Trey Anastasio Gives Update On New Music, Says He’s Open For More Grateful Dead Gigs

first_imgAfter a brief teaser the other day, Rolling Stone has shared a major interview with Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio covering a number of threads in his ongoing career. The main focal point of the interview was the band’s current level of cohesion and their new music, for which Anastasio gives a major update on the new album.When asked about the progress of the album, Anastasio cited an interview with Jon Fishman where the drummer said the album was mostly done and that none of the new songs recently debuted would be on it.It’s not as far along as Jon Fishman would like to think! We were laughing really hard. He actually got a little ripping about that. Because he came in and played drums on a few songs and then left to go on Bernie tour. And then we saw this interview: It said, “The Phish record is done!” We were all laughing at his, um, perspective. But it’s not done. It sounds really great to me. We’re really happy. The band’s firing on all cylinders right now, so this is the perfect time to go into the studio. We’ll see, but it’s been pretty joyous. We’re kind of all over the place, flying down to Nashville to work, and then I’ve been doing a lot of work on overdubs at Avatar, which is in Manhattan, and then we go to Burlington, and worked at the barn, and we’re even working at Page’s house and Mike’s house a little bit. As for the songs themselves, Anastasio is confident they’ll be ready for the road.I do think we’ll be playing them this summer! Actually, contrary to what Fish was saying, a couple of the songs we busted out last year have been tracked for the album. I’m not entirely sure what’ll be on there, but I think in the interview he said there weren’t any. That’s not true. Another reason why we were laughing.Anastasio also talks about the band feeling more like a collective unit than in years past.There’s a feeling of unity that is pervasive on tour. When I think about last summer and then in Mexico, and the amount of time that we spent together, and where everybody is in their lives right now, it’s pretty magical. And I think that’s why it was really important for us to go right into the studio. Everybody’s bringing songs to the table. Page brought some great songs, Mike brought some great songs, Fish brought some great songs. I’ve got a lot of new songs. And everybody’s just diving in, in a unified way. And we can’t wait to get back on the road. It’s going to be a good summer.He also spoke at length about the band’s drive to play mostly original music, and even touched on the absence of “Fluffhead” for those fans keeping score at home (aka everyone).Yeah, first of all because we love to. We’ve always had a lot of fun playing covers, and I’m sure we will continue to. But what was starting to happen was after 2013, 2014, 2015, I would get home and kind of think to myself, “Man, we played, like, ‘Guelah Papyrus’ once in the last two years.” And I like that song. I’m a big “Guelah Papyrus” fan. It’s one of my faves. Last year we got home, and and we didn’t play “Fluffhead” the whole summer. And that wasn’t a conscious thing. We have a lot of good songs, and we have more in the repertoire all the time. But I’m sure this summer we’re going to do at least six or seven more [new songs], because we’ve been making an album. So we’re probably going to want to play them. So the original songs have sort of moved to the front burner. The interview then touched upon Anastasio’s role in the Fare Thee Well celebration for 50 years of the Grateful Dead. The band had mentioned there was “unfinished business,” and RS asked if Anastasio would be willing to do more shows with them.I’m open all the time. It was definitely a little gigus interruptus [laughs]. There’s a lot of practicing for a short run, but I don’t know. I had such a good time playing with Bob and hanging out with Bob. I spent a week out at his beach house before the Fare Thee Well tour; the two of us just played. We sat on two little stools in his living room and just played and talked and it was fantastic. He’s such a good guy, and really fun. And I got to go to Phil’s and spend time with him and his family before the shows. Billy came to New York and played drums with me. So, I mean, I love those guys, and I’m always open. I’m grateful for the opportunity.The Phish guitarist wraps up the interview by talking about his method for reviewing each show and how often the band members are in communication. You can find the full interview here.last_img read more

Read More →

Lending Perspectives: Five loan and leadership lessons from COVID-19

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Sitting down at my computer at the end of another long day, I find comfort and stress relief thinking about what our credit union has achieved in the last six weeks. In early to mid-March, our members and our staff quickly transitioned from COVID-19 prevention in the form of washing our hands and not touching our faces to a shelter-in-place order in a matter of 48 hours.Operationally though, the impacts had only just begun. Staff at risk of being acutely affected by the virus were sent home. Staff that could work from home started transitioning to a different and, in most cases, less productive environment. Requests for help from our members came flooding in. There’s a lot of things I could talk about that we faced and dealt with very quickly during a very short period of time. However, here are five things that I think were my most important lessons learned or validations of what we already knew about our organization.1. Past results are not a predictor of future success.A variation of this is most often used when describing the return on an investment, but was certainly applicable to my credit union and, specifically, our plans to assist members. We have a lot of practice either helping our members, or being prepared to help them, over many years. Ent was very much ahead of the curve with loan modification plans before the Great Recession. We developed what we believe were innovative strategies to reduce payments and interest rates through unprecedented member outreach as early as February of 2008. We had a series of natural disasters in Colorado between 2012 and 2017, from fires to catastrophic hail storms, for which we developed emergency loan plans to assist members with short-term funding. We also had developed a government shutdown loan plan as well. In short, we felt we were ready for anything. continue reading »last_img read more

Read More →

LA Times, USC alumnus win Pulitzer for USC investigation

first_img“It was overwhelming and a huge honor — just a tribute to the commitment that the L.A. Times had put into covering USC and a credit to all the brave people at USC who spoke to us, many of them anonymously,” said Hamilton, a USC alumnus. “In terms of impact, I think it was nothing that any of us working on the story could have foreseen,” Hamilton said. “That so many former patients of Tyndall would come forward. That so many professors would mobilize and protest against the administration — and specifically Max Nikias. It was shocking, and we certainly didn’t predict any of it.” “I think what mattered is that it got the attention of the people who work at USC, who attended there and study there and care deeply about the University,” Hamilton said. “It had an impact on alumni and parents of students as well.” “Harriet and Paul are both such amazing and dedicated and thorough and tenacious reporters,” Hamilton said. “It was like a masterclass in investigative journalism, being able to work beside them … Each of us brought different things to the table.” (From left to right) Matt Hamilton, L.A. Times owner Patrick Soon-Shiong, Paul Pringle, Harriet Ryan and executive editor Norman Pearlstine celebrate the Times’ win Monday. (Photo courtesy of Rong-Gong Lin II) According to the Times, this is the 45th Pulitzer Prize the newspaper has won since 1942. Hamilton, who graduated with a master’s degree in journalism in 2014, said the impact of the story on the USC community is what mattered most. During his graduate education, Hamilton participated in Annenberg TV News and Neon Tommy, a now-defunct online media platform sponsored by Annenberg. He credits his USC education for providing him with a nuanced perspective in reporting. The Los Angeles Times won the Pulitzer Prize Monday for investigative reporting for its series of stories uncovering the abuse of hundreds of former and current USC students at the hands of former campus gynecologist George Tyndall. The series inspired investigations into Tyndall and the University’s knowledge of the abuse. The Los Angeles Police Department called the scandal the largest-ever sex abuse scandal in the department’s history. As of mid-March, there are over 650 plaintiffs across several lawsuits against Tyndall and the University. According to the L.A. Times, the investigation began when Ryan received an anonymous tip in February 2018 that revealed Tyndall’s abuse. The reporters spent three months interviewing sources and victims. In a May 2018 article titled, “A USC doctor was accused of bad behavior with young women for years. The university let him continue treating students,” Times reporters Harriet Ryan, Matt Hamilton and Paul Pringle revealed over 20 allegations of abuse against Tyndall. “The award recognizes an extraordinary piece of journalism that continues the Los Angeles Times’ commitment to public service journalism and stories that have real impact on the lives of our readers,” L.A. Times Executive Editor Norman Pearlstein wrote in a statement to the Daily Trojan. “Through all of the turmoil of the last few years, the one constant has been the newsroom’s commitment to public service journalism.” In the wake of the investigation, which rocked the USC community, former University President C. L. Max Nikias resigned amid calls from faculty, students and staff and Interim President Wanda Austin took office. After Austin’s appointment in August 2019, the University conducted a nationwide search for the University’s next president, which concluded with the selection of Carol Folt March 20. “[In] the process of selecting the new president, there was much more openness with the community than in prior times,” Hamilton said. “The leadership at the Trustee level and the administration seem to recognize that transparency is important and that the old ways of doing business need to be reformed.” Since the investigation was published, the L.A. Times has revealed multiple investigations and reports about the University’s role in the scandal and the ongoing state and federal lawsuits against USC and Tyndall. In October, USC agreed to a $215 million class action settlement, which will distribute tiers of compensation to current and former patients of Tyndall. “It’s undeniable that I see the University differently than other reporters do,” Hamilton said. “When it comes to the reporter trying to hold an institution accountable, I probably approach it differently having been a student. And I think I care deeply about the University because it gave me such a positive and great education.” Columbia University announced the winners of the 2019 Pulitzer Prizes, which were awarded on the recommendation of the Pulitzer Prize Board. In a video posted on the Times website, the newspaper’s El Segundo office cheered and applauded after the announcement was made. Hamilton said during his two years of reporting on USC for the Times, he has seen changes in the administration  last_img read more

Read More →

Wisconsin takes down Marquette in straight sets

first_imgIn its third game of the spring season, the Wisconsin volleyball team defeated in-state rival Marquette Wednesday evening at the UW Field House.In Wisconsin’s last home match of the spring schedule, the Badgers swept the Golden Eagles in three straight sets in the teams’ second matchup of the spring.Coming off a season in which they made an appearance in the National Championship game, Wisconsin was eager to prove it could match and potentially surpass its magical postseason run last year.The first set was a back-and-forth affair between the two teams. But after the score was 5-5, Wisconsin went on a 20-7 run to win the set. With the Badgers leading 7-6, UW proceeded to go on a 4-0 run, topped off by kills from junior outside hitters Courtney Thomas and Ellen Chapman to extend the lead to 11-6.Following a service error from Wisconsin freshman setter Lauren Carlini, the Badgers reeled off another 4-0 run started by a Thomas kill. Then, Thomas and freshman middle-blocker Haleigh Nelson combined for a block, and Chapman served two consecutive aces for a 15-7 lead.Chapman led the team in aces with three and kills with 11.“I think that spring is a time to learn during the year,” Chapman said. “We go through all of the fundamentals. It’s not so much like competition and grinding it out, it’s more like slow stuff and technique work. I think learning this during the spring and summer is huge going into the fall.”After trading points, the Badgers ended the first set on a 8-1 run, which was terminated by an emphatic Chapman spike, giving Wisconsin a 25-12 set win.The second set was once again a set of runs for Wisconsin. Marquette jumped out to a 7-5 lead after improving its blocking play and upping its aggressiveness at the net to force Wisconsin into some errors.After the Badgers found themselves down 7-5 early in the set, they went on a 6-1 run, which was countered by a Marquette 3-0 run to tie the set at 11. After trading points and with the Golden Eagles holding a 13-12 advantage, the Badgers ignited a 7-0 run to take a definitive 19-13 lead. The Badgers would win the set 25-17, with set-point coming on an ace by sophomore libero Taylor Morey.The third set was much more tightly contested than the previous two. The Golden Eagles held pace with the Badgers for the first seven points of the set. Then, UW rattled off a 3-0 run capped off by a Chapman kill to establish a lead of 10-7. A kill by freshman outside hitter Taylor Fricano four UW points later gave the Badgers what would be their largest lead of the set of 14-9.Marquette trimmed the lead to two later in the set at 21-19 and again at 22-20, but couldn’t climb over the hump and take the lead. The match ended after a service error on Marquette, with Wisconsin winning the set 25-22 and sweeping the Golden Eagles out of the Field House.Taking a look at Marquette’s roster, you would not be able to find one player older than a sophomore and there’s good reason behind that because the Marquette volleyball program’s first year was last season. But in just their first season, the Golden Gophers impressed, going 26-6 and winning the Big East. However, they were undersized and provided no real matchup problems for the Badgers. According to Lauren Carlini, Wisconsin still brought its A game and is always looking to improve, no matter who the opponent is.“Of course there’s still kinks you have to work out,” Carlini said. “Our team gets motivated no matter what, doesn’t matter if it’s spring, fall, whether it counts or not. It’s just being able to show people what we’re going to be about next year and showing that we’re a new team.”Junior outside hitter Deme Morales picked up eight kills in the match, and redshirt junior middle-blocker Dominique Thompson, who was named to the U.S. Collegiate National Team last week, had six winners. Fricano and Thomas each picked up five kills.Following the game, head coach Kelly Sheffield and some team members fielded questions from the Badger faithful who had a favorable turnout for this exhibition match.“Anything less than a national championship and you guys should picket this place,” Sheffield, who earned National Coach of the Year honors following last season, told the crowd.“The fall is more about the team; the spring is more about the individual,” Sheffield said. “They’re working on taking the things they’ve learned individually into a match.“We’re just getting better individually. I thought all of our kids did a nice job tonight, they played hard, they’re trying to figure things out. I thought it was a good effort by everybody.”last_img read more

Read More →

B&H Athletes with Retro Equipments from Olympic Games in Sarajevo at Olympic Games in Sochi

first_imgB&H Athletes at the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi (Russia) will have retro equipments from the Olympic Games 1984 in Sarajevo.They will have on the suits signs of the Olympic Committee of B&H but also the logo “snowflakes” from the Winter Olympic Games “Sarajevo 1984”. The will have three stars on the sleeves of their suits. Three stars represent 30 years from the Olympic Games in Sarajevo, B&H. On the back side of the costumes will be written “Olympic team of Bosnia and Herzegovina”.“We have used the original design of the sports equipments from the Olympic games 1984 in Sarajevo and the Sarajevo designer and artist Samir Plasto has done the redesign”, said Bojan Zec from the PR marketing agency CIP7, responsible for the coordination and implementation of a four year marketing approach OKB&H, tilted “Olympic Family- Celebrating Olympics”.The official promotion of equipments and athletes from B&H that will participate at the Olympics in Sochi will be held at the Olympic Mountains Jahorina and Bjelašnica on 31 January and 1 February at the manifestation of marking the 30th anniversary of the Olympic Games in Sarajevo.(Source: Klix.ba)last_img read more

Read More →

Iowa lawmakers to hear recommendations from panel on learning disability

first_imgA dyslexia task force is submitting recommendations to Iowa lawmakers today designed to improve instruction for kids with the common learning disability and other struggling readers. Task force member Katie Greving says the group conducted a survey of Iowa teachers, parents, students and others.Greving says, “The major finding of the survey was that a lot of people who are responsible for helping to meet the needs of these kids don’t have the basic knowledge and skills that they need, and wanted more knowledge and skills.”Greving says they also found a lot of inconsistencies across different schools in how they’re handling students with dyslexia. The group recommends the state develop a dyslexia-specific teaching endorsement, and that all teachers take an online training course about dyslexia.“The task force chose this recommendation to address a systematic lack of expertise on dyslexia in Iowa,” she says, “and that’s probably the most important thing that we’re asking of the legislature.” Greving adds, these steps can help kids who are struggling with reading for many different reasons, not just those who are diagnosed with dyslexia.last_img read more

Read More →