Nobel Prize winner speaks at ND Forum event

first_img“We need all students, whatever their future careers are going to be, to be able to think about science more like scientists do,” Nobel Prize winner Carl Wieman said as he urged Notre Dame to take a second look at education during Monday’s Notre Dame Forum event.Wieman’s presentation, “Taking a Scientific Approach to Science Education,” is the first in a series of discussions that asks, “What do Notre Dame Graduates Need to Know?” In his lecture, Wieman offered an answer that stressed the learning experience as opposed to the learned material itself.By the time a person becomes an authority in their field, they have developed a certain way of thinking about their discipline that gives them expertise, Wieman said. Students can begin to gain this expertise in a subject if they are exposed to a classroom environment that promotes discussion and interaction, rather than the standard lecture format most classes currently use, he said.“It’s not that the knowledge [of a subject] is absolutely important, but what really matters is to have knowledge integrated with these broader underlying aspects of expert thinking,” Wieman said. “Because that’s really when the knowledge is useful, rather than a bunch of memorized facts that you can’t do anything with.”While field experts are preferred to teach undergraduate courses, they may not initially understand the importance of this approach because of their own expertise, Wieman said.“One of the challenges of actually being a good teacher if you’re an expert, particularly of introductory students, is that the way you think your brain worked when it was at their level is fundamentally wrong, because there’s no way for the brain to know it’s changing … your brain is just plain different than [it] was when you were a beginning student,” he said.Wieman said the focus on research in many universities could also impact education.“We developed a system at research universities where really the only thing that’s measured — and it’s measured very carefully — is research productivity,” Wieman said. “And that’s what gets measured and rewarded. And so, as a person who’s done lots of science research I appreciate that. … It’s created the wonderfully productive research university system we have.”Wieman said universities’ obsession with efficiency may decrease the quality of research.“The problem is that because it’s the only thing that’s measured – it’s so effective at what it does – the collateral damage is that diverting even a small amount of time to pay attention to teaching and doing it more effectively penalizes a person and penalizes a department,” Wieman said. “So we have to fix that basic system.”Notre Dame physics professor Michael Hildreth said Wieman’s contribution to the Notre Dame Forum addressed an important topic that the University itself hopes to address.“The forum is supposed to address what Notre Dame students should know when they graduate, or I would rather phrase it, what Notre Dame students should learn while they’re here,” he said. “Too often we get bogged down in what students should know, which is really focused on topics. … I would rather turn that around to look at process. I would like to think that we would teach the students how to think.”Tags: Carl Wieman, Notre Dame Forum, Science Education, Scientific approachlast_img read more

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Bumbaca: Legacy debate about Joel Stave won’t affect how he views his career

first_imgFor all of the conversations people have participated in Wednesday arguing the legacy of Wisconsin quarterback Joel Stave, only one thing is clear.Joel Stave does not care what you think about his legacy. Heck, he may not even care about it himself.When asked about how he wanted to be remembered by the fans, Stave gives a general answer, focusing on his team’s success during his career.“More than anything, I hope they remember a few good seasons — seasons where we won a lot of games, seasons where we were able to play in some close, competitive games,” Stave said.In games Stave has started since taking over as starting quarterback, Wisconsin is 29-9. Michigan State and Ohio State are the only other Big Ten teams to win more games than the Badgers over the past four seasons.For the final time Saturday, he will run out in front of the Badger faithful at Camp Randall. He’ll have the chance to tie Brooks Bollinger for first all time in wins as a Wisconsin starting quarterback (30). If Stave wins two of the final three games of his college career (Northwestern, Minnesota and eventual bowl game), he’ll have that record all to himself.“That’s something I would take a lot of pride in,” Stave said. “Not many guys get the opportunity to play as many games as I’ve had here.”Chalk it up to a bullish offensive line for the majority of his career, a Heisman-level running game and consistent defenses, but the ball touched his hands every offensive play for the better part of four seasons. And no matter what, there’s a strong chance the record books will read Stave’s name in the column for most wins at UW, whether you consider that a valid statistic or not.The point of this isn’t to convince you Stave is the greatest quarterback this university has ever seen. Stave is far, far from perfect. He locks on to targets and stares them down. He throws too many interceptions. He’s not mobile enough and puts too much air under the ball.There will be those who feel the two-star recruit from Whitnall High School is undeserving of that distinction. Stave, a constant focal point of fans’ ire, takes all of the criticism in stride.“That’s the nature of the game. That’s the nature of playing quarterback,” Stave said. “When you play quarterback you kind of put yourself on a pedestal for criticism and that just comes with playing the position.”Even more impressive than UW’s record with Stave under center is the way he’s deflected the boos and shaken off the negative judgments.That’s because Wisconsin football means an incredible deal to Stave. The man re-entered a game in which he had a concussion against Illinois last month. He’s spent more semesters at UW (10) than he did in high school (seven). The experience, Stave said, has all been worth it.“I think over the years I’ve been able to make a lot of very good friends on the team. I’ve been able to earn the respect of my coaches and my teammates,” Stave said. “And I’ve been able to represent myself and the university in a way that I think is a good way to represent myself. Those were my goals coming in, and from that respect, I feel like I was able to reach them.”Stave has undergone three coaching changes. And while the offices at Camp Randall have operated like a revolving door the first half of this decade, Stave has been the constant.“That just shows how much of a players game it is,” Stave said. “The coaches do have a huge effect on the game, and a huge effect on the game plan and how the game is going to be played, but ultimately it’s the players out there on the field and a lot of it comes down to trust and chemistry.”This season, the circumstances have been different. UW’s powerhouse running game is nonexistent, partially because the offensive line is young and inexperienced. Stave’s right arm has been called on to win games by itself.He failed against Iowa. He threw four interceptions and got tripped at the one-yard line, a play that will probably decide the Badgers’ fate this season. (If UW scored on that possession, it would be on the fast track to Indianapolis and would currently be ranked in the College Football Playoff top 10.)But he led essentially two game-winning drives against Nebraska. He kept Wisconsin somewhat in the game, at least for the first half, against Alabama.“I think this team has come together through all the changes and through all the things that have kind of been up and down with this program,” Stave said. “We’ve been able to still win a lot of games. We’ve been able to be competitive. I think there’s a lot of pride to be had in that.”Stave will go in to the record books for his wins and judged by Wisconsin fans for his losses.Bad news for Stave haters: No. 2 doesn’t care about your heckling, your contempt or your disapproval. All he cares about is winning, and that’s the one thing he’s done during his career.He’s probably got a few wins left in the tank, too.last_img read more

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Jordan Ayew becomes Ghana’s joint-highest ever goalscorer in the Premier League

first_imgJordan Ayew’s career in the Premier League2015-16 – 30 appearances – 7 goals (Aston Villa)2016-17 – 14 appearances – 1 goal (Swansea)2017-18 – 36 appearances – 7 goals (Swansea)2018-19 – 20 appearances – 1 goal (Crystal Palace [loan])2019-20 – 28 appearances – 8 goals (Crystal Palace) – **current seasonGames Ayew has scored in this seasonMan United 1-2 Crystal PalaceAston Villa 0-1 Crystal PalaceWest Ham 1-2 Crystal PalaceArsenal 2-2 Crystal PalaceCrystal Palace 2-1 West HamCrystal Palace 1-1 ArsenalBrighton 0-1 Crystal PalaceCrystal Palace 1-0 WatfordAyew and Crystal Palace’s remaining Premier League gamesSaturday 14 March 2020 – vs Bournemouth (A)Saturday 21 March 2020 – vs Liverpool (A)Saturday 4 April 2020 – vs Burnley (H)Saturday 11 April 2020 – vs Leicester City (A)Saturday 18 April 2020 – vs Chelsea (H)Monday 27 April 2020 – vs Aston Villa (A)Saturday 2 May 2020 – vs Manchester United (H)Saturday 9 May 2020 – vs Wolverhampton Wanderers (A)Sunday 17 May 2020 – vs Tottenham Hotspur (H) Aside from notching his highest-ever goals tally in the Premier League, Black Stars striker Jordan Ayew picked up yet another milestone on Saturday.Having scored the winner for Crystal Palace against Brighton last weekend, Jordan Ayew scored his 24th ever goal in the Premier League against Watford.The goal takes him level with Anthony Yeboah as Ghana’s highest ever scorers in the Premier League.Saturday’s strike against the Hornets was Jordan’s eighth of the season and his 24th overall in the Premier League.Prior to this weekend, Tony Yeboah was alone at the top of the list, with his tally of 24 Premier League goals highest ever notched by a Ghanaian.Jordan passed his brother Andre’s tally of 21 goals when he scored Palace’s leveller against Arsenal back in January.His 24 goals have come in 128 appearances in the Premier League.He amassed his tally playing in the English top-flight with Aston Villa, Swansea City and Palace.He scored seven goals in his first season in the Premier League with Villa before netting once in the 2016-17 season while at Swansea.The next season he scored seven more for the Welsh club.He earned a loan move to Palace after Swansea went down to the Championship but endured a difficult goalscoring season, finding the net just once in 20 appearances.Jordan is now three goals clear of his brother Andre Ayew, who scored 21 times for Swansea and West Ham while in the Premier League, although Andre scored his in considerably fewer games.He’ll be hoping to surpass Anthony Yeboah’s tally of 24 goals in 47 appearances for Leeds United.Yeboah scored 12 goals in each of the 1994-95 and 1995-96 Premier League seasons.Tony Yeboah celebrates scoring for Leeds United in their 4-2 won over Wimbledon.Top five Ghanaian goalscorers in the Premier LeagueAnthony Yeboah – 47 appearances – 24 goalsJordan Ayew – 128 appearances – 24 goalsAndre Ayew – 89 appearances – 21 goalsMichael Essien – 168 appearances – 17 goalsAsamoah Gyan – 34 appearances – 10 goalslast_img read more

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