Sutton Foster Learns About Hookup Apps & More in Younger Premiere

first_imgLiza Learns About #ToplessTuesdayLiza and Kelsey meet up with Lauren for lunch. (Since when does Publishing Demon Trout allow lunch breaks?) Lauren then does what any driven millennial would do at the table: Take off her shirt for her 35,000 Twitter followers. “Breasts aren’t shameful. Ask Rihanna,” she says. The whole scene is just like that Sondheim ditty: “Here’s to the ladies who lunch—everybody strip!” Liza Learns About Lena DunhamSix skinny margaritas later, Liza meets Brooklyn-based hot tattoo artist Josh (Nico Tortorella), whose claim to fame is having “tattooed the insides of Lena Dunham’s ass cheeks” because “she wanted to keep some things private.” Not that Liza knows who Lena Dunham is. (She’s old, remember?!) Josh orders shots, sparks fly, Liza accidentally demands to see Josh’s junk. Nailed it. The Sutton Foster-led Younger premiered on TV Land on March 31 with two back-to-back episodes. In the half-hour comedy, the Tony winner plays Liza Miller, a 40-year-old newly single mother who passes herself off as 26 to resume her professional life. Along the way, she learns all sorts of tidbits that every 20-something should have on their radar. Here are just some of our favorite lessons that we learn with Liza in the first two episodes.EPISODE 1: PilotLiza Learns About Bang with FriendsWe first encounter 40-year-old Liza mid-job interview at a publishing firm. On cue, her significantly younger interviewers go off on a social media-fueled tangent, because they’re millennials. Facebook! Twitter! Instagram! Bang with Friends! We (Liza included) are then treated to a very work-appropriate story about Tinder and breast recognition. Welcome back to the working world, Liza! Liza Learns About Viral MarketingLiza, inspired by topless Lauren’s lunchtime reveal, convinces Trout to push the big Joyce Carol Oates release to a Tuesday. Because… #ToplessTuesday. Yep, after a half-naked photshoot in the middle of a crowded office and just a bit of internet magic, Liza has women from all over the globe showing off their Oates. Girl power! Literature! Boobs! Liza Learns About Ass ‘n’ TittiesDuring a meeting at the publishing firm, Liza’s phone goes off with a brand new ringtone: One that mentions two female body parts described in A Chorus Line’s “Dance: Ten; Looks: Three.” Her boss, Diana Trout (Miriam Shor), is disgusted; however, they’re all in a conference room discussing a Pride and Prejudice rerelease with what appears to be 50 Shades fan art on the cover. Mixed signals, Trout.EPISODE 2: Liza Sows Her OatesLiza Learns About the GridAt the start of episode two, Liza cements her place as a “millennial” and renounces her Gen X days. Unfortunately, her vision board looks like something out of a Lisa Frank psychological thriller. But hey, props for organization. With the help of an internet guru, Liza says goodbye to her 40-year-old web presence. She’s officially younger. Star Files View Commentscenter_img Liza Learns About Booty CallsLiza, back to her 40-year-old self, goes on a blind date with an age-appropriate Chipotle investor. Mr. Chipotle Investor, despite contributing to literal Heaven on Earth, is a terrible human being. But after a flirty text from Josh, Liza forgets all about the burrito schmuck. She rushes to her hipster hottie in the heart of Williamsburg, just as all 26-year-olds do. She leaves him with just a kiss at his door—the rest (i.e. her Oates) is for a future episode.Younger airs Tuesdays at 10 PM on TV Land. Tune in to discover what Liza will learn next! Liza Learns About Her Lady GardenLiza gets a publishing job and quickly befriends co-worker Kelsey (Hilary Duff). But with the exception of Helen Mirren, no one can de-age 14 years without a hitch. Following a Krav Maga class with Kelsey and their friend Lauren, Liza unleashes her literally gasp-inducing nether region. Liza, in need of some consulting after her hairy situation, turns to Maggie. Maggie’s seen her “fair share” of vaginas. Maggie is a gynecologist. Just kidding. Maggie is a lesbian artist. Liza Learns About Harry StylesWith the help of her best friend Maggie (Debi Mazar), Liza concludes that the best way to resume her career is to tell potential employers she’s 26 (I-9s be damned). Cue montage, in which Liza develops those key features every 26-year-old has: highlights, a nose ring, a Gmail account and One Direction flashcards. (RIP Zayn. And Caesar?) Liza Learns About MouthgasmsWhile out on the town, cutie Josh brings Liza meatballs. This scene, aside from a potentially disastrous run-in with some of Liza’s adult friends, does little to advance the plot. But it does have Foster reach sexual climax while eating a meatball. Now it’ll be even harder to tell him that she’s been lying about her age (and her daughter and her alleged work in India) this whole time. Meatballs have that effect. Sutton Fosterlast_img read more

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McGinley not swayed by Clarke rift

first_img And w hen Tom Watson was named US captain in December 2012, Clarke suggested 2010 captain Colin Montgomerie should also be considered as “whoever it is standing on that stage opposite Tom Watson needs a huge presence”. With the public backing of players such as Rory McIlroy, Luke Donald and Ian Poulter, McGinley subsequently won the day but admitted recently that his conversations with Clarke were now “short and sweet” and amounted to little more than passing pleasantries. However, the 47-year-old vowed to be professional when the new selection process gets under way. Since 1999, the captain was selected by the European Tour’s 15-strong tournament committee, but changes announced in August last year mean the responsibility now falls to the previous three captains (McGinley, Jose Maria Olazabal and Montgomerie), the Tour’s chief executive and a tournament committee representative. Asked by Press Association Sport if his relationship with Clarke would be a problem, McGinley said: “Abs olutely no problem whatsoever. I’m going to be very professional in my input. “I’m going to get opinions from a lot of players and a lot of people before I put my opinion forward as to what it will be. Just like I was very much pushed over the line by the players, I want to get the opinion of the players. “I think we’re very fortunate in Europe, a little bit like the Liverpool soccer team and the boot room, I think a lot of us have benefited hugely from being vice-captains. Darren has been a vice-captain along with many other guys. We will see where that all evolves and I’ll make a professional decision based on the views of people that I respect.” As to whether he would be a vice-captain under Clarke, McGinley added: “I don’t think I’d be vice-captain to anybody going forward to be honest. I’m very happy to help in an unofficial capacity but I don’t think I have the personality to go back in as vice-captain. Press Association Paul McGinley insists his strained relationship with Darren Clarke will not influence his opinion on who should be Europe’s next Ryder Cup captain. Clarke is odds-on favourite to lead the side at Hazeltine in 2016, when Europe will be looking to claim their fourth straight victory and ninth in the last 11 contests. The former Open champion sent McGinley a letter in 2011 offering his support for the latter’s bid to become captain in 2014, but later changed his mind and also put himself forward for the role. “I would like to be able to support the new captain in whatever direction he went, and if I had a belief about a different area, I’m afraid there would be a conflict.” That means McGinley’s Ryder Cup career is officially over, a career which has seen three wins as a player (2002, 2004 and 2006), two as a vice-captain (2010 and 2012) and one as captain. “That’s six I have been involved in and six wins,” he said. “L ike a heavyweight fighter, I will retire undefeated.” Undefeated but perhaps not uninvolved, McGinley raising the possibility of using his expertise in the same way he got former Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson to speak to the team on Tuesday. “I would certainly like to play a role, if required, a little bit like Alex Ferguson did this week for me,” he added. “I bounced ideas off him. He didn’t preach to me. He didn’t tell me what to do, but what he did was he solidified my ideas and he gave me confidence that, yeah, my hunches were right. “I certainly won’t be pushing myself forward (but) whoever the next captain may be, if he has any questions, I’ll help in any single way I can.” McGinley admitted his one regret at Gleneagles was not having enough time to coach Ian Poulter in the role of senior player for his partnership with Stephen Gallacher, the untried duo losing 5&4 on the opening morning. But he praised Poulter for accepting his somewhat limited role during the week, the top European points scorer in each of the previous three contests playing just twice before the singles. “I had to make some tough calls, really tough calls,” added McGinley, who said his decision not to pick Luke Donald as a wild card was still eating away at him; Donald sending McGinley a long text of congratulations on Sunday evening. “All along I had thought that Ian Poulter was going to play in the second afternoon, and he thought he was going to play, and at the 11th hour I decided on Martin Kaymer instead and to break up that dynamic of Poulter and (Justin) Rose which has been so successful. That was a big call. “But the way Ian accepted that decision, I mean, he came out to me on the golf course in the afternoon and he was consoling me. That means more to me than the Ian Poulter banging on his heart and what he did in Medinah.” last_img read more

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