gigus interruptus [laughs]. There’s a lot of practicing for a short run, but I don’t know. I had such a good time playing with Bob and hanging out with Bob. I spent a week out at his beach house before the Fare Thee Well tour; the two of us just played. We sat on two little stools in his living room and just played and talked and it was fantastic. He’s such a good guy, and really fun. And I got to go to Phil’s and spend time with him and his family before the shows. Billy came to New York and played drums with me. So, I mean, I love those guys, and I’m always open. I’m grateful for the opportunity.The Phish guitarist wraps up the interview by talking about his method for reviewing each show and how often the band members are in communication. You can find the full interview here.last_img read more

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Manus and Madang qualify for Besta Cup grand final

first_imgManus defeated Central team Koupa 3 thanks to a one point difference in the penalty shootout to grab a spot in the grand final. The defending champions were leading at half time 2-1 but Koupa bounced back in the second half to draw 3-3 at full time which forced the game into extra time.However both teams beefed up defence to prevent each other from scoring as the game moved into a penalty shootout where Manus was able to score five goals while Koupa only scored four.Manus is hoping to retain the title when they take on Madang who had an easy win over home team LFA 1-0.In the womens finals, Port Moresby Soccer Association will take on Lahi in the grand final which gets underway tomorrow.last_img

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At Climate Talks, a “Bicycle” Built for Bonn

first_imgIn this pivotal year for driving forward climate action, the process to transform the 2015 Paris Agreement into a reality has claimed center stage, marking a major milestone for global leadership on climate change. Climate negotiators meeting in Bonn this week will focus on developing a rulebook to implement the historic accord and assessing the strengthened action needed to put the world on track to meet its goals. They can’t choose one or the other; they must have this dual focus to see climate action success in 2018. It’s a bit like riding a bicycle: both wheels need to turn to move forward.Success depends on two outcomes: first, countries need to agree on robust guidelines – often called the Paris rulebook – for implementing the Paris Agreement; second, they must show they are ready to enhance their national climate commitments by 2020.These outcomes are inextricably linked, and equally essential. Clear signals that countries are ready to raise ambition by 2020 are critical to demonstrate that the Paris framework is in fact mobilizing the action we need. And the rulebook will provide clarity about how countries will bring forward new commitments and report on progress, providing the confidence needed by countries to make enhanced commitments.The discussions in Bonn will set the stage for those outcomes. Two elements sit at the top of the agenda: negotiations on the Paris rulebook and the Talanoa Dialogue on ambition.With only seven months left before COP24 in Katowice, Poland, where the rulebook is scheduled to be adopted in December, negotiators must redouble their efforts. A robust, transparent set of rules and guidelines is crucial to maintain trust among all countries and advance climate action under the Paris framework in a fair and effective manner. To do this, Parties to the agreement will need to maintain the vision of the Paris pact by crafting rules that apply to both developing and developed countries, while providing flexibility for developing countries as their capacity requires. Meanwhile, progress should be balanced among the rulebook’s various elements, many of which are closely interrelated.To meet the challenge of making serious headway on the rulebook, a critical outcome at Bonn will be to secure a mandate from Parties to draft a negotiating text ahead of the final negotiating sessions later this year.Talanoa Dialogue Sets the StageThe Talanoa Dialogue is also a central priority in Bonn, where country representatives and selected non-governmental representatives will meet to make the first collective assessment under the Paris Agreement, examining the state of progress on reducing emissions and the opportunities to take stronger action. While Parties and non-Party stakeholders are expected to share stories and lessons learned, it is critical that these discussions identify and generate the opportunities for concrete action to achieve the transformation needed. At its heart, the Talanoa process must set the stage for clear signals from ministers at COP24 that they will step up and commit to submitting new or updated Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) by 2020.Other important dimensions of these negotiations include the issues involving pre-2020 action, including accelerating near-term mitigation efforts and mobilizing finance to help developing countries pursue both mitigation and adaptation to tackle the climate challenge. There needs to be a clear recognition of the long-held commitments and expectations for pre-2020 action, a much-discussed issue at last year’s climate talks.Finance will also be a key topic of discussion. In addition to a focus on the level of finance and support provided, developing countries are also asking for improved access, predictability, and a balancing of future climate finance flows between mitigation and adaptation. Predictability is a widely recognized principle of aid effectiveness since it allows recipients to better plan and implement climate action; the challenge is to identify useful information to improve predictability while respecting donors’ domestic procedures. Meanwhile, the scheduled Suva Expert Dialogue on support (including finance) to address loss and damage will highlight the need to strengthen resilience against the adverse impacts of climate change faced by the most vulnerable.As 2018 unfolds, there are plenty of promising signs. Seven EU countries have called on the European Union to adopt emission reduction targets in line with the Paris Agreement, and the Netherlands and Sweden have called for a strengthening of the EU’s NDC by 2020. Other countries, such as New Zealand and the United Kingdom, have pledged to take steps to become  carbon neutral by the second half of this century. Nearly 400 companies have committed to Science Based Targets for reducing emissions and the International Maritime Organization has decided to significantly reduce emissions from shipping by mid-century.As the year progresses, pressure for a strong outcome will mount, with moments like the Petersberg Dialogue, the Ministerial Meeting on Climate Action in Montreal, the Global Climate Action Summit in California and the Climate Vulnerable Forum summit highlighting opportunities for strengthened action, scaled-up support, greater leadership and more robust rules. The world will look to leaders and policy makers to step up, deliver on their targets and make clear they will make bigger, bolder national climate commitments in the years ahead.last_img read more

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Portland woman crashes minivan arrested on suspicion of DUI

first_imgA Portland woman was arrested early Sunday morning for suspicion of DUI after her minivan veered off state Highway 500 and hit a traffic signal pole, the Washington State Patrol reported.Perla D. Rubio Valadez, 27, was westbound on the highway about 3 a.m. when her 1995 Ford Windstar left the highway at Falk Road and hit the signal pole at the northeast corner of the intersection, the patrol said. She was taken to PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center, where she was listed in satisfactory condition Sunday afternoon.The patrol report said Rubio Valadez probably fell asleep.The patrol also said Rubio Valadez was suspected of driving with a suspended license.last_img

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