Strength in numbers

first_imgHarvard researchers studying the same yeast used in beer brewing and bread making have gained new insights into one of the key steps between life’s earliest beginning and the development of complex animals like humans: the rise of multicellular life.A team of researchers led by Andrew Murray, the Herchel Smith Professor of Molecular Genetics, found that yeast cells that clumped together were able to more effectively manipulate and absorb sugars in their environment than were similar cells that lived singly. The experiments showed that in environments where the yeast’s sugar food source is dilute and the number of cells is small, the ability to clump together allowed cells that otherwise would have remained hungry and static to grow and divide.Murray said the work offers one explanation as to why single-celled organisms might have initially banded together deep in the history of life, though it’s impossible to prove conclusively that this is what happened.“Because there is an advantage to sticking together under these circumstances, and because we know that lots of single-celled organisms make enzymes to liberate goods from their environment, this may be the evolutionary force that led to multicellularity,” Murray said. “Short of inventing time travel and going back several billion years to see if this is how it happened … this is going to remain speculation.”The work, which appears in the Aug. 9 issue of the journal PLoS Biology, was conducted by a team including Murray, postdoctoral fellow John Koschwanez, and Bauer Fellow Kevin Foster.Common yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has long been used by scientists as a model organism for understanding single-celled life. Murray’s lab has been using yeast to examine the transmission of genetic information during cell division and the question of how cells respond to selective pressure.It is selective pressure, the driving force of evolution, at work in the most recent yeast experiments. Some mutations let yeast cells grow and divide more readily, giving them a better chance to pass their genes to subsequent generations and dominate the population. Murray and colleagues’ work shows that under certain conditions, working together gives yeast cells an advantage over those that go it alone.But first, the yeast needed work to do. Murray and colleagues devised a series of experiments that presented two problems for the yeast cells to solve if they were to take in enough food to grow and divide. The first was how to change their food from an unusable form to a usable form. The second was how to actually take in this food.The researchers put the yeast in a solution of sucrose, or plain old table sugar, which is composed of two simpler sugars, glucose and fructose. Yeast lives on sugar, but the sucrose can’t get through the membrane that surrounds the cell. So the yeast makes an enzyme called invertase to chop the sucrose into glucose and fructose, each of which can enter the cell using gatekeeping molecules, called transporters, that form part of the membrane.The second problem is how to get the glucose and fructose from the place where they were split apart by invertase to the transporters in the cell membrane. The only way to bridge the gap is through diffusion, an inefficient process. Researchers calculated that once a cell makes invertase and chops the larger sugar down to usable bits, only one sugar molecule in 100 would be captured by the cell that made it.They also calculated that, working alone, a single yeast cell in a dilute solution of sucrose would never take in enough glucose and fructose to be able to grow and divide. But by cooperating, clumps of yeast in that same solution might have a chance. With several cells in proximity, all releasing invertase to create smaller sugars, they would increase the density of those sugars near the clump, increasing the chances that each cell could take in enough to grow and divide.“The bigger the clump, the faster everyone gets to take up glucose and fructose,” Murray said.To test this idea, the researchers used two strains of yeast. The first was the common laboratory strain, which tends to reproduce by cleanly dividing and forming separate individuals in subsequent generations. The second strain, more commonly found in nature, tends to clump together after dividing.After putting cells from the two strains in dilute solutions of sucrose and letting them incubate for some time, researchers found that indeed, the clumping strains were growing and dividing while the yeast cells living alone were not.“Based on the results, there is an advantage to sticking together,” Murray said.The research, Murray said, has led to further investigations, ongoing now, on whether selective pressure would allow researchers to effectively evolve clumping yeast from those that live singly. Murray said results were preliminary, but promising.“It is proof of concept,” Murray said. “It could have happened this way. That’s not to say it did happen this way.”last_img read more

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Students travel to Super Bowl

first_imgThe sports world’s eyes will turn to Indianapolis this Sunday for the Super Bowl XLVI, which will feature a rematch between prominent East Coast teams the New England Patriots and the New York Giants. Several students plan to make the short trip to Indianapolis and participate in Super Bowl festivities before the game begins Sunday evening. Freshman Kayla Polcari said she and her sister, senior Annie Polcari, decided to spend the weekend in Indianapolis after they received tickets to the Super Bowl as a surprise gift. “The best dad in the world surprised me with them,” she said. Seniors Christina Carson and Michael Oliver said they are also driving to Indianapolis with a group of friends to experience the events in Super Bowl Village, though they do not have tickets to the game. “We’re going downtown for the concerts in Super Bowl village, like Darius Rucker, LMFAO and O.A.R., and they’re all free,” Carson said. The concerts begin Thursday evening and continue through Sunday. Carson and Oliver said they expect Saturday night’s CMT Crossroads Pepsi Super Bowl Fan Jam concert to be the highlight of their weekend. “We also somehow won tickets to the Crossroads concert at the Pepsi Coliseum with Steven Tyler and Carrie Underwood, so I’m really excited for that,” Oliver said. Though they plan to visit Super Bowl village, Carson and Oliver said they will come back to South Bend in time to watch the game with other students. Oliver, a Patriots fan, will be set against students like Polcari who will cheer for the Giants. “I’m so excited for the Giants win,” she said. Freshman Rachel Miceli, of Queens, New York, said her decision to cheer for the Giants was painful since her true loyalties lie with the New York Jets during the regular season. “I usually hate the Giants, but not as much as I hate the Patriots,” Miceli said. “I guess it comes down to the Giants being a New York team, so I’m supporting them.”last_img read more

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The Last Ship’s Collin Kelly-Sordelet on Fake Blood and Getting Close to Sting

first_img The Last Ship Collin Kelly-Sordelet photographed by Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com Age: “I’m 19, but I’ll be 20 on New Year’s Eve.”Hometown: Montclair, NJCurrent Role: Both a young version Gideon Fletcher, a man who leaves his seafaring town and returns 15 years later, and Gideon’s son Tom Dawson in Sting’s The Last Ship.Stage Cred: The Last Ship is Kelly-Sordelet’s first professional job, though in school he appeared in Guys and Dolls, Grease, Anything Goes, Aladdin, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and Urinetown. “I knew how to make fake blood when I was five. My dad [Rick Sordelet] has been a fight director my entire life. I’d walk into my basement and there’d be medieval weapons all over. I’d open up the fridge to get juice, and I’m like, ‘Oh, hey! Eight gallons of fake blood.’”“The first show I remember seeing was Beauty and the Beast. It was magical and I loved it. It’s always been very close to me because it really launched my father’s career and I’m kind of here because of it.”“I auditioned for Glee and didn’t get it. Those bastards! But I’m OK. I made my peace with Glee. It was really eating at me for a long time. I auditioned a lot throughout my senior year of high school for Broadway stuff, television and film.”“I had to drop out of Juilliard. I did one semester. Right before I went on for my first and only show there, I found out that I got The Last Ship. I wanted to finish the entire year, but my last month of classes would have conflicted with my first month of rehearsal.”“Sting puts everyone at ease. He kind of floats around in his Sting-y manner. He took a bunch of pictures with my friends, and I said, ‘Thanks for being so cool.’ And he’s like, ‘Well, I find it so much easier to be cool than not to be cool.’ I was just like, ‘C’mon dude? Really?!’”“One of the greatest moments was when we were all leaving rehearsal with Sting. We’re in a cramped elevator—I’m literally inches away from him—and I said jokingly, ‘Sting, I’ve never been so close to you before,’ and he turns to me and goes, ‘Don’t stand so close to me.’ I was just like, “Ohh! I’ve just made history!’” View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 24, 2015last_img read more

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Central American and Caribbean Armed Forces Cooperate to Fight Transnational Crime

first_imgOfficials from the Armed Forces of several Central American and Caribbean nations met recently to share their most successful strategies for halting drug trafficking, money laundering, gang activity, and other criminal enterprises. One break-out session focused on topics related to recording, seizing, and storing evidence. For this session, the Salvadoran Armed Forces (FAES, for its Spanish acronym) Special Forces Command provided several Zodiac boats for a simulated maritime interdiction. Twenty-one officers from Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic recently participated in the first Regional Conference on Transnational Crime, which was developed by El Salvador’s Regional Center on Training against Transnational Organized Crime (CRACCT). The conference was held February 21-March 2 in San Salvador Department. Prevention and early warning The content of the sessions and the practical exercises were useful to the Military representatives who attended the event. “When I get back to my country, I will spread the knowledge I received here to neutralize all of the threats we are facing. It is an unending task, and we now have more tools to succeed at it,” 1st Lt. Carrión said. The officers learned first-hand about new modi operandi and the structures and substructures of criminal groups, as well as the mechanisms that such groups use to evolve into a criminal organization. Prevention and early warning “I have learned about many things that are not being done in Guatemala yet,” explained First Lieutenant Bladimir Jerez Gómez, a representative from the Armed Forces of Guatemala.. For example, on the subject of gangs, I now understand very clearly how they develop, and I will tell others about the new methods of gang operation and their new structures so we can prevent gangs from spreading.” “When I get back to my country, I will spread the knowledge I received here to neutralize all of the threats we are facing. It is an unending task, and we now have more tools to succeed at it,” 1st Lt. Carrión said. “I have learned about many things that are not being done in Guatemala yet,” explained First Lieutenant Bladimir Jerez Gómez, a representative from the Armed Forces of Guatemala.. For example, on the subject of gangs, I now understand very clearly how they develop, and I will tell others about the new methods of gang operation and their new structures so we can prevent gangs from spreading.” This opinion was seconded by First Lieutenant Segundo Carrión, from the Dominican Air Force. Stronger together Col. Tejada said the meeting for the region’s Armed Forces was a valuable opportunity to continue sharing experiences and strengthening the joint effort to fight emerging threats that are currently impacting their countries. Finally, these workshops are a symbol of their increased level of operational readiness to fulfill the missions entrusted to them. This learning exercise and exchange of experiences also was critical for consolidating and standardizing border procedures to address these challenges, and to serve as proof that effective joint strategies can be formulated. The closing ceremony, where certificates of recognition and achievement for the conference were presented, was held at the facilities of the Special Anti-terrorism Command. Numerous Salvadoran police and military units provided instruction to the multinational audience throughout the course. Those units included Joint Group Cuscatlán, an interagency task force; the Anti-Transnational Gang Center; and elite teams from El Salvador’s National Civil Police (PNC): the Anti-Drug Division (DAN), and the Elite Organized Crime Division (DECO). “We are increasing the confidence and knowledge of our Armed Forces about how to face these emerging threats, above all in those countries where some of the phenomena – such as gangs – are not entrenched,” said Lieutenant Colonel Roberto Ayala Rivas, FAES representative to the Central American Armed Forces Conference (CFAC, for its Spanish acronym). The closing ceremony, where certificates of recognition and achievement for the conference were presented, was held at the facilities of the Special Anti-terrorism Command. Twenty-one officers from Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic recently participated in the first Regional Conference on Transnational Crime, which was developed by El Salvador’s Regional Center on Training against Transnational Organized Crime (CRACCT). The conference was held February 21-March 2 in San Salvador Department. The officers learned first-hand about new modi operandi and the structures and substructures of criminal groups, as well as the mechanisms that such groups use to evolve into a criminal organization. By Dialogo April 13, 2015 The content of the sessions and the practical exercises were useful to the Military representatives who attended the event. Numerous Salvadoran police and military units provided instruction to the multinational audience throughout the course. Those units included Joint Group Cuscatlán, an interagency task force; the Anti-Transnational Gang Center; and elite teams from El Salvador’s National Civil Police (PNC): the Anti-Drug Division (DAN), and the Elite Organized Crime Division (DECO). “Without a doubt, the topics related to drug trafficking and gangs generated more interest for all the officers, because they are threats that know no border and they must be addressed as such,” said CRACCT Director Colonel Carlos Alberto Tejada “These organizations already even have networks functioning in Europe.” Officials from the Armed Forces of several Central American and Caribbean nations met recently to share their most successful strategies for halting drug trafficking, money laundering, gang activity, and other criminal enterprises. This opinion was seconded by First Lieutenant Segundo Carrión, from the Dominican Air Force. “Without a doubt, the topics related to drug trafficking and gangs generated more interest for all the officers, because they are threats that know no border and they must be addressed as such,” said CRACCT Director Colonel Carlos Alberto Tejada “These organizations already even have networks functioning in Europe.” Stronger together Col. Tejada said the meeting for the region’s Armed Forces was a valuable opportunity to continue sharing experiences and strengthening the joint effort to fight emerging threats that are currently impacting their countries. Finally, these workshops are a symbol of their increased level of operational readiness to fulfill the missions entrusted to them. This learning exercise and exchange of experiences also was critical for consolidating and standardizing border procedures to address these challenges, and to serve as proof that effective joint strategies can be formulated. “We are increasing the confidence and knowledge of our Armed Forces about how to face these emerging threats, above all in those countries where some of the phenomena – such as gangs – are not entrenched,” said Lieutenant Colonel Roberto Ayala Rivas, FAES representative to the Central American Armed Forces Conference (CFAC, for its Spanish acronym). One break-out session focused on topics related to recording, seizing, and storing evidence. For this session, the Salvadoran Armed Forces (FAES, for its Spanish acronym) Special Forces Command provided several Zodiac boats for a simulated maritime interdiction. last_img read more

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Artist’s brush brings court cases to canvas

first_img March 15, 2004 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Artist’s brush brings court cases to canvas Artist’s brush brings court cases to canvas Lawyer Xavier Cortada creates an exhibit specifically for the Supreme Court Associate Editor Xavier Cortada calls his solo exhibit of spirited paintings, “May It Please the Court.”“And I hope it does,” added this gregarious Cuban-American from Miami, who does pro bono work on children’s issues as a lawyer but makes his living splashing bold colors on canvas with a social activist’s zeal.Mission accomplished.Plenty of praise poured from several justices during the March 1 opening reception at the Florida Supreme Court, as they gazed at dramatic depictions of six well-known Florida cases that sprang to life with potent symbolism.“I am just amazed by the power of some of these paintings,” said Justice Barbara Pariente. “And I am just overwhelmed that Xavier would have created these paintings just for this exhibit.”Evidence of the artist’s frantic deadline for the exhibit’s opening day was the still-wet oil on the painting “ The Miami Herald Publishing Co. v. Tornillo, ” accompanied with the words “Extra, extra. Read all about it: Freedom of expression includes freedom of opinion.”There was plenty of free expression in 39-year-old Cortada’s efforts to capture the meaning of landmark Florida cases dealing with everything from freedom of religion in “ Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye v. City of Hialeah ” to states rights in “ Seminole Tribe v. Florida. ”Cortada’s favorite piece created specifically for this exhibit was suggested by Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead: “ Gideon v. Wainwright — Because Gideon decided to write from his cell, others were guaranteed a right to counsel before being sent to theirs.”“There are a million ways I could have described Gideon, ” Cortada said, standing before the 4-foot-by-3-foot oil on canvas with passionate gestures at the small figure of Gideon, dwarfed by the cold steel bars of his cell, writing on a long roll of toilet paper.“I read this Robert Kennedy quote about Gideon taking charge and changing the course of history. Gideon could have literally done what his cell mate is doing, just sitting back and rotting away in jail. He could have used that paper as toilet paper. Instead, what Gideon decided to do is act,” Cortada explained.“Even in the most isolated, remote place, he said, ‘I am going to challenge.’ For someone who is marginalized to that level: You’re sitting in jail; you’re a homeless guy, a roamer, a drifter, no money, no nothing, no power. And you can single-handedly, on toilet paper (even though I’m taking creative license. I’m sure it was real paper) change the course of history. I think it speaks volumes for what we as a society can do. And that’s what I am trying to do through this exhibit.”Cortada is known around the world for using his art as advocacy for social issues, commissioned to create murals for The White House, The World Bank, Global Health Council, and the International AIDS Conferences (XII & XIII).“I care passionately about the law,” said Cortada, a 1992 University of Miami School of Law graduate. “Going to law school informed my career as an artist, which is why I paint these things instead of landscapes and flowers. I use art as a tool for advocacy.”That is strikingly apparent in his acrylic-on-canvas triptych titled, “All are equal (1), but some are more equal than others (2),” created in 2002 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the passage of the Dade County Human Rights Ordinance by the Dade County Commission.“The point I am trying to make is that when there is one insular minority, when there is one group of citizens targeted or in any way diminished, all of us as human beings are diminished. And our society becomes less free. When our society is less free, every single one of us is less free,” Cortada said.“This piece is timely, and it is about me. As an openly gay man, I am really concerned about what our society is doing, particularly today, and how easy it is to marginalize people. It is done to gays today, as it was done to African-Americans.. . . It is the civil rights issue of our time. So it is important to me for this piece to be here. Hopefully, it will open some minds.”He stood before that mural with his Cuban-born father, Carlos Cortada, who fled to Miami 42 years ago. “I am proud of my son, and I think I have very good reason to be,” Carlos Cortada said. “I am a painter, too.”He recalled how he would paint at night, and his young son would dabble with the paints, too, and say, “Dad, take a little longer.” The father would admonish, “You have to go to sleep now!” And the boy would beg: “Just a little longer!”That childhood passion for painting came in handy when Xavier Cortada was in Soweto, South Africa, five months after apartheid was lifted. He was a faculty member sent by the State Department to teach homeless children.“The kids couldn’t communicate with me, and I couldn’t communicate with them. I was wearing a tie, because I was very professional. Who am I? So I started doing what my father taught me, which is sketching and drawing. And that’s what they did. Before you knew it, there was this powerful communication going on back and forth. And I realized, oh my God!, what a powerful, powerful language. And if you look at the two paintings downstairs, of kids in adult prison and in the psychiatric hospital (“Convictim,”and “The Voice Project 2003 Mural” with youth at the Jackson Memorial Hospital SIPP residential program), it’s that same thread. I used art as a vehicle to have these kids open up and express themselves in ways that they would not otherwise.”It was Justice Raoul Cantero who nominated the work of Cortada for this latest Arts in the Court exhibit that invites the public to step inside the marbled high court and climb the stairs to the rotunda-turned-gallery.“I am very proud to have the opportunity to have Xavier, who clerked for me, and also a Cuban-American from Miami displaying his paintings here,” Justice Cantero said.Justice Peggy Quince, studying the symbolism in the paintings with legal intern Paul Ghiotto, exclaimed: “I love having art in the court. This is an especially good exhibit, because it’s about the legal profession. Many of these are about cases that were actually decided here.”Tallahassee lawyer Katrice Jenkins said she was particularly struck by “ Proffitt v Florida, ” an important Florida death penalty case. The accompanying words said: “Capital punishment formula: 7M + 8A= 0 (CU); M=mitigating, A=aggravating, CU=cruel and unusual.”“It really brings the cases to life,” she said. “ Proffitt, for instance, that was a really great one, the depiction of mitigating and aggravating factors. Overall, I think this is magnificent. Yes, it is truly amazing. It really does bring all of the things you’ve read about —yeow! —right in your face!”As Cortada explained that painting: “It has Francis Bacon written all over it. He has a piece about a pope sitting in a chair and it looks very electric. It’s almost ridiculous: 7 mitigating + 8 aggravating = CU. That’s how we create a formula. It’s the same way with kids in adult prison. You can almost absolve whatever irrationality by using formulas,” he said, adding the formula de-emotionalizes the death penalty so that it can be carried out.“To me, it is a fantastic painting. There is nothing more fantastic than the death penalty. If it’s shocking, and if it’s loud, and if it’s brash, then it needs to be here. Because what happens in this room is loud and brash, and it needs to be addressed.”The last time Cortada was at the Supreme Court, he said, he only had 60 seconds to address the justices in oral argument.“Now I have more time to articulate with the justices in a way that is more lasting. Using art, I allow the audience to draw their own conclusions, instead of me to advocate my point of view. As an attorney, to have my art at the Supreme Court is a particularly huge honor.” “May it Please the Court” exhibit at the Florida Supreme Court runs through July 15. To commemorate Law Day, four additional pieces will be brought to Tallahassee by May 1, including “ Bush v. Gore .”For more information, visit www.cortada.com.last_img read more

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New Year’s resolutions for compliance officers

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Lindsey RichardsonWith 2015 right around the corner, many of us are thinking of resolutions for the New Year.  While it is a great idea in theory, there are times when we set goals that are impractical to reach (Ahem, my 2014 resolution of working out at 5:00 a.m. 5 days a week? Let’s just say it didn’t quite happen).  However, if we break these larger goals into more realistic and attainable “mini” goals, it becomes a lot more manageable.  Let’s take compliance for example – we all have grand ideas of accomplishing the impossible, thinking we can save the day and get back on track.Then life comes and gets in the way – the marketing department needs an ad reviewed ASAP, or your examiners show up, or a final rule gets released – we all know the drill.  Why not cut yourself a break and start with a smaller goal?  For example, make a resolution to update your existing policies to make sure you are in compliance with current regulations.   The best part about this resolution?  PolicyWorks has done the hard work for you.  We offer PolicyAid, a comprehensive, online, policy library that will help your credit union develop and maintain policies as regulations change.  We currently have 80+ policies available, with quarterly updates to maintain compliance. continue reading »last_img read more

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America East, Bearcats commit to fight against racism

first_imgVESTAL (WBNG) — The Binghamton men’s basketball team is taking part in a movement much bigger than the game itself. Dempsey has been using this time to have conversations with his players, ones that may be uncomfortable, but are necessary. “They’re not just basketball players, not that they ever were, but they have more of a platform now than ever. We want to encourage them to use that in a positive and productive way.” As the leader of a D1 program, Dempsey is using his voice and is encouraging his players to do the same. The nine men’s basketball coaches of the America East Conference committed to give players Election Day 2020 off the court. A small step, setting a national example. “We felt it was important to come together as a group, and put a couple of action items behind our words. As division one players and coaches, we recognize that we need to be more outspoken about our goal of living in a society where equality is a priority,” says Dempsey. Dempsey says the goal isn’t to influence his players who to vote for, but rather to encourage them to make their vote count. “They have the freedom to vote for whoever they choose, and we want to encourage them to stand up and be counted, and exercise that right.” Now, the NCAA is now encouraging all member schools to grant athletes a day off from athletic activity on November 3. “If you’re going to be truly a team, truly a family you’re always preaching, than you have to understand what’s important to your teammates, and you have to try and come together to support each other.” In addition to giving athletes Election Day 2020 off, each school in the America East will host an anti-racism event at a home game this season.last_img read more

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Boeing’s 737 Max is set to return to the skies as industry reels from pandemic

first_imgIt’s been a bruising year for the company. In the first 10 months of 2020, Boeing lost 393 aircraft orders after factoring in new sales, cancellations and orders for planes that were converted to other aircraft. Chief rival Airbus won 308 net new orders for aircraft in that period, by comparison. Boeing has lost $3.45 billion this year through the end of September and analysts don’t expect it to get to positive free cash flow until the end of next year.Boeing executives, however, are eager to turn the page after the protracted crisis, and many investors appear to be, too. Boeing’s stock price has shot up more than 40% this month, fueled by optimism around the jets’ return and positive news from two vaccine trials. But the shares are still off more than 37% this year as the pandemic presents an added challenge to the plane maker.‘Finish line’Against that backdrop the Federal Aviation Administration is near “the finish line” of its review of the planes, it said last week. Other aviation authorities such as those in Europe and Brazil are likely to follow suit, ending the longest and largest grounding of a commercial aircraft. The recertification is key for Boeing because it hasn’t been able to deliver planes to customers since the grounding took effect in March 2019.- Advertisement – The Boeing 737 Max is nearing clearance to fly again after a 20-month ban prompted by two fatal crashes that sent the company into a crisis, but the planes are returning to a different problem.The coronavirus pandemic has roiled airline finances around the world, hurting demand for new planes and helping to drive up cancellations and deferrals.“The Max isn’t coming into a situation where everything is fine now,” said Phil Seymour, president of London-based aviation consulting firm IBA Group.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – A Boeing 737 MAX airplane is seen parked at a Boeing facility on August 13, 2019 in Renton, Washington.David Ryder | Getty Imagescenter_img All 346 people on board Lion Air Flight 610 on Oct. 29, 2018, and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 on March 10, 2019, were killed in the crashes.Pilots in both Max flights battled the planes’ automated flight-control system, which has been at the center of several investigations into the crashes. Pilots weren’t informed about the system and mentions of it had been removed from pilot manuals when they were delivered to airlines. A House investigation in September found regulatory, design and management problems as the jets were being developed led to the “preventable death” of the 346 people on board. Boeing has since made the system less aggressive and added more redundancies. FAA Administrator Steve Dickson, a former Delta pilot, tested the aircraft himself in September.Return to serviceOnce the aircraft is certified, 737 pilots will have to undergo training that will include sessions in a flight simulator, a process that could take several months to train all of an airline’s 737 flight crews. Southwest Airlines and United Airlines don’t expect to fly the planes commercially until sometime next year.Others expect it back sooner. American Airlines has scheduled the planes’ first commercial flights for Dec. 29 and is planning to allow customers to tour the planes before regular flights resume. Brazil’s Gol Linhas Aereas Inteligentes hasn’t started selling seats on the Max, but said it would fly it domestically in December, if it’s approved this week, CFO Richard Lark said in an interview. Eventually, it plans to use them to link Brazil with Florida.Gol is one of the biggest customers for the Max and has already cut 34 planes from its original order of 129 planes. Lark expressed confidence in the safety of the aircraft and in Boeing but said the pandemic may change the carrier’s needs.Additionally, it stokes concerns about the residual value of the aircraft, Lark said. Aircraft values have dropped in the pandemic, and the Max is no exception. IBA valued the 737 Max 8, the most commonly sold model, at $41 million in July, down nearly 9% from January. The Airbus A320neo, the Max’s main rival, also fell, losing close to 7% of its value to $42.5 million in that period.American has options to defer 18 of the 737 Max planes it ordered.“If [the grounding] gets lifted soon here in November, we’ll get some delivered in December,” American’s CFO, Derek Kerr, said during an industry conference last week. “There’s another 18 that come in 2021 and 2022 that we have deferral rights on those all. And we’ve said it would have to get much, much better for those to be taken. Assumptions are that they probably, over time, will be deferred.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

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New homes in Birmingham

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Award-winning writer at children’s workshop of the Nature Island Literary Festival

first_img Share Tweet 60 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img EducationLocalNewsPrimary Award-winning writer at children’s workshop of the Nature Island Literary Festival by: – July 20, 2011 Share Nature Island Literary Festival’s Children’s Workshop 2010, “Snake King” presentation by Delia Cuffy-Weekes. Photograph by: Greg German, Nature Island Literary Festival Facebook Gallery.Registration is now open for the Children’s Workshop, a key part of the Nature Island Literary Festival and Book Fair. Highlights this year include readings by Trish Cooke, the award-winning children’s writer, actress and playwright from the UK, the pre-publication sale of a new adventure story for young people set in Dominica, and Japanese calligraphy and origami making.The workshop (for ages 3 – 15), which aims to promote the enjoyment of reading and writing among young people, will take place on Saturday 30 July from 9.00am to 1.00pm at the Dominica Grammar School, Valley Road, Roseau.Apart from special readings, there will be face painting, word games for all ages, a book swap, and something very different – calligraphy and origami making by volunteers from Japan International Cooperation Agency. Children can learn about Japanese writing and have their names written in Japanese script.Trish Cooke was born – and lives – in England of Dominican parents and many of her books reflect that heritage. Her prize-winning book “So Much” won the prestigious Smarties book prize among other awards. She has also written scripts for theatre, TV, radio and film in the UK and is very experienced in presenting story sessions and workshops to children of all ages. Copies of her books will available for sale at the workshop.There will also be readings by Lucia John from her book about a caterpillar while copies of another new book for young people, Abraham’s Treasure by Joanne Skerrett, will be on sale. This is an exciting adventure story for older children set in Dominica which be available for the first time ever at the Children’s Workshop; it will be officially launched at the main Literary Festival (August 5 – 7) where Ms Skerrett will be participating and signing copies of her book.This year, the Children’s Festival has been moved to one week before the Literary Festival itself to allow participants – both adult and children – to play a part in the main festival.Registration is at the public library, Roseau, the UWI campus, Elmshall Road, and online ([email protected]). Closing date is July 27th. Parents are advised to provide a snack for their children.Website for Nature Island Literary Festival: www.dominicalitfest.com.For further information please contact Claudia Henderson: [email protected], 276 4449 and 448 1718.Press ReleaseNature Island Literary Festival and Book Fairlast_img read more

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