Teddy Midnight Drops New Track Ahead Of Upcoming Mixtape Release [Premiere]

first_imgTeddy Midnight, the electrofunk outfit hailing from Brooklyn, is releasing a brand new mixtape this Friday, March 10th, called Tedward Midi Vol. 1. Slated to be the first release in a series of upcoming new mixes from Teddy Midnight, this new music highlights their connection with more traditional house music over the jamtronica sound of their live shows. As producer and bassist Sean Silva said of Tedward Midi Vol 1., “I know there are certain elements that can’t be replicated by live instrumentation, and we thought a mixtape would be appropriate to highlight a side of us closer to the Beatport crowd.” You can take a listen to Live For Live Music’s exclusive premiere of a brand-new track from Teddy Midnight called “Slow Down” below, which will give you a little taste of the soon-to-be-released Tedward Midi Vol. 1. As described by Sean Silva, “‘Slow Down’ is a funky, circusy, booty-shakin’ ode to the dance floor that celebrates the naughty part inside all of us.” Give it a listen for yourself.The mixtape will be available via the band’s SoundCloud on Friday, March 10th, and the band will be hosting a release party for Tedward Midi Vol. 1 on the following night, Saturday, March 11th, at BRYAC in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Additionally, Teddy Midnight will be touring with The Magic Beans in April as well as supporting Pink Talking Fish during a hometown show at the Brooklyn Bowl and playing various festivals throughout the summer. You can check out their upcoming tour dates on their website here.last_img read more

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A public lecture to celebrate Caricom-Cuba Day in Dominica

first_img Tweet Sharing is caring! 28 Views   no discussions LocalNews A public lecture to celebrate Caricom-Cuba Day in Dominica by: – December 8, 2011 Sharecenter_img President of the Dominica Cuba Friendship Association, Frankie Lowe .The achievements, challenges and relationship between Cuba and Dominica will be examined during a Public Lecture carded for Thursday evening, to mark Caricom-Cuba Day in Dominica.This year marks the 39th Anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations of Cuba with Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, which took place on December 8th, 1972. The Heads of State and Government of Cuba and CARICOM who met in their first summit in Havana in December 2002, established that December 8th will be observed as the CARICOM-Cuba Day and in commemoration to this date, summit meetings will be held every three years.Dominica’s Ambassador to the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and Alba Coordinator, Dr Philbert Aaron will be the presenter at Thursday’s lecture carded for 7:00pm at the Baracoon Building in Roseau.President of the Dominica Cuba Friendship Association, Mr Frankie Lowe says that the observance is of great significance to Dominica.He noted that the achievements celebrated today as a result of Dominica’s relations with Cuba can be many.“We see it as important in sensitizing the general public on why the Dominica Cuba Friendship Association is in existence and the whole relation with Cuba and Caricom. It is important to know and for us in the Caribbean to remember that we have profited and benefitted from the relationship. It brings to mind several things to include the scholarships that Cuba has given to Caricom-member states. For Dominica alone we have about 400 professionals now trained through scholarships by Cuba. We also have a medical collaboration where we had the establishment of the nursing school, the expansion of the Intensive Care Unit. Cuba was also very instrumental in providing medical support to Haiti following the earthquake there”.Mr Lowe said that while the Caribbean region faces political, economic, social and natural challenges, which require a united attention, the association is poised on building a movement with students who continue to benefit under the Cuba-Dominica friendship.“The challenges we have here in Dominica is to get past students who have actually benefited from the programmes to be part of the movement to foster social and economical change. It is proving very difficult to get students to be part of the movement. I think we need to remember that in the good book it says that God doesn’t like an ungrateful people and an ungrateful nation. It is important that we are grateful, that we meet and discuss and even socialize; so the problem really is here rather than the other side”. Cuba highly appreciates that CARICOM countries share a clear position against the economic, commercial and financial blockade imposed by the United States of America against Cuba and openly express themselves publicly in this regard.The Dominica Cuba Friendship Association continues to support the government of Dominica’s stance on the embargo.“It is known that we as an association as well as the government of Dominica has made several presentations to the UN and other regional bodies and we think that it is time that the embargo be lifted. We are in support against the embargo and we think that there is no moral justification to have the embargo against Cuba. We think that it is high time that the embargo is lifted”.Out of the 19 countries of the region that expressed their rejection against the blockade in their speeches at the 66 session of the United Nations General Assembly, 10 are members of CARICOM, including Dominica.The Dominica Cuba Friendship Association will culminate the celebrations with a ‘Latin Night’ fundraising activity at the Marinor Complex at River Estate, Canefield on Friday, December 9th, 2011 from 9:00pm. Dominica Vibes News Share Sharelast_img read more

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Triple crown chase starts Saturday at Park Jefferson Speedway’s Memorial Clash

first_imgSiouxland’s top drivers in the Artworks Graphics Modifieds will have circled this event as the first race in the prestigious triple crown of IMCA Modified events hosted by the track.   Joining them will be a full program of IMCA racing for the J&J Fitting Stock Cars, Karl Kustoms Northern SportMods, IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks and the Fox 620 IMCA Sport Compacts.  JEFFERSON, S.D. – This Saturday, May 25, Park Jefferson Speedway will host one of the fans’ favorite nights of racing at the Park.  Tickets for adults are $18, seniors are $15 and children ages 6-16 are $5. Pit passes are $30. A clubhouse pass can be added to any ticket for $12 and purchased at the souvenir stand.  The pit gate will open at 4:30 p.m. with the main gate opening at 5 p.m. Hot laps will be slated for 6:15 p.m. and heat races scheduled at 7 p.m. or the conclusion of hot laps.   Fans and teams can arrange for rooms this weekend at the Park Jefferson rate of $89 by calling the Hampton Inn in North Sioux City.  The final leg of the Modified triple crown will see the invasion of the Arnold Motor Supply Dirt Knights Tour on Monday, July 22. Any driver who can sweep the three events will be in line for a $3,000 bonus presented by Pepsi and Artworks Graphics.  A full night of IMCA racing will be on hand as the Artworks Graphics-sponsored IMCA Modifieds compete in the fourth annual Memorial Clash. A healthy purse of $1,000 to win and $150 to start will greet entrants racing for a Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational berth.  There will be no entry fee or number fees charged this weekend at Park Jefferson as many driv­ers will be in the area for racing.  The Memorial Clash will see a draw/redraw format for drivers who will take to the black gumbo of Park Jefferson. The second leg will be run on July 1 as the sixth annual J&J Fitting Iron Cup sees drivers gunning for $1,500 to win. The event will also be part of the Midwest Madness Tour pre­sented by Arnold Motor Supply.  For more information, go to www.parkjeff.com or call 712 202-5540.last_img read more

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How Can Countries Make Progress at COP23? Work with Cities

first_imgAt this week’s climate conference in Bonn, Germany, the pressure is on many national governments to continue implementing the Paris Agreement despite the United States’ intention to withdraw. But they’ll have help from the world’s cities.Bonn is shaping up to be one of the most urban-centered climate summits yet. America’s Pledge, an effort led by Governor Jerry Brown of California and former Mayor of New York Michael Bloomberg to aggregate climate commitments from cities and other “non-Party actors,” will launch its first report, informed by analysis from WRI, on November 11. The Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, which counts more than 7,400 cities among its members, or 9 percent of the global population, will announce its 2030 goals. And the Urban Leadership Council, a group of representatives from city networks, the private sector and urban think tanks including WRI, will meet for the first time. These events and more are expected to climax with the Climate Summit of Local and Regional Leaders and the Global Covenant of Mayors Day on November 12 and 13.It’s fitting that cities are stepping up for climate action—they account for more than half the global population and about 70 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. But despite their prominence and power, cities can’t do it alone. They need support from leaders at the national and international levels.Connecting Cities to National GoalsCOP23 will prepare the way for next year’s “Talanoa” dialogue, where nations will assess progress towards the targets of the Paris Agreement and countries’ national climate plans, known as “nationally determined contributions,” or NDCs. But while the diplomatic machinery of NDCs was built with national governments in mind, much of the implementation required to see them achieved is at the subnational level, where cities play a big role. How national implementation agendas incorporate individual cities is a major open question.This kind of cooperative planning between cities and national governments can already be seen in a few places. In China, the central government assigns goals for provinces and cities to achieve the national carbon dioxide intensity reduction target. In Brazil, a new national law will help implement the NDC at the subnational and sectoral levels, too. But these examples are exceptions to the rule.There is also a limit to how much cities can do on their own. While cities consume and emit a great deal, they do not have full control over their emissions sources. According to a report by the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, only a third of a typical city’s assets and functions are directly owned or operated by city government. Cities are sometimes able to manage energy consumption through mechanisms such as transport plans and building codes, for instance, but vehicle fuel efficiency and the carbon intensity of the electrical grid are under the jurisdiction of the national government.Finance is another example. There are wildly varying degrees of coordination between national and city governments, which sometimes prevents climate funds from reaching municipalities or supporting their priorities. To change this, national policymakers need to recognize the growing role of cities in climate action and formally address it. Finding more ways to fund city-level work on a large scale is critical.Cities also need technical capacity to put added attention and funding to good use. In the rapidly growing cities of the global south, most of the infrastructure, housing and other services needed to absorb new residents have yet to be built. Decisions made now will influence the sustainability of cities for decades – not to mention economic and social outcomes, which are inextricably linked.Why It Matters to Get Cities RightCritics have pointed out that there were similar calls for independent subnational implementation after the United States chose not to ratify the Kyoto Protocol and after climate negotiations failed at COP15 in Copenhagen. The result was that emissions didn’t decline. Mere touting of climate leadership by mayors and advocates will not turn emissions trajectories. Things need to be different this time around.Simply put, cities must be key drivers towards a more sustainable, more equitable world – or we risk not getting there.To successfully implement the climate agenda in cities, we need better coordination between city and national planning that produces specific actions, agreement on how to fund them at a large scale and capacity to see them done. It is time for national and city governments to work together, hand in hand, to bend the global emissions trajectory towards sustainability.last_img read more

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