Central American and Caribbean Armed Forces Cooperate to Fight Transnational Crime

first_imgOfficials from the Armed Forces of several Central American and Caribbean nations met recently to share their most successful strategies for halting drug trafficking, money laundering, gang activity, and other criminal enterprises. One break-out session focused on topics related to recording, seizing, and storing evidence. For this session, the Salvadoran Armed Forces (FAES, for its Spanish acronym) Special Forces Command provided several Zodiac boats for a simulated maritime interdiction. Twenty-one officers from Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic recently participated in the first Regional Conference on Transnational Crime, which was developed by El Salvador’s Regional Center on Training against Transnational Organized Crime (CRACCT). The conference was held February 21-March 2 in San Salvador Department. Prevention and early warning The content of the sessions and the practical exercises were useful to the Military representatives who attended the event. “When I get back to my country, I will spread the knowledge I received here to neutralize all of the threats we are facing. It is an unending task, and we now have more tools to succeed at it,” 1st Lt. Carrión said. The officers learned first-hand about new modi operandi and the structures and substructures of criminal groups, as well as the mechanisms that such groups use to evolve into a criminal organization. Prevention and early warning “I have learned about many things that are not being done in Guatemala yet,” explained First Lieutenant Bladimir Jerez Gómez, a representative from the Armed Forces of Guatemala.. For example, on the subject of gangs, I now understand very clearly how they develop, and I will tell others about the new methods of gang operation and their new structures so we can prevent gangs from spreading.” “When I get back to my country, I will spread the knowledge I received here to neutralize all of the threats we are facing. It is an unending task, and we now have more tools to succeed at it,” 1st Lt. Carrión said. “I have learned about many things that are not being done in Guatemala yet,” explained First Lieutenant Bladimir Jerez Gómez, a representative from the Armed Forces of Guatemala.. For example, on the subject of gangs, I now understand very clearly how they develop, and I will tell others about the new methods of gang operation and their new structures so we can prevent gangs from spreading.” This opinion was seconded by First Lieutenant Segundo Carrión, from the Dominican Air Force. Stronger together Col. Tejada said the meeting for the region’s Armed Forces was a valuable opportunity to continue sharing experiences and strengthening the joint effort to fight emerging threats that are currently impacting their countries. Finally, these workshops are a symbol of their increased level of operational readiness to fulfill the missions entrusted to them. This learning exercise and exchange of experiences also was critical for consolidating and standardizing border procedures to address these challenges, and to serve as proof that effective joint strategies can be formulated. The closing ceremony, where certificates of recognition and achievement for the conference were presented, was held at the facilities of the Special Anti-terrorism Command. Numerous Salvadoran police and military units provided instruction to the multinational audience throughout the course. Those units included Joint Group Cuscatlán, an interagency task force; the Anti-Transnational Gang Center; and elite teams from El Salvador’s National Civil Police (PNC): the Anti-Drug Division (DAN), and the Elite Organized Crime Division (DECO). “We are increasing the confidence and knowledge of our Armed Forces about how to face these emerging threats, above all in those countries where some of the phenomena – such as gangs – are not entrenched,” said Lieutenant Colonel Roberto Ayala Rivas, FAES representative to the Central American Armed Forces Conference (CFAC, for its Spanish acronym). The closing ceremony, where certificates of recognition and achievement for the conference were presented, was held at the facilities of the Special Anti-terrorism Command. Twenty-one officers from Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic recently participated in the first Regional Conference on Transnational Crime, which was developed by El Salvador’s Regional Center on Training against Transnational Organized Crime (CRACCT). The conference was held February 21-March 2 in San Salvador Department. The officers learned first-hand about new modi operandi and the structures and substructures of criminal groups, as well as the mechanisms that such groups use to evolve into a criminal organization. By Dialogo April 13, 2015 The content of the sessions and the practical exercises were useful to the Military representatives who attended the event. Numerous Salvadoran police and military units provided instruction to the multinational audience throughout the course. Those units included Joint Group Cuscatlán, an interagency task force; the Anti-Transnational Gang Center; and elite teams from El Salvador’s National Civil Police (PNC): the Anti-Drug Division (DAN), and the Elite Organized Crime Division (DECO). “Without a doubt, the topics related to drug trafficking and gangs generated more interest for all the officers, because they are threats that know no border and they must be addressed as such,” said CRACCT Director Colonel Carlos Alberto Tejada “These organizations already even have networks functioning in Europe.” Officials from the Armed Forces of several Central American and Caribbean nations met recently to share their most successful strategies for halting drug trafficking, money laundering, gang activity, and other criminal enterprises. This opinion was seconded by First Lieutenant Segundo Carrión, from the Dominican Air Force. “Without a doubt, the topics related to drug trafficking and gangs generated more interest for all the officers, because they are threats that know no border and they must be addressed as such,” said CRACCT Director Colonel Carlos Alberto Tejada “These organizations already even have networks functioning in Europe.” Stronger together Col. Tejada said the meeting for the region’s Armed Forces was a valuable opportunity to continue sharing experiences and strengthening the joint effort to fight emerging threats that are currently impacting their countries. Finally, these workshops are a symbol of their increased level of operational readiness to fulfill the missions entrusted to them. This learning exercise and exchange of experiences also was critical for consolidating and standardizing border procedures to address these challenges, and to serve as proof that effective joint strategies can be formulated. “We are increasing the confidence and knowledge of our Armed Forces about how to face these emerging threats, above all in those countries where some of the phenomena – such as gangs – are not entrenched,” said Lieutenant Colonel Roberto Ayala Rivas, FAES representative to the Central American Armed Forces Conference (CFAC, for its Spanish acronym). One break-out session focused on topics related to recording, seizing, and storing evidence. For this session, the Salvadoran Armed Forces (FAES, for its Spanish acronym) Special Forces Command provided several Zodiac boats for a simulated maritime interdiction. last_img read more

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Dakar: Sainz stretches lead after navigating stage 10

first_imgSpanish veteran Carlos Sainz stretched his lead atop the overall Dakar Rally standings by winning the 10th stage through the dunes of Saudi Arabia’s Empty Quarter on Wednesday. Dakar Rally debutant Fernando Alonso, the two-time former Formula One champion, lost more than an hour on stage 10 after double rolling his Toyota, an accident that saw the Spaniard carry on driving with no windscreen The 57-year-old Mini driver clocked 2hr 03min 43sec on a stage shortened by high winds to a 233km special between Haradh and Shubaytah, finishing ahead of Poland’s Jakub Przygonski (mini) and South African Giniel de Villier (Toyota). Sainz took full advantage of navigational problems by closest rivals Nasser Al-Attiyah, the defending champion, and France’s ‘Mr. Dakar’, Stephane Peterhansel. Peterhansel, who has won the Dakar 13 times (seven times in a car and six times on a bike), finished 11min 48sec off Sainz’s pace, while Qatar’s Al-Attiyah was further back, at 17:46. The result means Sainz, with two stages to go, now sits 18:10 ahead of Al-Attiyah and 18:26 in front of Peterhansel. “It was a dangerous stage with lots of difficult dunes,” Peterhansel said. “Several kilometres before the neutralised section, we got completely lost with Nasser and other drivers. Some drivers got there at the right time, when we eventually found the right way and gained a lot of time. “In the end, it’s a good stage for my team-mate Carlos who has opened up a gap on Nasser, whilst we have got a bit closer to Nasser even if we are still in third position.” Dakar debutant Fernando Alonso, the two-time former Formula One champion, lost more than an hour after double rolling his Toyota, an accident that saw the Spaniard carry on driving with no windscreen. American Ricky Brabec increased his lead in the general standings of the motorbike category with a second-placed finish. Promoted Content5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks8 Shows That Went From “Funny” To “Why Am I Watching This”8 Most Expensive Mistakes In The History Of MankindPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your BodyWhat Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemCrazy Expensive Things That Taylor Swift OwnsThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World7 Reasons It’s Better To Be A Vegan Loading… Read Also: Dakar Rally: Peterhansel edges Al-Attiyah in stage 9 The HRC rider now leads Chilean Pablo Quintanilla (Husqvarna) by 25 minutes and stage winner Joan Barreda of Spain by 27 minutes. Thursday’s penultimate stage 11 sees competitors negotiate 744km, featuring a 379km special, from Shubaytah back to Haradh. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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