Online firm is first estate agency in the UK to offer iBuyer service

first_imgOnline estate agency Emoov is the latest organisation but the first agent in the UK to launch a US-style iBuyer service.This follows the Guild’s launch of a very similar platform in February last year and the launch of Net Ventures-backed Offerpal a few months later.All three services are unusual – and for same agents controversial – because they step in and buy a vendor’s property if a buyer can’t be found in the traditional way.Emoov, which is owned by proptech platform Mashroom, enables sellers to list their properties and, if they have not been sold within 30 days, they can request an offer directly from Emoov.This means that for the first time in the UK an estate agency is offering to get involved directly in the transaction rather than merely facilitating it, a concept some traditional agents are uncomfortable with.This is also different from the Guild’s service, which enables its member to pass on iBuyer leads rather than directly becoming involved in buying the property.In the US approximately 5% of homes are sold via iBuyer platforms such as Zillow and Opendoor and but in some states up to 40% of vendors consider using them.The price Emoov offers will be the market value of the property, minus the cost of buying and reselling it. That cost varies from property to property, typically ranging from 3% to 7% of the value.Stepan Dobrovolskiy, CEO of Mashroom, says: “Property chains are a pain for the UK housing market: 30% of transactions fall through, people waste hundreds of millions a year on fees.“The existing solutions capitalise on the huge distress that chains are causing to customers. This is also driven by the short-sightedness of service providers and unavailability of data.”offerpal ibuyer Opendoor Mashroom Emoov zillow March 4, 2021Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 4th March 2021 at 9:36 amWill Emoov become i-moov, if so surely it will cease to be an online model and simply be a buyer model, which exists already with many private companies who buy in property all around the UK, some on a very large scale. Given that Emoov has less than 100 properties on its books, this is a very strange development. If it listed say 60,000 properties a year like Purplebricks, an i-buyer model to ‘help’ distressed vendors might make sense. In the US many offer the i-buyer service, but the public eschews it as the devil is in the detail and they decide it is better to stay with sale by private treaty, rather than selling at a discount and taking a hit.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Online firm is first estate agency in the UK to offer iBuyer service previous nextProptechOnline firm is first estate agency in the UK to offer iBuyer serviceEmoov has launched its US-style iBuyer service following launches by the Guild and proptech platform Offerpal last year.Nigel Lewis4th March 20211 Comment526 Viewslast_img read more

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In the spirit of an intrepid reporter

first_imgStephen Engelberg, the managing editor of ProPublica, an independent nonprofit newsroom, envisions a new media world in which people pay for online content. Ultimately, investigative journalism will flourish, he told the audience, because “original unique content is what people want. There is a commercial argument for finding things out, things that nobody else knows.”Alex Jones, the Laurence M. Lombard Lecturer in the Press and Public Policy, and the director of the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, moderated the session.Earlier in the day, the city of Cambridge named the corner of Linden, Bow, and Mount Auburn streets as Halberstam Square in honor of the journalist. David L. Halberstam died doing what he loved, hunting down a story.The intrepid author, reporter, and Harvard graduate who won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the Vietnam War, which called into question the American military strategy in the conflict, died in a 2007 car crash.He was 73, and was on his way to an interview.The author of more than 20 books, including “The Best and the Brightest” and “The Powers That Be,” Halberstam began his love affair with reporting while at Harvard, becoming sports editor and managing editor for the student-run Harvard Crimson. During his lengthy career, he covered a vast range of subjects, including history, politics, the Civil Rights movement, and sports. He was known for an incredible work ethic and a passionate drive to find and report the truth.“When the government doesn’t tell the truth, the power of journalism goes up,” said Halberstam in a video clip that began a panel discussion about his life and legacy, held at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum on Wednesday (Oct. 6).Three seasoned reporters offered their perspectives on the changing nature of journalism in the age of new media and instant access, their thoughts on the future of investigative journalism, and their own accounts of reporting from the front lines and breaking big stories.Charles M. Sennott fell in love with the craft while helping his brother, who was a photographer for the Boston Herald. Transporting his brother’s film from the Boston Garden to the paper during Celtics’ games, Sennott knew then he “always wanted to be courtside.”Later, when Sennott was an investigative reporter for the Boston Globe, he covered the Big Dig and helped to break the financial and management scandal behind Boston’s massive highway project. Sennott, who also was a foreign correspondent and is now executive editor and vice president of the news website GlobalPost, said he knew he had a break in the Big Dig story when, over drinks with some of the project’s engineers, “One of them let slip, ‘There is no way this is going to work.’ ”Using Halberstam’s words, Sennott said it was the kind of instant “when history catapults you to a moment when journalism matters.”Aggressive, intelligent journalism is still important, but the path there looks vastly different from the one taken by Halberstam, who graduated from a local paper to The New York Times, said Sennott. He argued that GlobalPost’s model, which relies on a cadre of more than 100 freelance journalists working around the world to provide “international news for a digital age,” is the wave of the future for up-and-coming foreign correspondents.“It’s going to be a different path for you,” Sennott told the aspiring writers in the crowd, adding, “You are going to have to be your own brand.”A veteran foreign correspondent who has reported from war-ravaged countries such as Iraq and Afghanistan, panelist Martha Raddatz, now the chief foreign affairs correspondent for ABC News, said the nightly network news still plays a critical role in informing the country. By delivering a daily, comprehensive account of what is happening internationally, minus the endless distractions and “noise” that can be part of the online sphere, network news offers people “what’s important.”Discussing her own career, Raddatz recalled a seminal moment when, as ABC’s chief White House correspondent, she interviewed Vice President Dick Cheney. Telling Cheney in the spring of 2008 that two-thirds of Americans thought the war in Iraq was not worth fighting, Cheney, she recalled, stared back and said, “So?”“I could see his staff in the room just go ‘oh no,’ ” said Raddatz, adding, “A lot of moments passed where he could have said, ‘Let’s go back to that, or let me explain further,’ and he didn’t.”last_img read more

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CS Fullerton looks to extend streak vs Long Beach St.

first_imgSUPER SENIORS: Cal State Fullerton has relied heavily on its seniors this year. Jackson Rowe, Brandon Kamga, Austen Awosika and Davon Clare have combined to account for 67 percent of the team’s scoring this year and 73 percent of all Titans points over the last five games.CLUTCH CHANCE: Chance Hunter has connected on 42.5 percent of the 134 3-pointers he’s attempted and has made 5 of 16 over the last five games. He’s also converted 63.6 percent of his foul shots this season.ASSIST-TO-FG RATIO: The Beach have recently created baskets via assists more often than the Titans. Cal State Fullerton has 26 assists on 75 field goals (34.7 percent) across its previous three contests while Long Beach State has assists on 39 of 73 field goals (53.4 percent) during its past three games.DID YOU KNOW: Cal State Fullerton attempts more free throws per game than any other Big West team. The Titans have averaged 20.9 free throws per game this season, but that number has dropped to 18.3 over their four-game losing streak.___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25 ___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com CS Fullerton looks to extend streak vs Long Beach St. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditLong Beach State (11-20, 6-9) vs. Cal State Fullerton (10-20, 5-10)Titan Gym, Fullerton, California; Saturday, 10:30 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Cal State Fullerton looks for its sixth straight win in the head-to-head series over Long Beach State. In its last five wins against the Beach, Cal State Fullerton has won by an average of 4 points. Long Beach State’s last win in the series came on Jan. 20, 2018, an 81-73 victory.center_img Associated Press March 6, 2020last_img read more

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